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Sample records for bioluminescence resonance energy

  1. Measuring IL-1β Processing by Bioluminescence Sensors I: Using a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compan, Vincent; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β processing is one of the hallmarks of inflammasome activation and drives the initiation of the inflammatory response. For decades, Western blot or ELISA have been extensively used to study this inflammatory event. Here, we describe the use of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor to monitor IL-1β processing in real time and in living macrophages either using a plate reader or a microscope.

  2. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  3. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  4. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  5. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase—quantum dot bionanoconjugates

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    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M.; Doane, Tennyson L.; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2014-12-01

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor-acceptor distances (˜5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ˜5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications.

  7. Analysis of Arrestin Recruitment to Chemokine Receptors by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneterre, J; Montpas, N; Boularan, C; Galés, C; Heveker, N

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors recruit the multifunctional scaffolding protein beta arrestin in response to binding of their chemokine ligands. Given that arrestin recruitment represents a signaling axis that is in part independent from G-protein signaling, it has become a hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor functional selectivity. Therefore, quantification of arrestin recruitment has become a requirement for the delineation of chemokine and drug candidate activity along different signaling axes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) techniques provide methodology for such quantification that can reveal differences between nonredundant chemokines binding the same receptor, and that can be upscaled for high-throughput testing. We here provide protocols for the careful setup of BRET-based arrestin recruitment assays, and examples for the application of such systems in dose-response or time-course experiments. Suggestions are given for troubleshooting, optimizing test systems, and the interpretation of results obtained with BRET-based assays, which indeed yield an intricate blend of quantitative and qualitative information.

  8. Comparison of static and microfluidic protease assays using modified bioluminescence resonance energy transfer chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (F/BRET are two forms of Förster resonance energy transfer, which can be used for optical transduction of biosensors. BRET has several advantages over fluorescence-based technologies because it does not require an external light source. There would be benefits in combining BRET transduction with microfluidics but the low luminance of BRET has made this challenging until now. METHODOLOGY: We used a thrombin bioprobe based on a form of BRET (BRET(H, which uses the BRET(1 substrate, native coelenterazine, with the typical BRET(2 donor and acceptor proteins linked by a thrombin target peptide. The microfluidic assay was carried out in a Y-shaped microfluidic network. The dependence of the BRET(H ratio on the measurement location, flow rate and bioprobe concentration was quantified. Results were compared with the same bioprobe in a static microwell plate assay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The BRET(H thrombin bioprobe has a lower limit of detection (LOD than previously reported for the equivalent BRET(1-based version but it is substantially brighter than the BRET(2 version. The normalised BRET(H ratio of the bioprobe changed 32% following complete cleavage by thrombin and 31% in the microfluidic format. The LOD for thrombin in the microfluidic format was 27 pM, compared with an LOD of 310 pM, using the same bioprobe in a static microwell assay, and two orders of magnitude lower than reported for other microfluidic chip-based protease assays. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that BRET based microfluidic assays are feasible and that BRET(H provides a useful test bed for optimising BRET-based microfluidics. This approach may be convenient for a wide range of applications requiring sensitive detection and/or quantification of chemical or biological analytes.

  9. BRET: NanoLuc-Based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Platform to Monitor Protein-Protein Interactions in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiu-Lei; Fu, Haian

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a prominent biophysical technology for monitoring molecular interactions, and has been widely used to study protein-protein interactions (PPI) in live cells. This technology requires proteins of interest to be associated with an energy donor (i.e., luciferase) and an acceptor (e.g., fluorescent protein) molecule. Upon interaction of the proteins of interest, the donor and acceptor will be brought into close proximity and energy transfer of chemical reaction-induced luminescence to its corresponding acceptor will result in an increased emission at an acceptor-defined wavelength, generating the BRET signal. We leverage the advantages of the superior optical properties of the NanoLuc(®) luciferase (NLuc) as a BRET donor coupled with Venus, a yellow fluorescent protein, as acceptor. We term this NLuc-based BRET platform "BRET(n)". BRET(n) has been demonstrated to have significantly improved assay performance, compared to previous BRET technologies, in terms of sensitivity and scalability. This chapter describes a step-by-step practical protocol for developing a BRET(n) assay in a multi-well plate format to detect PPIs in live mammalian cells.

  10. Mathematical Models for Quantitative Assessment of Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET: Application to Seven Transmembrane Receptors (7TMRs Oligomerization

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    Luka eDrinovec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea that seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also designated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs might form dimers or higher order oligomeric complexes was formulated more than 20 years ago and has been intensively studied since then. In the last decade, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET has been one of the most frequently used biophysical methods for studying 7TMRs oligomerization. This technique enables monitoring physical interactions between protein partners in living cells fused to donor and acceptor moieties. It relies on non-radiative transfer of energy between donor and acceptor, depending on their intermolecular distance (1–10 nm and relative orientation. Results derived from BRET-based techniques are very persuasive; however, they need appropriate controls and critical interpretation. To overcome concerns about the specificity of BRET-derived results, a set of experiments has been proposed, including negative control with a non-interacting receptor or protein, BRET dilution, saturation and competition assays. This article presents the theoretical background behind BRET assays, then outlines mathematical models for quantitative interpretation of BRET saturation and competition assay results, gives examples of their utilization and discusses the possibilities of quantitative analysis of data generated with other RET-based techniques.

  11. In Vivo Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions with Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET): Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sihuai; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2016-10-11

    Proteins are the elementary machinery of life, and their functions are carried out mostly by molecular interactions. Among those interactions, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the most important as they participate in or mediate all essential biological processes. However, many common methods for PPI investigations are slightly unreliable and suffer from various limitations, especially in the studies of dynamic PPIs. To solve this problem, a method called Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) was developed about seventeen years ago. Since then, BRET has evolved into a whole class of methods that can be used to survey virtually any kinds of PPIs. Compared to many traditional methods, BRET is highly sensitive, reliable, easy to perform, and relatively inexpensive. However, most importantly, it can be done in vivo and allows the real-time monitoring of dynamic PPIs with the easily detectable light signal, which is extremely valuable for the PPI functional research. This review will take a comprehensive look at this powerful technique, including its principles, comparisons with other methods, experimental approaches, classifications, applications, early developments, recent progress, and prospects.

  12. In Vivo Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions with Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET): Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sihuai; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are the elementary machinery of life, and their functions are carried out mostly by molecular interactions. Among those interactions, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) are the most important as they participate in or mediate all essential biological processes. However, many common methods for PPI investigations are slightly unreliable and suffer from various limitations, especially in the studies of dynamic PPIs. To solve this problem, a method called Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) was developed about seventeen years ago. Since then, BRET has evolved into a whole class of methods that can be used to survey virtually any kinds of PPIs. Compared to many traditional methods, BRET is highly sensitive, reliable, easy to perform, and relatively inexpensive. However, most importantly, it can be done in vivo and allows the real-time monitoring of dynamic PPIs with the easily detectable light signal, which is extremely valuable for the PPI functional research. This review will take a comprehensive look at this powerful technique, including its principles, comparisons with other methods, experimental approaches, classifications, applications, early developments, recent progress, and prospects. PMID:27727181

  13. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons From Protease-Activated Receptor 1

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    Mohammed Akli eAYOUB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in real time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly versus the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gi1 and G12, but also -arrestin 1, can be regulated.

  14. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  15. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  16. Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) to Characterize Agonist-Induced Arrestin Recruitment to Modified and Unmodified G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthamsetti, Prashant; Quejada, Jose Rafael; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Lambert, Nevin A

    2015-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent ∼25% of current drug targets. Ligand binding to these receptors activates G proteins and arrestins, which are involved in differential signaling pathways. Because functionally selective or biased ligands activate one of these two pathways, they may be superior medications for certain diseases states. The identification of such ligands requires robust drug screening assays for both G protein and arrestin activity. This unit describes protocols for two bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assays used to monitor arrestin recruitment to GPCRs. One assay requires modification of GPCRs by fusion to a BRET donor or acceptor moiety, whereas the other can detect arrestin recruitment to unmodified GPCRs.

  17. Interaction of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 with G Proteins and Beta-Arrestin 1 Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

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    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are well recognized as being able to activate several signaling pathways through the activation of different G proteins as well as other signaling proteins such as beta-arrestins. Therefore, understanding how such multiple GPCR-mediated signaling can be integrated constitute an important aspect. Here, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to shed more light on the G protein coupling profile of trypsin receptor, or protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, and its interaction with beta-arrestin1. Using YFP and Rluc fusion constructs expressed in COS-7 cells, BRET data revealed a pre-assembly of PAR2 with both Galphai1 and Galphao and a rapid and transient activation of these G proteins upon receptor activation. In contrast, no preassembly of PAR2 with Galpha12 could be detected and their physical association can be measured with a very slow and sustained kinetics similar to that of beta-arrestin1 recruitment. These data demonstrate the coupling of PAR2 with Galphai1, Galphao and Galpha12 in COS-7 cells with differences in the kinetics of GPCR-G protein coupling, a parameter that very likely influences the cellular response. Moreover, this further illustrates that preassembly or agonist-induced G protein interaction depends on receptor-G protein pairs indicating another level of complexity and regulation of the signaling of GPCR-G protein complexes and its multiplicity.

  18. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

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    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  19. Setting up a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer high throughput screening assay to search for protein/protein interaction inhibitors in mammalian cells.

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    Cyril eCouturier

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the cell life and its response or adaptation to its environment are mediated by a network of protein/protein interactions termed interactome. Our knowledge of this network keeps growing due to the development of sensitive techniques devoted to study these interactions. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique was primarily developed to allow the dynamic monitoring of protein-protein interactions in living cells, and has widely been used to study receptor activation by intra- or extra-molecular conformational changes within receptors and activated complexes in mammal cells. Some interactions are described as crucial in human pathological processes, and a new class of drugs targeting them has recently emerged. The BRET method is well suited to identify inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and here is described why and how to set up and optimize a High Throughput Screening assay based on BRET to search for such inhibitory compounds. The different parameters to take into account when developing such BRET assays in mammal cells are reviewed to give general guidelines: considerations on the targeted interaction, choice of BRET version, inducibility of the interaction, kinetic of the monitored interaction, and of the BRET reading, influence substrate concentration, number of cells and medium composition used on the Z’ factor, and expected interferences for colored or fluorescent compounds.

  20. Quantification of the vascular endothelial growth factor with a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) based single molecule biosensor.

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    Wimmer, T; Lorenz, B; Stieger, K

    2016-12-15

    Neovascular pathologies in the eye like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the diabetic retinopathie (DR), retinopathie of prematurity (ROP) or the retinal vein occlusion (RVO) are caused through a hypoxia induced upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). So far a correlation of intraocular VEGF concentrations to the impact of the pathologies is limited because of invasive sampling. Therefore, a minimally invasive, repeatable quantification of VEGF levels in the eye is needed to correlate the stage of VEGF induced pathologies as well as the efficacy of anti-VEGF treatment. Here we describe the development of three variants of enhanced BRET2 (eBRET2) based, single molecule biosensors by fusing a Renilla luciferase mutant with enhanced light output (RLuc8) to the N-terminus and a suitable eBRET2 acceptor fluorophore (GFP2) to the C-terminus of a VEGF binding domain, directly fused or separated with two different peptide linkers for the quantification of VEGF in vitro. The VEGF binding domain consists of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) based on ranibizumab in which the light- and the heavy- F(ab) chains were connected with a peptide linker to generate one open reading frame (orf). All three variants generate measureable eBRET2 ratios by transferring energy from the luciferase donor to the GFP2 acceptor, whereas only the directly fused and the proline variant permit VEGF quantification. The directly fused biosensor variant allows the quantification of VEGF with higher sensitivity, compared to the widely used ELISA systems and a wide dynamic quantification range in vitro. Our system demonstrates not only an additional in vitro application on VEGF quantification but also a promising step towards an applicable biosensor in an implantable device able to quantify VEGF reliably after implantation in vivo.

  1. Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail

    1993-01-01

    Describes bioluminescence and the chemistry of how it occurs. Presents information for conducting the following classroom activities: (1) firefly mimic; (2) modeling deep-sea fish; (3) sea fireflies; and (4) the chemistry of light. (PR)

  2. Bioluminescence for determining energy state of plants

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    Ching, T. M.

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence produced by the luciferin-luciferase system is a very sensitive assay for ATP content in extracts of plant materials. The ATP test for seed and pollen viability and vigor is presented, along with prediction of high growth potential and productivity in new crosses and selections of breeding materials. ATP as an indicator for environmental quality, stresses, and metabolic regulation is also considered.

  3. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

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    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  4. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

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    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  5. An endogenous green fluorescent protein-photoprotein pair in Clytia hemisphaerica eggs shows co-targeting to mitochondria and efficient bioluminescence energy transfer.

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    Fourrage, Cécile; Swann, Karl; Gonzalez Garcia, Jose Raul; Campbell, Anthony K; Houliston, Evelyn

    2014-04-09

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and calcium-activated photoproteins of the aequorin/clytin family, now widely used as research tools, were originally isolated from the hydrozoan jellyfish Aequora victoria. It is known that bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is possible between these proteins to generate flashes of green light, but the native function and significance of this phenomenon is unclear. Using the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica, we characterized differential expression of three clytin and four GFP genes in distinct tissues at larva, medusa and polyp stages, corresponding to the major in vivo sites of bioluminescence (medusa tentacles and eggs) and fluorescence (these sites plus medusa manubrium, gonad and larval ectoderms). Potential physiological functions at these sites include UV protection of stem cells for fluorescence alone, and prey attraction and camouflaging counter-illumination for bioluminescence. Remarkably, the clytin2 and GFP2 proteins, co-expressed in eggs, show particularly efficient BRET and co-localize to mitochondria, owing to parallel acquisition by the two genes of mitochondrial targeting sequences during hydrozoan evolution. Overall, our results indicate that endogenous GFPs and photoproteins can play diverse roles even within one species and provide a striking and novel example of protein coevolution, which could have facilitated efficient or brighter BRET flashes through mitochondrial compartmentalization.

  6. Bioluminescent luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa detection and tracking

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    Background: Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-Q...

  7. Bioluminescence-activated deep-tissue photodynamic therapy of cancer.

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    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm(2) for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT.

  8. Theoretical Study of Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence.

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    Wang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Dinoflagellates are the most ubiquitous luminescent protists in the marine environment and have drawn much attention for their crucial roles in marine ecosystems. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence has been applied in underwater target detection. The luminescent system of dinoflagellates is a typical luciferin-luciferase one. However, the excited-state oxyluciferin is not the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence as in most luciferin-luciferase bioluminescent organisms. The oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellates is not fluorescent, whereas its luciferin emits bright fluorescence with similar wavelength of the bioluminescence. What is the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence and what is the chemical process of the light emission like? These questions have not been answered by the limited experimental evidence so far. In this study, for the first time, the density functional calculation is employed to investigate the geometries and properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellate. The calculated results agree with the experimental observations and indicate the luciferin or its analogue, rather than oxyluciferin, is the bioluminophore of dinoflagellate bioluminescence. A rough mechanism involving energy transfer is proposed for dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

  9. A dual-color far-red to near-infrared firefly luciferin analogue designed for multiparametric bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathoul, Amit P; Grounds, Helen; Anderson, James C; Pule, Martin A

    2014-11-24

    Red-shifted bioluminescent emitters allow improved in vivo tissue penetration and signal quantification, and have led to the development of beetle luciferin analogues that elicit red-shifted bioluminescence with firefly luciferase (Fluc). However, unlike natural luciferin, none have been shown to emit different colors with different luciferases. We have synthesized and tested the first dual-color, far-red to near-infrared (nIR) emitting analogue of beetle luciferin, which, akin to natural luciferin, exhibits pH dependent fluorescence spectra and emits bioluminescence of different colors with different engineered Fluc enzymes. Our analogue produces different far-red to nIR emission maxima up to λ(max)=706 nm with different Fluc mutants. This emission is the most red-shifted bioluminescence reported without using a resonance energy transfer acceptor. This improvement should allow tissues to be more effectively probed using multiparametric deep-tissue bioluminescence imaging.

  10. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Approaches to Study GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute one of the most studied proteins leading to important discoveries and perspectives in terms of their biology and implication in physiology and pathophysiology. This is mostly linked to the remarkable advances in the development and application of the biophysical resonance energy transfer (RET)-based approaches, including bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET, respectively). Indeed, BRET and FRET have been extensively applied to study different aspects of GPCR functioning such as their activation and regulation either statically or dynamically, in real-time and intact cells. Consequently, our view on GPCRs has considerably changed opening new challenges for the study of GPCRs in their native tissues in the aim to get more knowledge on how these receptors control the biological responses. Moreover, the technological aspect of this field of research promises further developments for robust and reliable new RET-based assays that may be compatible with high-throughput screening as well as drug discovery programs.

  11. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  12. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  13. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2013-05-05

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy localization in weakly dissipative resonant chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2016-08-01

    Localization of energy in oscillator arrays has been of interest for a number of years, with special attention paid to the role of nonlinearity and discreteness in the formation of localized structures. This work examines a different type of energy localization arising due to the presence of dissipation in nonlinear resonance arrays. As a basic model, we consider a Klein-Gordon chain of finite length subjected to a harmonic excitation applied at an edge of the chain. It is shown that weak dissipation may be a key factor preventing the emergence of resonance in the entire chain, even if its nondissipative analog is entirely captured into resonance. The resulting process in the dissipative oscillator array represents large-amplitude resonant oscillations in a part of the chain adjacent to the actuator and small-amplitude oscillations in the distant part of the chain. The conditions of the emergence of resonance as well as the conditions of energy localization are derived. An agreement between the obtained analytical results and numerical simulations is demonstrated.

  15. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-12-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow-orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C(15)H(10)O(5), which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence.

  16. Energy Harvesting with Coupled Magnetorestrictive Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    energy harvesting with coupled resonators while using magnetostrictive material called Galfenol. Galfenol is an alloy iron with an approximate...follows. First we introduce the model of the transducer with Galfenol as the magnetostrictive material. Here, we discuss the model parameters derived...v  1. INTRODUCTION

  17. Analytical Applications of Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W. (Editor); Picciolo, G. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence and chemiluminescence studies were used to measure the amount of adenosine triphosphate and therefore the amount of energy available. Firefly luciferase - luciferin enzyme system was emphasized. Photometer designs are also considered.

  18. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R., E-mail: him-lax3@yahoo.com [Laser Spectroscopy Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580003 (India)

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  19. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement.

  20. Characterization of IRA/IRB hybrid insulin receptors using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquart, Christophe; Achi, Josepha; Issad, Tarik

    2008-10-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is composed of two alpha-chains that bind ligands and two beta-chains that possess an intracellular tyrosine kinase activity. The IR is expressed in cells as two isoforms containing or not exon 11 (IRB and IRA, respectively). Several mRNA studies have demonstrated that the two isoforms are co-expressed in different tissues and in several cancer cells. IRA/IRB hybrid receptors, constituting of an alphabeta-chain from IRA and an alphabeta-chain from IRB, are likely to occur in cells co-expressing both isoforms, but their study has been hampered by the lack of specific tools. In previous work, we used BRET to study IR and IGF1R homodimers and heterodimers. Here, we have used BRET to characterize IRA/IRB hybrids. BRET saturation experiments showed that IRA/IRB hybrids are randomly formed in cells. Moreover, by co-transfecting HEK-293 cells with a luciferase-tagged kinase-dead version of one isoform and a wild-type untagged version of the other isoform, we showed that IRA/IRB hybrids can recruit, upon ligand stimulation, a YFP-tagged intracellular partner. Finally, using BRET, we have studied ligand-induced conformational changes within IRA/IRB hybrids. Dose-response experiments showed that hybrid receptors bind IGF-2 with the same affinity than IRA homodimers, whereas they bind IGF-1 with a lower affinity. Altogether, our data indicate that IRA/IRB hybrid receptors can form in cells co-expressing both IR isoforms, that they are capable of recruiting intracellular partners upon ligand stimulation, and that they have pharmacological properties more similar to those of IRA than those of IRB homodimers with regards to IGF-2.

  1. Green-Fluorescent Protein from the Bioluminescent Jellyfish Clytia gregaria Is an Obligate Dimer and Does Not Form a Stable Complex with the Ca2+-Discharged Photoprotein Clytin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malikova, N.P.; Visser, N.V.; Hoek, van A.; Skakun, V.V.; Vysotski, E.S.; Lee, J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) is the origin of the green bioluminescence color exhibited by several marine hydrozoans and anthozoans. The mechanism is believed to be Fo¨rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) within a luciferase-GFP or photoprotein-GFP complex. As the effect is found in vitro at mi

  2. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Based on the mechanism of FRET a variety of novel chemical sensors and Biosensors have been developed. This review highlights the recent applications of sensitive and selective ratiometric FRET based sensors.

  3. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.

  4. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  5. Bioluminescence-Sensing Assay for Microbial Growth Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ramadan Eed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional methods for microbial viability quantification require cultivation and are laborious. There is consequently a widespread need for cultivation-free methods. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay is considered an extremely effective biosensor; hence ATP is the energy currency of all living microbes and can be used as a rapid indicator of microbial viability. We developed an ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay to detect microbial viability. A bioluminescent recombinant E. coli strain was used with luciferase extracted from transformed bacteria. Results showed that there is a direct correlation between the bioluminescence intensity of the ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay and the microbial viability. Bacterial counts from food samples were detected using the developed sensing assay and validated by the traditional plate-counting method. Compared with the plate-counting method, ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay is a more rapid and efficient approach for detecting microbial viability.

  6. Intercombination Effects in Resonant Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillant, C L; Jones, M P A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a near-degeneracy between the initial state and a state with a different spin quantum number. We also consider a case of four atoms in a spin chain, and show that a spin impurity can resonantly hop along the chain. By engineering the many-body energy levels of the spin-chain, the breakdown of $LS$ coupling due to inter-electronic effects in individual atoms can be mapped onto a spatial separation of the total spin and the total orbital angular momentum along the spin chain.

  7. Energy harvesting with coupled magnetostrictive resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Suketu; Phipps, Alex; In, Visarath; Cavaroc, Peyton; Matus-Vargas, Antonio; Palacios, Antonio; Gonzalez-Hernandez, H. G.

    2014-03-01

    We report the investigation of an energy harvesting system composed of coupled resonators with the magnetostrictive material Galfenol (FeGa). A coupled system of meso-scale (1-10 cm) cantilever beams for harvesting vibration energy is described for powering and aiding the performance of low-power wireless sensor nodes. Galfenol is chosen in this work for its durability, compared to the brittleness often encountered with piezoelectric materials, and high magnetomechanical coupling. A lumped model, which captures both the mechanical and electrical behavior of the individual transducers, is first developed. The values of the lumped element parameters are then derived empirically from fabricated beams in order to compare the model to experimental measurements. The governing equations of the coupled system lead to a system of differential equations with all-to-all coupling between transducers. An analysis of the system equations reveals different patterns of collective oscillations. Among the many different patterns, a synchronous state appears to yield the maximum energy that can be harvested by the system. Experiments on coupled system shows that the coupled system exhibits synchronization and an increment in the output power. Discussion of the required power converters is also included.

  8. A comparison of approaches to estimate the resonance energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, Marcin; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.; van Lenthe, Joop H.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss Ab Initio approaches to calculate the energy lowering (stabilisation) due to aromaticity. We compare the valence bond method and the block-localised wave function approaches to calculate the resonance energy. We conclude that the valence bond approach employs a Pauling-Wheland resonance e

  9. A comparison of approaches to estimate the resonance energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.; Havenith, R.W.A.; Jenneskens, L.W.; van Lenthe, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss Ab Initio approaches to calculate the energy lowering (stabilisation) due to aromaticity. We compare the valence bond method and the block-localised wave function approaches to calculate the resonance energy. We conclude that the valence bond approach employs a Pauling–Wheland resonance e

  10. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  11. Development of a new procedure based on the energy charge measurement using ATP bioluminescence assay for the detection of living mould from graphic documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonirainy, Malalanirina Sylvia; Arnold, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Fungal contamination is a major cause of deterioration in libraries and archives. Curators and conservators increasingly need rapid microbiological analyses. This paper presents a rapid detection method for the fungal contaminants on documents. A previous study showed that the calculation of energy charge, using bioluminescence ATP assays, provides a useful indicator to determinate the viability of fungal strains. We argue that this sensitive and time-saving method is better than traditional culture techniques. However, the procedure needs to be modified to make it usable for lay persons. An improved and simplified protocol is proposed here for the extraction of adenylate nucleotides (AN) from fungal spores and for their measurements. Our new procedure can detect the existence of viable fungal strains on documents, presenting suspect spots within minutes. The extraction is performed by filtration with DMSO-TE solution as extractant. The different step of the measurement of AN content is carried out successively in a single test tube instead of the three tubes necessary in the initial method. The new procedure was tested on 12 strains among those most frequently found in archives and libraries and validated on swab samples from real documents.

  12. ANALYSIS OF PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING DEVICE WITH ADJUSTABLE RESONANCE FREQUENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Lei; Li Yuejuan; Marvin Cheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytic method that adjusts resonance frequency of a piezoelectric vibration energy harvester.A mathematical model that estimates resonance frequency of cantilever is also proposed.Through moving an attached mass and changing its weight on the cantilever beam,resonance frequency of adopted piezoelectric device can be adjusted to match the frequency of ambient vibration sources,which is critical in order to harvest maximum amount of energy.The theoretical results are validated by experiments that move different masses along experimental cantilever beams.The results demonstrate that resonance frequency can be adjusted by an attached mass located at different positions on the cantilever beam.Different combinations of operational conditions that harvest maximum amount of energy are also discussed in this paper.

  13. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  14. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Ivanov, Ivan B. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics, Ulyanovskaya 1, Petrodvoretz 198504 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast (Russian Federation); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” Ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  15. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Using Spiropyran and Diarylethene Photochromic Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Jares-Erijman

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the preparation and photophysical characterization of two model compounds designed to test a new approach for the quantitative determination of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET in biological systems. The method enables modulation of FRET by exploiting the unique reversible spectral properties of photochromic diarylethenes and spiropyrans to create switchable energy acceptors.

  16. Information Exchange via Surface Modified Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, Mathias; Huang, Dan; Ninham, Barry W; Sernelius, Bo E

    2013-01-01

    The theory is presented for resonance interaction between two atoms in an excited configuration: one atom, the "receptor" of information (i.e. energy), adsorbed on a phospholipid surface and the other atom, the "emitter" of information (i.e. energy), a long distance away. The dielectric function for a specific phospholipid membrane is obtained from density functional theory calculations. We present numerical results comparing the range and magnitude of non-specific Casimir-Polder interactions with the much more long-ranged, and highly specific, resonance interaction. A study of the resonance interaction with one or both atoms adsorbed on a phospholipid membrane surface reveals a possibility to have a cross over from attraction to repulsion or from repulsion to attraction at separations between receptor and emitter atoms exceeding several hundred {\\AA}ngstr\\"oms. The energy transfer and the observed transitions in the sign of the interaction energies near surfaces provide potential new ways to start recognitio...

  17. Bioluminescence-Sensing Assay for Microbial Growth Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Heba Ramadan Eed; Nora S. Abdel-Kader; Mahmoud Helmy El Tahan; Tianhong Dai; Rehab Amin

    2016-01-01

    The conventional methods for microbial viability quantification require cultivation and are laborious. There is consequently a widespread need for cultivation-free methods. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence-sensing assay is considered an extremely effective biosensor; hence ATP is the energy currency of all living microbes and can be used as a rapid indicator of microbial viability. We developed an ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay to detect microbial viability. A biolumine...

  18. Wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Breinbjerg, Olav; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate by theoretical analysis and experimental verification that mid-range wireless energy transfer systems may take advantage of de-tuned coupling devices, without jeopardizing the energy transfer efficiency. Allowing for a modest de-tuning of the source coil, energy transfer systems...... could be properly designed to minimize undesired energy dissipation in the source coil when the power receiver is out of the range. Our basic observation paves the way for more flexible design and fabrication of non-resonant mid-range wireless energy transfer systems, thus potentially impacting...... practical implementations of wireless energy transfer....

  19. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Irish, E K; Lovett, B W

    2013-01-01

    Coherent quantum energy transfer, as observed in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, is inhibited by energetic disorder. While this difficulty can be overcome to some extent by the addition of environmental noise, it has recently has begun to be appreciated that discrete intra- and/or intermolecular vibrational modes may play an important role in quantum dynamics. We present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrational modes create resonant energy transfer pathways, enhancing the efficiency of both coherent and dephasing-assisted transfer. The principles of this vibration-assisted resonance are illustrated in a simple model based on one energy-transfer branch of the well-characterised Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. Despite its simplicity, this model captures the interplay between strong electronic coupling that produces delocalised exciton states and resonance-enhanced weak coupling to local vibrational modes. Analytical and numerical results show that intramolecular vibrations can enhance...

  20. Resonance energy transport and exchange in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid I.

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that complete energy transfer between two weakly coupled linear oscillators occurs only at resonance. If the oscillators are nonlinear, the amplitude dependence of their frequencies may destroy, in general, any eventual resonance. This means that no substantial energy transfer may occur unless, exceptionally, resonance persists during the transfer. In this paper, the self-sustained resonance is considered for an oscillator array consisting of n coupled linear oscillators (a primary system) initially excited by impulse loading and connected to an essentially nonlinear attachment (NLA). Under the condition of resonance, initial energy is transferred to the NLA and then travels back and forth between the linear and nonlinear oscillators. It is shown that the general mechanism of the energy transport is similar to that in the previously studied system of two coupled oscillators but, in contrast to the two degree-of-freedom case, the multidimensional system requires a proper tuning not only for the NLA but for the entire array. In this work, we develop an order-reduction procedure, which allows the separated dynamical analysis for the pair of nonlinearly coupled oscillators and the remaining (n-1) linear oscillators. Using simplifications based on the low-order reduced model, we detect an admissible domain of parameters ensuring resonance interaction and then derive a closed-form approximate solution adequately describing the transient processes in the entire system. We obtain explicit approximate solutions for both conservative (complete energy exchange) and dissipative (irreversible energy transfer) systems and then illustrate the theoretical results by an example of the four degree-of-freedom system. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  1. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devendraa Siingh; Shubha Singh; R P Singh

    2006-02-01

    In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and -value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the disturbed conditions when the magnetosphere is depleted in electron density, the resonance energy of the electron enhances by an order of magnitude at higher latitudes, whereas the effect is small at low latitudes. An attempt is made to explain the enhanced wave activity observed during magnetic storm periods.

  2. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Smith, W. W. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Narducci, F. A. [Naval Air Systems Command, EO Sensors Division, Bldg 2187, Suite 3190 Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  3. Opportunities for shear energy scaling in bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sumy; Hueting, Raymond J E

    2014-10-01

    An important energy loss contribution in bulk acoustic wave resonators is formed by so-called shear waves, which are transversal waves that propagate vertically through the devices with a horizontal motion. In this work, we report for the first time scaling of the shear-confined spots, i.e., spots containing a high concentration of shear wave displacement, controlled by the frame region width at the edge of the resonator. We also demonstrate a novel methodology to arrive at an optimum frame region width for spurious mode suppression and shear wave confinement. This methodology makes use of dispersion curves obtained from finite-element method (FEM) eigenfrequency simulations for arriving at an optimum frame region width. The frame region optimization is demonstrated for solidly mounted resonators employing several shear wave optimized reflector stacks. Finally, the FEM simulation results are compared with measurements for resonators with Ta2O5/ SiO2 stacks showing suppression of the spurious modes.

  4. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices.

  5. BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING: PROGRESS AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Badr, Christian E.; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2011-01-01

    Application of bioluminescence imaging has grown tremendously in the past decade and has significantly contributed to the core conceptual advances in biomedical research. This technology provides valuable means for monitoring of different biological processes for immunology, oncology, virology and neuroscience. In this review, we will discuss current trends in bioluminescence and its application in different fields with emphasis on cancer research.

  6. Quorum sensing influences Vibrio harveyi growth rates in a manner not fully accounted for by the marker effect of bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeena E Nackerdien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate.

  7. Analysis of RXR/THR and RXR/PPARG2 heterodimerization by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Mulero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear receptors (NR regulate transcription of genes involved in many biological processes such as development, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death. Amongst them, PPARG2 and THR control tissue glucose and lipid homeostasis which are deregulated in severe pathophysiological conditions such as metabolic syndromes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe a real time BRET approach to monitor heterodimerization between RXR and PPARG2 or THR in vitro or in living cells. The presence of a specific DNA target was required to induce in vitro a BRET shift reflecting heterodimerization of RXR/PPARG2 or RXR/THR. As in electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, the stringency and specificity of the BRET shift assay depended upon assay condition optimization including MgCl2 concentration. For the nuclear receptors, we found by mutagenesis analysis that each heterodimer partner must harbor an intact DNA binding domain to induce BRET and heterodimerization on a DNA target. Moreover the interaction between the PPARG2 ligand binding domain and the RXR DNA binding domain stabilized the heterodimer on its DNA target. BRET microscopy in living cells highlighted the heterodimerization of RXR/PPARG2 within the nucleus clustered in discrete foci that may represent active target gene transcription regulation regions. BRET imaging also suggested that heterodimerization between RXR and PPARG2 required the DNA binding of PPARG2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The BRET approach described here allowed us to study the dynamic interactions which exist between NR in vitro or in living cells and can provide important information on heterodimerization modes, affinity with a given RE and subcellular localization of the heterodimers. This method could be used to study real time changes of NR heterodimers occurring on DNA depending upon cell activation, chromatin state and help to define the mechanisms of ligands or drug action designed to target NRs.

  8. Role of near threshold resonances in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Jain; N J Upadhyay

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a resonance close to the threshold strongly effects the dynamics of the interacting particles at low energies. Production of 12C, the element for life, in 4He burning in Sun is a classic example of such a situation. In intermediate energy nuclear physics, this situation arises in the interactions of an -meson with a nucleon and that of a −-meson with a proton at low energies, where both these systems have a resonance or a bound state near their thresholds, resulting in a strong attractive interaction. If putting these mesons in nuclear environment produces a strong attraction, it is possible that, in nature there may exist - and −-nuclear bound states. Such a tantalizing possibility has led to experimental and theoretical programmes to search for them. These efforts have produced positive results. This paper gives a brief critical overview of these studies, emphasizing especially the efforts led by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC).

  9. Harvesting energy from airflow with a michromachined piezoelectric harvester inside a Helmholtz resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matova, S.P.; Elfrink, R.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Schaijk, R. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report an airflow energy harvester that combines a piezoelectric energy harvester with a Helmholtz resonator. The resonator converts airflow energy to air oscillations which in turn are converted into electrical energy by a piezoelectric harvester. Two Helmholtz resonators with adju

  10. Exploiting in vitro and in vivo bioluminescence for the implementation of the three Rs principle (replacement, reduction, and refinement) in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Elisa; Cevenini, Luca; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Calabria, Donato; Roda, Aldo

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence-based analytical tools are suitable for high-throughput and high-content screening assays, finding widespread application in several fields related to the drug discovery process. Cell-based bioluminescence assays, because of their peculiar advantages of predictability, possibility of automation, multiplexing, and miniaturization, seem the most appealing tool for the high demands of the early stages of drug screening. Reporter gene technology and the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer principle are widely used, and receptor binding studies of new agonists/antagonists for a variety of human receptors expressed in different cell lines can be performed. Moreover, bioluminescence can be used for in vitro and in vivo real-time monitoring of pathophysiological processes within living cells and small animals. New luciferases and substrates have recently arrived on the market, further expanding the spectrum of applications. A new generation of probes are also emerging that promise to revolutionize the preclinical imaging market. This formidable toolbox is demonstrated to facilitate the implementation of the three Rs principle in the early drug discovery process, in compliance with ethical and responsible research to reduce cost and improve the reliability and predictability of results.

  11. Nano Sensing and Energy Conversion Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltai (Isaac Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic technique has been attracting much attention in applications of nano-bio-chemical sensing and energy conversion of solar energy harvesting and enhanced energy transfer. One approach for nano-bio-chemical sensing is surface plasmon resonance (SPR imaging, which can detect the material properties, such as density, ion concentration, temperature, and effective refractive index in high sensitivity, label-free, and real-time under ambient conditions. Recent study shows that SPR can successfully detect the concentration variation of nanofluids during evaporation-induced self-assembly process. Spoof surface plasmon resonance based on multilayer metallo-dielectric hyperbolic metamaterials demonstrate SPR dispersion control, which can be combined with SPR imaging, to characterize high refractive index materials because of its exotic optical properties. Furthermore, nano-biophotonics could enable innovative energy conversion such as the increase of absorption and emission efficiency and the perfect absorption. Localized SPR using metal nanoparticles show highly enhanced absorption in solar energy harvesting. Three-dimensional hyperbolic metamaterial cavity nanostructure shows enhanced spontaneous emission. Recently ultrathin film perfect absorber is demonstrated with the film thickness is as low as ~1/50th of the operating wavelength using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ phenomena at the wavelength close to SPR. It is expected to provide a breakthrough in sensing and energy conversion applications using the exotic optical properties based on the nanophotonic technique.

  12. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  13. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F.D.; Hagel, K.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O. (II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet, Giessen, Giessen (Germany)); Charity, R.J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R.S.; Simon, R.S.; Wessels, J.P. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Florence, Florence (Italy))

    1992-07-13

    High-energy {gamma} rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of {sup 136}Xe+{sup 48}Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width {Gamma} is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy {ital E}{sup *}. A saturation at about {Gamma}=10 MeV is observed for {ital E}{sup *}/{ital A}{ge}1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  14. Global stabilization of high-energy resonance for a nonlinear wideband electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Arata; Sato, Takeru

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental verification of a wideband nonlinear vibration energy harvester which has a globally stabilized high-energy resonating response. For the conventional linear vibration energy harvester, the maximum performance of the power generation and its bandwidth are in a relation of trade-off. The resonance frequency band can be expanded by introducing a Duffing-type nonlinear resonator in order to enable the harvester to generate larger electric power in a wider frequency range. However, since such nonlinear resonators often have multiple stable steady-state solutions in the resonance band, it is difficult for the nonlinear harvester to maintain the high performance of the power generation constantly. The principle of self-excitation and entrainment has been utilized to provide the global stability to the highest-energy solution by destabilizing other unexpected lower-energy solutions by introducing a switching circuit of the load resistance between positive and the negative values depending on the response amplitude of the oscillator. In this study, an experimental verification of this concept are carried out. An experimental prototype harvester is designed and fabricated and the performance of the proposed harvester is experimentally verified. It has been shown that the numerical and experimental results agreed very well, and the highest-energy solutions above the threshold value were successfully stabilized globally.

  15. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence microbe detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Chappelle, E.; Picciolo, G. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated biosensors for online use with NASA Water Monitoring System employs bioluminescence and chemiluminescence techniques to rapidly measure microbe contamination of water samples. System eliminates standard laboratory procedures requiring time duration of 24 hours or longer.

  16. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbietti, L. [e12, Physik Department Technische Universität München Excellence Cluster “Origin and Structure of the Universe” (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N{sup *} resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c{sup 2} in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000){sup ++} are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  17. Bioluminescence Potential Modeling and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    bioluminescence in the wakes of ships, breaking waves, around the bodies of rapidly moving fish and mammals , and from simple agitation of the water with one’s hand...history of brilliant displays of bioluminescence in the wakes of ships, breaking waves, around the bodies of rapidly moving fish and mammals , and from...during the earlier stages of upwelling development. Later, the observed deep offshore BL potential maximum disappeared and became a shallower and much

  18. Resonance Energy Transfer in Upconversion Nanoplatforms for Selective Biodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Yang, Dongpeng; Li, Fuyou

    2017-01-17

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) describes the process that energy is transferred from an excited donor to an acceptor molecule, leading to a reduction in the fluorescence emission intensity of the donor and an increase in that of the acceptor. By this technique, measurements with the good sensitivity can be made about distance within 1 to 10 nm under physiological conditions. For this reason, the RET technique has been widely used in polymer science, biochemistry, and structural biology. Recently, a number of RET systems incorporated with nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and upconversion nanoparticles, have been developed. These nanocrystals retain their optical superiority and can act as either a donor or a quencher, thereby enhancing the performance of RET systems and providing more opportunities in excitation wavelength selection. Notably, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their inherent advantages of large anti-Stoke shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, and absence of autofluorescence under low energy near-infrared (NIR) light excitation. These nanoparticles are promising for the biodetection of various types of analytes. Undoubtedly, the developments of those applications usually rely on resonance energy transfer, which could be regarded as a flexible technology to mediate energy transfer from upconversion phosphor to acceptor for the design of luminescent functional nanoplatforms. Currently, researchers have developed many RET-based upconversion nanosystems (RET-UCNP) that respond to specific changes in the biological environments. Specifically, small organic molecules, biological molecules, metal-organic complexes, or inorganic nanoparticles were carefully selected and bound to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles for the preparation of RET-UCNP nanosystems. Benefiting from the advantage and versatility offered by this technology, the research of RET

  19. Detecting Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer with Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augspurger, Ashley E. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Stender, Anthony S. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Han, Rui [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Fang, Ning [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-12-30

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal probes for studying intracellular environments and energy transfer mechanisms due to their plasmonic properties. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) relies on a plasmonic nanoparticle to donate energy to a nearby resonant acceptor molecule, a process which can be observed due to the plasmonic quenching of the donor nanoparticle. In this study, a gold nanosphere was used as the plasmonic donor, while the metalloprotein cytochrome c was used as the acceptor molecule. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy allows for simultaneous monitoring of complex environments and noble metal nanoparticles in real time. Using DIC and specially designed microfluidic channels, we were able to monitor PRET at the single gold particle level and observe the reversibility of PRET upon the introduction of phosphate-buffered saline to the channel. In an additional experiment, single gold particles were internalized by HeLa cells and were subsequently observed undergoing PRET as the cell hosts underwent morphological changes brought about by ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  20. Nucleon-nucleon resonances at intermediate energies using a complex energy formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Papadimitriou, G

    2015-01-01

    We apply our method of complex scaling, valid for a general class of potentials, in a search for nucleon-nucleon S-matrix poles up to 2 GeV laboratory kinetic energy. We find that the realistic potentials JISP16, constructed from inverse scattering, and chiral field theory potentials N$^3$LO and N$^2$LO$_{opt}$ support resonances in energy regions well above their fit regions. In some cases these resonances have widths that are narrow when compared with the real part of the S-matrix pole.

  1. Resonantly driven micromechanical energy converters; Resonante mikromechanische Energiewandler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehne, Ingo

    2009-07-01

    This work focuses on the investigation of resonantly driven micromechanical energy harvesters. They are based on electromechanically coupled spring-mass-systems, converting mechanical vibrations into electrical energy by employing appropriate physical transduction mechanisms, such as the inductive, the piezoelectric and the capacitive principle. These three approaches are compared to each other, especially with respect to electrical energy density, scaling behaviour and microtechnological fabricability. Theoretical considerations lead to the decision to implement both a capacitive and a piezoelectric micromechanical energy harvester. The capacitive energy transducer essentially consists of a mass suspended by silicon springs. This mass simultaneously serves as a movable electrode. A fixed counter electrode completes the variable capacitor. In order to function properly, the parallel-plate capacitor needs to be biased electrically. In contrast to existing state of the art a new approach is introduced, employing two different electrode materials with a large difference in their work functions. A periodical mechanical excitation leads to a variation of the electrical energy content within the biased capacitor, thus inducing a current flow, which can be used for driving an external electrical load. For the piezoelectric energy harvester, the concept of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a mass attached to the surface was used and devices were implemented. A mechanical excitation leads to a periodic deflection of the diaphragm caused by the stiffly coupled inertial mass and, thus, to a changing mechanical stress distribution within the diaphragm. This, in turn, induces a periodic charge separation within the piezoelectric diaphragm. The energy generated in this way can be consumed by an external electrical load with appropriate impedance matching. Theoretical model descriptions are established for both types of energy harvesters based on systems of state space equations. On

  2. Resonant tunneling: A method for simultaneous determination of resonance energy and energy eigenvalue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: Fethi_maiz@yahoo.fr [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); Eissa, S.A. [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); AL-AZHAR University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); AlFaify, S. [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-09-15

    Assuming an effective mass approximation and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method for simultaneous determination of the energy levels forming the sub-band structure and the transmissions coefficient of non-symmetrical, non-periodical potential semiconducting heterostructure is being proposed. The method can be applied on a multilayer system with varying thickness and effective mass of the layers, and with potential that is neither periodical nor symmetrical. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, cases of symmetrical rectangular triple-barrier structure with constant effective mass, multi-barrier semiconductor heterostructure (nine barriers–eight-wells), and monomer height barrier superlattices (300 barriers) systems have been examined. Findings show very good agreements with previously published results obtained by different methods on similar systems. The proposed method was found to be useful for any number of semiconducting layers arranged in any random way making it more realistic, simple, and applicable to superlattice analysis and for devices design.

  3. Experimental investigation of energy localization in line-defect resonator based on silicon locally resonant phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wanli; Feng, Duan; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, energy localization in line-defect resonator based on locally resonant phononic crystal (PnC) is experimentally studied. The defected resonator is realized by creating line defects on a two-dimension (2-D) silicon PnC. The silicon resonator was fabricated by micro machining process and tested by a combination of the fluid coupling method and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Acoustic waves with frequency range from 7.19 MHz to 7.50 MHz are trapped in the cavity, and the corresponding resonant modes are observed in-situ. The measured quality (Q) factor of the resonator, which is 427 at its resonant frequency of 7.3 MHz, is smaller than the simulated ones (666 and 5135). The experimental results agree well with the simulation results that frequencies of the trapped acoustic waves of are mostly in the range of the phononic bandgaps. The locally resonant based PnC resonator in paper with 17 dB magnitude amplification, which is normalized with respect to the transmission of a freestanding silicon slab in the same frequency range, has great potential in energy harvesting or sound concentration.

  4. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-Qin; Zhang, Mao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of the hadronic resonances K*0(892), ϕ(1020), Σ*(1385), and Ξ*(1530) in central AA collisions at , 200, and 2760 GeV is systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization is described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The p T spectra of K*0(892) calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low p T ≲ 1.5 GeV, and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects, the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on ϕ(1020) production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low p T on the basis of overall agreement with the data. We also predict the p T spectra of Σ*(1385) and Ξ*(1530), to be tested by the future experimental data. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575100, 11305076, 11505104)

  5. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Feng-lan; Wang, Rui-qin; Zhang, Mao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The production of hadronic resonances $K^{*}(892)$, $\\phi(1020)$, $\\Sigma^{*}(1385)$, and $\\Xi^{*}(1530)$ in central AA collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 17.3, 200, and 2760 GeV are systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization are described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The $p_T$ spectra of $K^{*}(892)$ calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low $p_T \\lesssim 1.5$ GeV and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on $\\phi(1020)$ production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low $p_T$ on the...

  6. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  7. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A

    2016-08-21

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  8. Resonant structure of low-energy H3+ dissociative recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H; Bing, Dennis; Buhr, Henrik; Greene, Chris H; Grieser, Manfred; Hoffmann, Jens; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Mendes, Mario B; Novotny, Oldrich; Novotny, Steffen; Orlov, Dmitry A; Repnow, Roland; Sorg, Tobias; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    New high-resolution dissociative recombination rate coefficients of rotationally cool and hot H3+ in the vibrational ground state have been measured with a 22-pole trap setup and a Penning ion source, respectively, at the ion storage ring TSR. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to explore the dependence of the rate coefficient on ion temperature and to study the contributions of different symmetries to probe the rich predicted resonance spectrum. The break-up energy was investigated by fragment imaging to derive internal temperatures of the stored parent ions under differing experimental conditions. A systematic experimental assessment of heating effects is performed which, together with a survey of other recent storage-ring data, suggests that the present rotationally cool rate-coefficient measurement was performed at 380^{+50}_{-130} K and that this is the lowest rotational temperature so far realized in storage-ring rate-coefficient measurements on H3+. This partially suppo...

  9. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  10. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  11. Red fluorescent protein-aequorin fusions as improved bioluminescent Ca2+ reporters in single cells and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Bakayan

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence recording of Ca(2+ signals with the photoprotein aequorin does not require radiative energy input and can be measured with a low background and good temporal resolution. Shifting aequorin emission to longer wavelengths occurs naturally in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to the green fluorescent protein (GFP. This process has been reproduced in the molecular fusions GFP-aequorin and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-aequorin, but the latter showed limited transfer efficiency. Fusions with strong red emission would facilitate the simultaneous imaging of Ca(2+ in various cell compartments. In addition, they would also serve to monitor Ca(2+ in living organisms since red light is able to cross animal tissues with less scattering. In this study, aequorin was fused to orange and various red fluorescent proteins to identify the best acceptor in red emission bands. Tandem-dimer Tomato-aequorin (tdTA showed the highest BRET efficiency (largest energy transfer critical distance R(0 and percentage of counts in the red band of all the fusions studied. In addition, red fluorophore maturation of tdTA within cells was faster than that of other fusions. Light output was sufficient to image ATP-induced Ca(2+ oscillations in single HeLa cells expressing tdTA. Ca(2+ rises caused by depolarization of mouse neuronal cells in primary culture were also recorded, and changes in fine neuronal projections were spatially resolved. Finally, it was also possible to visualize the Ca(2+ activity of HeLa cells injected subcutaneously into mice, and Ca(2+ signals after depositing recombinant tdTA in muscle or the peritoneal cavity. Here we report that tdTA is the brightest red bioluminescent Ca(2+ sensor reported to date and is, therefore, a promising probe to study Ca(2+ dynamics in whole organisms or tissues expressing the transgene.

  12. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  13. Low-energy neutron resonances in erbium and gadolinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Shore, F.J.; Sailor, V.L.

    1960-01-01

    The two neutron resonances in Er at 0.46 and 0.58 eV were measured using samples enriched in Er166, Er167 and Er168 It was found that both resonances occur in the target nucleus Er167. The isotopic cross-sections of Gd155 and Gd157 were measured from 0.02 to 0.30 eV and resonances were found in G...

  14. Indicators based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Roger Y

    2009-07-01

    One of the major new trends in the design of indicators for optically imaging biochemical and physiological functions of living cells has been the exploitation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). FRET is a well-known spectroscopic technique for monitoring changes in the proximity and mutual orientation of pairs of chromophores. It has long been used in biochemistry and cell biology to assess distances and orientations between specific labeling sites within a single macromolecule or between two separate molecules. More recently, macromolecules or molecular pairs have been engineered to change their FRET in response to biochemical and physiological signals such as membrane potential, cyclic AMP (cAMP), protease activity, free Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM) concentrations, protein-protein heterodimerization, phosphorylation, and reporter-gene expression. Because FRET is general, nondestructive, and easily imaged, it has proven to be one of the most versatile spectroscopic readouts available to the designer of new probes. FRET is particularly amenable to emission ratioing, which is more reliably quantifiable than single-wavelength monitoring and better suited than excitation ratioing to high-speed and laser-excited imaging. This article summarizes the photophysical principles of FRET and the types of indicators used.

  15. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  16. Low-energy neutron flux measurement using a resonance absorption filter surrounding a lithium glass scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Hamidi, S.

    2007-06-01

    The resonance absorption filter technique has been used to determine the thermal/epithermal neutron flux. The main idea in this technique is to use an element with a high and essentially singular resonance in the neutron absorption cross section as a filter surrounding a miniature-type lithium glass scintillator. The count with and without the filter surrounding the detector gives the number of resonance-energy neutrons. Some preliminary results and a comparison with the MCNP code are shown.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence of resonance energy transfer mechanism from PbS QDs to bulk silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernechea M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the efficiency of the resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon. We present spectroscopic evidence that resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon can be an efficient process for separation distances below 12 nm. Temperature measurements are also presented for PbS quantum dots deposited on glass and silicon with 5 nm and 20nm spacer thicknesses substrates. Our findings show that the resonance energy transfer efficiency remains constant over the 50K to 300K temperature range.

  18. Bioluminescence tomography based on the phase approximation model

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, W; Wang, G.

    2010-01-01

    A reconstruction method of bioluminescence sources is proposed based on a phase approximation model. Compared with the diffuse approximation, this phase approximation model more correctly predicts bioluminescence photon propagation in biological tissues, so that bioluminescence tomography can accurately locate and quantify the distribution of bioluminescence sources. The compressive sensing (CS) technique is applied to regularize the inverse source reconstruction to enhance numerical stabilit...

  19. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  20. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  1. The use of the equivalence between boxing and scaling to determine resonance energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sucre, M.; Lefebvre, R.

    1986-10-01

    It is shown that the stabilization graphs obtained by enclosing a quantum system in a box of varying size can be exploited through analytical continuation to derive resonance energies. The similarity between this approach and that based on the variation of a scaling factor in the basis set used to represent the resonance wavefunction is emphasized.

  2. EXAMINING A SERIES RESONANT INVERTER CIRCUIT TO USE IN THE PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin ÇETİN

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As we know, solar energy is the energy source which is environment friendly, renewable, and can be found easily. Particularly, in the recent years, interest on producing electrical energy by alternative energy sources increased because of the fact that underground sources are not enough to produce energy in the future and also these sources cause enviromental pollution. The solar energy is one of the most popular one among the alternative energy sources. Photovoltaic systems produce the electrical energy from the sunlight. In this study, a series resonant inverter circuit which is used in the photovoltaic energy conversion systems has been examined.Effects of the series resonant inverter circuit on the photovoltaic energy conversion system have been investigated and examined

  3. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  4. Forster resonance energy transfer rate in any dielectric nanophotonic medium with weak dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study FRET and spontaneous emission in arbitrary nanophotonic media with weak dispersion and weak absorption in the frequency overlap...... to the mirror, typically a few nm. Finally, we discuss the consequences of our results to applications of Forster resonance energy transfer, for instance in quantum information processing....

  5. Energy Dissipation in Graphene Mechanical Resonators with and without Free Edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Takamura

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS have high future potential to realize sensitive mass and force sensors owing to graphene’s low mass density and exceptional mechanical properties. One of the important remaining issues in this field is how to achieve mechanical resonators with a high quality factor (Q. Energy dissipation in resonators decreases Q, and suppressing it is the key to realizing sensitive sensors. In this article, we review our recent work on energy dissipation in doubly-clamped and circular drumhead graphene resonators. We examined the temperature (T dependence of the inverse of a quality factor ( Q - 1 to reveal what the dominant dissipation mechanism is. Our doubly-clamped trilayer resonators show a characteristic Q - 1 -T curve similar to that observed in monolayer resonators: Q - 1 ∝ T 2 above ∼100 K and ∝ T 0.3 below ∼100 K. By comparing our results with previous experimental and theoretical results, we determine that the T 2 and T 0.3 dependences can be attributed to tensile strain induced by clamping metals and vibrations at the free edges in doubly-clamped resonators, respectively. The Q - 1 -T curve in our circular drumhead resonators indicates that removing free edges and clamping metal suppresses energy dissipation in the resonators, resulting in a linear T dependence of Q - 1 in a wide temperature range.

  6. Cryogenic resonant microwave compressors with energy extraction through "warm" interference switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoilenko, G. M.; Shlapakovski, A. S.; Yushkov, Yu. G.

    2016-01-01

    A method of switching cryogenic resonant microwave compressors from the energy accumulation mode to the energy release mode is proposed and analyzed. The switching process is based on the resonant transfer of the microwave energy from a cryogenic storage cavity to a room temperature commutation cavity. The transfer can be realized using a cascade interference microwave switch weakly coupled to the storage cavity and consisting of two H-plane waveguide tees connected in series. The tees are made of a normally conducting material, located outside the cryostat, and contain commuting units in shorted side arms. The length of the cascade input arm (from the storage cavity to the first tee) is non-resonant, while the space between the storage cavity and the second tee is resonant. The weak coupling of the storage cavity to the cascade and the non-resonant length of its input arm allow one to minimize losses during the energy accumulation phase. When the commuting unit in the first tee is ignited, the tee opens, and the non-resonant volume of the cascade input arm is transformed into the volume of the resonant commutation cavity. The microwave energy is then transferred in a resonant way from the storage cavity to the commutation cavity, and when the transfer is complete, the commuting unit in the second tee is ignited to extract the energy into a load. It is shown analytically that, at a certain value of the coupling (the cryogenic storage cavity to the normally conducting cascade of tees) and length of the cascade input arm, the power gain in the storage cavity can be kept high. It is also shown that the energy accumulated in the storage cavity can be effectively transferred to the commutation cavity and from the commutation cavity to the load.

  7. The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Konstantin V; Petushkov, Valentin N; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petunin, Alexei I; Bondar, Vladimir S; Rodicheva, Emma K; Medvedeva, Svetlana E; Oba, Yuichi; Oba, Yumiko; Arseniev, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Sergey; Gitelson, Josef I; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-07-06

    Many species of fungi naturally produce light, a phenomenon known as bioluminescence, however, the fungal substrates used in the chemical reactions that produce light have not been reported. We identified the fungal compound luciferin 3-hydroxyhispidin, which is biosynthesized by oxidation of the precursor hispidin, a known fungal and plant secondary metabolite. The fungal luciferin does not share structural similarity with the other eight known luciferins. Furthermore, it was shown that 3-hydroxyhispidin leads to bioluminescence in extracts from four diverse genera of luminous fungi, thus suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for fungal bioluminescence.

  8. Resonance treatment using pin-based pointwise energy slowing-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Changho; Lee, Deokjung

    2017-02-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method using a pointwise energy solution has been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the equivalence theory. The equivalence theory uses a crude resonance scattering source approximation, and assumes a spatially constant scattering source distribution inside a fuel pellet. These two assumptions cause a significant error, in that they overestimate the multi-group effective cross sections, especially for 238U. The new resonance self-shielding method solves pointwise energy slowing-down equations with a sub-divided fuel rod. The method adopts a shadowing effect correction factor and fictitious moderator material to model a realistic pointwise energy solution. The slowing-down solution is used to generate the multi-group cross section. With various light water reactor problems, it was demonstrated that the new resonance self-shielding method significantly improved accuracy in the reactor parameter calculation with no compromise in computation time, compared to the equivalence theory.

  9. Performance characteristics of an energy selective electron refrigerator with double resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Min; He Ji-Zhou; Tang Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes the energy selective electron (ESE) engine with double resonances as a refrigerator in one dimensional (ID) system. It consists of two infinitely large electron reservoirs with different temperatures and chemical potentials, and they are perfectly thermally insulated from each other and interaction only via a double 'idealized energy filter' whose widths are all finite. Taking advantage of the density of state and Fermi distribution in the ID system, the heat flux into each reservoir may then be calculated. Moreover, the coefficient of performance may be derived from the expressions for the heat flux into the hot and cold reservoirs. The performance characteristic curves are plotted by numerical analysis. The influences of the resonances widths, the energy position of resonance and the space of two resonances on performance of the ESE refrigerator are discussed. The results obtained here have theoretical significance for the understanding of thermodynamic performance of the micro-nano devices.

  10. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  11. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-10-20

    POLIDENT (POint LIbraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  12. Multicomponent long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction system: Bright solitons, energy-sharing collisions, and resonant solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkaravarthi, K; Kanna, T; Vijayajayanthi, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2014-11-01

    We consider a general multicomponent (2+1)-dimensional long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction (LSRI) system with arbitrary nonlinearity coefficients, which describes the nonlinear resonance interaction of multiple short waves with a long wave in two spatial dimensions. The general multicomponent LSRI system is shown to be integrable by performing the Painlevé analysis. Then we construct the exact bright multisoliton solutions by applying the Hirota's bilinearization method and study the propagation and collision dynamics of bright solitons in detail. Particularly, we investigate the head-on and overtaking collisions of bright solitons and explore two types of energy-sharing collisions as well as standard elastic collision. We have also corroborated the obtained analytical one-soliton solution by direct numerical simulation. Also, we discuss the formation and dynamics of resonant solitons. Interestingly, we demonstrate the formation of resonant solitons admitting breather-like (localized periodic pulse train) structure and also large amplitude localized structures akin to rogue waves coexisting with solitons. For completeness, we have also obtained dark one- and two-soliton solutions and studied their dynamics briefly.

  13. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  14. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S; Smith, W Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world's oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication.

  15. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  16. Resonance Energy of an Arene Hydrocarbon from Heat of Combustion Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, Vladimir L

    2015-12-08

    A simple experimental method for determination of the resonance energy by measuring the energies of combustion for two isomeric compounds, aromatic 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethylbenzene and nonaromatic trans,trans,cis-1,5,9-cyclododecatriene is proposed. Both compounds not only have the same molecular formula, but also contain the same number of sp(2) and sp(3) carbon atoms. After converting the obtained values into the gas phase heats of combustion and subtracting one value from another, the resulting mean resonance energy of 184 kJ/mol was obtained. The proposed method can be offered as an experiment for an undergraduate physical chemistry lab curriculum.

  17. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J., E-mail: jtang@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  18. Resonance-induced enhancement of the energy harvesting performance of piezoelectric flags

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Yifan; Doare, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous flapping of a flag can be used to produce electrical energy from a fluid flow when coupled to a generator. In this paper, the energy harvesting performance of a flag covered by a single pair of PVDF piezoelectric electrodes is studied both experimentally and numerically. The electrodes are connected to a resistive-inductive circuit that forms a resonant circuit with the piezoelectric's intrinsic capacitance. Compared with purely resistive circuits, the resonance between the circuit and the flag's flapping motion leads to a significant increase in the harvested energy. Our experimental study also validates our fluid-solid-electric nonlinear numerical model.

  19. The trouble with resonance energies: a Hückel theory topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langler Richard Francis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energies are shown to be quasithermodynamic in character. Hence, they are generally unsuitable as bases for anticipating kinetic stabilities. Examples are provided, leading to the conclusion that those who intend the word 'aromatic' to mean chemically unreactive, need to carry out full Hückel calculations in order to rank hydrocarbons using the frontier orbital energies.

  20. Resonance interaction energy between two accelerated identical atoms in a coaccelerated frame and the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonance interaction energy between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, interacting with the scalar field or the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, in the reference frame coaccelerating with the atoms. We assume that one atom is excited and the other in the ground state, and that they are prepared in their correlated symmetric or antisymmetric state. Using perturbation theory, we separate, at the second order in the atom-field coupling, the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction field to the energy shift of the interacting system. We show that only the radiation reaction term contributes to the resonance interaction between the two atoms, while Unruh thermal fluctuations, related to the vacuum fluctuations contribution, do not affect the resonance interatomic interaction. We also show that the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated atoms, recently investigated in the comoving (locally inertial) frame, can be recovered in the coaccelerate...

  1. Enhanced acoustoelectric coupling in acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Aichao; Bai, Xiaoling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, enhanced acoustoelectric transduction in an acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators has been reported. The harvester uses a pair of cavities mechanically coupled with a compliant perforated plate to enhance the acoustic coupling between the cavity and the plate. The experimental results show that the volume optimization of the second cavity can significantly increase the generated electric voltage up to 400% and raise the output power to 16 times as large as that of a harvester using a single Helmholtz resonator at resonant frequencies primarily related to the plate.

  2. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Su

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  3. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dongxu, E-mail: sudx@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 1538505 (Japan); Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 1538505 (Japan); Cartmell, Matthew P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  4. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s2 at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  5. Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates: Evidence that the Adaptive Value of Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates is Concentration Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Karen A; Widder, Edith A

    2017-03-01

    Three major hypotheses have been proposed to explain why dinoflagellate bioluminescence deters copepod grazing: startle response, aposematic warning, and burglar alarm. These hypotheses propose dinoflagellate bioluminescence (A) startles predatory copepods, (B) warns potential predators of toxicity, and (C) draws the attention of higher order visual predators to the copepod's location. While the burglar alarm is the most commonly accepted hypothesis, it requires a high concentration of bioluminescent dinoflagellates to be effective, meaning the bioluminescence selective advantage at lower, more commonly observed, dinoflagellate concentrations may result from another function (e.g. startle response or aposematic warning). Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate copepod grazing (Acartia tonsa) on bioluminescent dinoflagellates (during bioluminescent and nonbioluminescent phases, corresponding to night and day, respectively) at different concentrations (10, 1000, and 3000 cells mL(-1) ), on toxic (Pyrodinium bahamense var. bahamense) and nontoxic (Lingulodinium polyedrum) bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and in the presence of nonluminescent diatoms (Thalassiosira eccentrica). Changes in copepod ingestion rates, clearance rates, and feeding preferences as a result of these experimental factors, particularly during the mixed trails with nonluminescent diatoms, indicate there is a concentration threshold at which the burglar alarm becomes effective and below which dinoflagellate bioluminescence functions as an aposematic warning.

  6. Development of a human breast-cancer derived cell line stably expressing a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET-based phosphatidyl inositol-3 phosphate (PIP3 biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Shiue Kuo

    Full Text Available Stimulation of tyrosine kinase receptors initiates a signaling cascade that activates PI3K. Activated PI3K uses PIP2 to generate PIP3, which recruit Akt to the plasma membrane through its pleckstrin homology (PH domain, permitting its activation by PDKs. Activated Akt controls important biological functions, including cell metabolism, proliferation and survival. The PI3K pathway is therefore an attractive target for drug discovery. However, current assays for measurement of PIP3 production are technically demanding and not amenable to high-throughput screening. We have established a MCF-7-derived breast cancer cell line, that stably co-expresses the PH domain of Akt fused to Renilla luciferase and YFP fused to a membrane localization signal. This BRET biosensor pair permits to monitor, in real time, in living cells, PIP3 production at the plasma membrane upon stimulation by different ligands, including insulin, the insulin analogue glargine, IGF1, IGF2 and EGF. Moreover, several known inhibitors that target different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway caused inhibition of ligand-induced BRET. Cetuximab, a humanized anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of cancer, completely inhibited EGF-induced BRET, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostine AG1024 inhibited insulin effect on PIP3 production. Moreover, the effects of insulin and IGF1 were inhibited by molecules that inhibit PI3K catalytic activity or the interaction between PIP3 and the PH domain of Akt. Finally, we showed that human serum induced a dose-dependent increase in BRET signal, suggesting that this stable clone may be used as a prognostic tool to evaluate the PI3K stimulatory activity present in serum of human patients. We have thus established a cell line, suitable for the screening and/or the study of molecules with stimulatory or inhibitory activities on the PI3K/Akt pathway that will constitute a new tool for translational research in diabetes and cancer.

  7. Bearing fault identification by higher order energy operator fusion: A non-resonance based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghidi, H.; Liang, M.

    2016-10-01

    We report a non-resonance based approach to bearing fault detection. This is achieved by a higher order energy operator fusion (HOEO_F) method. In this method, multiple higher order energy operators are fused to form a single simple transform to process the bearing signal obscured by noise and vibration interferences. The fusion is guided by entropy minimization. Unlike the popular high frequency resonance technique, this method does not require the information of resonance excited by the bearing fault. The effects of the HOEO_F method on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) are illustrated in this paper. The performance of the proposed method in handling noise and interferences has been examined using both simulated and experimental data. The results indicate that the HOEO_F method outperforms both the envelope method and the original energy operator method.

  8. Internal resonance with commensurability induced by an auxiliary oscillator for broadband energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liuyang; Tang, Lihua; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-05-01

    An internal resonance based broadband vibration energy harvester is proposed by introducing an auxiliary oscillator to the main nonlinear harvesting oscillator. Compared to conventional nonlinear energy harvesters, the natural frequencies of this two-degree-of-freedom nonlinear system can be easily adjusted to be commensurable which will result in more resonant peaks and better wideband performance. Experimental measurements and equivalent circuit simulations demonstrate that this design outperforms its linear counterpart. In addition to the open-circuit voltage, the optimal resistance to obtain the maximum power is determined. Nearly 130% increase in the bandwidth is achieved compared to the linear counterpart at an excitation level of 2 m/s2. The findings provide insight for the design of a broadband energy harvester when there is nonlinearity and internal resonance.

  9. Effectiveness Testing of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for an Automobile Wheel Using Stochastic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshun; Zheng, Rencheng; Shimono, Keisuke; Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-10-17

    The collection of clean power from ambient vibrations is considered a promising method for energy harvesting. For the case of wheel rotation, the present study investigates the effectiveness of a piezoelectric energy harvester, with the application of stochastic resonance to optimize the efficiency of energy harvesting. It is hypothesized that when the wheel rotates at variable speeds, the energy harvester is subjected to on-road noise as ambient excitations and a tangentially acting gravity force as a periodic modulation force, which can stimulate stochastic resonance. The energy harvester was miniaturized with a bistable cantilever structure, and the on-road noise was measured for the implementation of a vibrator in an experimental setting. A validation experiment revealed that the harvesting system was optimized to capture power that was approximately 12 times that captured under only on-road noise excitation and 50 times that captured under only the periodic gravity force. Moreover, the investigation of up-sweep excitations with increasing rotational frequency confirmed that stochastic resonance is effective in optimizing the performance of the energy harvester, with a certain bandwidth of vehicle speeds. An actual-vehicle experiment validates that the prototype harvester using stochastic resonance is capable of improving power generation performance for practical tire application.

  10. MEMS fabricated energy harvesting device with 2D resonant structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Wang, Fei; Triches, Marco

    This paper reports on a MEMS energy harvester able to generate power from two perpendicular ambient vibration directions. CYTOP polymer is used both as the electret material for electrostatic transduction and as a bonding interface for low-temperature wafer bonding. With final chip size of ~1 cm2...

  11. New perspectives on ultrafast Förster Resonant Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauffmann H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif violate Förster's dipole-dipole interaction picture for energy transfer in the low picosecond to sub-100 femtosecond regime. First theoretical explanations are presented.

  12. Measuring distances within unfolded biopolymers using fluorescence resonance energy transfer: The effect of polymer chain dynamics on the observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of investigations in which distances within unfolded proteins, polypeptides, and other biopolymers are probed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, a method that relies on the strong distance dependence of energy transfer between a pair of dyes attached to the molecule of interest. In order to interpret the results of such experiments it is commonly assumed that intramolecular diffusion is negligible during the excited state lifetime. Here we explore the conditions under which this “frozen chain” approximation fails, leading to significantly underestimated donor-acceptor distances, and describe a means of correcting for polymer dynamics in order to estimate these distances more accurately. PMID:19725638

  13. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hoke, Eric T.

    2010-02-11

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  14. Brightening gold nanoparticles: new sensing approach based on plasmon resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-05-11

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F- ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  15. Taming the Yukawa potential singularity: improved evaluation of bound states and resonance energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alhaidari, A D; Abdelmonem, M S

    2007-01-01

    Using the tools of the J-matrix method, we absorb the 1/r singularity of the Yukawa potential in the reference Hamiltonian, which is handled analytically. The remaining part, which is bound and regular everywhere, is treated by an efficient numerical scheme in a suitable basis using Gauss quadrature approximation. Analysis of resonance energies and bound states spectrum is performed using the complex scaling method, where we show their trajectories in the complex energy plane and demonstrate the remarkable fact that bound states cross over into resonance states by varying the potential parameters.

  16. Mesoscopic order and the dimensionality of long-range resonance energy transfer in supramolecular semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Clément; Makereel, François; Herz, Laura M.; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    We present time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on two series of oligo-p-phenylenevinylene materials that self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with thermotropic reversibility in dodecane. One set of derivatives form chiral helical stacks, while the second set form less organized "frustrated" stacks. Here we study the effects of supramolecular organization on the resonance energy transfer rates. We measure these rates in nanoassemblies formed with mixed blends of oligomers and compare them with the rates predicted by Förster theory. Our results and analysis show that control of supramolecular order in the nanometer length scale has a dominant effect on the efficiency and dimensionality of resonance energy transfer.

  17. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... as resonators storing mechanical energy. These resonators are evanescently coupled by the surface. The dispersion diagram is presented and shows very low group velocities as the wave vector approaches the limit of the first Brillouin zone. ©2009 American Institute of Physics...

  18. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Kurt R; Chaudhuri, Tandra R; Szafran, April Adams; O'Quinn, Darrell; Weaver, Casey; Dugger, Kari; Lamar, Dale; Kesterson, Robert A; Wang, Xiangdong; Frank, Stuart J

    2008-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of bioluminescence imaging applications in small animal models in recent years, propelled by the availability of instruments, analysis software, reagents, and creative approaches to apply the technology in molecular imaging. Advantages include the sensitivity of the technique as well as its efficiency, relatively low cost, and versatility. Bioluminescence imaging is accomplished by sensitive detection of light emitted following chemical reaction of the luciferase enzyme with its substrate. Most imaging systems provide 2-dimensional (2D) information in rodents, showing the locations and intensity of light emitted from the animal in pseudo-color scaling. A 3-dimensional (3D) capability for bioluminescence imaging is now available, but is more expensive and less efficient; other disadvantages include the requirement for genetically encoded luciferase, the injection of the substrate to enable light emission, and the dependence of light signal on tissue depth. All of these problems make it unlikely that the method will be extended to human studies. However, in small animal models, bioluminescence imaging is now routinely applied to serially detect the location and burden of xenografted tumors, or identify and measure the number of immune or stem cells after an adoptive transfer. Bioluminescence imaging also makes it possible to track the relative amounts and locations of bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens over time. Specialized applications of bioluminescence also follow tissue-specific luciferase expression in transgenic mice, and monitor biological processes such as signaling or protein interactions in real time. In summary, bioluminescence imaging has become an important component of biomedical research that will continue in the future.

  19. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui, E-mail: yinghui_wang@jlu.edu.cn; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang, E-mail: zhanghz@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics.

  1. Resonance transition energies and oscillator strengths in lutetium and lawrencium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu; Fischer, C Froese

    2002-05-06

    The transition energies and oscillator strengths for nd (2)D(3/2)-(n+1)p (2)P(o)(1/2,3/2) transitions in Lu ( n = 5, Z = 71) and Lr ( n = 6, Z = 103) were calculated with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The present study confirmed that the ground state of atomic Lr is [Rn]5f(14)7s(2)7p (2)P(o)(1/2). The calculation for Lr required wave function expansions of more than 330 000 configuration states. In Lu, the transition energies, with Breit and QED corrections included, agree with experiment to within 126 cm(-1). In lighter elements, core correlation is usually neglected but was found to be of extreme importance for these heavy elements, affecting the oscillator strengths by a factor of 3 and 2 in Lu and Lr, respectively.

  2. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  3. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca-Maza, X., E-mail: xavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colò, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Li-Gang [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, ITP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sagawa, H. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Center for Mathematics and Physics, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, Wako, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  4. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol [Department of System Dynamics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Eun, E-mail: jekim@cu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, 13-13 Hayang-Ro, Hayang-Eup, Gyeongsan-Si, Gyeongsangbuk-Do 712-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm{sup 3}, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  5. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Ho Sun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm3, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  6. Bioluminescence microscopy using a short focal-length imaging lens

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoh, K; Akiyoshi, R; May-Maw-Thet,; Sugiyama, T; Dosaka, S; Hatta-Ohashi, Y; Suzuki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence from cells is so dim that bioluminescence microscopy is performed using an ultra low-light imaging camera. Although the image sensor of such cameras has been greatly improved over time, such improvements have not been made commercially available for microscopes until now. Here, we customized the optical system of a microscope for bioluminescence imaging. As a result, bioluminescence images of cells could be captured with a conventional objective lens and colour imaging camera....

  7. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load.

  8. New experimental study of low-energy (p,gamma) resonances in magnesium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Limata, B; Formicola, A; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Becker, H W; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; DiLeva, A; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Salvo, C; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H -P

    2010-01-01

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H shell burning. In particular, the strengths of low-energy resonances with E < 200 keV in 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al determine the production of 26Al and a precise knowledge of these nuclear data is highly desirable. Absolute measurements at such low-energies are often very difficult and hampered by gamma-ray background as well as changing target stoichiometry during the measurements. The latter problem can be partly avoided using higher energy resonances of the same reaction as a normalization reference. Hence the parameters of suitable resonances have to be studied with adequate precision. In the present work we report on new measurements of the resonance strengths omega_gamma of the E = 214, 304, and 326 keV resonances in the reactions 24Mg(p,gamma)25Al, 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al, and 26Mg(p,gamma)27Al, respectively. These studies were performed at the LUNA facility in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory using multiple experime...

  9. The lowest resonance in QCD from low--energy data

    CERN Document Server

    Ametller, L

    2014-01-01

    We show that a generalization of $su(2)$ Chiral Perturbation Theory, including a perturbative singlet scalar field, converges faster towards the physical value of sensible low--energy observables. The physical mass and width of the scalar particle are obtained through a simultaneous analysis of the pion radius and the gamma gamma -> pi^0 pi^0 cross-section. Both values are statistically consistent with the ones obtained by using Roy equations in pi-pi scattering. In addition we find indications that the photon-photon-singlet coupling is quite small.

  10. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system.

  11. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation.

  12. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  13. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  14. Investigation of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jaba; Datta Roy, Arpan; Dey, Dibyendu; Chakraborty, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Paul, P. K.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between two organic dyes Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G was investigated in aqueous solution in presence and absence of synthetic clay laponite. Spectroscopic studies suggest that both the dyes were present mainly as monomer in solution. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer occurred from Fluorescein to Rhodamine 6G in solutions. Energy transfer efficiency increases in presence of laponite and the maximum efficiency was 72.00% in aqueous laponite dispersion. Energy transfer efficiency was found to be pH sensitive. It has been demonstrated that with proper calibration it is possible to use the present system under investigation to sense pH over a wide range from 1.5 to 8.0.

  15. Color-Tunable Resonant Photoluminescence and Cavity-Mediated Multistep Energy Transfer Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Daichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Lorke, Axel; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-07-26

    Color-tunable resonant photoluminescence (PL) was attained from polystyrene microspheres doped with a single polymorphic fluorescent dye, boron-dipyrrin (BODIPY) 1. The color of the resonant PL depends on the assembling morphology of 1 in the microspheres, which can be selectively controlled from green to red by the initial concentration of 1 in the preparation process of the microspheres. Studies on intersphere PL propagation with multicoupled microspheres, prepared by micromanipulation technique, revealed that multistep photon transfer takes place through the microspheres, accompanying energy transfer cascade with stepwise PL color change. The intersphere energy transfer cascade is direction selective, where energy donor-to-acceptor down conversion direction is only allowed. Such cavity-mediated long-distance and multistep energy transfer will be advantageous for polymer photonics device application.

  16. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  17. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  18. Sensing DNA Opening in Transcription Using Quenchable Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Santoso, Yusdi; Tomescu, Alexandra I.; Gryte, Kristofer; Hwang, Ling Chin; Camará, Beatriz; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2010-01-01

    Many biological processes, such as gene transcription and replication, involve opening and closing of short regions of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Few techniques, however, can study these processes in real time or at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a Förster resonance energy transfer (F

  19. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based method for histone methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devkota, Kanchan; Lohse, Brian; Nyby Jakobsen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    A simple dye–quencher fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay for methyltransferases was developed and used to determine kinetic parameters and inhibitory activity at EHMT1 and EHMT2. Peptides mimicking the truncated histone H3 tail were functionalized in each end with a dye...

  20. Foerster resonance energy transfer in inhomogeneous non-dispersive nanophotonic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    A nondispersive inhomogeneous dielectric environment of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum emitters affects their Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) rate. We find that this rate does not depend on the emission frequency and hence not on the local optical density of states (LDOS...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  3. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  4. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  5. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  6. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-04

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest.

  7. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  8. Optimisation of acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Mason, Suzannah K. G.; Glinton, Sophie; Cobbold, Mark; Styles, Iain B.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-03-01

    Decreasing the acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT) will enable animals to be imaged within the window of stable emission of the bioluminescent source, a higher imaging throughput and minimisation of the time which an animal is anaesthetised. This work investigates, through simulation using a heterogeneous mouse model, two methods of decreasing acquisition time: 1. Imaging at fewer wavelengths (a reduction from five to three); and 2. Increasing the bandwidth of filters used for imaging. The results indicate that both methods are viable ways of decreasing the acquisition time without a loss in quantitative accuracy. Importantly, when choosing imaging wavelengths, the spectral attenuation of tissue and emission spectrum of the source must be considered, in order to choose wavelengths at which a high signal can be achieved. Additionally, when increasing the bandwidth of the filters used for imaging, the bandwidth must be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm.

  9. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  10. Lighting up bioluminescence with coelenterazine: strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-04-01

    Bioluminescence-based techniques, such as bioluminescence imaging, BRET and dual-luciferase reporter assay systems, have been widely used to examine a myriad of biological processes. Coelenterazine (CTZ), a luciferin or light-producing compound found in bioluminescent organisms, has sparked great curiosity and interest in searching for analogues with improved photochemical properties. This review summarizes the current development of coelenterazine analogues, their bioluminescence properties, and the rational design of caged coelenterazine towards biotargets, as well as their applications in bioassays. It should be emphasized that the design of caged luciferins can provide valuable insight into detailed molecular processes in organisms and will be a trend in the development of bioluminescent molecules.

  11. Broadening the Frequency Bandwidth of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters Using Coupled Linear Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeqi, Soheil

    The desire to reduce power consumption of current integrated circuits has led design engineers to focus on harvesting energy from free ambient sources such as vibrations. The energy harvested this way can eliminate the need for battery replacement, particularly, in low-energy remote sensing and wireless devices. Currently, most vibration-based energy harvesters are designed as linear resonators, therefore, they have a narrow resonance frequency. The optimal performance of such harvesters is achieved only when their resonance frequency is matched with the ambient excitation. In practice, however, a slight shift of the excitation frequency will cause a dramatic reduction in their performance. In the majority of cases, the ambient vibrations are totally random with their energy distributed over a wide frequency spectrum. Thus, developing techniques to extend the bandwidth of vibration-based energy harvesters has become an important field of research in energy harvesting systems. This thesis first reviews the broadband vibration-based energy harvesting techniques currently known in some detail with regard to their merits and applicability under different circumstances. After that, the design, fabrication, modeling and characterization of three new piezoelectric-based energy harvesting mechanism, built typically for rotary motion applications, is discussed. A step-by-step procedure is followed in order to broaden the bandwidth of such energy harvesters by introducing a coupled spring-mass system attached to a PZT beam undergoing rotary motion. It is shown that the new strategies can indeed give rise to a wide-band frequency response making it possible to fine-tune their dynamical response. The numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data as far as the frequency response is concerned.

  12. Using bioluminescence imaging in glioma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luwor, Rodney B; Stylli, Stanley S; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumour and has the worst prognosis. Over the last decade, the use of bioluminescence imaging technology has rapidly become widespread to further understand the mechanisms that drive GBM development and progression. Pre-clinical evaluation and optimisation of therapeutic efficacy in GBM research has also utilised this simple non-invasive technology. Here we summarise recent advances made in glioma biology and therapeutic intervention using bioluminescence imaging. This review also describes the current knowledge regarding the use of luciferase-based reporters in examining the role of specific cancer signalling cascades that promote glioma progression.

  13. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays.

  14. Harvesting wind energy to detect weak signals using mechanical stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Barbara J.; Rix, Jillian G.; Ross, Samuel J.; Yu, Yue; Lindner, John F.; Mathewson, Nathan; Wainwright, Elliot R.; Wilson, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Wind is free and ubiquitous and can be harnessed in multiple ways. We demonstrate mechanical stochastic resonance in a tabletop experiment in which wind energy is harvested to amplify weak periodic signals detected via the movement of an inverted pendulum. Unlike earlier mechanical stochastic resonance experiments, where noise was added via electrically driven vibrations, our broad-spectrum noise source is a single flapping flag. The regime of the experiment is readily accessible, with wind speeds ˜20 m/s and signal frequencies ˜1 Hz. We readily obtain signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 10 dB.

  15. Harvesting under transient conditions: harvested energy as a proxy for optimal resonance frequency detuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Taylor D.; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvesting is of interest in a wide range of applications, and a number of harvesting schemes have been proposed and studied { primarily when operating under steady state conditions. However, energy harvesting behavior is rarely studied in systems with transient excitations. This paper will work to develop an understanding of this behavior within the context of a particular vibration reduction technique, resonance frequency detuning. Resonance frequency detuning provides a method of reducing mechanical response at structural resonances as the excitation frequency sweeps through a given range. This technique relies on switching the stiffness state of a structure at optimal times to detune its resonance frequency from that of the excitation. This paper examines how this optimal switch may be triggered in terms of the energy harvested, developing a normalized optimal switch energy that is independent of the open- and short-circuit resistances. Here the open- and short-circuit shunt resistances refer to imposed conditions that approximate the open- and short-circuit conditions, via high and low resistance shunts. These conditions are practically necessary to harvest the small amounts of power needed to switch stiffness states, as open-circuit and closed-circuit refer to infinite resistance and zero resistance, respectively, and therefore no energy passes through the harvesting circuit. The limiting stiffness states are then defined by these open- and short-circuit resistances. The optimal switch energy is studied over a range of sweep rates, damping ratios, and coupling coefficients; it is found to increase with the coupling coefficient and decrease as the sweep rate and damping ratio increase, behavior which is intuitive. Higher coupling means more energy is converted by the piezoelectric material, and therefore more energy is harvested in a given time; an increased sweep rate means resonance is reached sooner, and there will less

  16. A Wireless Magnetic Resonance Energy Transfer System for Micro Implantable Medical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the magnetic resonance coupling principle, in this paper a wireless energy transfer system is designed and implemented for the power supply of micro-implantable medical sensors. The entire system is composed of the in vitro part, including the energy transmitting circuit and resonant transmitter coils, and in vivo part, including the micro resonant receiver coils and signal shaping chip which includes the rectifier module and LDO voltage regulator module. Transmitter and receiver coils are wound by Litz wire, and the diameter of the receiver coils is just 1.9 cm. The energy transfer efficiency of the four-coil system is greatly improved compared to the conventional two-coil system. When the distance between the transmitter coils and the receiver coils is 1.5 cm, the transfer efficiency is 85% at the frequency of 742 kHz. The power transfer efficiency can be optimized by adding magnetic enhanced resonators. The receiving voltage signal is converted to a stable output voltage of 3.3 V and a current of 10 mA at the distance of 2 cm. In addition, the output current varies with changes in the distance. The whole implanted part is packaged with PDMS of excellent biocompatibility and the volume of it is about 1 cm3.

  17. Performance optimization of total momentum filtering double-resonance energy selective electron heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ze-Min; Chen, Lin-Gen; Ge, Yan-Lin; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model for energy selective electron (ESE) heat pumps operating with two-dimensional electron reservoirs is established in this study. In this model, a double-resonance energy filter operating with a total momentum filtering mechanism is considered for the transmission of electrons. The optimal thermodynamic performance of the ESE heat pump devices is also investigated. Numerical calculations show that the heating load of the device with two resonances is larger, whereas the coefficient of performance (COP) is lower than the ESE heat pump when considering a single-resonance filter. The performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps in the total momentum filtering condition are generally superior to those with a conventional filtering mechanism. In particular, the performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps considering a conventional filtering mechanism are vastly different from those of a device with total momentum filtering, which is induced by extra electron momentum in addition to the horizontal direction. Parameters such as resonance width and energy spacing are found to be associated with the performance of the electron system.

  18. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  19. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  20. Analysis of resonance energy transfer in model membranes: role of orientational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Gorbenko, Galina P

    2002-10-16

    The model of resonance energy transfer (RET) in membrane systems containing donors randomly distributed over two parallel planes separated by fixed distance and acceptors confined to a single plane is presented. Factors determining energy transfer rate are considered with special attention being given to the contribution from orientational heterogeneity of the donor emission and acceptor absorption transition dipoles. Analysis of simulated data suggests that RET in membranes, as compared to intramolecular energy transfer, is substantially less sensitive to the degree of reorientational freedom of chromophores due to averaging over multiple donor-acceptor pairs. The uncertainties in the distance estimation resulting from the unknown mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor are analyzed.

  1. Resonance Energy Transfer in Hybrid Devices in the Presence of a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature, nonradiative resonant energy transfer from InGaN/GaN quantum wells to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals separated by aluminum oxide layers of different thicknesses. Nonradiative energy transfer from the quantum wells to the nanocrystals at separation distances of up...... to approximately 10 nm was observed. By comparing the carrier dynamics of the quantum wells and the nanocrystals, we found that nonradiative recombination via surface states, generated during dry etching of the wafer, counteracts the nonradiative energy-transfer process to the nanocrystals and therefore decreases...

  2. Nanophotonic Control of the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS...... is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply...

  3. Multiway study of hybridization in nanoscale semiconductor labeled DNA based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of the ternary-binary complex competition of a target sequence and of its two complementary probes in sandwich DNA hybridization is reported. To achieve this goal, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes (QD...... in the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) plot. From the obtained data, energy transfer efficiency and Forster radius (R-0) were calculated. In particular, our results demonstrated that energy transfer by using QD donor-QD acceptor FRET pairs is more efficient in comparison with QD donor-organic dye acceptor pairs. Soft...

  4. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  5. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  6. Non-Resonant Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting Utilizing Phase Transformation in Relaxor Ferroelectric Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Finkel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in phase transition transduction enabled the design of a non-resonant broadband mechanical energy harvester that is capable of delivering an energy density per cycle up to two orders of magnitude larger than resonant cantilever piezoelectric type generators. This was achieved in a [011] oriented and poled domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal, mechanically biased to a state just below the ferroelectric rhombohedral (FR-ferroelectric orthorhombic (FO phase transformation. Therefore, a small variation in an input parameter, e.g., electrical, mechanical, or thermal will generate a large output due to the significant polarization change associated with the transition. This idea was extended in the present work to design a non-resonant, multi-domain magnetoelectric composite hybrid harvester comprised of highly magnetostrictive alloy, [Fe81.4Ga18.6 (Galfenol or TbxDy1-xFe2 (Terfenol-D], and lead indium niobate–lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. A small magnetic field applied to the coupled device causes the magnetostrictive element to expand, and the resulting stress forces the phase change in the relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. We have demonstrated high energy conversion in this magnetoelectric device by triggering the FR-FO transition in the single crystal by a small ac magnetic field in a broad frequency range that is important for multi-domain hybrid energy harvesting devices.

  7. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jing, E-mail: jingqiu@cqu.edu.cn; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Liu, Xin; Chen, Hengjia; Yang, Jin [Sensors and Instruments Research Center, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Vibration energy harvesting is now receiving more interest as a means for powering intelligent wireless sensor systems. In this paper, a resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH) employing double cantilever to convert low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy is presented. The VEH is made up of two cantilever beams, a coil, and magnetic circuits. The electric output performances of the proposed electromagnetic VEH have been investigated. With the enhancement of turns number N, the optimum peak power of electromagnetic VEH increases sharply and the resonance frequency deceases gradually. When the vibration acceleration is 0.5 g, we obtain the optimum output voltage and power of 9.04 V and 50.8 mW at frequency of 14.9 Hz, respectively. In a word, the prototype device was successfully developed and the experimental results exhibit a great enhancement in the output power and bandwidth compared with other traditional electromagnetic VEHs. Remarkably, the proposed resonant electromagnetic VEH have great potential for applying in intelligent wireless sensor systems.

  8. Orbital Feshbach resonances with a small energy gap between open and closed channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanting; Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a new type of Feshbach resonance, i.e., orbital Feshbach resonance (OFR), was proposed for the ultracold alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms and was experimentally observed in the ultracold gases of 173Yb atoms. Unlike most of the magnetic Feshbach resonances of ultracold alkali atoms, when the OFR of 173Yb atoms appears, the energy gap between the thresholds of the open channel (OC) and the closed channel (CC) is much smaller than the characteristic energy of the interatomic interaction, i.e., the van der Waals energy. In this paper we study the OFR in systems with a small CC-OC threshold gap. We show that in these systems the OFR can be induced by the coupling between the OC and either an isolated bound state of the CC or the scattering states of the CC. Moreover, we also show that in each case the two-channel Huang-Yang pesudopotential is always applicable for the approximate calculation of the low-energy scattering amplitude. Our results imply that in the two-channel theoretical calculations for these systems it is appropriate to take into account the contributions from the scattering states of the CC.

  9. Resonant frequency of mass-loaded membranes for vibration energy harvesting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Dong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vibration based energy harvesting has been widely investigated to target ambient vibration sources as a means to generate small amounts of electrical energy. While cantilever-based geometries have been pursued frequently in the literature, here membrane-based geometries for the energy harvesting device is considered, with the effects of an added mass and tension on the effective resonant frequency of the membranes studied. An analytical model is developed to describe the vibration response for a circular membrane with added mass structure, with the results closely agreeing with finite element simulation in ANSYS. A complementary study of square membranes loaded with a central mass shows analogous behavior. The analytical model is then used to interpret the experimentally observed shift in resonance frequency of a circular membrane with a proof mass. The impact of membrane tension and central proof mass on the resonant frequency of the membrane suggests that this approach may be used as a tuning method to optimize the response of membrane-based designs for maximum power output for vibration energy harvesting applications.

  10. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  11. Three new low-energy resonances in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanna, F; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Böltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Prati, P; Scott, D A; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2015-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between $^{20}$Ne and $^{27}$Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400\\,keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7\\,keV are reported. Their resonance strengths have been derived with 2-7\\% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances have been greatly reduced. Data were taken using a windowless $^{22}$Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National I...

  12. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, F.; Depalo, R.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless 22Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars.

  13. Bioluminescent bioreporter sensing of foodborne toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Amanda C.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Histamine is the primary etiological agent in the foodborne disease scombrotoxicosis, one of the most common food toxicities related to fish consumption. Procedures for detecting histamine in fish products are available, but are often too expensive or too complex for routine use. As an alternative, a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter has been constructed to develop a biosensor system that autonomously responds to low levels of histamine. The bioreporter contains a promoterless Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxCDABE) fused with the Vibrio anguillarum angR regulatory gene promoter of the anguibactin biosynthetic operon. The bioreporter emitted 1.46 times more bioluminescence than background, 30 minutes after the addition of 100mM histamine. However, specificity was not optimal, as this biosensor generated significant bioluminescence in the presence of L-proline and L-histidine. As a means towards improving histamine specificity, the promoter region of a histamine oxidase gene from Arthrobacter globiformis was cloned upstream of the promotorless lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. This recently constructed whole-cell, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter is currently being tested for optimal performance in the presence of histamine in order to provide a rapid, simple, and inexpensive model sensor for the detection of foodborne toxins.

  14. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  15. Multicolor Bioluminescence Obtained Using Firefly Luciferin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyama, Masahiro; Saito, Ryohei; Iwano, Satoshi; Obata, Rika; Niwa, Haruki; Maki, Shojiro A

    2016-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence is widely used in life science research as a useful analysis tool. For example, the adenosine-5`-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent enzymatic firefly bioluminescence reaction has long been utilized as a microbial monitoring tool. Rapid and sensitive firefly luciferin-luciferase combinations are used not only to measure cell viability but also for reporter-gene assays. Recently, bioluminescence was utilized as a noninvasive, real-time imaging tool for living subjects to monitor cells and biological events. However, the number of commercialized luciferase genes is limited and tissue-permeable near-infrared (NIR) region emitting light is required for in vivo imaging. In this review, recent studies describing synthetic luciferin analogues predicted to have red-shifted bioluminescence are summarized. Luciferase substrates emitting red, green, and blue light that were designed and developed in our laboratory are presented. The longest emission wavelength of the synthesized luciferin analogues was recorded at 675 nm, which is within the NIR region. This compound is now commercially available as "Aka Lumine®".

  16. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors.

  17. Simulation of Electrostatic Actuation in Interdigitated Comb Drive MEMS Resonator for Energy Harvester Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, S.; Pavithra, M.; Muruganand, S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an actuation mechanism based on the interdigitated comb drive MEMS resonator. The important role of that device is to establish MEMS resonators for the second order systems. Comb drive model is one of the basic model which uses the principle of electrostatic and force can be generated for the capacitive sensors. This work is done by overlapping movable and fixed comb fingers which produces an energy. The specific range of the polyimide material properties of young's modulus of 3.1GPa and density of 1300 Kg/m3. Results are shown in the structural domain performance of a lateral motion which corresponds to the applying voltage between the interdigitated comb fingers. It has laterally driven about 40pm with driving voltage. Also the resonance frequency 24Hz and 15Hz with high quality factors are depending on the spring length 260pm and 360pm and structure thickness of 2μm and 5 μm. Here Finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the various physics scenario and it is designed as two dimensional structure multiphysics domain. The prototype of comb drive MEMS resonator has been suitable for energy harvesting system applications.

  18. Resonance poles and threshold energies for hadron physical problems by a model-independent universal algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; Wambach, Jochen; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-01-01

    We show how complex resonance poles and threshold energies for systems in hadron physics can be accurately obtained by using a method based on the Pad\\'{e}-approximant which was recently developed for the calculation of resonance poles for atomic and molecular auto-ionization systems. The main advantage of this method is the ability to calculate the resonance poles and threshold energies from \\emph{real} spectral data. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of this method we apply it here to an analytical model as well as to experimental data for the squared modulus of the vector pion form factor, the S0 partial wave amplitude for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering and the cross section ratio $R(s)$ for $e^+e^-$ collisions. The extracted values for the resonance poles of the $\\rho(770)$ and the $f_0(500)$ or $\\sigma$ meson are in very good agreement with the literature. When the data are noisy the prediction of decay thresholds proves to be less accurate but feasible.

  19. An energetic measure of aromaticity and antiaromaticity based on the Pauling-Wheland resonance energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2006-02-20

    Various criteria based on geometric, energetic, magnetic, and electronic properties are employed to delineate aromatic and antiaromatic systems. The recently proposed block-localized wave function (BLW) method evaluates the original Pauling-Wheland adiabatic resonance energy (ARE), defined as the energy difference between the real conjugated system and the corresponding virtual most stable resonance structure. The BLW-derived ARE of benzene is 57.5 kcal mol(-1) with the 6-311+G** basis set. Kistiakowsky's historical experimental evaluation of the stabilization energy of benzene (36 kcal mol(-1)), based on heats of hydrogenation, seriously underestimates this quantity due to the neglect of the partially counterbalancing hyperconjugative stabilization of cyclohexene, employed as the reference olefin (three times) in Kistiakowsky's evaluation. Based instead on the bond-separation-energy reaction involving ethene, which has no hyperconjugation, as well as methane and ethane, the experimental resonance energy of benzene is found to be 65.0 kcal mol(-1). We derived the "extra cyclic resonance energy" (ECRE) to characterize and measure the extra stabilization (aromaticity) of conjugated rings. ECRE is the difference between the AREs of a fully cyclically conjugated compound and an appropriate model with corresponding, but interrupted (acyclic) conjugation. Based on 1,3,5-hexatriene, which also has three double bonds, the ECRE of benzene is 36.7 kcal mol(-1), whereas based on 1,3,5,7-octatetraene, which has three diene conjugations, the ECRE of benzene is 25.7 kcal mol(-1). Computations on a series of aromatic, nonaromatic, and antiaromatic five-membered rings validate the BLW-computed resonance energies (ARE). ECRE data on the five-membered rings (derived from comparisons with acyclic models) correlate well with nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and other quantitative aromaticity criteria. The ARE of cyclobutadiene is almost the same as butadiene but is 10.5 kcal

  20. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  1. Conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Shinya; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    We study the conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage. Heat leakage current from a hot electrode to a cold electrode is taken into account in the analysis of the harvester operation. Modeling of electrical output indicates that a maximum heat leakage current is not negligible because it is larger than that of the heat current harvested into electrical power. A reduction of heat leakage is required in this energy harvester in order to obtain efficient heat-to-electrical conversion. Multiple energy levels of a quantum dot can increase the output power of the harvester. Heavily doped colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are a possible candidate for a quantum-dot monolayer in the energy harvester to reduce heat leakage, scaling down device size, and increasing electrical output via multiple discrete energy levels.

  2. Quantum dot-DNA bioconjugates for fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer-based biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Berti, Lorenzo; Pons, Thomas; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2007-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique photophysical properties which make them excellent fluorescence resonance energy transfer donors. However, lack of facile methods for conjugating biomolecules such as DNA, proteins and peptides to QDs have limited their applications. In this report, we describe a general procedure for the preparation of a synthetic peptide that can be covalently attached to DNA segments and used to facilitate the self-assembly of the modified DNA onto water soluble QDs. To characterize this conjugation strategy, dye-labeled DNA is first reacted with the synthetic peptide and the resulting peptide-DNA then self-assembled onto QDs. QD attachment is verified by monitoring resonance energy transfer efficiency from the QD donor to the dye-labeled DNA acceptor. QD-DNA bioconjugates assembled using this method may find applications as molecular beacons and hybridization probes.

  3. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie [Key laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen [Key laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Smart Sensor Engineering Center, Jiangsu R& D Center for Internet of Things, Wuxi 214315 (China)

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  4. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Moyet, Richard; Rossetti, George A., E-mail: george.rossetti-jr@uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Stace, Joseph; Amin, Ahmed [Sensors and Sonar Systems Department, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Newport, Newport, Rhode Island 02841 (United States); Finkel, Peter [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]{sub C}-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequency up-conversion.

  5. Electronic Couplings for Resonance Energy Transfer from CCSD Calculations: From Isolated to Solvated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Scalmani, Giovanni

    2015-11-10

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of electronic couplings provide great insights for the study of resonance energy transfer (RET). However, most of these calculations rely on approximate QM methods due to the computational limitations imposed by the size of typical donor-acceptor systems. In this work, we present a novel implementation that allows computing electronic couplings at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of theory. Solvent effects are also taken into account through the polarizable continuum model (PCM). As a test case, we use a dimer of indole, a common model system for tryptophan, which is routinely used as an intrinsic fluorophore in Förster resonance energy transfer studies. We consider two bright π → π* states, one of which has charge transfer character. Lastly, the results are compared with those obtained by applying TD-DFT in combination with one of the most popular density functionals, B3LYP.

  6. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  7. [ATP pool and bioluminescence in psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekserova, L É; Alenina, K A; Efremenko, E N; Mazhul', M M; Piskunova, N F; Ismailov, A D

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence activity and ATP pool were investigated in the culture of psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum collected-from the exponential and stationary growth phases, as well as immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. In liquid culture, ATP pool remained at an almost a constant level throughout the luminescence cycle (over 100 h). The ATP pool in the stationary-phase and PVA-immobilizedl cells remained constant throughout their incubation in the medium (over 200 h) and in 3% NaCl solution (over 100 h): Quantitative assessment of integral photon yield and ATP pool indicated that bioluminescence decay in growing or stationary cells was not caused by limitation by the energy substrates of the luciferase reaction. Kinetic and quantitative parameters of emission activity and ATP pool excluded the possibility of formation of the aldehyde substrate for luciferase via reduction of the relevant fatty acids in NADPH and ATP-dependent reductase reaction and its oxidation in the monooxygenase reaction. Our results indicate that the aliphatic aldehyde is not utilized in the process of light emission.

  8. Density functional resonance theory: complex density functions, convergence, orbital energies, and functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, Daniel L; Wasserman, Adam

    2012-04-28

    Aspects of density functional resonance theory (DFRT) [D. L. Whitenack and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 163002 (2011)], a recently developed complex-scaled version of ground-state density functional theory (DFT), are studied in detail. The asymptotic behavior of the complex density function is related to the complex resonance energy and system's threshold energy, and the function's local oscillatory behavior is connected with preferential directions of electron decay. Practical considerations for implementation of the theory are addressed including sensitivity to the complex-scaling parameter, θ. In Kohn-Sham DFRT, it is shown that almost all θ-dependence in the calculated energies and lifetimes can be extinguished via use of a proper basis set or fine grid. The highest occupied Kohn-Sham orbital energy and lifetime are related to physical affinity and width, and the threshold energy of the Kohn-Sham system is shown to be equal to the threshold energy of the interacting system shifted by a well-defined functional. Finally, various complex-scaling conditions are derived which relate the functionals of ground-state DFT to those of DFRT via proper scaling factors and a non-Hermitian coupling-constant system.

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looger Loren L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. Results An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage λ recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. Conclusion The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins as powerful toolkits for in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A. L.; Savitsky, A. P.

    2011-02-01

    To expand the field of research in biological systems development of extra-sensitive analytical methods is highly desirable. In this review, the latest advances in technologies relying on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins (FP's) to visualize numerous molecular processes in living cells are discussed. Variety of FP's as well as of novel experimental techniques allows one to choose the most appropriate tools to attack concrete problems.

  11. Development of a Real-Time Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer PCR To Detect Arcobacter Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Buissonnière, Alice; Prouzet-Mauleon, Valérie; Gresser, Jessica; Wesley, Irene; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2007-01-01

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was done by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology. Discrimination between Arcobacter species was straightforward, as the corresponding melting points showed significant differences with the characteristic melting temperatures of 63.5°C, 58.4°C, 60.6°C...

  12. Autonomously Bioluminescent Mammalian Cells for Continuous and Real-time Monitoring of Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian cell-based in vitro assays have been widely employed as alternatives to animal testing for toxicological studies but have been limited due to the high monetary and time costs of parallel sample preparation that are necessitated due to the destructive nature of firefly luciferase-based screening methods. This video describes the utilization of autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells, which do not require the destructive addition of a luciferin substrate, as an inexpensive and facile method for monitoring the cytotoxic effects of a compound of interest. Mammalian cells stably expressing the full bacterial bioluminescence (luxCDABEfrp) gene cassette autonomously produce an optical signal that peaks at 490 nm without the addition of an expensive and possibly interfering luciferin substrate, excitation by an external energy source, or destruction of the sample that is traditionally performed during optical imaging procedures. This independence from external stimulation places the burden for maintaining the bioluminescent reaction solely on the cell, meaning that the resultant signal is only detected during active metabolism. This characteristic makes the lux-expressing cell line an excellent candidate for use as a biosentinel against cytotoxic effects because changes in bioluminescent production are indicative of adverse effects on cellular growth and metabolism. Similarly, the autonomous nature and lack of required sample destruction permits repeated imaging of the same sample in real-time throughout the period of toxicant exposure and can be performed across multiple samples using existing imaging equipment in an automated fashion. PMID:24193545

  13. Resonance energy transfer in conjugates of semiconductor nanocrystals and organic dye molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    I analyze the efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in luminescent donor-acceptor complexes based on conjugates of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and nanorods and the luminescent dyes. Semiconductor nanocrystals serve either as FRET donors or acceptors. Experimentally observed reduced FRET efficiency in complexes of nanorods and dye molecules as compared to quantum dots are found to be attributable to a distance-limited energy transfer rate in case of point-like dye dipoles and extended nanorod dipole.

  14. Resonant principle for operation of energy recuperator for a magnetized electron beam: A numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Astrelin, V. T.; Koidan, V. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.

    2002-04-01

    The problem of energy recuperator for a high current sheet electron beam used to drive a millimeter-waves generator is considered. There are two main obstacles to solving the problem. The first one is the presence of a magnetic field guiding beam electrons. The second obstacle is significant energy and angular spreads of the electrons in the waste beam. To overcome these obstacles, we suggest a novel scheme of a recuperator. The main idea of the proposed scheme is the use of a decelerating electrical field together with a guiding magnetic field that has longitudinal and spatial periodic transverse components. Resonance of a bounce electron motion with the cyclotron motion in this field gives a strong increase in the Larmour radius of electrons with the energy in a narrow interval. The decelerated electrons with the resonance energy fall away from the beam and are absorbed by a collector at a proper potential. It is shown that efficiency of this novel scheme can reach about 80% even if the sheet beam has a broad energy spectrum.

  15. Plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer: A real-time electrodynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wendu; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Schatz, George C

    2017-02-14

    This paper presents a new real-time electrodynamics approach for determining the rate of resonance energy transfer (RET) between two molecules in the presence of plasmonic or other nanostructures (inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media). In this approach to plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer (PC-RET), we develop a classical electrodynamics expression for the energy transfer matrix element which is evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to solve Maxwell's equations for the electric field generated by the molecular donor and evaluated at the position of the molecular acceptor. We demonstrate that this approach yields RET rates in homogeneous media that are in precise agreement with analytical theory based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the presence of gold nanoparticles, our theory shows that the long-range decay of the RET rates can be significantly modified by plasmon excitation, with rates increased by as much as a factor of 10(6) leading to energy transfer rates over hundreds of nm that are comparable to that over tens of nm in the absence of the nanoparticles. These promising results suggest important future applications of the PC-RET in areas involving light harvesting or sensing, where energy transfer processes involving inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media are commonplace.

  16. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Dastoor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  17. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  18. Resonant charge transfer in low-energy ion scattering: Information depth in the reionization regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primetzhofer, D; Spitz, M; Taglauer, E; Bauer, P

    2011-11-01

    Time-Of-Flight Low-energy ion scattering (TOF-LEIS) experiments were performed for He(+) ions scattered from Cu(100) and Cu(0.5)Au(0.5)(100). Probabilities for resonant neutralization and reionization in close collisions were deduced in a wide energy range. To learn about the information depth in LEIS, in a next step ion spectra were analyzed for polycrystalline Cu samples. The relative yield of backscattered projectiles, which have undergone distinct charge exchange processes, was calculated. Results indicate a strong contribution to the ion yield that origins from particles reionized in a close collision in deeper layers when experiments are performed at energies where reionization is prominent. The surface sensitivity of the ion signal at different energies is quantified. Based on these results, the total ion spectrum was quantitatively modelled by two consistent, but different approaches.

  19. Nanotubular J-aggregates and quantum dots coupled for efficient resonance excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Kirmse, Holm; Steeg, Egon; Kühn, Sergei; Friede, Sebastian; Kirstein, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2015-02-24

    Resonant coupling between distinct excitons in organic supramolecular assemblies and inorganic semiconductors is supposed to offer an approach to optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on colloidal nanohybrids consisting of self-assembled tubular J-aggregates decorated with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) via electrostatic self-assembly. The role of QDs in the energy transfer process can be switched from a donor to an acceptor by tuning its size and thereby the excitonic transition energy while keeping the chemistry unaltered. QDs are located within a close distance (energy transfer coupling, which is around 92% in the case of energy transfer from the QD donor to the J-aggregate acceptor and approximately 20% in the reverse case. This system provides a model of an organic-inorganic light-harvesting complex using methods of self-assembly in aqueous solution, and it highlights a route toward hierarchical synthesis of structurally well-defined supramolecular objects with advanced functionality.

  20. Can nanophotonics control the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, C.; Zijlstra, N.; Lagendijk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary form only given. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is the dominant nonradiative energy transfer mechanism between a donor and acceptor fluorophore in nanometer proximity. FRET plays a pivotal role in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria and many applications, ranging...... from photovoltaics and lighting, to probing molecular distances and interactions.It is an intriguing open question whether the FRET rate γFRET and the energy transfer efficiency ηFRET can also be controlled by the nanoscale optical environment, characterized by the local density of optical states (LDOS......-defined distances (ranging from 60 nm to 270 nm) from a metallic mirror. The energy transfer rate γFRET and efficiency ηFRET are obtained by measuring the donor emission rate γDA in presence and the rate γD in absence of the acceptor using time-correlated single-photon counting based lifetime imaging. Our data...

  1. $\\phi$ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from $\\phi N$ resonant interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, D; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The $\\phi$-meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant $\\phi N$ interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several $N^*$-like states are dynamically generated in these models around $2$ GeV, in the vicinity of the $\\phi N$ threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the $\\phi$ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the $\\bar K K$ cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to $\\phi N$) we report a $\\phi$ broadening up to about $40$-$50$ MeV, to be added to the $\\phi\\to\\bar K K$ in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about $35$ MeV at normal matter density. The $\\phi$ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole mo...

  2. ϕ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from ϕ N resonant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, D.; Hiller Blin, A. N.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The ϕ -meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant ϕ N interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several N*-like states are dynamically generated in these models around 2 GeV, in the vicinity of the ϕ N threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the ϕ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the K ¯K cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to ϕ N ) we report a ϕ broadening up to about 40-50 MeV, to be added to the ϕ →K ¯K in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about 35 MeV at normal matter density. The ϕ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole modes with the ϕ quasiparticle peak. The former results point in the direction of making up for missing absorption as reported in ϕ nuclear production experiments.

  3. Bioluminescence as an ecological factor during high Arctic polar night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Heather A.; Cohen, Jonathan H.; Berge, Jørgen; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A.

    2016-11-01

    Bioluminescence commonly influences pelagic trophic interactions at mesopelagic depths. Here we characterize a vertical gradient in structure of a generally low species diversity bioluminescent community at shallower epipelagic depths during the polar night period in a high Arctic fjord with in situ bathyphotometric sampling. Bioluminescence potential of the community increased with depth to a peak at 80 m. Community composition changed over this range, with an ecotone at 20–40 m where a dinoflagellate-dominated community transitioned to dominance by the copepod Metridia longa. Coincident at this depth was bioluminescence exceeding atmospheric light in the ambient pelagic photon budget, which we term the bioluminescence compensation depth. Collectively, we show a winter bioluminescent community in the high Arctic with vertical structure linked to attenuation of atmospheric light, which has the potential to influence pelagic ecology during the light-limited polar night.

  4. Bioluminescence microscopy using a short focal-length imaging lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, K; Akiyoshi, R; May-Maw-Thet; Sugiyama, T; Dosaka, S; Hatta-Ohashi, Y; Suzuki, H

    2014-03-01

    Bioluminescence from cells is so dim that bioluminescence microscopy is performed using an ultra low-light imaging camera. Although the image sensor of such cameras has been greatly improved over time, such improvements have not been made commercially available for microscopes until now. Here, we customized the optical system of a microscope for bioluminescence imaging. As a result, bioluminescence images of cells could be captured with a conventional objective lens and colour imaging camera. As bioluminescence microscopy requires no excitation light, it lacks the photo-toxicity associated with fluorescence imaging and permits the long-term, nonlethal observation of living cells. Thus, bioluminescence microscopy would be a powerful tool in cellular biology that complements fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Direct measurement of low-energy $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Depalo, R; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Boeltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Ciani, G F; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; Di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Piatti, D; Prati, P; Straniero, O; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2016-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is the most uncertain process in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. At temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars and classical novae, its uncertainty is mainly due to a large number of predicted but hitherto unobserved resonances at low energy. Purpose: A new direct study of low energy $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Method: The proton capture on $^{22}$Ne was investigated in direct kinematics, delivering an intense proton beam to a $^{22}$Ne gas target. $\\gamma$ rays were detected with two high-purity germanium detectors enclosed in a copper and lead shielding suppressing environmental radioactivity. Results: Three resonances at 156.2 keV ($\\omega\\gamma$ = (1.48\\,$\\pm$\\,0.10)\\,$\\cdot$\\,10$^{-7}$ eV), 189.5 keV ($\\omega\\gamma$ = (1.87\\,$\\pm$\\,0.06)\\,$\\cdot$\\,10$^{-6}$ eV) and 259.7 keV ($\\o...

  6. Hunting for dark matter coannihilation by mixing dijet resonances and missing transverse energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Malte; El Hedri, Sonia; Kaminska, Anna; Liu, Jia; de Vries, Maikel; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Felix; Zurita, José

    2016-09-01

    Simplified models of the dark matter (co)annihilation mechanism predict striking new collider signatures untested by current searches. These models, which were codified in the coannihilation codex, provide the basis for a dark matter (DM) discovery program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) driven by the measured DM relic density. In this work, we study an exemplary model featuring s-channel DM coannihilation through a scalar diquark mediator as a representative case study of scenarios with strongly interacting coannihilation partners. We discuss the full phenomenology of the model, ranging from low energy flavor constraints, vacuum stability requirements, and precision Higgs effects to direct detection and indirect detection prospects. Moreover, motivated by the relic density calculation, we find significant portions of parameter space are compatible with current collider constraints and can be probed by future searches, including a proposed analysis for the novel signature of a dijet resonance accompanied by missing transverse energy (MET). Our results show that the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb-1 luminosity should be sensitive to mediators as heavy as 1 TeV and dark matter in the 400-500 GeV range. The combination of searches for single and paired dijet peaks, non-resonant jets + MET excesses, and our novel resonant dijet + MET signature have strong coverage of the motivated relic density region, reflecting the tight connections between particles determining the dark matter abundance and their experimental signatures at the LHC.

  7. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Griep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Magnetic Resonance : Introduction, Advanced Topics and Applications to Fossil Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at an Advanced Study Institute on "Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Fossil Energy Problems," which was held at the village of Maleme, Crete, in July of 1983. As of this writing, a different popular attitude prevails from that when the ASI was proposed as far as how critical the world energy picture is. In the popular press, a panglossian attitude (the "petroleum glut" of the 80's) has replaced the jeremiads of the 70's ( a catastrophic "energy crisis"). Yet, there are certain important constants: (a) for the foreseeable future, fossil energy sources (petroleum, coal, oil shale, etc. ) will continue to be of paramount importance; and (b) science and technology of the highest order are needed to extend the fossil ener~y resource base and to utilize it in a cost-effective manner that is also environmentally acceptable. It is precisely this second item that this volume addresses. The volume introduces the phenomenology of magnetic resonance ~n a unified and detailed man...

  9. Non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for car-key applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Hehn, T.; Thewes, M.; Kuehne, I.; Frey, A.; Scholl, G.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for application in a remote car-key, to extend the lifetime of the battery or even to realize a fully energy autonomous, maintenance-free car-key product. Characteristic for a car-key are low frequency and large amplitude motions during normal daily operation. The basic idea of this non-resonant generator is to use a round flat permanent magnet moving freely in a round flat cavity, which is packaged on both sides by printed circuit boards embedded with multi-layer copper coils. The primary goal of this structure is to easily integrate the energy harvester with the existing electrical circuit module into available commercial car-key designs. The whole size of the energy harvester is comparable to a CR2032 coin battery. To find out the best power-efficient and optimal design, several magnets with different dimensions and magnetizations, and various layouts of copper coils were analysed and built up for prototype testing. Experimental results show that with an axially magnetized NdFeB magnet and copper coils of design variant B a maximum open circuit voltage of 1.1V can be observed.

  10. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  11. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  12. Bioluminescence as a classroom tool for scientist volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M; Andrade, J D

    2000-01-01

    There is a great need for practicing scientists to volunteer their time and expertise in the K-12th grade science classroom. We have found that bioluminescence is a fun and exciting way to teach basic science concepts and is an excellent tool for the volunteering scientist. We have had very positive reactions from both teachers and students. The excitement of the students when they first see bioluminescence is contagious. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are one of the easiest ways to introduce students to this fascinating topic. Many activities and experiments can be done using the bioluminescent dinoflagellates and many students and teachers could benefit from your knowledge and expertise. See you in the classroom.

  13. Resonant antineutrino induced electron capture with low energy bound-beta beams

    CERN Document Server

    Oldeman, R G C; Saitta, B

    2009-01-01

    Antineutrino induced electron capture is a resonant process that can have a larg e cross-section for beams of monochromatic antineutrinos. We calculate the cross-section of this process and investigate an experimental setup where monochromatic antineutrinos are produced from the bound-beta decay of fully ionized radioactive atoms in a storage ring. If the energy between the source and the target is well matched, the cross-sections can be significantly larger than the cross-sections of commonly used non-resonant processes. The rate that can be achieved at a small distance between the source and two targets of $10^3$ kg is up to one interaction per $8 .3\\cdot10^{18}$ decaying atoms. For a source-target distance corresponding to the first atmospheric neutrino osc illation maximum, the largest rate is one interaction per $3.2\\cdot10^{21}$ decaying atoms.

  14. Bioluminescent assay for human lymphocyte blast transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, E G; Budagyan, V M; Romanova, N A; Brovko LYu; Ugarova, N N

    1995-05-01

    One of the basic tests of in vitro evaluation of immune cell functional activity is a proliferative response of lymphocytes on the action of external stimuli such as mitogenic lectines, antigens, etc. We compared two methods used to assess the lymphocyte functional status. (1) [3H]thymidine incorporation and (2) bioluminescence for determination of intracellular ATP in blast cells. Comparison has been done for healthy donors and patients with proven low immunological status. The proposed bioluminescent method for evaluation of the proliferative response was shown to be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes. This method allows one to process a large number of samples at the same time and correlates highly with the radionuclide test use hazardous radioactive materials.

  15. Resonance energies of the allyl cation and allyl anion: contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of propene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Josiah B; Karty, Joel M

    2004-02-06

    Density functional theory was employed to calculate the acidities and hydride abstraction enthalpies of propene (3) and propane (4), along with their vinylogues (5 and 6, respectively). The same reaction enthalpies were calculated for the propene vinylogues in which the terminal vinyl group was rotated perpendicular to the rest of the conjugated system (7). The contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of each vinylogue of 5 (n = 1-3) was computed and extrapolated to n = 0 (the parent propene system). The resonance energies of the allyl cation and anion were determined to be about 20-22 and 17-18 kcal/mol, respectively. Comparisons are made to resonance energies calculated using other methodologies.

  16. Synthesis and Resonance Energy Transfer in Conjugates of Luminescent Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots and Chlorin e6 Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosyuk, A. A.; Artemyev, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    We synthesized a new type of conjugates of highly luminescent water soluble CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots covalently bound to Chlorin e6 dye molecules. We observed a resonance energy transfer from quantum dots emitting at 660 nm to Chlorine e6 molecules in our conjugates which can be utilized for phototherapy. Contrary to that quantum dots emitting at 588 nm show non-resonance quenching of excitonic luminescence without the energy transfer to dye molecules.

  17. Semiclassical wave packet treatment of scattering resonances: application to the delta zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-09-28

    For the first time Feshbach-type resonances important in recombination reactions are characterized using the semiclassical wave packet method. This approximation allows us to determine the energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of the resonances and also to observe a very interesting correlation between them. Most important is that this approach permits description of a quantum delta-zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions and reproduces the anomalous rates of ozone formation.

  18. Laser interaction based on resonance saturation (LIBORS): an alternative to inverse bremsstrahlung for coupling laser energy into a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R M; Drewell, N; Cardinal, P

    1979-06-01

    Resonance saturation represents an efficient and rapid method of coupling laser energy into a gaseous medium. In the case of a plasma superelastic collision quenching of the laser maintained resonance state population effectively converts the laser beam energy into translational energy of the free electrons. Subsequently, ionization of the laser pumped species rapidly ensues as a result of both the elevated electron temperature and the effective reduction of the ionization energy for those atoms maintained in the resonance state by the laser radiation. This method of coupling laser energy into a plasma has several advantages over inverse bremsstrahlung and could therefore be applicable to several areas of current interest including plasma channel formation for transportation of electron and ion beams, x-ray laser development, laser fusion, negative ion beam production, and the conversion of laser energy to electricity.

  19. Nuclear Symmetry Energy: constraints from Giant Quadrupole Resonances and Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Maza, X; Bortignon, P F; Brenna, M; Cao, Li-Gang; Centelles, M; Colò, G; Paar, N; Viñas, X; Vretenar, D; Warda, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical efforts are being devoted to the study of observables that can shed light on the properties of the nuclear symmetry energy. We present our new results on the excitation energy [X. Roca-Maza et al., Phys. Rev. C 87, 034301 (2013)] and polarizability of the Isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance (IVGQR), which has been the object of new experimental investigation [S. S. Henshaw et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 222501 (2011)]. We also present our theoretical analysis on the parity violating asymmetry at the kinematics of the Lead Radius Experiment [S. Abrahamyan et al. (PREx Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 112502 (2012)] and highlight its relation with the density dependence of the symmetry energy [X. Roca-Maza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 252501 (2011)].

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human serum albumin to a bioactive indoloquinolizine system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramita Das; Arabinda Mallick; Basudeb Haldar; Alok Chakrabarty; Nitin Chattopadhyay

    2007-03-01

    The interaction between a bioactive molecule, 3-acetyl-4-oxo-6,7-dihydro-12H indolo-[2,3-a] quinolizine (AODIQ), with human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied using steady-state absorption and fluorescence techniques. A 1 : 1 complex formation has been established and the binding constant () and free energy change for the process have been reported. The AODIQ-HSA complex results in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the tryptophan moiety of HSA to the probe. The critical energy-transfer distance (0) for FRET and the Stern-Volmer constant (sv) for the fluorescence quenching of the donor in the presence of the acceptor have been determined. Importantly, SV has been shown to be equal to the binding constant itself, implying that the fluorescence quenching arises only from the FRET process. The study suggests that the donor and the acceptor are bound to the same protein at different locations but within the quenching distance.

  1. Nanophotonic control of the F\\"orster resonance energy transfer efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Christian; Lagendijk, Ad; Wubs, Martijn; Mosk, Allard P; Subramaniam, Vinod; Vos, Willem L

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply a change in the characteristic F\\"orster distance, in contrast to common lore that this distance is fixed for a given FRET pair.

  2. Detection of Parametric Roll Resonance on Ships from Indication of Nonlinear Energy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    The detection of the onset of parametric roll resonance on ships is of a central importance in order to activate specific control strategies able to counteract the large roll motion. One of the main priorities is to have detectors with a small detection time, such that warnings can be issued when...... the roll oscillations are about 5◦. This paper proposes two different detection approaches: the first one based on sinusoidal detection in white gaussian noise; the second one utilizes an energy flow indicator in order to catch the onset of parametric roll based upon the transfer of energy from heave...... and pitch to roll. Both detectors have been validated against experimental data of a scale model of a container vessel excited with both regular and irregular waves. The detector based on the energy flow indicator proved to be very robust to different scenarios (regular/irregular waves) since it does...

  3. Violation of energy-per-hadron scaling in a resonance matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bravina, L V; Fuchs, C; Lu, Z D; Zabrodin, E E; Faessler, Amand

    2002-01-01

    Yields of hadrons, their average masses and energies per hadron at the stage of chemical freeze-out in (ultra)relativistic heavy-ion collisions are analyzed within the statistical model. The violation of the scaling / = 1 GeV observed in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 AGeV is linked to the formation of resonance-rich matter with a considerable fraction of baryons and antibaryons. The rise of the energy-per-hadron ratio in baryon-dominated matter is discussed. A violation of the scaling condition is predicted for a very central zone of heavy-ion collisions at energies around 40 AGeV.

  4. Nanophotonic enhancement of the F\\"orster resonance energy transfer rate on single DNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ghenuche, Petru; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Nanophotonics achieves accurate control over the luminescence properties of a single quantum emitter by tailoring the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale and modifying the local density of optical states (LDOS). This paradigm could also benefit to F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) by enhancing the near-field electromagnetic interaction between two fluorescent emitters. Despite the wide applications of FRET in nanosciences, using nanophotonics to enhance FRET remains a debated and complex challenge. Here, we demonstrate enhanced energy transfer within single donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs confined in gold nanoapertures. Experiments monitoring both the donor and the acceptor emission photodynamics at the single molecule level clearly establish a linear dependence of the FRET rate on the LDOS in nanoapertures. These findings are applied to enhance the FRET rate in nanoapertures up to six times, demonstrating that nanophotonics can be used to intensify the near-field energy transfer and improve t...

  5. Conjugated-polymer-based energy-transfer systems for antimicrobial and anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huanxiang; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-29

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) attract a lot of attention in sensing, imaging, and biomedical applications because of recent achievements that are highlighted in this Research News article. A brief review of recent progress in the application of CP-based energy-transfer systems in antimicrobial and anticancer treatments is provided. The transfer of excitation energy from CPs to photosensitizers leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are able to efficiently kill pathogenic microorganisms and cancer cells in the surroundings. Both fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) modes are discussed.

  6. Measurement of the OXYGEN-17(PROTON, Alpha Particle) Nitrogen -14 Cross Section at Stellar Energies (proton Energies, Resonant Reaction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Jeffery Curtis

    The isotopic abundance ratio 16O/17O has been shown to be a good probe of mass flow and mixing in stars. This ratio is sensitive to the depth of convective mixing which occurs on the giant branch and to the amount of nonconvective mixing occurring on the main sequence. The interpretation of recent observations of this ratio in red giants is limited by a large uncertainty in the value of the 17O(p, alpha)14N reaction rate. This reaction rate is dominated at stellar energies by a resonance at E_{rm x} = 5673 keV in the compound nucleus 18 F, whose strength was previously uncertain. We have carried out a measurement of the ^ {17}O(p,alpha)^{14 }N cross section at proton energies of 75 keV and 65 keV. Thick, high-purity rm Ta_2O _5 targets enriched to 77% ^ {17}O were used in conjunction with beam currents of 0.45 mA and large-solid-angle detectors. The background for the experiment was measured using targets of natural isotopic composition. The resonance peak was observed in the data collected at 75 keV, and we determined the proton width of the 5673 keV state to be 22 +/- 4 neV. This implies a rate for the 17O(p,alpha)^ {14}N reaction that is ten times greater than the typical rates used previously in stellar models.

  7. Nuclear Poincaré cycle synchronizes with the incident de Broglie wave to predict regularity in neutron resonance energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Makio

    2016-06-01

    In observed neutron resonances, long believed to be a form of quantum chaos, regular family structures are found in the s-wave resonances of many even-even nuclei in the tens keV to MeV region [M.Ohkubo, Phys. Rev. C 87, 014608(2013)]. Resonance reactions take place when the incident de Broglie wave synchronizes with the Poincaré cycle of the compound nucleus, which is composed of several normal modes with periods that are time quantized by inverse Fermi energy. Based on the breathing model of the compound nucleus, neutron resonance energies in family structures are written by simple arithmetic expressions using Sn and small integers. Family structures in observed resonances of 40Ca+n and 37Cl+n are described as simple cases. A model for time quantization is discussed.

  8. Bi-resonant structure with piezoelectric PVDF films for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Shanshan; Crovetto, Andrea; Peng, Zhuoteng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a bi-resonant structure of piezoelectric PVDF films energy harvester (PPEH), which consists of two cantilevers with resonant frequencies of 15 Hz and 22 Hz. With increased acceleration, the vibration amplitudes of the two cantilever-mass structures are increased and collision...... and experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with the bi-resonant structure can generate higher power output than that of the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources at low frequency, and hence significantly improves the vibration-to- electricity...

  9. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Delplanque

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+ act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5 modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+ and the acceptor (Cy5 with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  10. Performance Improvement of Polymer Solar Cells by Surface-Energy-Induced Dual Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mengnan; Shen, Ping; Liu, Yan; Chen, Boyuan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping; Shen, Liang

    2016-03-09

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) is effectively applied on polymer solar cells (PSCs) to improve power conversion efficiency (PCE). However, universality of the reported results mainly focused on utilizing single type of MNPs to enhance light absorption only in specific narrow wavelength range. Herein, a surface-energy-induced dual MNP plasmon resonance by thermally evaporating method was presented to achieve the absorption enhancement in wider range. The differences of surface energy between silver (Ag), gold (Au), and tungsten trioxide (WO3) compared by contact angle images enable Ag and Au prefer to respectively aggregate into isolated islands rather than films at the initial stage of the evaporation process, which was clearly demonstrated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement. The sum of plasmon-enhanced wavelength range induced by both Ag NPs (350-450 nm) and Au NPs (450-600 nm) almost cover the whole absorption spectra of active layers, which compatibly contribute a significant efficiency improvement from 4.57 ± 0.16 to 6.55 ± 0.12% compared to the one without MNPs. Besides, steady state photoluminescence (PL) measurements provide strong evidence that the SPR induced by the Ag-Au NPs increase the intensity of light absorption. Finally, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) reveals that doping Au and Ag causes upper shift of both the work function and valence band of WO3, which is directly related to hole collection ability. We believe the surface-energy-induced dual plasmon resonance enhancement by simple thermally evaporating technique might pave the way toward higher-efficiency PSCs.

  11. Excitation energy and strength of the pygmy dipole resonance in stable tin isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Özel, B; Lenske, H; Von Neumann-Cosel, P; Poltoratska, I; Ponomarev, V Yu; Richter, A; Savran, D; Tsoneva, N

    2009-01-01

    The $^{112,120}$Sn$(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ reactions have been studied at the S-DALINAC. Electric dipole (E1) strength distributions have been determined including contributions from unresolved strength extracted by a fluctuation analysis. Together with available data on $^{116,124}$Sn, an experimental systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable even-mass tin isotopes is established. The PDR centroid excitation energies and summed strengths are in reasonable agreement with quasiparticle-phonon model calculations based on a nonrelativistic description of the mean field but disagree with relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation predictions.

  12. State-selective high-energy excitation of nuclei by resonant positron annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Belov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual γ photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including giant resonances and monopole transitions. In certain cases, it may have higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation and it can even occur with high probability when the latter is energetically forbidden.

  13. The parametric resonance features for theory of energy transfer in dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyonov, V. P.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of energy transfer between degrees of freedom of dusty plasma system can be described by equations similar to Mathieu equation with account of stochastic forces. Such equation is studied by analytical approach. The solutions for higher order of accuracy are obtained. The method for numerical solution and resonance zone detection is proposed. The solution for the extended Mathieu equation is obtained for wide range of parameter values. The results of numerical solution are compared with analytical solutions of different order and known analytical results for Mathieu equation.

  14. Level set segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on local Gaussian distribution fitting energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yunjie; Pan, Xiaohua; Hong, Xunning; Xia, Deshen

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a variational level set approach in a multi-phase formulation to segmentation of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images with intensity inhomogeneity. In our model, the local image intensities are characterized by Gaussian distributions with different means and variances. We define a local Gaussian distribution fitting energy with level set functions and local means and variances as variables. The means and variances of local intensities are considered as spatially varying functions. Therefore, our method is able to deal with intensity inhomogeneity without inhomogeneity correction. Our method has been applied to 3T and 7T MR images with promising results.

  15. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Miranda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data.

  16. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer induced by conjugation of metalloproteins to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa, P. P.; Chiuri, R.; Manna, L.; Pellegrino, T.; del Mercato, L. L.; Parak, W. J.; Calabi, F.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.

    2006-01-01

    We show the possibility of realizing a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor nanoparticle (NP) and a metalloprotein, in which the photophysical properties of the two species can be exploited to elicit fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanisms from the biomolecule to the NP. A specific conjugation process between CdSe/ZnS core/shell water soluble NPs, functionalized with surface exposed thiol groups (-SH), and the apo form of the metalloprotein azurin (Az) has been achieved, resulting in a fixed distance in the donor-acceptor pairs. The increase in the NP fluorescence intensity was found to be dependent on the Az to NP molar ratio.

  17. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, O.G., E-mail: omr@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico); Moura, C.A., E-mail: celio.moura@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Rua Santa Adélia, 166, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil); Parada, A., E-mail: alexander.parada00@usc.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-05-11

    Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data.

  18. Direct determination of resonance energy transfer in photolyase: structural alignment for the functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuang; Guo, Lijun; Ai, Yuejie; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Luo, Yi; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-11-13

    Photoantenna is essential to energy transduction in photoinduced biological machinery. A photoenzyme, photolyase, has a light-harvesting pigment of methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) that transfers its excitation energy to the catalytic flavin cofactor FADH¯ to enhance DNA-repair efficiency. Here we report our systematic characterization and direct determination of the ultrafast dynamics of resonance energy transfer from excited MTHF to three flavin redox states in E. coli photolyase by capturing the intermediates formed through the energy transfer and thus excluding the electron-transfer quenching pathway. We observed 170 ps for excitation energy transferring to the fully reduced hydroquinone FADH¯, 20 ps to the fully oxidized FAD, and 18 ps to the neutral semiquinone FADH(•), and the corresponding orientation factors (κ(2)) were determined to be 2.84, 1.53 and 1.26, respectively, perfectly matching with our calculated theoretical values. Thus, under physiological conditions and over the course of evolution, photolyase has adopted the optimized orientation of its photopigment to efficiently convert solar energy for repair of damaged DNA.

  19. In vivo bioluminescence tomography based on multi-view projection and 3D surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Leng, Chengcai; Deng, Kexin; Hu, Yifang; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a powerful optical molecular imaging modality, which enables non-invasive realtime in vivo imaging as well as 3D quantitative analysis in preclinical studies. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct inner light sources accurately, the prior structural information is commonly necessary and obtained from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This strategy requires expensive hybrid imaging system, complicated operation protocol and possible involvement of ionizing radiation. The overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. In this study we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic system (POBTS) and a novel BLT method based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. The POBTS acquired a sparse set of white light surface images and bioluminescent images of a mouse. Then the white light images were applied to an approximate surface model to generate a high quality textured 3D surface reconstruction of the mouse. After that we integrated multi-view luminescent images based on the previous reconstruction, and applied an algorithm to calibrate and quantify the surface luminescent flux in 3D.Finally, the internal bioluminescence source reconstruction was achieved with this prior information. A BALB/C mouse with breast tumor of 4T1-fLuc cells mouse model were used to evaluate the performance of the new system and technique. Compared with the conventional hybrid optical-CT approach using the same inverse reconstruction method, the reconstruction accuracy of this technique was improved. The distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.184 mm.

  20. Energy harvesting using parametric resonant system due to time-varying damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapolan, Matteo; Tehrani, Maryam Ghandchi; Bonisoli, Elvio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of energy harvesting is considered using an electromechanical oscillator. The energy harvester is modelled as a spring-mass-damper, in which the dissipated energy in the damper can be stored rather than wasted. Previous research provided the optimum damping parameter, to harvest maximum amount of energy, taking into account the stroke limit of the device. However, the amount of the maximum harvested energy is limited to a single frequency in which the device is tuned. Active and semi-active strategies have been suggested, which increases the performance of the harvester. Recently, nonlinear damping in the form of cubic damping has been proposed to extend the dynamic range of the harvester. In this paper, a periodic time-varying damper is introduced, which results in a parametrically excited system. When the frequency of the periodic time-varying damper is twice the excitation frequency, the system internal energy increases proportionally to the energy already stored in the system. Thus, for certain parametric damping values, the system can become unstable. This phenomenon can be exploited for energy harvesting. The transition curves, which separate the stable and unstable dynamics are derived, both analytically using harmonic balance method, and numerically using time simulations. The design of the harvester is such that its response is close to the transition curves of the Floquet diagram, leading to stable but resonant system. The performance of the parametric harvester is compared with the non-parametric one. It is demonstrated that performances and the frequency bandwidth in which the energy can be harvested can be both increased using time-varying damping.

  1. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is presente

  2. A REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. The unifyin...

  3. Detection of ATP and NADH: A Bioluminescent Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Ted C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Described is a bioluminescent assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) that meets the requirements of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. The 3-hour experiment provides students with experience in bioluminescence and analytical biochemistry yet requires limited instrumentation,…

  4. Single-cell bioluminescence and GFP in biofilm research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.J. Jr, Sayler, G., White, D.C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States), Ctr. Env. Biotech; Phiefer, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States), Environmental Sciences Div.

    1996-12-31

    Using flow cells and a combination of microscopy techniques, we can unequivocally identify single bacterial cells that express bioluminescent and fluorescent bioreporters. We have shown that, for attached cells, bioluminescence output within a bacterial strain can vary greatly from cell to cell.

  5. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny F. Chou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Förster (or fluorescence resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting.

  6. An analytical model for a piezoelectric vibration energy harvester with resonance frequency tunability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article conceptually proposes a new method to tune the resonance frequency of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters, in which the supporting position of the vibrator can be adjusted for frequency tuning. The corresponding analytical model is established to predict the performances of the harvester based on the principles of energy. First, the equivalent stiffness and mass of the vibrator in bending mode are derived explicitly for the different supporting positions. A simple analysis method is then established for the frequency, output voltage, and output power. Finally, some numerical examples are given to demonstrate the presented method. The results are also compared with those by finite element method and good agreement is observed.

  7. Cytochrome c location in phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin model membranes: resonance energy transfer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Galina P; Domanov, Yegor A

    2003-03-25

    Resonance energy transfer between lipid-bound fluorescent probe 3-methoxybenzanthrone as a donor and heme group of cytochrome c as an acceptor has been examined to ascertain the protein disposition relative to the surface of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (10, 50 and 80 mol%). The model of energy transfer in membrane systems has been extended to the case of donors distributed between the two-bilayer leaflets and acceptors located at the outer monolayer taking into account the donor and acceptor orientational behavior. Assuming specific protein orientation relative to the membrane surface and varying lateral distance of the donor-acceptor closest approach in the range from 0 to 3.5 nm the limits for possible heme distances from the bilayer midplane have been found to be 0.8-3 nm (10 mol% CL), 0-2.6 nm (50 mol% CL), and 1.4-3.3 nm (80 mol% CL).

  8. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias-Garcia, A; Garcia, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C, E-mail: aiglesiasg@santafe-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (INTEC-CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, CC91, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the {Gamma} point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  9. Preliminary investigation into the design of thermally responsive Forster resonance energy transfer colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Monte Scott

    While nuclear imaging techniques (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and Positron Emission Tomography) have proven effective for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the human body, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging offers additional benefits. Fluorescent imaging provides high resolution with real-time response, persistent lifetime (hours to days), cell targeting, and transdermal penetration with minimal physical encumbrance. Malignant cells can be targeted by absorbance of exogenous fluorescent nanoprobe contrast agents. Imaging is improved by fluorescent enhancement, especially by energy transfer between attached dyes. Also for use against cancer are heat-active treatments, such as hyperthermal, photothermal, and chemothermal therapies. Helpful to these treatments is the thermal response from nanoprobes, within human cells, which provide real-time feedback. The present study investigates the design and feasibility of a nanoprobe molecular device, absorbable into malignant human cells, which provides real-time tracking and thermal response, as indicated by enhanced fluorescence by energy transfer. A poly(propargyl acrylate) colloidal suspension was synthesized. The particles were modified with a triblock copolymer, previously shown to be thermally responsive, and an end-attached fluorescent dye. A second dye was modeled for attachment in subsequent work. When two fluorescent dyes are brought within sufficiently close proximity, and excitation light is supplied, energy can be transferred between dyes to give enhanced fluorescence with a large Stokes shift (increase in wavelength between excitation and emission). The dye pair was modeled for overlap of emission and absorbance wavelengths, and energy transfer was demonstrated with 23% efficiency and a 209 nm Stokes shift. The quantum yield of the donor dye was determined at 70%, and the distance for 50% energy transfer was calculated at 2.9 nm, consistent with reports for similar compounds. When

  10. Fluorescent material concentration dependency: Förster resonance energy transfer in quasi-solid state DSSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Jo, Hyun-Jun; Thogiti, Suresh; Yang, Weon Ki; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is critical for wide spectral absorption, an increased dye loading, and photocurrent generation of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). This process consists of organic fluorescent materials (as an energy donor), and an organic dye (as an energy acceptor on TiO2 surfaces) with quasi-solid electrolyte. The judicious choice of the energy donor and acceptor facilitates a strong spectral overlap between the emission and absorption regions of the fluorescent materials and dye. This FRET process enhances the light-harvesting characteristics of quasi-solid state DSSCs. In this study, DSSCs containing different concentrations (0, 1, and 1.5 wt%) of a fluorescent material (FM) as the energy donor are investigated using FRET. The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs containing FMs in a quasi-solid electrolyte increased by 33% over a pristine cell. The optimized cell fabricated with the quasi-solid state DSSC containing 1.0 wt% FM shows a maximum efficiency of 3.38%, with a short-circuit current density (J SC ) of 4.32 mA/cm-2, and an open-circuit voltage (V OC ) of 0.68 V under illumination of simulated solar light (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm-2). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  12. Gold nanoparticles-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer for ultrasensitive detection of melamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxiu; Wang, Yadi; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A turn-on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer method was fabricated for the determination of melamine by using bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein chemiluminescence reaction as a donor and dispersed gold nanoparticles as an acceptor. The chemiluminescence signal of bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein reaction decreased significantly in the presence of dispersed gold nanoparticles because the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles perfectly overlapped with the chemiluminescence spectrum. Melamine could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, leading to a dramatic red-shift of the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles. The absorption band of the aggregated gold nanoparticles does not overlap with the chemiluminescence spectrum of the reaction. In such a case, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer could not happen and the chemiluminescence signal was restored. The procedure allowed the measurement of 3.2×10(-12)-3.2×10(-7) mol/L melamine with a limit of detection of 3×10(-13) mol/L. The method was applied to the determination of melamine in spiked milk samples; with recoveries within the range 94.1-104.2%.

  13. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis.

  14. Detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in coffee using chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun-Jung; Mun, Hyoyoung; Kim, Su-Ji; Shim, Won-Bo; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-03-01

    We report a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in roasted coffee beans. The aptamer sequences used in this study are 5'-DNAzyme-Linker-OTA aptamer-3'-dabcyl. Dabcyl at the end of the OTA aptamer region plays as a quencher in CRET aptasensor. When hemin and OTA are added, the dabcyl-labeled OTA aptamer approaches to the G-quadruplex-hemin complex by formation of the G-quadruplex-OTA complex. The G-quadruplex-hemin complexes possess horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-like activity, and therefore, the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (HRPzyme) catalyzes peroxidation in the presence of luminol and H2O2. Resonance energy transfer between luminol (donor) and dabcyl (acceptor) enables quenching of chemiluminescence signals. The signal decreases with increasing the concentration of OTA within the range of 0.1-100ngmL(-1) (limit of detection 0.22ngmL(-1)), and the level of recovery of the respective 1ngmL(-1) and 10ngmL(-1) spiked coffee samples was 71.5% and 93.3%. These results demonstrated the potential of the proposed method for OTA analysis in diverse foods.

  15. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  16. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  17. Resonant Structure Described by a Deep Folded Potential for the 12C+12C Scattering at Lower-Energy Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-Xu; LI Qing-Run; ZHAO Wei-Qin

    2002-01-01

    Based on the analyses of the elastic angular distributions,an energy-dependent folding potential for the 12C+12C system is established.This potential has a deep real part,and can reasonably well describe the resonant structure in the 12C+12C elastic scattering in the low-energy region of 10 ~ 70 MeV.

  18. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  19. Performance analysis and experimental verification of mid-range wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Wang, Jingyu; Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency analysis of a mid-range wireless energy transfer system is performed through non-resonant magnetic coupling. It is shown that the self-resistance of the coils and the mutual inductance are critical in achieving a high efficiency, which is indicated by our theoretical...... formulation and verified in our experiments. It is experimentally shown that high efficiency, up to 65%, can be realized even in a non-resonant wireless energy system which employs a device part with moderate or low quality factor. We also address some aspects of a practical wireless energy transfer system...... and show that careful design of the de-tuned system can intrinsically minimize the power dissipated in the source part. Our non-resonant scheme presented in this paper allows flexible design and fabrication of a wireless energy transfer systems with transfer distance being several times of the coils...

  20. Investigations and system design for simultaneous energy and data transmission through inductively coupled resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Lloret Fuentes, E.; Buchholz, M.

    2015-11-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) with simultaneous data transmission through coupled magnetic resonators is investigated in this paper. The development of this system is dedicated to serve as a basis for applications in the field of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), for example tracking vital parameters remotely, charge and control sensors and so on. Due to these different scenarios we consider, it is important to have a system which is reliable under the circumstance of changing positioning of the receiving device. State of the art radio systems would be able to handle this. Nevertheless, energy harvesting from far field sources is not sufficient to power the devices additionally on mid-range distances. For this reason, coupled magnetic resonant circuits are proposed as a promising alternative, although suffering from more complex positioning dependency. Based on measurements on a simple prototype system, an equivalent circuit description is used to model the transmission system dependent on different transmission distances and impedance matching conditions. Additionally, the simulation model is used to extract system parameters such as coupling coefficients, coil resistance and self-capacitance, which cannot be calculated in a simple and reliable way. Furthermore, a mathematical channel model based on the schematic model has been built in MATLAB©. It is used to point out the problems occurring in a transmission system with variable transmission distance, especially the change of the passband's centre frequency and its bandwidth. Existing solutions dealing with this distance dependent behaviour, namely the change of the transmission frequency dependent on distance and the addition of losses to the resonators to increase the bandwidth, are considered as not inventive. First, changing the transmission frequency increases the complexity in the data transmission system and would use a disproportional total bandwidth compared to the actually available bandwidth

  1. Enhanced harvesting of red photons in nanowire solar cells: evidence of resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Karthik; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-04-28

    Modern excitonic solar cells efficiently harvest photons in the 350-650 nm spectral range; however, device efficiencies are typically limited by poor quantum yields for red and near-infrared photons. Using Forster-type resonance energy transfer from zinc phthalocyanine donor molecules to ruthenium polypyridine complex acceptors, we demonstrate a four-fold increase in quantum yields for red photons in dye-sensitized nanowire array solar cells. The dissolved donor and surface anchored acceptor molecules are not tethered to each other, through either a direct chemical bond or a covalent linker layer. The spatial confinement of the electrolyte imposed by the wire-to-wire spacing of the close-packed nanowire array architecture ensures that the distances between a significant fraction of donors and acceptors are within a Förster radius. The critical distance for energy transfer from an isolated donor chromophore to a self-assembled monolayer of acceptors on a plane follows the inverse fourth power instead of the inverse sixth power relation. Consequently, we observe near quantitative energy transfer efficiencies in our devices. Our results represent a new design paradigm in excitonic solar cells and show it is possible to more closely match the spectral response of the device to the AM 1.5 solar spectrum through use of electronic energy transfer.

  2. Resonance energy transfer between fluorescent BSA protected Au nanoclusters and organic fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Rich, Ryan; Fudala, Rafal; Butler, Susan; Kokate, Rutika; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to their unique fluorescence properties and lack of toxicity. These metal nanoclusters have utility in a variety of disciplines including catalysis, biosensing, photonics, imaging and molecular electronics. However, they suffer from several disadvantages such as low fluorescence quantum efficiency (typically near 6%) and broad emission spectrum (540 nm to 800 nm). We describe an approach to enhance the apparent brightness of BSA Au clusters by linking them with a high extinction donor organic dye pacific blue (PB). In this conjugate PB acts as a donor to BSA Au clusters and enhances its brightness by resonance energy transfer (RET). We found that the emission of BSA Au clusters can be enhanced by a magnitude of two-fold by resonance energy transfer (RET) from the high extinction donor PB, and BSA Au clusters can act as an acceptor to nanosecond lifetime organic dyes. By pumping the BSA Au clusters using a high extinction donor, one can increase the effective brightness of less bright fluorophores like BSA Au clusters. Moreover, we prepared another conjugate of BSA Au clusters with the near infrared (NIR) dye Dylight 750 (Dy750), where BSA Au clusters act as a donor to Dy750. We observed that BSA Au clusters can function as a donor, showing 46% transfer efficiency to the NIR dye Dy750 with a long lifetime component in the acceptor decay through RET. Such RET-based probes can be used to prevent the problems of a broad emission spectrum associated with the BSA Au clusters. Moreover, transferring energy from BSA Au clusters to Dy750 will result in a RET probe with a narrow emission spectrum and long lifetime component which can be utilized in imaging applications.

  3. Moment searching algorithm for bioluminescence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludong Jin; Yan Wu; Jie Tian; Heyu Huang; Xiaochao Qu

    2009-01-01

    To avoid the ill-posedness in the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography, a moment searching algorithm fusing the finite element method (FEM) with the moment concept in theoretical mechanics is developed. In the algorithm, the source's information is mapped to the surface photon flux density by FEM, and the source's position is modified with the feedback through the algorithm of barycenter searching, which makes full use of the position information of the photon flux density on surface. The position is modified in every iterative step and will finally converge to the real source's value theoretically.

  4. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  5. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products.

  6. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  7. Low-energy $DD^{*+}$ Scattering and the Resonance-like Structure $Z_c(3900)$

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ying; Lei, Yu-Hong; Li, Ning; Liang, Jian; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Hang; Liu, Jin-Long; Liu, Liuming; Liu, Yong-Fu; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhaofeng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Wang, Zhan-Lin; Yang, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory lattice study, low-energy scattering of $D$ and $D^*$ meson are analyzed using lattice QCD with $N_f=2$ twisted mass fermion configurations with three pion mass values. The calculation is performed within single-channel L\\"uscher's finite-size formalism. The threshold scattering parameters, namely the scattering length $a_0$ and the effective range $r_0$, for the $s$-wave scattering in $J^P=1^+$ channel are extracted. For the cases in our study, the interaction between the two charmed mesons is weakly repulsive. Our lattice results therefore do not support the possibility of a shallow bound state for the two charmed mesons for the pion mass values we studied. This calculation provides some useful information on the nature of the newly discovered resonance-like structure $Z_c(3900)$ by various experimental groups.

  8. Hunting for Dark Matter Coannihilation by Mixing Dijet Resonances and Missing Transverse Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Buschmann, Malte; Kaminska, Anna; Liu, Jia; de Vries, Maikel; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Felix; Zurita, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Simplified models of the dark matter (co)annihilation mechanism predict striking new collider signatures untested by current searches. These models, which were codified in the coannihilation codex, provide the basis for a dark matter (DM) discovery program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) driven by the measured DM relic density. In this work, we study an exemplary model featuring $s$-channel DM coannihilation through a scalar diquark mediator as a representative case study of scenarios with strongly interacting coannihilation partners. We discuss the full phenomenology of the model, ranging from low energy flavor constraints, vacuum stability requirements, and precision Higgs effects to direct detection and indirect detection prospects. Moreover, motivated by the relic density calculation, we find significant portions of parameter space are compatible with current collider constraints and can be probed by future searches, including a proposed analysis for the novel signature of a dijet resonance accompanied...

  9. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  10. Wideband resonator arrays for electromagnetic energy harvesting and wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavikia, Babak; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates the viability of wideband Ground-backed Complementary Split-Ring Resonator (WG-CSRR) arrays with significant power conversion efficiency and bandwidth enhancement in comparison to the technology used in current electromagnetic energy harvesting systems. Through numerical full-wave analysis, we demonstrated the correlation between the topology of the WG-CSRR patch and the electric current distribution over the patch at different frequencies. A comparative study of power harvesting efficiency and frequency bandwidth through numerical analysis was presented where an array of WG-CSRRs is compared to an array of G-CSRRs and an array of microstrip patch antennas. A significant improvement in bandwidth is achieved in comparison to the G-CSRR array reported in earlier work.

  11. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping, E-mail: liping@cqu.edu.cn; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng [Research Center of Sensors and Instruments, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  12. RecQ Helicase-catalyzed DNA Unwinding Detected by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Dong ZHANG; Shuo-Xing DOU; Ping XIE; Peng-Ye WANG; Xu Guang XI

    2005-01-01

    A fluorometric assay was used to study the DNA unwinding kinetics induced by Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. This assay was based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and carried out on stopped-flow, in which DNA unwinding was monitored by fluorescence emission enhancement of fluorescein resulting from helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding. By this method, we determined the DNA unwinding rate of RecQ at different enzyme concentrations. We also studied the dependences of DNA unwinding magnitude and rate on magnesium ion concentration. We showed that this method could be used to determine the polarity of DNA unwinding. This assay should greatly facilitate further study of the mechanism for RecQcatalyzed DNA unwinding.

  13. Hybrid aptamer-antibody linked fluorescence resonance energy transfer based detection of trinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabherwal, Priyanka; Shorie, Munish; Pathania, Preeti; Chaudhary, Shilpa; Bhasin, K K; Bhalla, Vijayender; Suri, C Raman

    2014-08-05

    Combining synthetic macromolecules and biomolecular recognition units are promising in developing novel diagnostic and analysis techniques for detecting environmental and/or clinically important substances. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) apta-immunosensor for explosive detection is reported using 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) specific aptamer and antibodies tagged with respective FRET pair dyes in a sandwich immunoassay format. FITC-labeled aptamer was used as a binder molecule in the newly developed apta-immunoassay format where the recognition element was specific anti-TNT antibody labeled with rhodamine isothiocyanate. The newly developed sensing platform showed excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of the order of 0.4 nM presenting a promising candidate for routine screening of TNT in samples.

  14. Upconversion nanoparticle-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qian; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-06-15

    This paper reports a novel nanosensor for organophosphorus pesticides based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The detection mechanism is based on the facts that AuNPs quench the fluorescence of UCNPs and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATC) into thiocholine. Under the optimized conditions, the logarithm of the pesticides concentration was proportional to the inhibition efficiency. The detection limits of parathion-methyl, monocrotophos and dimethoate reached 0.67, 23, and 67 ng/L, respectively. Meanwhile, the biosensor shows good sensitivity, stability, and could be successfully applied to detection of OPs in real food samples, suggesting the biosensor has potentially extensive application clinic diagnoses assays.

  15. Systematically Searching for New Resonances at the Energy Frontier using Topological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullah, Mohammad; DiFranzo, Anthony; Frate, Meghan; Pitcher, Craig; Shimmin, Chase; Upadhyay, Suneet; Walker, James; Weatherly, Pierce; Fox, Patrick J; Whiteson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new strategy to systematically search for new physics processes in particle collisions at the energy frontier. An examination of all possible topologies which give identifiable resonant features in a specific final state leads to a tractable number of `topological models' per final state and gives specific guidance for their discovery. Using one specific final state, $\\ell\\ell jj$, as an example, we find that the number of possibilities is reasonable and reveals simple, but as-yet-unexplored, topologies which contain significant discovery potential. We propose analysis techniques and estimate the sensitivity for $pp$ collisions with $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV and $\\mathcal{L}=300$ fb$^{-1}$.

  16. Biosensing with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Coupling between Fluorophores and Nanocarbon Allotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocarbon allotropes (NCAs, including zero-dimensional carbon dots (CDs, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs and two-dimensional graphene, exhibit exceptional material properties, such as unique electrical/thermal conductivity, biocompatibility and high quenching efficiency, that make them well suited for both electrical/electrochemical and optical sensors/biosensors alike. In particular, these material properties have been exploited to significantly enhance the transduction of biorecognition events in fluorescence-based biosensing involving Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET. This review analyzes current advances in sensors and biosensors that utilize graphene, CNTs or CDs as the platform in optical sensors and biosensors. Widely utilized synthesis/fabrication techniques, intrinsic material properties and current research examples of such nanocarbon, FRET-based sensors/biosensors are illustrated. The future outlook and challenges for the research field are also detailed.

  17. Fluorescent resonance energy transfer based detection of biological contaminants through hybrid quantum dot-quencher interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadurai, D; Norton, E; Hale, J; Garland, J W; Stephenson, L D; Stroscio, M A; Sivananthan, S; Kumar, A

    2008-06-01

    A nanoscale sensor employing fluorescent resonance energy transfer interactions between fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) and organic quencher molecules can be used for the multiplexed detection of biological antigens in solution. Detection occurs when the antigens to be detected displace quencher-labelled inactivated (or dead) antigens of the same type attached to QD-antibody complexes through equilibrium reactions. This unquenches the QDs, allowing detection to take place through the observation of photoluminescence in solution or through the fluorescence imaging of unquenched QD complexes trapped on filter surfaces. Multiplexing can be accomplished by using several different sizes of QDs, with each size QD labelled with an antibody for a different antigen, providing the ability to detect several types of antigens or biological contaminants simultaneously in near real-time with high specificity and sensitivity.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer of gas-phase ions under ultra high vacuum and ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankevich, Vladimir; Chagovets, Vitaliy; Widjaja, Fanny; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Yang, Zhiyi; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-05-21

    We report evidence for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of gas-phase ions under ultra high vacuum conditions (10(-9) mbar) inside a mass spectrometer as well as under ambient conditions inside an electrospray plume. Two different FRET pairs based on carboxyrhodamine 6G (donor) and ATTO590 or Bodipy TR (acceptor) dyes were examined and their gas-phase optical properties were studied. Our measurements indicate a different behavior for the two FRET pairs, which can be attributed to their different conformations in the gas phase. Upon desolvation via electrospray ionization, one of the FRET pairs undergoes a conformational change that leads to disappearance of FRET. This study shows the promise of FRET to obtain a direct correlation between solution and gas-phase structures.

  19. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  20. Study on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CdS quantum dots and Eosin Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Zhang, Zhengwei; Yu, Yan; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-03-01

    Water-soluble CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared using mercaptoacetic acid (TGA) as the stabilizer in an aqueous system. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system was constructed between water-soluble CdS QDs (donor) and Eosin Y (acceptor). Several factors that impacted the fluorescence spectra of the FRET system, such as pH (3.05-10.10), concentration of Eosin Y (2-80 mg/L) and concentration of CdS QDs (2-80 mg/L), were investigated and refined. Donor-to-acceptor ratios, the energy transfer efficiency (E) and the distance (r) between CdS QDs and Eosin Y were obtained. The results showed that a FRET system could be established between water-soluble CdS QDs and Eosin Y at pH 5.0; donor-to-acceptor ratios demonstrated a 1: 8 proportion of complexes; the energy transfer efficiency (E) and the distance (r) between the QDs and Eosin Y were 20.07% and 4.36 nm,respectively.

  1. Effect of Zinc oxide nanoparticle on Fluorescence Resonance Energy transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Dey, Dibyendu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Paul, Pabitra Kumar; Das, R.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between two dyes Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G were investigated in solution in the presence and absence of Zinc oxide nanoparticle. Zinc oxide nanostructure is used as the fluorescence enhancing agent for the present study since donor (Fluorescein) fluorescence increase significantly in presence of nanoparticle. Accordingly, the energy transfer efficiency in the presence of nanoparticle increases. The maximum efficiency was 69% for acceptor (Rhodamine 6G) concentration of 0.75 × 10- 5 M. The energy transfer efficiency was found to be pH sensitive and it varies from 4.15% to 90.00% in mixed dye solution for a change in pH from 1.5 to 10.0. With proper calibration it is possible to use the present system under investigation to sense pH which is better with respect to our previous reported results [Spectrochim. Acta Part A. 149 (2015) 143-149] as it can sense a wide range of pH and with better sensitivity.

  2. Resonance energy transfer in self-organized organic/inorganic dendrite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikau, D.; Savateeva, D.; Lesnyak, V.; Gaponik, N.; Fernández, Y. Núnez; Vasilevskiy, M. I.; Costa, M. F.; Mochalov, K. E.; Oleinikov, V.; Rakovich, Y. P.

    2013-09-01

    Hybrid materials formed by semiconductor quantum dots and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes provide a unique combination of enhanced absorption in inorganic constituents with large oscillator strength and extremely narrow exciton bands of the organic component. The optical properties of dendrite structures with fractal dimension 1.7-1.8, formed from J-aggregates integrated with CdTe quantum dots (QDs), have been investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Our results demonstrate that (i) J-aggregates are coupled to QDs by Förster-type resonant energy transfer and (ii) there are energy fluxes from the periphery to the centre of the structure, where the QD density is higher than in the periphery of the dendrite. Such an anisotropic energy transport can be only observed when dendrites are formed from QDs integrated with J-aggregates. These QD/J-aggregate hybrid systems can have applications in light harvesting systems and optical sensors with extended absorption spectra.

  3. Near-resonant rotational energy transfer in HCl–H{sub 2} inelastic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanza, Mathieu; Lique, François, E-mail: francois.lique@univ-lehavre.fr [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, 76058 Le Havre (France); Kalugina, Yulia [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, 76058 Le Havre (France); Department of Optics and Spectroscopy, Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin av., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Wiesenfeld, Laurent [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France)

    2014-02-14

    We present a new four-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface for the HCl–H{sub 2} van der Waals system. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. Potential energy surface was obtained from electronic structure calculations using a coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations method. The four atoms were described using the augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta basis set and bond functions were placed at mid-distance between the HCl and H{sub 2} centers of mass for a better description of the van der Waals interaction. The global minimum is characterized by the well depth of 213.38 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the T-shape structure with H{sub 2} molecule on the H side of the HCl molecule. The dissociation energies D{sub 0} are 34.7 cm{sup −1} and 42.3 cm{sup −1} for the complex with para- and ortho-H{sub 2}, respectively. These theoretical results obtained using our new PES are in good agreement with experimental values [D. T. Anderson, M. Schuder, and D. J. Nesbitt, Chem. Phys. 239, 253 (1998)]. Close coupling calculations of the inelastic integral rotational cross sections of HCl in collisions with para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2} were performed at low and intermediate collisional energies. Significant differences exist between para- and ortho-H{sub 2} results. The strongest collision-induced rotational HCl transitions are the transitions with Δj = 1 for collisions with both para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. Rotational relaxation of HCl in collision with para-H{sub 2} in the rotationally excited states j = 2 is dominated by near-resonant energy transfer.

  4. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang WANG; Jun ZHAO; Jin ZENG; Kai-jie WU; Yu-le CHEN; Xin-ya ng WANG; Luke S CHANG; Da-lin HE

    2011-01-01

    Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detectbladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively.The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair.Methods:Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed,which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family.Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637,253J and T24,as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined.Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.For assays using dual FRET MBs,the excitation wavelength was 488 nm,and the emission detection wavelengths were 520+20 nm and 560+20 nm,respectively.Results:The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals.In contrast,no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs.Conclusion:The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer.

  5. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsun Su, Yen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien [Science and Technology of Accelerator Light Source, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei [Department of Resource Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-05

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  6. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsun Su, Yen; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien; Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  7. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  8. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  9. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Sugimoto, Noriaki [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, Yuya [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corp., 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  10. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  11. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer and living cell imaging of novel pyridyltriphenylamine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duojun; Qian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A novel pyridyltriphenylamine-rhodamine dye PTRh and a pyridyltriphenylamine derivative PTO were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS-MALDI-TOF. PTRh performed typical fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal from pyridyltriphenylamine to rhodamine along with notable color change from green to rose when interacting with Hg2+ in EtOH/H2O. And PTRh as a ratiometric probe for Hg2+ based on FRET could achieve a very low detection limit of 32 nM and energy transfer efficiency of 83.7% in aqueous organic system. On the other hand, spectra properties of PTO in its aggregates, THF/H2O mixed solution and silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) dispersed in water were investigated. And the results indicated PTO exhibited bright green fluorescence in solid state, and PTO was successfully encapsulated in silica matrix (30-40 nm), emitting bright blue fluorescence with 11.7% quantum yield. Additionally, living cell imaging experiments demonstrated that PTRh could effectively response to intracellular Hg2+ and PTO-doped Si-NPs were well uptaken by MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It could be concluded that the chromophores are promising materials used as biosensors.

  12. Heavy baryonic resonances, multi strange hadrons and equilibration at SIS18 energies

    CERN Document Server

    Steinheimer, J; Becattini, F; Stock, R; Bleicher, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the details and time dependence of particle production in nuclear collisions at a fixed target beam energy of $E_{\\mathrm{lab}}= 1.76$ A GeV with the UrQMD transport model. We find that the previously proposed production mechanism for multi strange hadrons, $\\phi$ and $\\Xi$, are possible due to secondary interactions of incoming nuclei of the projectile and target with already created nuclear resonances, while the Fermi momenta of the nuclei play only a minor role. We also show how the centrality dependence of these particle multiplicities can be used to confirm the proposed mechanism, as it strongly depends on the number of participants in the reaction. Furthermore we investigate the time dependence of particle production in collisions of Ca+Ca at this beam energy, in order to understand the origins of the apparent chemical equilibration of the measured particle yields. We find that indeed the light hadron yields appear to be in equilibrium already from the very early stage of the collision while in...

  13. Electric and magnetic properties computed for valence bond structures: is there a link between pauling resonance energy and ring current?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, Remco W A

    2006-04-28

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties have been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their individual Kekulé resonance structures. The results show that there is no direct relationship between the Pauling resonance energy and the properties; the response properties are weighted averages of the properties of the individual structures. According to the aromaticity criteria based on molecular properties, one-structure benzene would be aromatic; thus, concerning molecular properties, spin-coupled bonds do not behave like localized bonds in Lewis structures, with which they are usually associated.

  14. Energy transfer of surface wind-induced currents to the deep ocean via resonance with the Coriolis force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2017-03-01

    There are two main comparable sources of energy to the deep ocean-winds and tides. However, the identity of the most efficient mechanism that transfers wind energy to the deep ocean is still debated. Here we study, using oceanic general circulation model simulations and analytic derivations, the way that the wind directly supplies energy down to the bottom of the ocean when it is stochastic and temporally correlated or when it is periodic with a frequency that matches the Coriolis frequency. Basically, under these, commonly observed, conditions, one of the wind components resonates with the Coriolis frequency. Using reanalysis surface wind data and our simple model, we show that about one-third of the kinetic energy that is associated with wind-induced currents resides in the abyssal ocean, highlighting the importance of the resonance of the wind with the Coriolis force.

  15. Resonance effects on the dynamics of dense granular beds: achieving optimal energy transfer in vibrated granular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windows-Yule, C.R.K.; Rosato, A.D.; Thornton, A.R.; Parker, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of experimental techniques and discrete particle method simulations, we investigate the resonant behaviour of a dense, vibrated granular system. We demonstrate that a bed of particles driven by a vibrating plate may exhibit marked differences in its internal energy dependent on t

  16. Electric and Magnetic properties Computed for Valence Bond Structures: Is There a Link between Pauling Resonance Energy and Ring Current?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, R.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties haven been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their i

  17. Potential energy surfaces of short polyenes in the state T1 : analysis of time resolved resonance Raman spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlandi, G.; Negri, F.; Wilbrandt, R.; Langkilde, F.W.; Brouwer, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of T1 resonance Raman spectra of some conjugated compounds is discussed making use of semiempirical quantum chemical calculations. Information obtained about T1 potential energy curve indicates that in short polyenes the perpendicular form is roughly degenerate with the trans isomer. Pr

  18. Förster resonance energy transfer demonstrates a flavonoid metabolon in living plant cells that displays competitive interactions between enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crosby, K.C.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Winkel, B.S.J.

    2011-01-01

    We have used Förster resonance energy transfer detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) to provide the first evidence from living plants cells for the existence of a flavonoid metabolon. The distribution of flux within this system may be regulated by the direct competition of

  19. Peptide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer protease substrates for the detection and diagnosis of Bacillus species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hulst, A.G.; Alphen, P.T.W. van; Roffel, S.; Schans, M.J. van der; Merkel, T.; Belkum, A. van; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of a highly specific enzyme-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay for easy and rapid detection both in vitro and in vivo of Bacillus spp., among which are the members of the B. cereus group. Synthetic substrates for B. anthracis proteases were designed

  20. Estimating protein-protein interaction affinity in single living cells using Förster resonance energy transfer measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet; Raarup, Merete Krog; Rubak, Ege

    Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) images we study the possibility of estimating the equilibrium dissociation constant Kd and the intrinsic FRET efficiency Em from single cells. We model the measurement uncertainty in the acquired images and use the method of total least squares...

  1. Expanding the bioluminescent toolkit for in vivo imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Paley, Miranda Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is among the most dynamic imaging modalities for visualizing whole cells and gene expression patterns in vivo. This technique captures light emission from the luciferase-catalyzed oxidation of small molecule luciferins with highly sensitive CCD cameras. While powerful, current options for multiplexed BLI in mice are limited by the number of luciferase/luciferin pairs found in nature. Our lab aims to expand the bioluminescent toolkit by pairing mutant luciferases ...

  2. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse.

  3. BIOLUMINESCENCE: TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY BEYOND THE UNIVERSITY WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jesus de Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of video in teaching and learning processes provides a challenging environment, able to stimulate the intellect and facilitate understanding in life science studies. Videos can be of extraordinary importance in education and dissemination of knowledge, contributing to greater learning, but is rarely used and exploited properly, especially for teaching biochemistry. Biochemistry is considered complex because it involves many molecular structures and processes, especially considering the number of events and molecules involved in the metabolism. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to introduce biochemistry for the students of basic education using the theme "Light, Science and Life" in a playful and fun way. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A video about bioluminescence was designed and prepared aiming to use it as a support for learning biochemistry by students of basic education of public schools located in Salvador, Bahia. In order to prepare the video, undergraduate students initially revised the literature in order to acquire proper knowledge, and along with their teacher advisor worked the elaboration of texts, textbook and questionnaire and applied at school. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Analysis the qualitative results of the experiment on the preparation and use of the video about "Bioluminescence" focused mainly on the content of biochemistry linked to theme Light, Science and Life, and demonstrated the importance of such work in the teaching-learning process. The dynamics used allowed greater interaction between students and teacher, and the teaching of biochemistry in a fun way beyond the university walls. CONCLUSION: The teaching through recreational resources, e.g. videos and other educational strategies that foster learning should be encouraged from basic education, always bearing in order to transmit through these teaching methods the main concepts covered in biochemistry.

  4. Development of homogeneous binding assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and Alexa Fluor fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Beechem, Joseph M

    2006-10-01

    We studied the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots emitting at 565, 605, and 655 nm as energy donors and Alexa Fluor fluorophores with absorbance maxima at 594, 633, 647, and 680 nm as energy acceptors. As a first step, we prepared covalent conjugates between all three types of quantum dots and each of the Alexa Fluor fluorophores that could act as an energy acceptor. All of these conjugates displayed efficient resonance energy transfer. Then we prepared covalent conjugates of these quantum dots with biotin, fluorescein, and cortisol and established that the binding of these conjugates to suitable Alexa Fluor-labeled antibodies and streptavidin (in the case of biotin) can be efficiently detected by measuring the resonance energy transfer in homogeneous solutions. Finally, based on these observations, competitive binding assays for these three small analytes were developed. The performance of these assays as a function of the degree of labeling of the quantum dots was evaluated. It was found that decreasing the degree of loading of the quantum dots leads to decreases of the limits of detection. The results show the great potential of this FRET system for the development of new homogeneous binding assays.

  5. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 μg L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 μg L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity

  6. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Campbell

    Full Text Available Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  8. Stimulation of bioluminescence in Noctiluca sp. using controlled temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Li, GuiJuan; Liu, HuanYing; Hu, HaoHao; Zhang, XueGang

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence induced by multifarious stimuli has long been observed and is remains under investigation because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism underlying bioluminescence is not yet fully understood. This work presents a new experimental method for studying Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence under temperature change stimulation. It is a study of Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence using controlled temperature changes in a tank. A characteristic of this experiment is the large volume of water used (1 m(3) in a tank of 2 × 1 × 1 m). Temperature changes were controlled by two methods. In the first, a flask filled with hot water was introduced into the tank and in the second, a water heater was used in the tank. Temperature changes were recorded using sensors. Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence was recorded using a Canon 5D Mark II and this allowed the characteristics of Noctiluca sp. bioluminescence under temperature change stimulation to be monitored.

  9. Neutron resonance transmission spectroscopy with high spatial and energy resolution at the J-PARC pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Ooi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kamiyama, T.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Shiota, Y. [Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8 Kita-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2014-05-11

    The sharp variation of neutron attenuation at certain energies specific to particular nuclides (the lower range being from ∼1 eV up to ∼1 keV), can be exploited for the remote mapping of element and/or isotope distributions, as well as temperature probing, within relatively thick samples. Intense pulsed neutron beam-lines at spallation sources combined with a high spatial, high-timing resolution neutron counting detector, provide a unique opportunity to measure neutron transmission spectra through the time-of-flight technique. We present the results of experiments where spatially resolved neutron resonances were measured, at energies up to 50 keV. These experiments were performed with the intense flux low background NOBORU neutron beamline at the J-PARC neutron source and the high timing resolution (∼20 ns at epithermal neutron energies) and spatial resolution (∼55 µm) neutron counting detector using microchannel plates coupled to a Timepix electronic readout. Simultaneous element-specific imaging was carried out for several materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼150 µm. The high timing resolution of our detector combined with the low background beamline, also enabled characterization of the neutron pulse itself – specifically its pulse width, which varies with neutron energy. The results of our measurements are in good agreement with the predicted results for the double pulse structure of the J-PARC facility, which provides two 100 ns-wide proton pulses separated by 600 ns, broadened by the neutron energy moderation process. Thermal neutron radiography can be conducted simultaneously with resonance transmission spectroscopy, and can reveal the internal structure of the samples. The transmission spectra measured in our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of mapping elemental distributions using this non-destructive technique, for those elements (and in certain cases, specific isotopes), which have resonance energies below a few keV, and with lower

  10. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  11. Development of a resonant laser ionization gas cell for high-energy, short-lived nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sonoda, T; Tomita, H; Sakamoto, C; Takatsuka, T; Furukawa, T; Iimura, H; Ito, Y; Kubo, T; Matsuo, Y; Mita, H; Naimi, S; Nakamura, S; Noto, T; Schury, P; Shinozuka, T; Wakui, T; Miyatake, H; Jeong, S; Ishiyama, H; Watanabe, Y X; Hirayama, Y; Okada, K; Takamine, A

    2012-01-01

    A new laser ion source configuration based on resonant photoionization in a gas cell has been developed at RIBF RIKEN. This system is intended for the future PArasitic RI-beam production by Laser Ion-Source (PALIS) project which will be installed at RIKEN's fragment separator, BigRIPS. A novel implementation of differential pumping, in combination with a sextupole ion beam guide (SPIG), has been developed. A few small scroll pumps create a pressure difference from 1000 hPa - 10^-3 Pa within a geometry drastically miniaturized compared to conventional systems. This system can utilize a large exit hole for fast evacuation times, minimizing the decay loss for short-lived nuclei during extraction from a buffer gas cell, while sufficient gas cell pressure is maintained for stopping high energy RI-beams. In spite of the motion in a dense pressure gradient, the photo-ionized ions inside the gas cell are ejected with an assisting force gas jet and successfully transported to a high-vacuum region via SPIG followed by ...

  12. Passive suppression of helicopter ground resonance using nonlinear energy sinks attached on the helicopter blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeot, B.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the passive control of a rotor instability named helicopter Ground Resonance (GR). The passive device consists of a set of essential cubic nonlinear absorbers named Nonlinear Energy Sinks (NES) each of them positioned on a blade. A dynamic model reproducing helicopter GR instability is presented and transformed to a time-invariant nonlinear system using a multi-blade coordinate transformation based on Fourier transform mapping the dynamic state variables into a non-rotating reference frame. Combining complexification, slow/fast partition of the dynamics and averaging procedure, a reduced model is obtained which allowed us to use the so-called geometric singular perturbation analysis to characterize the steady state response regimes. As in the case of a NES attached to the fuselage, it is shown that under suitable conditions, GR instability can be completely suppressed, partially suppressed through periodic response or strongly modulated response. Relevant analytical results are compared, for validation purposes, to direct integration of the reference and reduced models.

  13. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and Laser Fluorescent Analysis of Defects in DNA Double Helix

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Giorgadze, Tamar G; Jaliashvili, Zaza V; Chkhaberidze, Jemal G; Monaselidze, Jamlet R; Khuskivadze, Temur B

    2013-01-01

    Real time laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy usage for microanalysis of DNA double helix defects is shown. The method is based on Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in intercalator-donor pair (acridine orange as a donor and ethidium bromide as an acceptor). Transition metal ions such as Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), photo- and thermo effects were used to cause double helix defects in DNA. FRET radii were experimentally estimated in background electrolyte solution (0.01 M NaNO3) and proved to be 3.9 +- 0.3 nm and the data are in satisfactory agreement with the theoretically calculated value Ro = 3.5 +- 0.3 nm. Concentration of DNA sites, exposed to Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I) ions, AgNPs impact as well as laser irradiation ({\\lambda} = 457 nm) and temperature, which are applicable for intercalation, were estimated in relative units. FRET method allows to estimate the concentration of double helix areas with high quality stability applicable for intercalation in DNA after it was subjec...

  14. Experimental Validation of a Theory for a Variable Resonant Frequency Wave Energy Converter (VRFWEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minok; Virey, Louis; Chen, Zhongfei; Mäkiharju, Simo

    2016-11-01

    A point absorber wave energy converter designed to adapt to changes in wave frequency and be highly resilient to harsh conditions, was tested in a wave tank for wave periods from 0.8 s to 2.5 s. The VRFWEC consists of a closed cylindrical floater containing an internal mass moving vertically and connected to the floater through a spring system. The internal mass and equivalent spring constant are adjustable and enable to match the resonance frequency of the device to the exciting wave frequency, hence optimizing the performance. In a full scale device, a Permanent Magnet Linear Generator will convert the relative motion between the internal mass and the floater into electricity. For a PMLG as described in Yeung et al. (OMAE2012), the electromagnetic force proved to cause dominantly linear damping. Thus, for the present preliminary study it was possible to replace the generator with a linear damper. While the full scale device with 2.2 m diameter is expected to generate O(50 kW), the prototype could generate O(1 W). For the initial experiments the prototype was restricted to heave motion and data compared to predictions from a newly developed theoretical model (Chen, 2016).

  15. Förster resonance energy transfer as a tool to study photoreceptor biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovan, Stephanie C.; Howell, Scott; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-11-01

    Vision is initiated in photoreceptor cells of the retina by a set of biochemical events called phototransduction. These events occur via coordinated dynamic processes that include changes in secondary messenger concentrations, conformational changes and post-translational modifications of signaling proteins, and protein-protein interactions between signaling partners. A complete description of the orchestration of these dynamic processes is still unavailable. Described in this work is the first step in the development of tools combining fluorescent protein technology, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and transgenic animals that have the potential to reveal important molecular insights about the dynamic processes occurring in photoreceptor cells. We characterize the fluorescent proteins SCFP3A and SYFP2 for use as a donor-acceptor pair in FRET assays, which will facilitate the visualization of dynamic processes in living cells. We also demonstrate the targeted expression of these fluorescent proteins to the rod photoreceptor cells of Xenopus laevis, and describe a general method for detecting FRET in these cells. The general approaches described here can address numerous types of questions related to phototransduction and photoreceptor biology by providing a platform to visualize dynamic processes in molecular detail within a native context.

  16. Förster resonance energy transfer as a tool to study photoreceptor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovan, Stephanie C; Howell, Scott; Park, Paul S-H

    2010-01-01

    Vision is initiated in photoreceptor cells of the retina by a set of biochemical events called phototransduction. These events occur via coordinated dynamic processes that include changes in secondary messenger concentrations, conformational changes and post-translational modifications of signaling proteins, and protein-protein interactions between signaling partners. A complete description of the orchestration of these dynamic processes is still unavailable. Described in this work is the first step in the development of tools combining fluorescent protein technology, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and transgenic animals that have the potential to reveal important molecular insights about the dynamic processes occurring in photoreceptor cells. We characterize the fluorescent proteins SCFP3A and SYFP2 for use as a donor-acceptor pair in FRET assays, which will facilitate the visualization of dynamic processes in living cells. We also demonstrate the targeted expression of these fluorescent proteins to the rod photoreceptor cells of Xenopus laevis, and describe a general method for detecting FRET in these cells. The general approaches described here can address numerous types of questions related to phototransduction and photoreceptor biology by providing a platform to visualize dynamic processes in molecular detail within a native context.

  17. Novel fluorescent silica nanoparticle probe for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamad Khalil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and utilization of a novel particulate label based on fluorescent hybrid silica nanoparticles are reported in this article. These fluorescent nanoparticles have shown several unique advantages over existing dye molecules, quantum dots, and latex-based fluorescent particles in easy preparation, good photostability and high sensitivity. Alexa Fluor® dyes, the leading and most trusted fluorescent dyes available today were used to make the grafting onto silica nanoparticles. Alexa Fluor® was modified with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APS to provide reactive groups Alexa-APS. Alexa-APS can be grafted onto silica nanoparticles via silylation process. The silica nanoparticles were prepared by Stöber methods and treated by Etching to functionalized their surface. A mixture of Alexafluoro donor A488 and Alexafluoro acceptor A568 coated silica nanoparticles leads to the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET by excitation of the acceptor when the particles are distant by less than 10nm.

  18. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  19. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle eTallet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin receptor (PRLR is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L or PRLR blockade (antagonist involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue-native electrophoresis, BRET1, we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell-surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements.

  20. Nicking enzyme-assisted biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Li, Wenkai; Duan, Yingfen; Li, Zhongjie; Deng, Le

    2014-05-15

    Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) outbreaks continue to occur, and have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvC I is widely used for the detection of biomolecules and displays activity for specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In this study, we developed a biosensor to detect S. enteritidis based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using nicking enzyme and carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because of the quenching effect of black hole quencher 1 (BHQ 1), the CNPs do not fluoresce in the reaction system. When the target bacteria are added, the nicking enzyme recognizes and cleaves the dsDNA fabricated by the interaction between probe and target. As a result, the CNPs dissociate from BHQ 1 and emit strong fluorescence. Using the nicking enzyme, the fluorescence signals of the biosensor are greatly amplified. The biosensor exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of S. enteritidis ranging from 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in water and from 1.5 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in milk. The present results indicate that our FRET-based detection system can be widely employed for the effective detection of pathogens.

  1. Analyzing the influence of contact-induced quenching processes on Förster resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Ralf; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2007-07-01

    Experiments based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are widely used to obtain information on conformational dynamics of biomolecular systems. To reliably measure FRET, accurate knowledge of photophysical properties of the used fluorophores is indispensable. In high FRET constructs donor (D) and acceptor (A) fluorophores can approach each other close enough that electronic interactions might occur. When separated by distances on the order of van der Waals radii, photophysical properties can be changed reversibly, opening new non-radiative relaxation pathways, or irreversibly, chemically altering the fluorophores. Even transient contacts can thus compromise accurate FRET measurements. To study FRET and competing D-A contact-induced processes we labeled the amino acid cystein (Cys) with two fluorophores. A donor (D; TMR or Cy3B) was attached to the thiol group and an acceptor (A; Atto647N) to the amino group of Cys. Absorption spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were used to characterize the different A-Cys-D complexes at the ensemble level. In addition, we performed single-molecule FRET experiments using alternating-laser excitation to study the heterogeneity of the FRET-systems. We identified competing quenching processes severely changing D and A quantum yields upon fluorophore contact. The results are applicable for quantitative analysis of FRET in dynamic molecular systems that allow transient contact between D and A fluorophores.

  2. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Bid Activation in Living Cells during Ultraviolet-induced Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinyuan WU; Da XING; Lei LIU; Tongsheng CHEN; Wei R. CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a DNA-damaging agent that triggers apoptosis through both the membrane death receptor and mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathways. Bid, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2family member, is important in most cell types to apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, YFP-Bid-CFP, comprised of yellow and cyan fluorescent protein and a full length Bid,was used as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis (FRET) probe. Using the FRET technique based on YFP-Bid-CFP, we found that Bid activation was initiated at 9±1 h after UV irradiation, and the average duration of the activation was 75± 10 min. Bid activation coincided with a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential with an average duration of 50±10 min. When cells were pretreated with Z-IETD-fmk(caspase-8 specific inhibitor) the process of Bid activation was completely inhibited, but the apoptosis was only partially affected. Z-DEVD-fmk (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-FA-fmk (non asp specific inhibitor) did not block Bid activation. Furthermore, the endogenous Bid activation with or without Z-IETD-fmk in response to UV irradiation was confirmed by Western blotting. In summary, using the FRET technique, we observed the dynamics of Bid activation during UV-induced apoptosis and found that it was a caspase-8 dependent event.

  3. Photoswitchable semiconductor nanocrystals with self-regulating photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián A.; Gillanders, Florencia; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules and nanoparticles constitute superior biosensors for a wide range of industrial, research and biomedical applications. Rendered reversible by spontaneous or deterministic means, such probes facilitate many of the techniques in fluorescence microscopy that surpass the optical resolution dictated by diffraction. Here we have devised a family of photoswitchable quantum dots (psQDs) in which the semiconductor core functions as a fluorescence donor in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and multiple photochromic diheteroarylethene groups function as acceptors upon activation by ultraviolet light. The QDs were coated with a polymer bearing photochromic groups attached via linkers of different length. Despite the resulting nominal differences in donor-acceptor separation and anticipated FRET efficiencies, the maximum quenching of all psQD preparations was 38±2%. This result was attributable to the large ultraviolet absorption cross-section of the QDs, leading to preferential cycloreversion of photochromic groups situated closer to the nanoparticle surface and/or with a more favourable orientation.

  4. Carbon quantum dots as fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for organophosphate pesticides determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Song, Yang; Yan, Xu; Zhu, Chengzhou; Ma, Yongqiang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-03-07

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) obtained from natural organics attract significant attention due to the abundance of carbon sources, varieties of heteroatom doping (such as N, S, P) and good biocompatibility of precursor. In this study, tunable fluorescence emission CQDs originated from chlorophyll were synthesized and characterized. The fluorescence emission can be effectively quenched by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Thiocholine, which was produced from acetylthiocholine (ATC) by the hydrolysis of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), could cause the aggregation of Au NPs and the corresponding recovery of FRET-quenched fluorescence emission. The catalytic activity of BChE could be irreversibly inhibited by organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), thus, the recovery effect was reduced. By evaluating the fluorescence emission intensity of CQDs, a FRET-based sensing platform for OPs determination was established. Paraoxon was studied as an example of OPs. The sensing platform displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the paraoxon concentrations in the range of 0.05-50μgL(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05μgL(-1). Real sample study in tap and river water revealed that this sensing platform was repeatable and accurate. The results indicate that the OP sensor is promising for applications in food safety and environmental monitoring.

  5. Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer: Coupling between Chromophore Molecules and Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yue; Xie, Tao; Qian, Ruo-Can; Long, Yi-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from a single metallic nanoparticle to the molecules adsorbed on its surface has attracted more and more attentions in recent years. Here, a molecular beacon (MB)-regulated PRET coupling system composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and chromophore molecules has been designed to study the influence of PRET effect on the scattering spectra of GNPs. In this system, the chromophore molecules are tagged to the 5'-end of MB, which can form a hairpin structure and modified on the surface of GNPs by its thiol-labeled 3'-end. Therefore, the distance between GNPs and chromophore molecules can be adjusted through the open and close of the MB loop. From the peak shift, the PRET interactions of different GNPs-chromophore molecules coupling pairs have been calculated by discrete dipole approximation and the fitting results match well with the experimental data. Therefore, the proposed system has been successfully applied for the analysis of PRET situation between various metallic nanoparticles and chromophore molecules, and provides a useful tool for the potential application in screening the PRET-based nanoplasmonic sensors.

  6. Interaction between fluorescein isothiocyanate and carbon dots: Inner filter effect and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Xu, Chaoyong; Bai, Yanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Dongmei; Liang, Jiangong; Liu, Lingzhi; Han, Heyou

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used for the preparation of multifunctional probes by conjugation with organic fluorescent dyes. However, the effect of organic fluorescent dyes on CDs still remains poorly understood. Herein, the effect of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) on CDs was explored by spectroscopic techniques at pH 5.1, 7.0 and 9.0. The fluorescent intensity of CDs was found to be quenched gradually after mixing directly with different concentrations of FITC, but the fluorescent lifetime of CDs remained unchanged. According to the results of UV-vis absorption spectra and fluorescent lifetime measurements, a pH-dependent inner filter effect (IFE) between CDs and FITC was proposed. However, the fluorescent lifetime of CDs deceased after their conjugation with FITC, implying the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CDs and FITC. This study has revealed two different effects of FITC on CDs with varying pH values and provided useful theoretical guidelines for further research on the interaction between other nanoparticles and fluorophores.

  7. Highly sensitive turn-on fluorescence detection of thrombomodulin based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Liyan; Zhu, Jiaming; Wang, Wen; Jin, Lehe; Fu, Yanjiao; Duan, Bohui; Tan, Liang

    2017-02-01

    As an integral glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial cells, thrombomodulin (TM) has very high affinity for thrombin. TM has been regarded to be a marker of endothelial damage since it can be released during endothelial cell injury. In this work, a highly sensitive fluorescence method for the quantitative detection of TM was developed. TM antibody (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were bound on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to construct BSA-AuNPs-Ab nanocomposites and they were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The fluorescence of acridine orange (AO) was quenched by the prepared gold nanocomposites based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the presence of TM, the fluorescence was turned on due to the effective separation of AO from the surface of gold nanocomposites. Under optimum conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the TM concentration from 0.1 pg mL- 1 to 5 ng mL- 1 with a low detection limit of 12 fg mL- 1. The release of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) by the injured HUVEC-C cells in the presence of H2O2 was investigated using the proposed method. The released sTM content in the growth medium was found to be increased with the enhancement of contact time of the cells with H2O2.

  8. Association of a novel preribosomal complex in Trypanosoma brucei determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ciganda, Martin; Williams, Noreen

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that the trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37 form a unique preribosomal complex with ribosomal protein L5 and 5S rRNA in the nucleoplasm. We hypothesize that this novel trimolecular complex is necessary for stabilizing 5S rRNA in Trypanosoma brucei and is essential for the survival of the parasite. In vitro quantitative analysis of the association between the proteins L5 and P34 is fundamental to our understanding of this novel complex and thus our ability to exploit its unique characteristics. Here we used in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to analyze the association between L5 and P34. First, we demonstrated that FRET can be used to confirm the association between L5 and P34. We then determined that the binding constant for L5 and P34 is 0.60 ± 0.03 μM, which is in the range of protein-protein binding constants for RNA binding proteins. In addition, we used FRET to identify the critical regions of L5 and P34 involved in the protein-protein association. We found that the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motif (RRM) of P34 and the L18 domain of L5 are important for the association of the two proteins with each other. These results provide us with the framework for the discovery of ways to disrupt this essential complex.

  9. Photoswitchable semiconductor nanocrystals with self-regulating photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián A; Gillanders, Florencia; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A; Jovin, Thomas M

    2015-01-16

    Photoswitchable molecules and nanoparticles constitute superior biosensors for a wide range of industrial, research and biomedical applications. Rendered reversible by spontaneous or deterministic means, such probes facilitate many of the techniques in fluorescence microscopy that surpass the optical resolution dictated by diffraction. Here we have devised a family of photoswitchable quantum dots (psQDs) in which the semiconductor core functions as a fluorescence donor in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and multiple photochromic diheteroarylethene groups function as acceptors upon activation by ultraviolet light. The QDs were coated with a polymer bearing photochromic groups attached via linkers of different length. Despite the resulting nominal differences in donor-acceptor separation and anticipated FRET efficiencies, the maximum quenching of all psQD preparations was 38±2%. This result was attributable to the large ultraviolet absorption cross-section of the QDs, leading to preferential cycloreversion of photochromic groups situated closer to the nanoparticle surface and/or with a more favourable orientation.

  10. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  11. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S., E-mail: lgoldner@physics.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Milas, Peker [Department of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  13. Near-Infrared Resonance Energy Transfer Glucose Biosensors in Hybrid Microcapsule Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike McShane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence-based sensing systems offer potential for noninvasive monitoring with implantable devices, but require carrier technologies that provide suitable immobilization, accessibility, and biocompatibility. Recent developments towards this goal include a competitive binding assay for glucose that has been encapsulated in semipermeable microcapsule carriers. This paper describes an extension of this work to increase the applicability to in vivo monitoring, wherein two significant developments are described: (1 a near-infrared resonance energy transfer system for transducing glucose concentration, and (2 novel hybrid organic-inorganic crosslinked microcapsules as carriers. The quenching-based assay is a competitive binding (CB system based on apo-glucose oxidase (AG as the receptor and dextran as the competitive ligand. The encapsulated quencher-labeled dextran and near infrared donor-labeled glucose receptor showed a stable and reversible response with tunable sensitivity of 1–5%/mM over the physiological range, making these transducers attractive for continuous monitoring for biomedical applications.

  14. A silver nanorod resonance rayleigh scattering-energy transfer analytical platform for trace tea polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aihui; Wang, Yaohui; Wen, Guiqing; Zhang, Xinghui; Luo, Yanghe; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-04-15

    The stable silver nanorod (AgNR) sol in red was prepared by the two-step procedure of NaBH4-H2O2 and citrate heating reduction, and it exhibited a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 346 nm. In pH 3.8 HAc-NaAc buffer solution, tea polyphenols (TP) reacted with ammonium molybdate (AM) to form yellow organic molybdate (OM) as receptor that was closed to the donor of AgNR, the RRS energy transfer (RRS-ET) takes place, owing to the overlapping between the AgNR RRS spectra and OM absorption spectra. When TP concentration increased, the RRS intensity decreased due to the RRS-ET increasing. So, a simple and sensitive AgNR surface plasmon RRS-ET analytical platform was fabricated to detect trace TP in the range of 0.05-0.85 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 μg/mL TP. The TP in tea samples was analyzed by this RRS-ET analysis platform, with satisfactory results.

  15. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13 μg mL- 1 and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program.

  16. Tomographic imaging of flourescence resonance energy transfer in highly light scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; McGinty, James; Tahir, Khadija B.; Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Mohan, P. Surya; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Sardini, Alessandro; French, Paul M. W.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional localization of protein conformation changes in turbid media using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) was investigated by tomographic fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FRET occurs when a donor fluorophore, initially in its electronic excited state, transfers energy to an acceptor fluorophore in close proximity through non-radiative dipole-dipole coupling. An acceptor effectively behaves as a quencher of the donor's fluorescence. The quenching process is accompanied by a reduction in the quantum yield and lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Therefore, FRET can be localized by imaging changes in the quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Extending FRET to diffuse optical tomography has potentially important applications such as in vivo studies in small animal. We show that FRET can be localized by reconstructing the quantum yield and lifetime distribution from time-resolved non-invasive boundary measurements of fluorescence and transmitted excitation radiation. Image reconstruction was obtained by an inverse scattering algorithm. Thus we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first tomographic FLIM-FRET imaging in turbid media. The approach is demonstrated by imaging a highly scattering cylindrical phantom concealing two thin wells containing cytosol preparations of HEK293 cells expressing TN-L15, a cytosolic genetically-encoded calcium FRET sensor. A 10mM calcium chloride solution was added to one of the wells to induce a protein conformation change upon binding to TN-L15, resulting in FRET and a corresponding decrease in the donor fluorescence lifetime. The resulting fluorescence lifetime distribution, the quantum efficiency, absorption and scattering coefficients were reconstructed.

  17. Resonance estimates of O(p^6) low-energy constants and QCD short-distance constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Knecht, M; Knecht, Marc; Nyffeler, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Starting from the study of the low-energy and high-energy behaviours of the QCD three-point functions , and , several O(p^6) low-energy constants of the chiral Lagrangian are evaluated within the framework of the lowest meson dominance (LMD) approximation to the large-N_C limit of QCD. In certain cases, values that differ substantially from estimates based on a resonance Lagrangian are obtained. It is pointed out that the differences arise through the fact that QCD short-distance constraints are in general not correctly taken into account in the approaches using resonance Lagrangians. We discuss the implications of our results for the O(p^6) counterterm contributions to the vector form factor of the pion and to the decay \\pi -> e \

  18. Observation of Scattering Resonances in the Penning Ionization of NH$_3$ by He($^3$S$_1$) at Low Collision Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jankunas, Justin; Hapka, Michal; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A merged-beam study of the gas phase He($^3$S$_1$) + NH$_3$ Penning ionization reaction dynamics in the collision energy range 3.3 $\\mu$eV $<$ E $<$ 10 meV is presented. In this energy range the reaction rate is governed by long-range attraction. Shape resonances are observed at collision energies of 1.8 meV and 7.3 meV and are assigned to $\\ell$=15,16 and $\\ell$=20,21 partial waves, respectively. The experimental results are well reproduced by theoretical calculations with the short-range reaction probability $P_{sr}=0.035$.

  19. Statistical analysis of the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance of the High Energy Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yi; Duan, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    In a diffraction-limited storage ring, half integer resonances can have strong effects on the beam dynamics, associated with the large detuning terms from the strong focusing and strong sextupoles as required for an ultralow emittance. In this study, the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance (MA) was statistically analyzed based on one design of the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS). It was found that the probability of MA reduction due to crossing of half integer resonances is closely correlated with the level of beta beats at the nominal tunes, but independent of the error sources. The analysis indicated that for the presented HEPS lattice design, the rms amplitude of beta beats should be kept below 1.5% horizontally and 2.5% vertically to reach a small MA reduction probability of about 1%.

  20. Bioluminescence tracking of alginate micro-encapsulated cell transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiernan, Aubrey R; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based therapies to treat loss-of-function hormonal disorders such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease are routinely coupled with encapsulation strategies, but an understanding of when and why grafts fail in vivo is lacking. Consequently, investigators cannot clearly define the key factors that influence graft success. Although bioluminescence is a popular method to track the survival of free cells transplanted in preclinical models, little is known of the ability to use bioluminescence for real-time tracking of microencapsulated cells. Furthermore, the impact that dynamic imaging distances may have, due to freely-floating microcapsules in vivo, on cell survival monitoring is unknown. This work addresses these questions by applying bioluminescence to a pancreatic substitute based on microencapsulated cells. Recombinant insulin-secreting cells were transduced with a luciferase lentivirus and microencapsulated in Ba(2+) crosslinked alginate for in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro quantitative bioluminescence monitoring was possible and viable microencapsulated cells were followed in real time under both normoxic and anoxic conditions. Although in vivo dispersion of freely-floating microcapsules in the peritoneal cavity limited the analysis to a qualitative bioluminescence evaluation, signals consistently four orders of magnitude above background were clear indicators of temporal cell survival. Strong agreement between in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation over time was discovered by making direct bioluminescence comparisons between explanted microcapsules and parallel in vitro cultures. Broader application of this bioluminescence approach to retrievable transplants, in supplement to currently used end-point physiological tests, could improve understanding and accelerate development of cell-based therapies for critical clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of neurogenesis - the role of the blood brain barrier in an experimental model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Inga B; Schelhaas, Sonja; Zinnhardt, Bastian; Viel, Thomas; Hermann, Sven; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2017-02-13

    Bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase in Doublecortin(+) (Dcx) neuroblasts might serve as a powerful tool to study the role of neurogenesis in models of brain injury and neurodegeneration using non-invasive, longitudinal in vivo imaging. Therefore, we aimed to use BLI in B6(Cg)-Tyrc-2J/J Dcx-Luc (Doublecortin-Luciferase, Dcx-Luc) mice to investigate its suitability to assess neurogenesis in a unilateral injection model of Parkinson's disease. We further aimed to assess the blood brain barrier leakage associated with the intranigral 6-OHDA injection to evaluate its impact on substrate delivery and bioluminescence signal intensity. Two weeks after lesion, we observed an increase in bioluminescence signal in the ipsilateral hippocampal region in both, 6-OHDA and vehicle injected Dcx-Luc mice. At the same time, no corresponding increase in Dcx(+) neuroblast numbers could be observed in the dentate gyrus of C57Bl6 mice. Blood brain barrier leakage was observed in the hippocampal region and in the degenerating substantia nigra of C57Bl6 mice in vivo using T1 weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gadovist(®) and ex vivo using Evans Blue Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging and mouse Immunoglobulin G staining. Our data suggests a BLI signal dependency on blood brain barrier permeability, underlining a major pitfall of substrate/tracer dependent imaging in invasive disease models.

  2. Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for low-energy electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J

    2016-01-01

    Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are presented. Transitions between all 42 vibrational levels of O$_2(\\textrm{X}\\ ^3\\Sigma_g^- $) are considered. Molecular rotations are parameterized by the rotational quantum number $J$ which is considered in the range 1 to 151. The lowest four resonant states of O$_2^-$, $^2\\Pi_g$, $^2\\Pi_u$, $^4\\Sigma_u^-$ and $^2\\Sigma_u^-$, are taken into account. The calculations are performed using the fixed-nuclei R-matrix approach to determine the resonance positions and widths, and the boomerang model to characterize the nuclei motion. Two energy regions below and above 4~eV are investigated: the first one is characterized by sharp structures in the cross section, and the second by a broad resonance peaked at 10~eV. The computed cross sections are compared with theoretical and experimental results available in literature for both the energy regions, and are made available for use by modelers. The effect of ...

  3. Observations and Measurements of Planktonic Bioluminescence in and Around a Milky Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    produced by plankton subjected to mechanical stimulation) can be observed from breaking wave crests and swimming shoals of fish . The Arabian Sea is...identification: growth at 4 ’C, growth at 35 ’C, ainylase, lipase , gelatinase. growth on maltose, cellobiose, gluconate, BIOLUMINESCENCE IN MILKY SEA 57...neofluar oil -immersion objective. BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS Surface-water bioluminescence Surface-water bioluminescence was measured continuously during

  4. Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a bile salt aggregate: Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjwal Mandal; Subhadip Ghosh; Dibyendu Kumar Das; Aniruddha Adhikari; Shantanu Dey; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 153 (C153) to Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in a secondary aggregate of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The emission spectrum of C153 in NaDC is analysed in terms of two spectra-one with emission maximum at 480 nm which corresponds to a non-polar and hydrophobic site and another with maximum at ∼ 530 nm which arises from a polar hydrophilic site. The time constants of FRET were obtained from the rise time of the emission of the acceptor (R6G). In the NaDC aggregate, FRET occurs in multiple time scales -4 ps and 3700 ps. The 4 ps component is assigned to FRET from a donor (D) to an acceptor (A) held at a close distance (DA ∼ 17 Å) inside the bile salt aggregate. The 3700 ps component corresponds to a donor-acceptor distance ∼ 48 Å. The long (3700 ps) component may involve diffusion of the donor. With increase in the excitation wavelength (ex) from 375 to 435 nm, the relative contribution of the ultrafast component of FRET (∼ 4 ps) increases from 3 to 40% with a concomitant decrease in the contribution of the ultraslow component (∼3700 ps) from 97 to 60%. The ex dependence is attributed to the presence of donors at different locations. At a long ex (435 nm) donors in the highly polar peripheral region are excited. A short ex (375 nm) `selects’ donor at a hydrophobic location.

  5. Upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer based biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Shen, Pei; Li, Chunya; Wang, Yanying; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a very important biomarker in blood. Presently, sensitive and selective determination of MMP-2 directly in blood samples is still a challenging job because of the high complexity of the sample matrix. In this work, we reported a new homogeneous biosensor for MMP-2 based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from upconversion phosphors (UCPs) to carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). A polypeptide chain (NH(2)-GHHYYGPLGVRGC-COOH) comprising both the specific MMP-2 substrate domain (PLGVR) and a π-rich motif (HHYY) was designed and linked to the surface of UCPs at the C terminus. The FRET process was initiated by the π-π interaction between the peptide and CNPs, which thus quenched the fluorescence of the donor. Upon the cleavage of the substrate by the protease at the amide bond between Gly and Val, the donor was separated from the acceptor while the π-rich motif stayed on the acceptor. As a result, the fluorescence of the donor was restored. The fluorescence recovery was found to be proportional to the concentration of MMP-2 within the range from 10-500 pg/mL in an aqueous solution. The quantification limit of this sensor was at least 1 order of magnitude lower than that of other reported assays for MMP-2. The sensor was used to determine the MMP-2 level directly in human plasma and whole blood samples with satisfactory results obtained. Owing to the hypersensitivity of the method, clinical samples of only less than 1 μL were needed for accurate quantification, which can be meaningful in MMP-2-related clinical and bioanalytical applications.

  6. Combining MFD and PIE for accurate single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Sikor, Martin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Mokranjac, Dejana; Seidel, Claus A M; Lamb, Don C

    2012-03-01

    Single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer (spFRET) experiments using single-molecule burst analysis on a confocal microscope are an ideal tool to measure inter- and intramolecular distances and dynamics on the nanoscale. Different techniques have been developed to maximize the amount of information available in spFRET burst analysis experiments. Multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) is used to monitor a variety of fluorescence parameters simultaneously and pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) employs direct excitation of the acceptor to probe its presence and photoactivity. To calculate accurate FRET efficiencies from spFRET experiments with MFD or PIE, several calibration measurements are usually required. Herein, we demonstrate that by combining MFD with PIE information regarding all calibration factors as well as an accurate determination of spFRET histograms can be performed in a single measurement. In addition, the quality of overlap of the different detection volumes as well as the detection of acceptor photophysics can be investigated with MFD-PIE. Bursts containing acceptor photobleaching can be identified and excluded from further investigation while bursts that contain FRET dynamics are unaffected by this analysis. We have employed MFD-PIE to accurately analyze the effects of nucleotides and substrate on the interdomain separation in DnaK, the major bacterial heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). The interdomain distance increases from 47 Å in the ATP-bound state to 84 Å in the ADP-bound state and slightly contracts to 77 Å when a substrate is bound. This is in contrast to what was observed for the mitochondrial member of the Hsp70s, Ssc1, supporting the notion of evolutionary specialization of Hsp70s for different cellular functions in different organisms and cell organelles.

  7. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor between upconverting nanoparticles and palladium nanoparticles for ultrasensitive CEA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Shi, Liang; Sun, De-En; Li, Peiwu; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-12-15

    An ultrasensitive biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was constructed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between upconverting nanoparticles (UCPs) and palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). PdNPs was synthesized by the addition of a solution of Na2PdCl4 into a mixture of N2H4·H2O as the reducing agent and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as the stabilizer. The CEA aptamer (5'-NH2-ATACCAGCTTATTCAATT-3') was conjugated to hexanedioic acid (HDA) modified UCPs (HDA-UCPs) through an EDC-NHS coupling protocol. The coordination interaction between nitrogen functional groups of the CEA aptamer and PdNPs brought UCPs and PdNPs in close proximity, which resulted in the fluorescence quenching of UCPs to an extent of 85%. And the non-specific fluorescence quenching caused by PdNPs towards HDA-UCPs was negligible. After the introduction of CEA into the UCPs-CEA aptamer-PdNPs fluorescence quenching system, the CEA aptamer preferentially combined with CEA accompanied by the conformational change which weakened the coordination interaction between the CEA aptamer and PdNPs. So fluorescence recovery of UCPs was observed and a linear relationship between the fluorescence recovery of UCPs and the concentration of CEA was obtained in the range from 2pg/mL to 100pg/mL in the aqueous buffer with the detection limit of 0.8pg/mL. The ultrasensitive detection of CEA was also realized in diluted human serum with a linear range from 4pg/mL to 100pg/mL and a detection limit of 1.7pg/mL. This biosensor makes the most of the high quenching ability of PdNPs towards UCPs with negligible non-specific fluorescence quenching and has broad application prospects in biochemistry.

  8. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in AOT/4-chlorophenol/m-xylene organogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata, E-mail: dmandal.chemistry@gmail.com

    2015-06-15

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between donor coumarins (C102 and C153) and acceptor Rhodamine 6G were studied in AOT/4-chlorophenol/m-xylene organogels. The gel comprises a three-dimensional network of fiber bundles trapping the m-xylene solvent. Each fiber is an aggregate of several strands, and each strand consists of a central columnar stack of the phenols, surrounded by AOT headgroups. Our acceptor is ionic so that it was concentrated near the polar center of the strand, while the neutral donors were likely distributed over a wider region. With C153 as donor, clear evidence of FRET (time-constant~100 ps) was found, which indicated that the donor and acceptor may reside in neighboring strands within the same fiber. However, with C102 as donor, FRET probably occurred over an ultrashort, sub-picosecond time-scale suggesting that the donor and acceptor in this case resided in close vicinity. Thus, C102 tends to localize near the polar centre of the strands, compared to the more hydrophobic C153, which prefers to occupy the relatively non-polar peripheral regions of the strands and fibers. - Highlights: • FRET between coumarin donors and Rhodamine 6G acceptor studied in AOT organogels. • With Coumarin 153 donor, a ~100 ps FRET component detected in both donor and acceptor fluorescence. • With Coumarin 102 donor, FRET component too short to be detected with a time-resolution of ~70 ps. • The FRET rates reveal crucial differences in donor–acceptor distances for the two coumarin donors.

  9. Fluorescent resonance energy transfer: A tool for probing molecular cell-biomaterial interactions in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, Nathaniel D; Mooney, David J

    2007-05-01

    The current paradigm in designing biomaterials is to optimize material chemical and physical parameters based on correlations between these parameters and downstream biological responses, whether in vitro or in vivo. Extensive developments in molecular design of biomaterials have facilitated identification of several biophysical and biochemical variables (e.g. adhesion peptide density, substrate elastic modulus) as being critical to cell response. However, these empirical observations do not indicate whether different parameters elicit cell responses by modulating redundant variables of the cell-material interface (e.g. number of cell-material bonds, cell-matrix mechanics). Recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied to quantitatively analyze parameters of the cell-material interface for both two- and three-dimensional adhesion substrates. Tools based on FRET have been utilized to quantify several parameters of the cell-material interface relevant to cell response, including molecular changes in matrix proteins induced by interactions both with surfaces and cells, the number of bonds between integrins and their adhesion ligands, and changes in the crosslink density of hydrogel synthetic extracellular matrix analogs. As such techniques allow both dynamic and 3-D analyses they will be useful to quantitatively relate downstream cellular responses (e.g. gene expression) to the composition of this interface. Such understanding will allow bioengineers to fully exploit the potential of biomaterials engineered on the molecular scale, by optimizing material chemical and physical properties to a measurable set of interfacial parameters known to elicit a predictable response in a specific cell population. This will facilitate the rational design of complex, multi-functional biomaterials used as model systems for studying diseases or for clinical applications.

  10. Noninvasive fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging of in vivo premature drug release from polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley J; Sun, Duxin

    2013-11-01

    Understanding in vivo drug release kinetics is critical for the development of nanoparticle-based delivery systems. In this study, we developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging approach to noninvasively monitor in vitro and in vivo cargo release from polymeric nanoparticles. The FRET donor dye (DiO or DiD) and acceptor dye (DiI or DiR) were individually encapsulated into poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-PS) nanoparticles. When DiO (donor) nanoparticles and DiI (acceptor) nanoparticles were coincubated with cancer cells for 2 h, increased FRET signals were observed from cell membranes, suggesting rapid release of DiO and DiI to cell membranes. Similarly, increased FRET ratios were detected in nude mice after intravenous coadministration of DiD (donor) nanoparticles and DiR (acceptor) nanoparticles. In contrast, another group of nude mice i.v. administrated with DiD/DiR coloaded nanoparticles showed decreased FRET ratios. Based on the difference in FRET ratios between the two groups, in vivo DiD/DiR release half-life from PEO-PS nanoparticles was determined to be 9.2 min. In addition, it was observed that the presence of cell membranes facilitated burst release of lipophilic cargos while incorporation of oleic acid-coated iron oxide into PEO-PS nanoparticles slowed the release of DiD/DiR to cell membranes. The developed in vitro and in vivo FRET imaging techniques can be used to screening stable nanoformulations for lipophilic drug delivery.

  11. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics and Bifurcation Behavior of a 2-DOF Spring Resonator with End Stopper for Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Aroudi A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the model of a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF spring resonator with end stopper for an energy harvesting application is presented. Then we characterize its nonlinear dynamical behavior by numerical simulations when some suitable parameters are varied. The system is formed by two resonators subject to external vibrational excitation and with an end stopper. We present the continuous time dynamical model of the system in the form of a switched fourth order differential equation. Harmonic vibrations are considered as the main ambient energy source for the system and its frequency response representing the RMS value of the displacement is first computed. The dynamical behavior is unveiled by computing state-space trajectories, timedomain series and FFT spectra and frequency response as the excitation amplitude is varied.

  13. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-12-02

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave.

  14. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in

  15. Thoughts on the diversity of convergent evolution of bioluminescence on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.

    2012-10-01

    The widespread independent evolution of analogous bioluminescent systems is one of the most impressive and diverse examples of convergent evolution on earth. There are roughly 30 extant bioluminescent systems that have evolved independently on Earth, with each system likely having unique enzymes responsible for catalysing the bioluminescent reaction. Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule and a luciferase or photoprotein that results in the emission of light. Some independent systems utilize the same luciferin, such as the use of tetrapyrrolic compounds by krill and dinoflagellates, and the wide use of coelenterazine by marine organisms, while the enzymes involved are unique. One common thread among all the different bioluminescent systems is the requirement of molecular oxygen. Bioluminescence is found in most forms of life, especially marine organisms. Bioluminescence in known to benefit the organism by: attraction, repulsion, communication, camouflage, and illumination. The marine ecosystem is significantly affected by bioluminescence, the only light found in the pelagic zone and below is from bioluminescent organisms. Transgenic bioluminescent organisms have revolutionized molecular research, medicine and the biotechnology industry. The use of bioluminescence in studying molecular pathways and disease allows for non-invasive and real-time analysis. Bioluminescence-based assays have been developed for several analytes by coupling luminescence to many enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  16. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    2 Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island David Lapota Space and Naval...Warfare Systems Center, Pacific USA 1. Introduction A significant portion of bioluminescence in all oceans is produced by dinoflagellates . Numerous...studies have documented the ubiquitous distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in near surface waters (Seliger et al., 1961; Yentsch and Laird

  17. Luminescence resonance energy transfer based on β-NaYF_4:Yb,Er nanoparticles and TRITC dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN LingDong; GU JianQin; ZHANG ShuZhuo; ZHANG YaWen; YAN ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    β-NaYF_4:Yb,Er nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most efficient upconversion materials, which can convert near-infrared light to higher-energy light through multiple photon absorptions or energy transfer. In addition, they may be attractive alternative donors for luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) studies, because of their sharp absorption and emission profiles, high quantum yields, large anti-stokes shifts, long lifetime, low toxicity, and superior photo-stability. In principle, many problems of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), such as excitation of acceptors, emission overlaps between donors and acceptors, high background noise, potential toxicity, and instability, can be overcome using β-NaYF_4:Yb,Er NPs as energy donors. Because the organic coating induced separation can significantly reduce the energy transfer efficiency and aqueous FRET system is difficult to be applied in devices, we demonstrate a novel NP-dye LRET system in solid state. The emission of the β-NaYF_4:Yb,Er NPs at 539 nm overlaps with the absorption of the tetrametrylrhodarnine isothiocyante (TRITC), satisfying the requirement of LRET process. Since TRITC molecules are adsorbed on the β-NaYF_4:Yb,Er NPs by an electrostatic interaction, the interaction distance is suitable for LRET without any further modulation. The resultant solid LRET system is ready for the further applications for devices.

  18. Luminescence resonance energy transfer based on β-NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles and TRITC dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    β-NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most efficient upconversion materials, which can convert near-infrared light to higher-energy light through multiple photon absorptions or energy transfer. In addition, they may be attractive alternative donors for luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) studies, because of their sharp absorption and emission profiles, high quantum yields, large anti-stokes shifts, long lifetime, low toxicity, and superior photo-stability. In principle, many problems of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), such as excitation of acceptors, emission overlaps between donors and acceptors, high background noise, potential toxicity, and instability, can be overcome using β-NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs as energy donors. Because the organic coating induced separation can significantly reduce the energy transfer efficiency and aqueous FRET system is difficult to be applied in devices, we demonstrate a novel NP-dye LRET system in solid state. The emission of the β-NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs at 539 nm overlaps with the absorption of the tetrametrylrhodarnine isothiocyante (TRITC), satisfying the requirement of LRET process. Since TRITC molecules are adsorbed on the β-NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs by an electrostatic interaction, the interaction distance is suitable for LRET without any further modulation. The resultant solid LRET system is ready for the further applications for devices.

  19. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  20. Recent Advances in Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Biosensing, Molecular Imaging and Drug Release Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Nai-Tzu Chen; Shih-Hsun Cheng; Ching-Ping Liu; Jeffrey S. Souris; Chen-Tu Chen; Chung-Yuan Mou; Leu-Wei Lo

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) may be regarded as a “smart” technology in the design of fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. Recently, a variety of nanoparticles that include quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, polymer, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and upconversion nanoparticles have been employed to modulate FRET. Researchers have developed a number of “visible” and “activatable” FRET probes se...

  1. Near-infrared single-photon spectroscopy of a whispering gallery mode resonator using energy-resolving transition edge sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Förtsch, Michael; Stevens, Martin J; Strekalov, Dmitry; Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Nam, Sae Woo; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to perform spectroscopy of near-infrared single photons without the need of dispersive elements. This method is based on a photon energy resolving transition edge sensor and is applied for the characterization of widely wavelength tunable narrow-band single photons emitted from a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. We measure the emission wavelength of the generated signal and idler photons with an uncertainty of up to 2 nm.

  2. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging Reveals that Chemokine-Binding Modulates Heterodimers of CXCR4 and CCR5 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dimerization has emerged as an important feature of chemokine G-protein-coupled receptors. CXCR4 and CCR5 regulate leukocyte chemotaxis and also serve as a co-receptor for HIV entry. Both receptors are recruited to the immunological synapse during T-cell activation. However, it is not clear whether they form heterodimers and whether ligand binding modulates the dimer formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a sensitive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) imaging ...

  3. Detection of DNA adducts by bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shunqing; Tan, Xianglin; Yao, Qunfeng; He, Min; Zhou, Yikai; Chen, Jian

    2001-09-01

    Luminescent assay for detection ATP is very sensitive with limitation of 10-17 moles. ATP using styrene oxide as a model carcinogen we currently apply a luminescence technique to detect the very low levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in vitro and in vivo. The bioluminescent assay of DNA adducts entails three consecutive steps: digestion of modified DNA to adducted dinucleoside monophosphate and normal nucleotide are hydrolyzed to nucleosides (N) by nuclease P1 and prostatic acid phosphomonesterase (PAP); incorporation of (gamma) -P of ATP into normal nucleoside(N); detection of consumption of ATP by luminescence. This assay does not require separate manipulation because of the selective property of nuclease P1. One fmol of carcinogen- DNA adducts was detected by luminescent assay. A good correlation between results of luminescent assay and 32P-postlabeling procedures has been observed. We detect 1 adduct in 108 nucleotides for 10(mu) g DNA sample. The procedures of luminescent method is very simple and low- cost. IT appears applicable to the ultra sensitive detection of low levels of DNA adducts without radioactive isotope.

  4. Using Off-Resonance Laser Modulation for Beam Energy Spread Cooling in Generation of Short-Wavelength Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao

    2013-01-01

    Various seeding configurations have being proposed for frequency up-conversion of the electron beam density distribution, in which the energy spread, may however hinder the harmonic generation efficiency. In this Letter, a method for cooling the electron beam energy spread by off-resonance seed laser modulation is described, using a transversely dispersed beam and a modulator undulator with proper transverse gradient. With this novel mechanism, it is shown that the frequency up-conversion efficiency can be significantly enhanced. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for seeded soft x-ray free electron laser and storage ring based coherent harmonic generation in extreme ultraviolet spectral region.

  5. Recent Advances in Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Biosensing, Molecular Imaging and Drug Release Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET may be regarded as a “smart” technology in the design of fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. Recently, a variety of nanoparticles that include quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, polymer, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and upconversion nanoparticles have been employed to modulate FRET. Researchers have developed a number of “visible” and “activatable” FRET probes sensitive to specific changes in the biological environment that are especially attractive from the biomedical point of view. This article reviews recent progress in bringing these nanoparticle-modulated energy transfer schemes to fruition for applications in biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  6. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  7. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammation in Animal Models of Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Michal B.; Wilson, Leslie; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Pepple, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We develop a quantitative bioluminescence assay for in vivo longitudinal monitoring of inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Methods Three models of experimental uveitis were induced in C57BL/6 albino mice: primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU), endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Intraperitoneal injection of luminol sodium salt, which emits light when oxidized, provided the bioluminescence substrate. Bioluminescence images were captured by a PerkinElmer In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) Spectrum and total bioluminescence was analyzed using Living Image software. Bioluminescence on day zero was compared to bioluminescence on the day of peak inflammation for each model. Longitudinal bioluminescence imaging was performed in EIU and EAU. Results In the presence of luminol, intraocular inflammation generates detectable bioluminescence in three mouse models of uveitis. Peak bioluminescence in inflamed PMU eyes (1.46 × 105 photons/second [p/s]) was significantly increased over baseline (1.47 × 104 p/s, P = 0.01). Peak bioluminescence in inflamed EIU eyes (3.18 × 104 p/s) also was significantly increased over baseline (1.09 × 104 p/s, P = 0.04), and returned to near baseline levels by 48 hours. In EAU, there was a nonsignificant increase in bioluminescence at peak inflammation. Conclusions In vivo bioluminescence may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative measure of intraocular inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Primed mycobacterial uveitis and EIU are both acute models with robust anterior inflammation and demonstrated significant changes in bioluminescence corresponding with peak inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis is a more indolent posterior uveitis and generated a more modest bioluminescent signal. In vivo imaging system bioluminescence is a nonlethal, quantifiable assay that can be used for monitoring inflammation in animal models of uveitis. PMID:28278321

  8. Space application research of EMCCDs for bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao

    The detection of bioluminescense is widely used on the ground, while the detection of bioluminescence in space is still at the stage of detecting bright bioluminescense. With the rapid development of research in Space Life Sciences, it will be necessary to develop a detection technology to detect weak bioluminescense. Compared to other low-light detection techniques for ground, there are more advantages of EMCCDs for space application. Build a space bioluminescence imaging detection system, analysis the feasibility and capability of its will be significant. Co-Author:Xie Zongbao,Zheng Weibo

  9. Bioluminescence as the Basis for the Detection of Trichothecenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-17

    screened for their ability to quench bioluminescence were obtained through the courtesy of Dr. Lou Carson, of the Toxicology Division of the Food and...34 Recent Adv. Phytochem . 9, 167 (1974). 13. Lyman, J. and Fleming, R.H., "Composition of Seawater," J. Mar. Res. 3, 134 (1940). 14. Mayer, C.F., "Endemic...DIELDRIN Cl CI Cl~c C 1 2I• HEPTACHLOR EPOXIDE OCTACHLOR EPOXIDE "Fig. 11 - Pesticides screened for ability to quench bioluminescence Ir £ d, PF K.I IR 10 R 125 - I ’S * N 586 9 -q

  10. Higher lying resonances in low-energy electron scattering with carbon monoxide

    CERN Document Server

    Dora, Amar; Chakrabarti, Kalyan

    2016-01-01

    R-matrix calculations on electron collisions with CO are reported whose aim is to identify any higher-lying resonances above the well-reported and lowest $^2\\Pi$ resonance at about 1.6~eV. Extensive tests with respect to basis sets, target models and scattering models are performed. The final results are reported for the larger cc-pVTZ basis set using a 50 state close-coupling (CC) calculation. The Breit-Wigner eigenphase sum and the time-delay methods are used to detect and fit any resonances. Both these methods find a very narrow $^2\\Sigma^+$ symmetry Feshbach-type resonance very close to the target excitation threshold of the b $^3\\Sigma^+$ state which lies at 12.9 eV in the calculations. This resonance is seen in the CC calculation using cc-pVTZ basis set while a CC calculation using the cc-pVDZ basis set does not produce this feature. The electronic structure of CO$^-$ is analysed in the asymptotic region, 45 molecular states are found to correlate with states dissociating to an anion and an atom. Electr...

  11. Strange hadrons and resonances at LHC energies with the ALICE detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badalá A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of (multistrange hadrons and resonance production allows in heavyion collisions to gather information on the early partonic phase of the fireball and its evolution. The ALICE collaboration has measured the production of K*(8920, φ(1020 resonances and KS0, Λ, Ξ−, Ω− hadrons and their anti-particles at mid-rapidity in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. This contribution presents results on strangeness enhancement, baryon to meson ratios (Λ/KS0 and Ω−/φ and on resonance to stable particle ratio (φ/K and K*/K. The nuclear modification factor RAA of the φ(1020 will be also discussed.

  12. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs.

  13. Characterization and inhibition of norovirus proteases of genogroups I and II using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, KS 66506 (United States); Takahashi, Daisuke; Prakash, Om [Department of Biochemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Kim, Yunjeong, E-mail: ykim@vet.ksu.edu [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    Noroviruses are the major cause of food- or water-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. The norovirus protease that cleaves a large viral polyprotein to nonstructural proteins is essential for virus replication and an attractive target for antiviral drug development. Noroviruses show high genetic diversity with at least five genogroups, GI-GV, of which GI and GII are responsible for the majority of norovirus infections in humans. We cloned and expressed proteases of Norwalk virus (GI) and MD145 virus (GII) and characterized the enzymatic activities with fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates. We demonstrated that the GI and GII proteases cleaved the substrates derived from the naturally occurring cleavage site in the open reading frame (ORF) 1 of G1 norovirus with similar efficiency, and that enzymatic activity of both proteases was inhibited by commercial protease inhibitors including chymostatin. The interaction of chymostatin to Norwalk virus protease was validated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

  14. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin...

  15. Resonant energy transfer between patterned InGaN/GaN quantum wells and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingsheng; Wang, Huayong

    2016-01-01

    We explore an easy method for preparation of a hybrid device of a photonic crystal InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) and colloidal quantum dots using conventional photolithography. It is demonstrated from electroluminescence spectra that Förster resonance energy transfer takes place efficiently between the photonic crystal InGaN/GaN QW and CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots. From the photoluminescence decay of the InGaN/GaN QW, the largest Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency between the photonic crystal GaN quantum well and colloidal quantum dots is measured as 88% and the corresponding Förster-resonance-energy-transfer fraction reached 42%. An easy approach is explored to realize a highly efficient electrically driven colloidal quantum dot device using the Förster-resonance-energy-transfer mechanism.

  16. All organic host-guest crystals based on a dumb-bell-shaped conjugated host for light harvesting through resonant energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Reingard; Berger, Ricarda; Manca, Marianna; Hulliger, Jürg; Weber, Edwin; Loi, Maria A; Botta, Chiara

    2012-01-16

    Together we glow: Fully organic host-guest crystals with two dyes inserted in their parallel nanochannels display broad emission in the visible range thanks to resonant energy transfer. The conjugated host crystal provides light harvesting in the UV region.

  17. New generation polyphase resonant converter-modulators for the Korean atomic energy research institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gribble, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present operational data and performance parameters of the newest generation polyphase resonant high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) as developed and delivered to the KAERI 100 MeV ''PEFP'' accelerator [1]. The KAERI design realizes improvements from the SNS and SLAC designs [2]. To improve the IGBT switching performance at 20 kHz for the KAERI system, the HVCM utilizes the typical zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) at turn on and as well as artificial zero-current-switching (ZCS) at turn-off. The new technique of artificial ZCS technique should result in a 6 fold reduction of IGBT switching losses (3). This improves the HCVM conversion efficiency to better than 95% at full average power, which is 500 kW for the KAERI two klystron 105 kV, 50 A application. The artificial ZCS is accomplished by placing a resonant RLC circuit across the input busswork to the resonant boost transformer. This secondary resonant circuit provides a damped ''kick-back'' to assist in IGBT commutation. As the transformer input busswork is extremely low inductance (< 10 nH), the single RLC network acts like it is across each of the four IGBT collector-emitter terminals of the H-bridge switching network. We will review these topological improvements and the overall system as delivered to the KAERI accelerator and provide details of the operational results.

  18. Thermal energy transfer by plasmon-resonant composite nanoparticles at pulse laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-04-01

    Heating of composite plasmon-resonant nanoparticles (spherical gold nanoshells) under pulse laser illumination is considered. The numerical solution of the time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for spatial inhomogeneities of absorbed laser radiation is performed. Important features of temperature kinetics and thermal flux inside nanoparticles are analyzed. Possible applications of the observed effects in nanotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  19. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  20. A combination of NADHP and hispidin is not essential for bioluminescence in luminous fungal living gills of Mycena chlorophos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Katsunori

    2017-01-05

    The chemical mechanisms underlying visible bioluminescence in the fungus Mycena chlorophos are not clear. A combination of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and hispidin, which has been reported to increase the intensity of in vitro luminescence in crude cold-water extracts prepared from the bioluminescent fruiting bodies of M. chlorophos, exhibited potential bioluminescence activation in the early bioluminescence stages, in which the bioluminescence was ultra-weak, for living gills and luminescence activation for non-bioluminescent gills, which was collapsed by freezing and subsequent thawing, at all bioluminescence stages. These abilities were not evident in considerably bioluminescent gills. These abilities were blocked by trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, which were identified as in vivo bioluminescence-activating components. Original bioluminescence and bioluminescence produced from the addition of trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid in living gills were almost completely inhibited by 10 mM NaN3 , whereas the luminescence produced form the combination of NADPH and hispidin in thawed non-bioluminescent and living gills at the early weak bioluminescence stages was not inhibited by 10 mM NaN3 . Thus, the combination of NADPH and hispidin plays different roles in luminescence systems compared with essential bioluminescence systems, and the combination of NADPH and hispidin was not essential for visible bioluminescence in living gills.

  1. Pygmy resonance and low-energy enhancement in the $\\gamma$-ray strength functions of Pd~isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksen, Tomas Kvalheim; Guttormsen, Magne; Görgen, Andreas; Larsen, Ann-Cecilie; Renstrøm, Therese; Ruud, Inger-Eli; Siem, Sunniva; Toft, Heidi Kristine; Tveten, Gry Merete; Wilson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    An unexpected enhancement in the $\\gamma$-ray strength function, as compared to the low energy tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), has been observed for Sc, Ti, V, Fe and Mo isotopes for $E_\\gamma4$ MeV, which is interpreted as a PDR centered at $E_{\\gamma}\\approx8$ MeV. An enhanced $\\gamma$-ray strength at low energies is also observed for $^{105}$Pd, which is the lightest isotope measured in this work. Further, the results correspond and agree very well with the observations from the Cd isotopes, and support the suggested transitional region for the onset of low-energy enhancement with decreasing mass number. The neutron number dependency of the PDR strength is also evident.

  2. Analytic Elastic Cross Sections for Electron-Atom Scattering from Generalized Fano Profiles of Overlapping Low-Energy Shape Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nicoletopoulos, P

    2003-01-01

    The variation with energy of the total cross section for elastic electron scattering from atoms of several elements is caused primarily by shape resonances corresponding to the formation of temporary negative ions. It is shown that such cross sections are expressible analytically in terms of a constant background added to a "generalized Fano profile" [Durand Ph, et al (2001) J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 1953, ibid (2002) 35, 469]. In three cases (sodium, magnesium and mercury), a detailed consideration proves that this representation is accurate in a fairly wide energy range. Moreover, the related momentum transfer cross sections are tailor-made for studying "elastic" electron transport in terms of the two-term solution of the Boltzmann equation: Not only are the resulting swarm transport coefficients adjustable to the experimental values, but above all they are calculable very easily because the unnormalized energy distribution is obtainable analytically. The ample saving in computational effort is ex...

  3. Investigation of the cerebral energy status in patients with glutaric aciduria type I by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H E; Koch, H G; Weglage, J; Freudenberg, F; Ullrich, K

    2003-04-01

    In vivo phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to investigate markers of the cerebral energy status in two patients with glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I). Besides an increased concentration of phosphomonoesters in one patient, no other significant alterations from controls were found. This might indicate increased resynthesis of dendritic processes secondary to preceding metabolic crises. In contrast to previous cell-culture studies, no cerebral depletion of phosphocreatine (PCr) was observed. In conclusion, a severe global and permanent depletion of cerebral energy supplies must be ruled out. The benefit of a permanent creatine substitution to stabilize mitochondrial energy metabolism seems thus questionable. However, as MRS was performed during stable clinical conditions, the possibility of a PCr decrease during acute metabolic crises cannot be assessed.

  4. Upgrading bioluminescent bacterial bioreporter performance by splitting the lux operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon

    2011-05-01

    Bioluminescent bacterial bioreporters harbor a fusion of bacterial bioluminescence genes (luxCDABE), acting as the reporting element, to a stress-response promoter, serving as the sensing element. Upon exposure to conditions that activate the promoter, such as an environmental stress or the presence of an inducing chemical, the promoter::reporter fusion generates a dose-dependent bioluminescent signal. In order to improve bioluminescent bioreporter performance we have split the luxCDABE genes of Photorhabdus luminescens into two smaller functional units: luxAB, that encode for the luciferase enzyme, which catalyzes the luminescence reaction, and luxCDE that encode for the enzymatic complex responsible for synthesis of the reaction's substrate, a long-chain aldehyde. The expression of each subunit was put under the control of either an inducible stress-responsive promoter or a synthetic constitutive promoter, and different combinations of the two units were tested for their response to selected chemicals in Escherichia coli. In all cases tested, the split combinations proved to be superior to the native luxCDABE configuration, suggesting an improved efficiency in the transcription and/or translation of two small gene units instead of a larger one with the same genes. The best combination was that of an inducible luxAB and a constitutive luxCDE, indicating that aldehyde availability is limited when the five genes are expressed together in E. coli, and demonstrating that improved biosensor performance may be achieved by rearrangement of the lux operon genes.

  5. Unanimous Model for Describing the Fast Bioluminescence Kinetics of Ca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eremeeva, Elena V.; Bartsev, Sergey I.; Berkel, van Willem J.H.; Vysotski, Eugene S.

    2017-01-01

    Upon binding their metal ion cofactors, Ca2+-regulated photoproteins display a rapid increase of light signal, which reaches its peak within milliseconds. In the present study, we investigate bioluminescence kinetics of the entire photoprotein family. All five recombinant hydromedusan Ca2+-regulated

  6. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  7. Monitoring Bloom Dynamics of a Common Coastal Bioluminescent Ctenophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    watershed run-off and discharge of submarine ground-water can profoundly impact growth conditions of bioluminescent plankton on very short space and...changes in marine ecosystems (Kane, 2009). Gelatinous zooplankton, such as Mnemiopsis sp., feed on mesozooplankton, with copepods being their main food

  8. Feasibility Study for a Compact, Multi-Purpose Bioluminescence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-30

    which is likely to be primarily dinoflagellates, ostracods and gelatinous zooplankton, however a faster pump speed would be desirable in a profiling...and defense sectors by providing a valuable tool for biological oceanographers interested in plankton distribution patterns as well as providing...quantifying, tracking and identifying bioluminescent plankton . IEEE J. Oceanic Engineering. Widder, E.A. (1997) In situ video recordings of

  9. Low-energy MOS depletion modulators in silicon-on-insulator micro-donut resonators coupled to bus waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soref, Richard; Guo, Junpeng; Sun, Greg

    2011-09-12

    Electrical, optical and electro-optical simulations are presented for a waveguided, resonant, bus-coupled, p-doped Si micro-donut MOS depletion modulator operating at the 1.55 μm wavelength. To minimize the switching voltage and energy, a high-K dielectric film of HfO₂ or ZrO₂ is chosen as the gate dielectric, while a narrow ring-shaped layer of p-doped poly-silicon is selected for the gate electrode, rather than metal, to minimize plasmonic loss loading of the fundamental TE mode. In a 6-μm-diam high-Q resonator, an infrared intensity extinction ratio of 6 dB is predicted for a modulation voltage of 2 V and a switching energy of 4 fJ/bit. A speed-of-response around 1 ps is anticipated. For a modulator scaled to operate at 1.3 μm, the estimated switching energy is 2.5 fJ/bit.

  10. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  11. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  12. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  13. Broadband Energy Harvesting Using a Metamaterial Resonator Embedded With Non-Foster Impedance Circuitry

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and implantable biomedical devices need efficient power and data transfer with very low profile antennas. We propose a low profile electrically small antenna for near-field wireless power and data telemetry employing a metamaterial Split Ring Resonator (SRR) antenna. SRRs can be designed for operation over wide frequencies from RF to visible. However, they are inherently narrowband making them sensitive to component mismatch with respect to external transmit antenna. Here we propose an embedding of a non-foster impedance circuitry into the metamaterial SRR structure that imparts conjugate negative complex impedance to this resonator antenna thereby increasing the effective bandwidth and thus overcoming the fundamental limit for efficient signal coupling. We demonstrate the concept through extensive numerical simulations and a prototype system at the board level using discrete off-the-shelf components and printed circuit SRR antenna at 500 MHz. We show that the power trans...

  14. Boosting bioluminescence neuroimaging: an optimized protocol for brain studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswendt, Markus; Adamczak, Joanna; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used for optical cell tracking approaches. However, reliable and quantitative bioluminescence of transplanted cells in the brain is highly challenging. In this study we established a new bioluminescence imaging protocol dedicated for neuroimaging, which increases sensitivity especially for noninvasive tracking of brain cell grafts. Different D-Luciferin concentrations (15, 150, 300 and 750 mg/kg), injection routes (i.v., i.p., s.c.), types of anesthesia (Isoflurane, Ketamine/Xylazine, Pentobarbital) and timing of injection were compared using DCX-Luc transgenic mice for brain specific bioluminescence. Luciferase kinetics was quantitatively evaluated for maximal photon emission, total photon emission and time-to-peak. Photon emission followed a D-Luciferin dose-dependent relation without saturation, but with delay in time-to-peak increasing for increasing concentrations. The comparison of intravenous, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal substrate injection reflects expected pharmacokinetics with fastest and highest photon emission for intravenous administration. Ketamine/Xylazine and Pentobarbital anesthesia showed no significant beneficial effect on maximal photon emission. However, a strong difference in outcome was observed by injecting the substrate pre Isoflurane anesthesia. This protocol optimization for brain specific bioluminescence imaging comprises injection of 300 mg/kg D-Luciferin pre Isoflurane anesthesia as an efficient and stable method with a signal gain of approx. 200% (compared to 150 mg/kg post Isoflurane). Gain in sensitivity by the novel imaging protocol was quantitatively assessed by signal-to-noise calculations of luciferase-expressing neural stem cells grafted into mouse brains (transplantation of 3,000-300,000 cells). The optimized imaging protocol lowered the detection limit from 6,000 to 3,000 cells by a gain in signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Direct measurement of several resonance strengths and energies in 34S(α , γ) 38 Ar within the T = 2 . 2 GK Gamow window with DRAGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D.; O'Malley, P.; Akers, C.; Chen, A. A.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Erikson, L. E.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Greife, U.; Hager, Ulrike; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Laird, A. M.; Mahl, A.; Ruiz, C.

    2015-10-01

    Radiative α capture on 34S can impact nucleosynthesis in several astrophysical environments, including oxygen burning, explosive oxygen burning (Type II supernovae), and Type Ia supernovae. However, there exist discrepancies in the literature for the resonance strengths of two strong resonances within the Gamow window for oxygen burning temperatures (E0 +/- Δ / 2 = 3183 +/- 897 keV at T = 2 . 2 GK). Previous measurements suffered from systematic uncertainties inherent in the experimental technique. Furthermore, there are several states in 38Ar in the energy range of interest for which no 34S + α resonance strength/energy measurements have been performed. This measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF in BC, Canada. DRAGON's experimental technique allows direct measurement of quantities such as stopping power and resonance energy, alleviating the need for external inputs and reducing uncertainty. This talk will discuss DRAGON's experimental technique, analysis methods and results.

  16. Validation of constitutively expressed bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a rapid microbiological quantification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Naseby, D C

    2015-06-15

    Whole cell biosensors have been extensively used for monitoring toxicity and contamination of various compounds and xenobiotics in environmental biology and microbial ecology; their application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries has been limited. According to several pharmacopoeias, pharmaceutical products must be tested for microbial activity using traditional viable count techniques; the use of whole cell microbial biosensors potentially provides an alternative, fast, and efficient method. However there is a lack of a validated bioluminescence method. Prototype whole cell microbial biosensors have already been developed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Validation of the bioluminescent strains was performed in accordance with the pharmacopoeia, Parenteral Drug Association and International Organisation of Standardisation. These strains demonstrated that the bioluminescent method was accurate, precise and equivalent, as compared with plate counting at a range of 10(3)-10(7) CFU/mL. Percentage recoveries using the bioluminescent method were between 70% and 130% for all bioluminescent strains and therefore the bioluminescent method was accurate according to the criteria set in PDA technical report 33. The method was also more precise (relative standard deviation less than 15%) than the traditional plate counting method or the ATP bioluminescent method. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) CFU/mL. Two-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the traditional plate counting and the novel bioluminescent method for all bioluminescent strains. The bioluminescent constructs passed/exceeded pharmacopoeia-specified criteria for range, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and equivalence.

  17. BLProt: Prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar

    2011-08-17

    Background: Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence.Results: In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated.Conclusion: BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. 2011 Kandaswamy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  18. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, P., E-mail: papp@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Matejčík, Š. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mach, P.; Urban, J. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Paidarová, I. [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, CZ-182 23 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Horáček, J., E-mail: horacek@mbox.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • The anions are stabilized by additional charges on the nuclei. • The energy dependence of anions and neutrals on nuclear charges are calculated by ab initio methods. • Resonance energies and widths are obtained from the energy data by analytical continuation with Padé approximation. • The resonance energies and widths of amino acids are compared with Nestmann–Peyerimhoff’s method and with experiment. • The resonance energies and (widths) of formic acid monomer and dimer are 2.09 (0.33) eV and 1.7 (0.13) eV, respectively. - Abstract: The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  19. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J B; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-12-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in Etests demonstrated increased bioluminescence at sub-MICs of different antibiotics. This study aimed to further evaluate the influence of antibiotic pressure on bioluminescence in S. aureus Xen29. Bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen29, grown planktonically in tryptone soy broth, was quantified in the absence and presence of different concentrations of vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin or chloramphenicol and was related to expression of the luxA gene under antibiotic pressure measured using real-time PCR. In the absence of antibiotics, staphylococcal bioluminescence increased over time until a maximum after ca. 6h of growth, and subsequently decreased to the detection threshold after 24h of growth owing to reduced bacterial metabolic activity. Up to MICs of the antibiotics, bioluminescence increased according to a similar pattern up to 6h of growth, but after 24h bioluminescence was higher than in the absence of antibiotics. Contrary to expectations, bioluminescence per organism (CFU) after different growth periods in the absence and at MICs of different antibiotics decreased with increasing expression of luxA. Summarising, antibiotic pressure impacts the relation between CFU and bioluminescence. Under antibiotic pressure, bioluminescence is not controlled by luxA expression but by co-factors impacting the bacterial metabolic activity. This conclusion is of utmost importance when evaluating antibiotic efficacy in live animals using bioluminescent bacterial strains.

  20. Uptake kinetics and biodistribution of C-14-D-luciferin-a radiolabeled substrate for the firefly luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence reaction : impact on bioluminescence based reporter gene imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Frank; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Bhaumik, Srabani; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of D-luciferin to oxyluciferin in the presence of cofactors, producing bioluminescence. This reaction is used in optical bioluminescence-based molecular imaging approaches to detect the expression of the firefly luciferase reporter g

  1. Graphene and graphene-like two-denominational materials based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Lyu, Jing; Shi, Jingyu; Yang, Mo

    2017-03-15

    In the past decades, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied in many biological applications to reveal the biological information at the nanoscale. Recently, graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials started to be used in FRET assays as donors or acceptors including graphene oxide (GO), graphene quantum dot (GQD), graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C3N4) and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2, MnO2, and WS2). Due to the remarkable properties such as large surface to volume ratio, tunable energy band, photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility, these 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays have shown great potential in various biological applications. This review summarizes the recent development of graphene and graphene-like 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays in applications of biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery monitoring.

  2. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02-0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe.

  3. Measurement of inverse pion photoproduction at energies spanning the N ( 1440 ) resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, A.; Prakhov, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Briscoe, W. J.; Nefkens, B. M.; Allgower, C. E.; Arndt, R. A.; Bekrenev, V.; Bennhold, C.; Clajus, M.; Comfort, J. R.; Craig, K.; Grosnick, D.; Isenhower, D.; Knecht, N.; Koetke, D. D.; Kulbardis, A.; Kozlenko, N.; Kruglov, S.; Lolos, G.; Lopatin, I.; Manley, D. M.; Manweiler, R.; Marušić, A.; McDonald, S.; Olmsted, J.; Papandreou, Z.; Peaslee, D.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Price, J. W.; Ramirez, A. F.; Sadler, M.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, T. D.; Starostin, A.; Staudenmaier, H. M.; Supek, I.; Tippens, W. B.; Workman, R. L.

    2004-09-01

    Differential cross sections for the process π- p→γn have been measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer. Measurements were made at 18 pion momenta from 238 to 748 MeV/c , corresponding to Eγ for the inverse reaction from 285 to 769 MeV . The data have been used to evaluate the γn multipoles in the vicinity of the N(1440) resonance. We compare our data and multipoles to previous determinations.

  4. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  5. Transition to resonance-rich matter in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Bravina, L V; Bleicher, M; Bass, S A; Brandstetter, M; Faessler, A; Fuchs, C; Greiner, W; Gorenstein, M I; Soff, S; Stöcker, H

    2001-01-01

    The equilibration of hot and dense nuclear matter produced in the central region in central Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ AGeV is studied within the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The pressure here becomes isotropic at $t \\approx 5$ fm/c. Within the next 15 fm/c the expansion of the matter proceeds almost isentropically with the entropy per baryon ratio $S/A \\approx 150$. During this period the equation of state in the $(P,\\epsilon)$-plane has a very simple form, $P=0.15 \\epsilon$. Comparison with the statistical model (SM) of an ideal hadron gas reveals that the time of $\\approx 20$ fm/$c$ may be too short to attain the fully equilibrated state. Particularly, the fractions of resonances are overpopulated in contrast to the SM values. The creation of such a long-lived resonance-rich state slows down the relaxation to chemical equilibrium and can be detected experimentally.

  6. A Framework to Analyze the Stochastic Harmonics and Resonance of Wind Energy Grid Interconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a modeling and analysis methodology for investigating the stochastic harmonics and resonance concerns of wind power plants (WPPs. Wideband harmonics from modern wind turbines (WTs are observed to be stochastic, associated with real power production, and they may adversely interact with the grid impedance and cause unexpected harmonic resonance, if not comprehensively addressed in the planning and commissioning of the WPPs. These issues should become more critical as wind penetration levels increase. We thus propose a planning study framework comprising the following functional steps: First, the best fitted probability density functions (PDFs of the harmonic components of interest in the frequency domain are determined. In operations planning, maximum likelihood estimations (MLEs followed by a chi-square test are used once field measurements or manufacturers’ data are available. Second, harmonic currents from the WPP are represented by randomly-generating harmonic components based on their PDFs (frequency spectrum and then synthesized for time domain simulations via inverse Fourier transform. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive assessment by including the impacts of feeder configurations, harmonic filters and the variability of parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed study approach for a 100-MW offshore WPP consisting of 20 units of 5-MW full converter turbines, a realistic benchmark system adapted from a WPP under development in Korea and discuss lessons learned through this research.

  7. A Framework to Analyze Stochastic Harmonics and Resonance of Wind Energy Grid Interconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Youngho; Lee, Choongman; Hur, Kyeon; Kang, Yong Cheol; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Sang-Ho; Choy, Young-Do; Yoon, Gi-Gab

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses a modeling and analysis methodology for investigating the stochastic harmonics and resonance concerns of wind power plants (WPPs). Wideband harmonics from modern wind turbines are observed to be stochastic, associated with real power production, and they may adversely interact with the grid impedance and cause unexpected harmonic resonance if not comprehensively addressed in the planning and commissioning of the WPPs. These issues should become more critical as wind penetration levels increase. We thus propose a planning study framework comprising the following functional steps: First, the best-fitted probability density functions (PDFs) of the harmonic components of interest in the frequency domain are determined. In operations planning, maximum likelihood estimations followed by a chi-square test are used once field measurements or manufacturers' data are available. Second, harmonic currents from the WPP are represented by randomly-generating harmonic components based on their PDFs (frequency spectrum) and then synthesized for time-domain simulations via inverse Fourier transform. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive assessment by including the impacts of feeder configurations, harmonic filters, and the variability of parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed study approach for a 100-MW offshore WPP consisting of 20 units of 5-MW full-converter turbines, a realistic benchmark system adapted from a WPP under development in Korea, and discuss lessons learned through this research.

  8. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  9. Impact of Anesthesia Protocols on In Vivo Bioluminescent Bacteria Imaging Results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chuzel

    Full Text Available Infectious murine models greatly benefit from optical imaging using bioluminescent bacteria to non-invasively and repeatedly follow in vivo bacterial infection. In this context, one of the most critical parameters is the bioluminescence sensitivity to reliably detect the smallest number of bacteria. Another critical point is the anesthetic approaches that have been demonstrated to impact the bioluminescence flux emission in studies with luciferase-transfected tumor cells. However, this impact has never been assessed on bacteria bioluminescent models. To this end, we investigated the effects of four anesthesia protocols on the bioluminescence flux in a central venous catheter murine model (SKH1-hr(hr mice infected by a bioluminescent S. aureus Xen36 strain. Bioluminescence imaging was performed on mice anesthetized by either ketamine/xylazine (with or without oxygen supplementation, or isoflurane carried with air or oxygen. Total flux emission was determined in vivo daily for 3 days and ex vivo at the end of the study together with a CFU counting of the biofilm in the catheter. Bioluminescence flux differences appear between the different anesthetic protocols. Using a ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (with air, bacteria detection was impossible since the bioluminescence signal remains in the background signal. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane and oxygen led to a signal significantly higher to the background all along the kinetics. The use of isoflurane in air presents a bioluminescence signal similar to the use of ketamine/xylazine with oxygen. These data highlight the importance of oxygen to improve bioluminescence flux by bacteria with isoflurane as well as with ketamine/xylazine anesthetics. As a conclusion, we recommend the use of isoflurane anesthetic with oxygen to increase the bioluminescence sensitivity in this kind of study.

  10. Impact of Anesthesia Protocols on In Vivo Bioluminescent Bacteria Imaging Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzel, Thomas; Sanchez, Violette; Vandamme, Marc; Martin, Stéphane; Flety, Odile; Pager, Aurélie; Chabanel, Christophe; Magnier, Luc; Foskolos, Marie; Petit, Océane; Rokbi, Bachra; Chereul, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Infectious murine models greatly benefit from optical imaging using bioluminescent bacteria to non-invasively and repeatedly follow in vivo bacterial infection. In this context, one of the most critical parameters is the bioluminescence sensitivity to reliably detect the smallest number of bacteria. Another critical point is the anesthetic approaches that have been demonstrated to impact the bioluminescence flux emission in studies with luciferase-transfected tumor cells. However, this impact has never been assessed on bacteria bioluminescent models. To this end, we investigated the effects of four anesthesia protocols on the bioluminescence flux in a central venous catheter murine model (SKH1-hr(hr) mice) infected by a bioluminescent S. aureus Xen36 strain. Bioluminescence imaging was performed on mice anesthetized by either ketamine/xylazine (with or without oxygen supplementation), or isoflurane carried with air or oxygen. Total flux emission was determined in vivo daily for 3 days and ex vivo at the end of the study together with a CFU counting of the biofilm in the catheter. Bioluminescence flux differences appear between the different anesthetic protocols. Using a ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (with air), bacteria detection was impossible since the bioluminescence signal remains in the background signal. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane and oxygen led to a signal significantly higher to the background all along the kinetics. The use of isoflurane in air presents a bioluminescence signal similar to the use of ketamine/xylazine with oxygen. These data highlight the importance of oxygen to improve bioluminescence flux by bacteria with isoflurane as well as with ketamine/xylazine anesthetics. As a conclusion, we recommend the use of isoflurane anesthetic with oxygen to increase the bioluminescence sensitivity in this kind of study.

  11. An Assessment and Annotated Bibliography of Marine Bioluminescence Research: 1979-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    1983). Speculations on the hydrogen peroxide and the photogenic cells are Colours of Marine Bioluminescence. Abstr., 15th associated with a brown...of the taxonomic distribution of Affinity of the Reduced Riboflavin 5’-Phosphate Site. bioluminescence among various groups of organisms Biochemistry...possible biological functions for for reduced riboflavin 5’-phosphate (FMNH,). The bioluminescence are explored. The spectral emission inhibitor was

  12. A study on bioluminescence and photoluminescence in the earthworm Eisenia lucens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pes, O; Midlik, A; Schlaghamersky, J; Zitnan, M; Taborsky, P

    2016-02-01

    Eisenia lucens is an earthworm living in the organic soil layer of decomposing wood. When irritated, the worm expels coelomic fluid through pores in its body wall, exhibiting blue-green bioluminescence. The mechanism of the bioluminescence, which seems to be different from other bioluminescence systems of terrestrial animals, has been studied in this work. Many lines of evidence indicate that riboflavin stored in coelomycetes plays an important role in this glowing reaction.

  13. Mechanisms of bioluminescence, chemiluminescence and of their regulation. Progress report, one year period through March 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, H H

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on a 10-yr study of the production and role of excited states in biological systems and the mechanisms involved in bioluminescence and chemoluminescence. An hypothesis of the origin of bioluminescence is presented that is based on the mixed function oxygenase reaction. Techniques of absolute measurements of light intensities and spectral composition were applied in studies of bioluminescence of marine dinoflagellates and the chemiluminescence of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the result of enzymatic hydroxylation. (CH)

  14. Power Take-Off with Integrated Resonator for Energy Extraction from Linear Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a magnetic gear for converting linear motion into rotational motion and vice versa. The present invention converts slow linear irregular oscillating motion of wave energy devices into torque on a high speed shaft for powering a generator while making the wave energy device...... of sea or ocean waves into useful energy, such as electricity. The invention relates to the control and operation of a magnetic gear based motor/generator system. The invention provides a high force density electric powered linear actuator....

  15. Constraints on the Neutron Skin and the Symmetry Energy from the Anti-analog Giant Dipole Resonance in 208Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, L G; Colo', G; Sagawa, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the neutron-skin thickness Delta(R) on the energy difference between the anti-analog giant dipole resonance (AGDR), E(AGDR), and the isobaric analog state (IAS), E(IAS), in a heavy nucleus such as 208Pb. For guidance, we first develop a simple and analytic, yet physical, approach based on the Droplet Model that linearly connects the energy difference E(AGDR)-E(IAS) with Delta(R). To test this correlation on more fundamental grounds, we employ a family of systematically varied Skyrme energy density functionals where variations on the value of the symmetry energy at saturation density J are explored. The calculations have been performed within the fully self consistent Hartree-Fock (HF) plus charge-exchange random phase approximation (RPA) framework. We confirm the linear correlation within our microscopic apporach and, by comparing our results with available experimental data in 208Pb, we find that our analysis is consistent with Delta(R) = 0.204 \\pm 0.009 fm, J = 31.4 \\pm 0.5 MeV ...

  16. Proposal of a New Method for Measuring Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET Rapidly, Quantitatively and Non-Destructively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Johannes Helm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The process of radiationless energy transfer from a chromophore in an excited electronic state (the “donor” to another chromophore (an “acceptor”, in which the energy released by the donor effects an electronic transition, is known as “Förster Resonance Energy Transfer” (FRET. The rate of energy transfer is dependent on the sixth power of the distance between donor and acceptor. Determining FRET efficiencies is tantamount to measuring distances between molecules. A new method is proposed for determining FRET efficiencies rapidly, quantitatively, and non-destructively on ensembles containing donor acceptor pairs: at wavelengths suitable for mutually exclusive excitations of donors and acceptors, two laser beams are intensity-modulated in rectangular patterns at duty cycle ½ and frequencies ƒ1 and ƒ2 by electro-optic modulators. In an ensemble exposed to these laser beams, the donor excitation is modulated at ƒ1, and the acceptor excitation, and therefore the degree of saturation of the excited electronic state of the acceptors, is modulated at ƒ2. Since the ensemble contains donor acceptor pairs engaged in FRET, the released donor fluorescence is modulated not only at ƒ1 but also at the beat frequency Δƒ: = |ƒ1 − ƒ2|. The depth of the latter modulation, detectable via a lock-in amplifier, quantitatively indicates the FRET efficiency.

  17. Foerster resonance energy transfer rate and local density of optical states are uncorrelated in any dielectric nanophotonic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study an analytic model system wherein a pair of ideal dipole emitters - donor and acceptor - exhibit energy transfer in the vicinity of an ideal mirror. The FRET rate is controlled by the mirror up to distances comparable to the donor-acceptor distance, that is, the few-nanometer range. For vanishing distance, we find a complete inhibition or a four-fold enhancement, depending on dipole orientation. For mirror distances on the wavelength scale, where the well-known `Drexhage' modification of the spontaneous-emission rate occurs, the FRET rate is constant. Hence there is no correlation between the Foerster (or total) energy transfer rate and the LDOS. At any distance to the mirror, the total energy transfer between a closely-spaced donor and acceptor is dominated by Foerster transfer, i.e., by the static dipole-dipole interaction that yields the cha...

  18. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  19. Nonlinear oscillation of nanoelectro-mechanical resonators using energy balance method: considering the size effect and the van der Waals force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalambaz, Mohammad; Ghalambaz, Mehdi; Edalatifar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The energy balance method is utilized to analyze the oscillation of a nonlinear nanoelectro-mechanical system resonator. The resonator comprises an electrode, which is embedded between two substrates. Two types of clamped-clamped and cantilever nano-resonators are studied. The effects of the van der Waals attractions, Casimir force, the small size, the fringing field, the mid-plane stretching, and the axial load are taken into account. The governing partial differential equation of the resonator is reduced using the Galerkin method. The energy method is applied to obtain an analytical solution without considering any linearization or small parameter. The results of the present study are compared with the results available in the literature. In addition, the results of the present analytical solution are compared with the Runge-Kutta numerical results. An excellent agreement between the present analytical solution, numerical solution, and the results available in the literature was found. The influences of the van der Waals force, Casimir force, size effect, and fringing field effect on the oscillation frequency of resonators are studied. The results indicate that the presence of the intermolecular forces (van der Waals), Casimir force, and fringing field effect decreases the oscillation frequency of the resonator. In contrast, the presence of the size effect increases the oscillation frequency of the resonator.

  20. Polymer-Polymer Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Significantly Boosts the Power Conversion Efficiency of Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; Bharti, Vishal; Kumar, Mahesh; Chand, Suresh; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-06-24

    Optically resonant donor polymers can exploit a wider range of the solar spectrum effectively without a complicated tandem design in an organic solar cell. Ultrafast Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in a polymer-polymer system that significantly improves the power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells from 6.8% to 8.9% is demonstrated, thus paving the way to achieving 15% efficient solar cells.

  1. Self-energy Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Parameters within Quantum Electrodynamics Perturbation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Aucar

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A theory for the calculation of self-energy corrections to the nuclear magnetic parameters is given in this paper. It is based on the S-matrix formulation of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED. Explicit expressions for the various terms of the S-matrix are given. The interpretation of the self-energy, one- and two-vertex terms and some perspective for possible future developments are discussed.

  2. Measurement of Inverse Pion Photoproduction at Energies Spanning the N(1440) Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Shafi, A; Strakovsky, I I; Briscoe, W J; Nefkens, B M K; Allgower, C E; Arndt, R A; Bekrenev, V; Bennhold, C; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Grosnick, D P; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D D; Kulbardis, A; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G J; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Manweiler, R; Marusic, A; McDonald, S; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D; Phaisangittisakul, N; Price, J W; Ramírez, A F; Sadler, M; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, T D S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M; Supek, I; Tippens, W B; Workman, R L; Workman, and R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the process pi^- p -> gamma n have been measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer. Measurements were made at 18 pion momenta from 238 to 748 MeV/c, corresponding to E_gamma for the inverse reaction from 285 to 769 MeV. The data have been used to evaluate the gamma n multipoles in the vicinity of the N(1440) resonance. We compare our data and multipoles to previous determinations. A new three-parameter SAID fit yields 36 +/- 7 (GeV)^-1/2 X 10^-3 for the A^n_1/2 amplitude of the P_11.

  3. High accuracy 235U(n,f data in the resonance energy region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradela C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 235U neutron-induced cross section is widely used as reference cross section for measuring other fission cross sections, but in the resonance region it is not considered as an IAEA standard because of the scarce experimental data covering the full region. In this work, we deal with a new analysis of the experimental data obtained with a detection setup based on parallel plate ionization chambers (PPACs at the CERN n_TOF facility in the range from 1 eV to 10 keV. The relative cross section has been normalised to the IAEA value in the region between 7.8 and 11 eV, which is claimed as well-known. Comparison with the ENDF/B-VII evaluation and the IAEA reference file from 100 eV to 10 keV are provided.

  4. Energy-efficient tunable silicon photonic micro-resonator with graphene transparent nano-heaters

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Longhai; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    Thermally-tuning silicon micro-cavities are versatile and beneficial elements in low-cost large-scale photonic integrated circuits (PICs). Traditional metal heaters used for thermal tuning in silicon micro-cavities usually need a thick SiO2 upper-cladding layer, which will introduce some disadvantages including low response speed, low heating efficiency, low achievable temperature and complicated fabrication processes. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate thermally-tuning silicon micro-disk resonators by introducing graphene transparent nano-heaters, which contacts the silicon core directly without any isolator layer. This makes the graphene transparent nano-heater potentially to have excellent performances in terms of the heating efficiency, the temporal response and the achievable temperature. It is also shown that the graphene nano-heater is convenient to be used in ultrasmall photonic integrated devices due to the single-atom thickness and excellent flexibility of graphene. Both experi...

  5. Phage-amplified bioluminescent bioreporters for the detection of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven; Young, Jacque C.; Ozen, Aysu; Jegier, Patricia; Johnson, Courtney; Daumer, Kathleen; Garland, Jay; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a bioluminescent bioreporter system for the detection and monitoring of pathogenic microbial species. Current detection methodologies typically rely on time-consuming sample pre-enrichment steps to elevate pathogen concentrations to detectable levels or DNA based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques that require extensive user training and expensive instrumentation. Detection utilizing bioluminescent bioreporter organisms, however, can provide a simple and rapid means of monitoring foodborne pathogens. Bioluminescent bioreporters are engineered to produce light in response to specific environmental inducers. The light signal is then measured with photodetector devices to generate a quantitative assessment of inducer concentration. The immediate goal of this research effort is to integrate key quorum sensing signal transduction elements into pathogen specific bacteriophages. Upon infection of a unique pathogenic species by the bacteriophages, quorum sensing signals will be generated that will subsequently stimulate bioluminescence in neighboring bioluminescent bioreporter cells. Utilizing both bacteriophages and bioluminescent bioreporters, we realize exceptional pathogen specificity while attaining enhanced bioluminescence production. This integrative approach will lead to rapid pathogen identification without requisite sample pre-enrichment. Additionally, since the bioluminescent response is completely intrinsic to the bioreporter organism, no user interventions are required for generating light signals; the protocol requires only addition of the food sample with the bacteriophage/bioluminescent bioreporter system. Measurement of light responses can be achieved using high-throughput microtiter plate readers, hand-held photomultiplier units, or microchip luminometers.

  6. Measurement of Bacterial Bioluminescence Intensity and Spectrum: Current Physical Techniques and Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2016-01-01

    : Bioluminescence is light production by living organisms, which can be observed in numerous marine creatures and some terrestrial invertebrates. More specifically, bacterial bioluminescence is the "cold light" produced and emitted by bacterial cells, including both wild-type luminescent and genetically engineered bacteria. Because of the lively interplay of synthetic biology, microbiology, toxicology, and biophysics, different configurations of whole-cell biosensors based on bacterial bioluminescence have been designed and are widely used in different fields, such as ecotoxicology, food toxicity, and environmental pollution. This chapter first discusses the background of the bioluminescence phenomenon in terms of optical spectrum. Platforms for bacterial bioluminescence detection using various techniques are then introduced, such as a photomultiplier tube, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based integrated circuit. Furthermore, some typical biochemical methods to optimize the analytical performances of bacterial bioluminescent biosensors/assays are reviewed, followed by a presentation of author's recent work concerning the improved sensitivity of a bioluminescent assay for pesticides. Finally, bacterial bioluminescence as implemented in eukaryotic cells, bioluminescent imaging, and cancer cell therapies is discussed.

  7. Monitoring of Bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum in a Complex Food Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbad, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    A bioluminescent Lactobacillus plantarum (pLuc2) strain was constructed. The luminescent signal started to increase during the early exponential phase and reached its maximum in the mid-exponential phase in a batch culture of the strain. The signal detection sensitivity of the strain was the highest in PBS (phosphate buffered saline), followed by milk and MRS broth, indicating that the sensitivity was influenced by the matrix effect. The strain was used in millet seed fermentation which has a complex matrix and native lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The luminescent signal was gradually increased until 9 h during fermentation and abolished at 24 h, indicating that the strain could be specifically tracked in the complex matrix and microflora. Therefore, the bioluminescent labeling system can be used for monitoring LAB in food and dairy sciences and industries. PMID:28316482

  8. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  9. Determination of effective resonance energy for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction by the cadmium ratio method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the effective resonance energy, Ebarr -value for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction was measured using cadmium ratio method. A dual monitor (197Au-98Mo), which has convenient resonance properties, was employed for characterization of the irradiation sites. Then analytical grade iridium oxide samples diluted with CaCO3 to lower neutron self-shielding effect stacked in small cylindrical Teflon boxes were irradiated once with a 1 mm thick Cd cylindrical box placed in a thermalized neutron field of an 241Am-Be neutron source then without it. The activities produced in samples during 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction were measured using a p-type HPGe detector γ-ray spectrometer with a 44.8% relative efficiency. The correction factors for thermal, epithermal neutron self-shielding (Gth, Gepi), true coincidence summing (Fcoi) and gamma-ray self-absorption (Fs) effects were determined with appropriate approaches and programs. Thus, the experimental Ebarr -value was determined to be 2.65 ± 0.61 eV for 193Ir target nuclide. The recent data for Q0 and FCd values for Ebarr determination were based on k0-NAA online database. The present experimental Ebarr value was calculated and compared with more recent values for Q0 and FCd for 193Ir. Additionally, the Ebarr -values was theoretically calculated from the up-to-date resonance data obtained from ENDF/B VII library using two different approaches. Since there is no experimentally determined Ebarr -value for the 193Ir isotope, the results are compared with the calculated ones given in the literature.

  10. The energy scaling in a side-pumped ultra-low-magnification unstable resonator by employing a compact master oscillator power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C. Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Su, K. W.

    2016-10-01

    The energy scaling for a diode-side-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in an ultra-low-magnification unstable convex-concave resonator is investigated. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate the fact that the energy scaling is restricted by the increasing of side-pumping sources inside the resonator because of the significant pump-to-mode size mismatching. It is verified that employing the master oscillation power amplifier can effectively enlarge the output pulse energy and improve the beam quality. Up to 60-mJ pulse energy with 17-MW peak power is obtained at a pump energy of 520 mJ. A 1573-nm eye-safe laser emission with pulse energy up to 25 mJ is further attended via the extracavity optical parametric oscillator.

  11. Bacterial bioluminescence and Gumbel statistics: From quorum sensing to correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, Domenico; Velardi, Luciano; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Talà, Adelfia; Salvatore Tredici, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We show that, in particular experimental conditions, the time course of the radiant fluxes, measured from a bioluminescent emission of a Vibrio harveyi related strain, collapse after suitable rescaling onto the Gumbel distribution of extreme value theory. We argue that the activation times of the strain luminous emission follow the universal behavior described by this statistical law, in spite of the fact that no extremal process is known to occur.

  12. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described...

  13. Regulation of Bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi Strain KNH6

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Anne K.; Rader, Bethany A.; Stabb, Eric V.; Mandel, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is taxonomically restricted to certain proteobacteria, many of which belong to the Vibrionaceae. In the most well-studied cases, pheromone signaling plays a key role in regulation of light production. However, previous reports have indicated that certain Photobacterium strains do not use this regulatory method for controlling luminescence. In this study, we combined genome sequencing with genetic approaches to characterize the regulation of luminescence in Photobacte...

  14. A human brainstem glioma xenograft model enabled for bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Dinca, Eduard B.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Prados, Michael D.; James, Charles D.; Gupta, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for children with diffuse brainstem gliomas is extremely poor. There is a need for relevant brainstem tumor models that can be used to test new therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre-clinical studies. We report the development of a brainstem-tumor model in rats and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy as part of this model. Luciferase-modified human glioblastoma...

  15. Bioluminescence imaging of estrogen receptor activity during breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Dell'Omo, Giulia; Ramachandran, Balaji; Manni, Isabella; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are known to play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development as well as in its neoplastic transformation. Although several studies highlighted the contribution of ER signaling in the breast transformation, little is known about the dynamics of ER state of activity during carcinogenesis due to the lack of appropriate models for measuring the extent of receptor signaling in time, in the same animal. To this aim, we have developed a reporter mouse model for the non-invasive in vivo imaging of ER activity: the ERE-Luc reporter mouse. ERE-Luc is a transgenic mouse generated with a firefly luciferase (Luc) reporter gene driven by a minimal promoter containing an estrogen responsive element (ERE). This model allows to measure receptor signaling in longitudinal studies by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we have induced sporadic mammary cancers by treating systemically ERE-Luc reporter mice with DMBA (9,10-dimethyl 1,2-benzanthracene) and measured receptor signaling by in vivo imaging in individual animals from early stage until a clinically palpable tumor appeared in the mouse breast. We showed that DMBA administration induces an increase of bioluminescence in the whole abdominal area 6 h after treatment, the signal rapidly disappears. Several weeks later, strong bioluminescence is observed in the area corresponding to the mammary glands. In vivo and ex vivo imaging analysis demonstrated that this bioluminescent signal is localized in the breast area undergoing neoplastic transformation. We conclude that this non-invasive assay is a novel relevant tool to identify the activation of the ER signaling prior the morphological detection of the neoplastic transformation.

  16. Wireless Power Transmission Compare and Contrast with the Form of Resonance Frequency, Mutual Inductance and Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saifuddin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the thesis is about the wireless power transmission. The details of wireless power, its several elements, their application and working principles are described here. There are also details description of mutual inductance, resonance frequency and solar energy. As a result of an increase in consumer demand for electronic devices, many researchers have begun to develop technology that could power these electronic devices without the use of wires. Even today‟s most technologically advanced innovations are bound by a relatively short battery life. Through magnetism, resonance, or microwaves many different avenues exist for research and development in regard to wireless power. We will use our paper as an opportunity to investigate different technologies and review them based on their merits. Consumer devices need to accomplish a task not only cheaply but also safely. This paper will allow a better understanding of the exact science behind wireless power transmission. Also it will show how this science relates to products and their environment.

  17. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  18. Diels-Alder addition of some 6-and 5-member ring aromatic compounds on the Si(001)-2×1 surface: dependence of the binding energy on the resonance energy of the aromatic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An energy decomposition scheme is proposed for understanding of the relative lowbinding energy of the [4+2] cycloaddition of benzene on the Si(001)-2×1 surface. By means ofdensity functional cluster model calculations, this scheme is demonstrated to be applicable tosome other 6-and 5-member ring aromatic compounds, giving a trend that the binding energy ofthe [4+2] cycloaddition products of those aromatic compounds on the Si(001) surface dependsstrongly on their resonance energy.

  19. Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy of quantum well resonances in Fe films on the Cu-covered W(110) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Altman, M S

    2013-07-01

    Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy has been used to investigate the quantum size effect (QSE) in electron reflectivity from Fe films grown on a pseudomorphic Cu layer on a W(110) surface. Intensity oscillations caused by the QSE as functions of Fe film thickness and incident electron energy identify quantum well resonance conditions in the film. Evaluation of these intensity oscillations using the phase accumulation model provides information on the unoccupied spin polarized band structure in the Fe film above the vacuum level. We also find evidence that the presence of the non-magnetic Cu layer shifts spin polarized quantum well resonances in the Fe layer uniformly downward in energy by 1.1eV compared to Fe/W(110) films without an interface Cu layer, suggesting that the Cu layer gives a small degree of control over the quantum well resonances.

  20. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance; Estocasticidad de la absorcion de energia en la resonancia electron-ciclotronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez T, C. [Departamento de Fisica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez A, O

    1998-07-01

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  1. Homeotropic alignment and Förster resonance energy transfer: The way to a brighter luminescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Taylor, Alaric; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis, E-mail: i.papakonstantinou@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-07

    We investigate homeotropically aligned fluorophores and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for luminescent solar concentrators using Monte-Carlo ray tracing. The homeotropic alignment strongly improves the trapping efficiency, while FRET circumvents the low absorption at homeotropic alignment by separating the absorption and emission processes. We predict that this design doped with two organic dye molecules can yield a 82.9% optical efficiency improvement compared to a single, arbitrarily oriented dye molecule. We also show that quantum dots are prime candidates for absorption/donor fluorophores due to their wide absorption band. The potentially strong re-absorption and low quantum yield of quantum dots is not a hindrance for this design.

  2. Structure–function–folding relationships and native energy landscape of dynein light chain protein: nuclear magnetic resonance insights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P M Krishna Mohan; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2009-09-01

    The detailed characterization of the structure, dynamics and folding process of a protein is crucial for understanding the biological functions it performs. Modern biophysical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have provided a way to obtain accurate structural and thermodynamic information on various species populated on the energy landscape of a given protein. In this context, we review here the structure–function–folding relationship of an important protein, namely, dynein light chain protein (DLC8). DLC8, the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex, acts as a cargo adaptor. The protein exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into a pure monomer below pH 4. Cargo binding occurs at the dimer interface. Dimer stability and relay of perturbations through the dimer interface are anticipated to be playing crucial roles in the variety of functions the protein performs. NMR investigations have provided great insights into these aspects of DLC8 in recent years.

  3. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  4. Scaling output energy in a diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched laser with a flat-flat resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. Y.; Huang, Y. J.; Liang, H. C.; Chen, Y. F.; Su, K. W.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial and temporal behaviors in a diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched laser with a flat-flat resonator are systematically explored as a function of the cavity length. A Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG miniature laser is experimentally used to show that the scale-up of the pulse energy without the higher-order transverse modes can be practically realized by optimizing the cavity length as a function of the pump size. A theoretical analysis is performed to confirm the experimental results. The extracavity second harmonic generation is experimentally conducted to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser design. PACS number(s): 42.60.Gd Q-switching; 42.55.Xi Diode-pumped lasers; 42.55.-f Lasers; 42.65.Sf Dynamics of nonlinear optical systems; optical instabilities, optical chaos and complexity, and optical spatiotemporal dynamics.

  5. Chemiluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Competitive Immunoassay Employing Hapten-Functionalized Quantum Dots for the Detection of Sulfamethazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mingfang; Wen, Kai; Beier, Ross C; Eremin, Sergei A; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2016-07-20

    We describe a new strategy for using chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) by employing hapten-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) in a competitive immunoassay for detection of sulfamethazine (SMZ). Core/multishell QDs were synthesized and modified with phospholipid-PEG. The modified QDs were functionalized with the hapten 4-(4-aminophenyl-sulfonamido)butanoic acid. The CRET-based immunoassay exhibited a limit of detection for SMZ of 9 pg mL(-1), which is >4 orders of magnitude better than a homogeneous fluorescence polarization immunoassay and is 2 orders of magnitude better than a heterogeneous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This strategy represents a simple, reliable, and universal approach for detection of chemical contaminants.

  6. Micro-RNA detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer of DNA-carbon quantum dots probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakbaz, Faeze; Mahani, Mohamad

    2017-04-15

    Carbon quantum dots have been proposed as an effective platform for miRNA detection. Carbon dots were synthesized by citric acid. The synthesized dots were characterized by dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and FT-IR spectrophotometry. The fluorescence quantum yield of the synthesized dots was determined using quinine sulfate as the standard. The FAM-labeled single stranded DNA, as sensing element, was adsorbed on dots by π-π interaction. The quenching of the dots fluorescence due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used for mir 9-1 detection. In the presence of the complementary miRNA, the FRET did not take place and the fluorescence was recovered.

  7. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis.

  8. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  9. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner.

  10. Graphene quantum dot antennas for high efficiency Förster resonance energy transfer based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Alagesan; Pan, Zhenghui; Rong, Genlan; Li, Hongfei; Zhou, Lisha; Li, Wanfei; Qiu, Yongcai; Xu, Yijun; Hou, Yuan; Zheng, Zhaozhao; Zhang, Yuegang

    2017-03-01

    The light harvesting efficiency of an acceptor dye can be enhanced by judicious choice and/or design of donor materials in the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this work, we explore graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as energy relay antennas for the high power conversion efficiency Ru-based N719 acceptor dyes. The absorption, emission, and time decay spectral results evidence the existence of the FRET, the radiative energy transfer (RET), and a synergistic interaction between GQDs and N719 dye. The FRET efficiency is measured to be 27%. The GQDs co-sensitized DSSC achieves an efficiency (ƞ) of 7.96% with a Jsc of 16.54 mAcm-2, which is 30% higher than that of a N719-based DSSC. GQDs also reduce the charge recombination, which results in an increased open-circuit voltage up to 770 mV. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency and UV-Vis absorption measurement reveal that the enhanced absorption of the GQDs antennas is responsible for the improved Jsc in the whole UV-Visible region, while the RET/FRET and the synergistic effect contribute to the significant increase of Jsc in the UV region.

  11. Numerical method to calculate the quantum transmission, resonance and eigenvalue energies: application to a biased multibarrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: fethimaiz@gmail.com [University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, PO Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-15

    A novel method to calculate the quantum transmission, resonance and eigenvalue energies forming the sub-bands structure of non-symmetrical, non-periodical semiconducting heterostructure potential has been proposed in this paper. The method can be applied on a multilayer system with varying thickness of the layer and effective mass of electrons and holes. Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, Schrödinger equation at each media is solved and then using a confirmed recurrence method, the transmission and reflection coefficients and the energy quantification condition are expressed. They are simple combination of coupled equations. Schrödinger's equation solutions are Airy functions or plane waves, depending on the electrical potential energy slope. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, the N barriers – (N−1) wells structure for N=3, 5, 8, 9, 17 and 35 are studied. All results show very good agreements with previously published results obtained from applying different methods on similar systems.

  12. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in chemistry and biology: Non-Förster distance dependence of the FRET rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangeeta Saini; Harjinder Singh; Biman Bagchi

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a popular tool to study equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers and biopolymers in condensed phases and is now widely used in conjunction with single molecule spectroscopy. In the data analysis, one usually employs the Förster expression which predicts (1/6) distance dependence of the energy transfer rate. However, critical analysis shows that this expression can be of rather limited validity in many cases. We demonstrate this by explicitly considering a donor-acceptor system, polyfluorene (PF6)-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), where the size of both donor and acceptor is comparable to the distance separating them. In such cases, one may expect much weaker distance (as 1/2 or even weaker) dependence. We have also considered the case of energy transfer from a dye to a nanoparticle. Here we find 1/4 distance dependence at large separations, completely different from Förster. We also discuss recent application of FRET to study polymer conformational dynamics.

  13. Energy Moment Method Applied to Nuclear Quadrupole Splitting of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, V

    1962-01-01

    Expressions giving the sum of the energy values, raised to the second and third power, for a nucleus interacting with a static magnetic field and a static electric field gradient are derived. Several applications of this method for obtaining the values of the components of the electric field...

  14. Noninvasive quantification of fluid mechanical energy losses in the total cavopulmonary connection with magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Anand K; Halliburton, Sandra S; Setser, Randolph M; White, Richard D; Chatzimavroudis, George P

    2007-01-01

    A major determinant of the success of surgical vascular modifications, such as the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC), is the energetic efficiency that is assessed by calculating the mechanical energy loss of blood flow through the new connection. Currently, however, to determine the energy loss, invasive pressure measurements are necessary. Therefore, this study evaluated the feasibility of the viscous dissipation (VD) method, which has the potential to provide the energy loss without the need for invasive pressure measurements. Two experimental phantoms, a U-shaped tube and a glass TCPC, were scanned in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner and the images were used to construct computational models of both geometries. MR phase velocity mapping (PVM) acquisitions of all three spatial components of the fluid velocity were made in both phantoms and the VD was calculated. VD results from MR PVM experiments were compared with VD results from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations on the image-based computational models. The results showed an overall agreement between MR PVM and CFD. There was a similar ascending tendency in the VD values as the image spatial resolution increased. The most accurate computations of the energy loss were achieved for a CFD grid density that was too high for MR to achieve under current MR system capabilities (in-plane pixel size of less than 0.4 mm). Nevertheless, the agreement between the MR PVM and the CFD VD results under the same resolution settings suggests that the VD method implemented with a clinical imaging modality such as MR has good potential to quantify the energy loss in vascular geometries such as the TCPC.

  15. Electrochemiluminescence detection of TNT by resonance energy transfer through the formation of a TNT-amine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenjing; Xu, Min; Pang, Lei; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Majeed, Saadat; Xu, Guobao

    2014-04-14

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a widely used nitroaromatic explosive with significant detrimental effects on the environment and human health. Its detection is of great importance. In this study, both electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based detection of TNT through the formation of a TNT-amine complex and the detection of TNT through electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECRET) are developed for the first time. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-modified [Ru(phen)3](2+) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline)-doped silica nanoparticles (RuSiNPs) with uniform sizes of (73±3) nm were synthesized. TNT can interact with APTES-modified RuSiNPs through charge transfer from electron-rich amines in the RuSiNPs to the electron-deficient aromatic ring of TNT to form a red TNT-amine complex. The absorption spectrum of this complex overlaps with the ECL spectrum of the APTES-modified RuSiNPs/triethylamine system. As a result, ECL signals of the APTES-modified RuSiNPs/triethylamine system are turned off in the presence of TNT owing to resonance energy transfer from electrochemically excited RuSiNPs to the TNT-amine complex. This ECRET method has been successfully applied for the sensitive determination of TNT with a linear range from 1×10(-9) to 1×10(-6) M with a fast response time within 1 min. The limit of detection is 0.3 nM. The method exhibits good selectivity towards 2,4-dinitrotoluene, p-nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, phenol, p-quinone, 8-hydroxyquinoline, p-phenylenediamine, K3[Fe(CN)6], Fe(3+), NO3(-), NO2(-), Cr(3+), Fe(2+), Pb(2+), SO3(2-), formaldehyde, oxalate, proline, and glycine.

  16. A high-throughput homogeneous immunoassay based on Förster resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Jing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhengjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Chengquan [Changzhou College of Information Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Pan, Xiaohu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Liu, Songqin, E-mail: liusq@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-02-06

    Graphical abstract: A Förster resonance energy transfer system by using polyclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as donor and monoclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor for sensitive detection of tumor marker was proposed. Highlights: ► A homogeneous immunosensing strategy based on FRET for detection of tumor marker was proposed. ► Close of QDs and AuNPs allow the occurrence of quenching the photoluminescence of nano-bio-probes. ► Signal quenching was monitored by a self-developed image analyzer. ► The fluorometric assay format is attractive for widespread carcinoma screening and even field use. -- Abstract: A novel homogeneous immunoassay based on Förster resonance energy transfer for sensitive detection of tumor, e.g., marker with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), was proposed. The assay was consisted of polyclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as donor and monoclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor. In presence of CEA, the bio-affinity between antigen and antibody made the QDs and AuNPs close enough, thus the photoluminescence (PL) quenching of CdTe QDs occurred. The PL properties could be transformed into the fluorometric variation, corresponding to the target antigen concentration, and could be easily monitored and analyzed with the home-made image analysis software. The fluorometric results indicated a linear detection range of 1–110 ng mL{sup −1} for CEA, with a detection limit of 0.3 ng mL{sup −1}. The proposed assay configuration was attractive for carcinoma screening or single sample in point-of-care testing, and even field use. In spite of the limit of available model analyte, this approach could be easily extended to detection of a wide range of biomarkers.

  17. Synchronization of circadian bioluminescence as a group-foraging strategy in cave glowworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Andrew J; Merritt, David J

    2013-07-01

    Flies of the genus Arachnocampa are sit-and-lure predators that use bioluminescence to attract flying prey to their silk webs. Some species are most common in rainforest habitat and others inhabit both caves and rainforest. We have studied the circadian regulation of bioluminescence in two species: one found in subtropical rainforest with no known cave populations and the other found in temperate rainforest with large populations in limestone caves. The rainforest species is typical of most nocturnal animals in that individuals are entrained by the light:dark (LD) cycle to be active at night; in this case, their propensity to bioluminesce is greatest at night. The dual-habitat species shows an opposite phase response to the same entrainment; its bioluminescence propensity rhythm is entrained by LD exposure to peak during the day. Nevertheless, in LD environments, individuals do not bioluminesce during the day because ambient light inhibits their bioluminescence (negative masking), pushing bioluminescence into the dark period. This unusual and unexpected phenomenon could be related to their association with caves and has been suggested to be an adaptation of the circadian system that promotes synchronization of a colony's output of bioluminescence. Here, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that individuals do synchronize their bioluminescence rhythms when in visual contact with each other. Entrainment of the bioluminescence rhythm to the biological photophase causes colony-wide synchronization, creating a daily sinusoidal rhythm of the intensity of bioluminescence in the many thousands of individuals making up a colony. This synchronization could provide a group-foraging advantage, allowing the colony to glow most brightly when the prey are most likely to be active.

  18. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L., E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.it; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Districti Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame 46556, Indiana (United States); Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  19. Interferometric phase detection at x-ray energies via Fano resonance control

    CERN Document Server

    Heeg, K P; Schumacher, D; Wille, H -C; Röhlsberger, R; Pfeifer, T; Evers, J

    2014-01-01

    Modern x-ray light sources promise access to structure and dynamics of matter in largely unexplored spectral regions. However, the desired information is encoded in the light intensity and phase, whereas detectors register only the intensity. This phase problem is ubiquitous in crystallography and imaging, and impedes the exploration of quantum effects at x-ray energies. Here, we demonstrate phase-sensitive measurements characterizing the quantum state of a nuclear two-level system at hard x-ray energies. The nuclei are initially prepared in a superposition state. Subsequently, the relative phase of this superposition is interferometrically reconstructed from the emitted x-rays. Our results form a first step towards x-ray quantum state tomography, and provide new avenues for structure determination and precision metrology via x-ray Fano interference.

  20. Triple α resonances in the 6Li + 6Li → 3α reaction at low energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tumino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The 6Li + 6Li → 3α reaction has been measured in a kinematically complete experiment at 3.1 MeV of beam energy. The reaction mainly proceeds via intermediate 8Be states. The interaction between any two of the three α particles provides events with one, two or three 8Be interfering levels, with strong enhancement in the α–α coincidence yield. Evidence of three 8Be levels within the same 3α event suggests that one α particle is exchanged between the other two. This is a condition for Efimov states to occur in nuclei, for which no observation exists yet. The hyperspherical formalism for the low-energy three-body problem has been applied to point out the 3α particle correlation.

  1. Understanding and modeling Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) introduction to FRET

    CERN Document Server

    Govorov, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    This Brief presents a historical overview of the Förster-type nonradiative energy transfer and a compilation of important progress in FRET research, starting from Förster until today, along with a summary of the current state-of-the-art. Here the objective is to provide the reader with a complete account of important milestones in FRET studies and FRET applications as well as a picture of the current status.

  2. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie [Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China) and School of Life Sciences and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  3. Combining electric and magnetic static field for the tuning of the lifetime of zero energy Feshbach resonances: Application to 3He+NH collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Stoecklin, T

    2009-01-01

    We study the variation of the positions of two magnetically tuned Zero energy Feshbach resonances when a parallel superimposed electric field is applied. We show that their variation as a function of the electric field follows a simple analytical law and is then predictable. We find that depending on the initial state of the diatomic molecule the resonance is either shifted to higher or to lower values of the magnetic field when the electric field is applied. We calculate the Close Coupling lifetimes of these resonances and show that they also follow a simple law as a function of both the magnetic and the electric field. We demonstrate using this expression that the lifetime of the resonances can be maximised by choosing an appropriate value of the applied electric and found a good agreement with the results of our Close Coupling calculations. These results could be checked in future experiments dedicated to the 3He + NH collisions

  4. Repulsive magnetic levitation-based ocean wave energy harvester with variable resonance: Modeling, simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Masoud; Wang, Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a magnetic levitation characteristic used in a vibration based energy harvester, called repulsive magnetic scavenger (RMS). The RMS is capable of harvesting ocean wave energy with a unique repelling permanent magnet array, which provides a stronger and more uniform magnetic field, compared to its attracting magnetic counterparts. The levitating magnets are stacked together around a threaded rod so that the same pole is facing each other. Two fixed magnets placed with one at each end of the RMS provides a collocated harvesting and braking mechanism in the face of high amplitude vibrations. Magnets in the levitated magnet stack are separated by pole pieces which are made of metals to intensify the magnetic field strength. The effect of the thickness and the use of different materials with different permeability for pole pieces is also studied to obtain an optimal energy harvesting efficiency. Moreover, the procedure to find the restoring force applied to the levitating magnet stack is demonstrated. Then, the Duffing vibration equation of the harvester is solved and the frequency response function is calculated for various force amplitudes and electrical damping so as to investigate the effect of these parameters on the response of the system. Furthermore, the effect of the maximum displacement of the moving magnet stack on the natural frequency of the device is studied. And finally, Faraday's law is employed to estimate the output voltage and power of the system under the specified input excitation force. Experiments show that the output emf voltage of the manufactured prototype reaches up to 42 V for an excitation force with the frequency of 9 Hz and the maximum amplitude of 3.4 g.

  5. Construction of Multi-Chromophoric Spectra from Monomer Data: Applications to Resonant Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Chenu, Aurélia

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model that establishes a quantitative link between the physical properties of molecular aggregates and their constituent building blocks. The relation is built on the coherent potential approximation, calibrated against exact results, and proven reliable for a wide range of parameters. It provides a practical method to compute spectra and transfer rates in multi-chromophoric systems from experimentally accessible monomer data. Applications to F\\"orster energy transfer reveal optimal transfer rates as functions of both the system-bath coupling and intra-aggregate coherence.

  6. Construction of Multichromophoric Spectra from Monomer Data: Applications to Resonant Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Aurélia; Cao, Jianshu

    2017-01-01

    We develop a model that establishes a quantitative link between the physical properties of molecular aggregates and their constituent building blocks. The relation is built on the coherent potential approximation, calibrated against exact results, and proven reliable for a wide range of parameters. It provides a practical method to compute spectra and transfer rates in multichromophoric systems from experimentally accessible monomer data. Applications to Förster energy transfer reveal optimal transfer rates as functions of both the system-bath coupling and intra-aggregate coherence.

  7. Understanding and modeling Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET)

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández Martínez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2017-01-01

    This Brief presents a complete study of the generalized theory of Förster-type energy transfer in nanostructures with mixed dimensionality. Here the aim is to obtain a generalized theory of FRET including a comprehensive set of analytical equations for all combinations and configurations of nanostructures and deriving generic expressions for the dimensionality involved. In this brief, the modification of FRET mechanism with respect to the nanostructure serving as the donor vs. the acceptor will be included, focusing on the rate’s distance dependency and the role of the effective dielectric function in FRET, which will be a unique, useful source for those who study and model FRET.

  8. Bacterial Bioluminescence: Spectral Study of the Emitters in the In Vivo Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheson, I.B.C.; Lee, J.; Muller, F.

    1981-01-01

    Transient fluorescent species are observed in the bioluminescent reactions of three reduced flavin mononucleotides with aliphatic aldehydes and oxygen, catalyzed by bacterial luciferase. In each case the fluorescence spectral distribution is similar to that of the bioluminescence but is readily dist

  9. Evaluation of ATP bioluminescence assays for potential use in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Zoie A; Wilson, Michael; Pratten, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    ATP bioluminescence is being applied in hospitals to measure surface contamination. We compared commercial luminometers for detecting the number Staphylococcus aureus associated with surfaces. The data showed that the ATP bioluminescence methods tested were not robust enough to generate quantitative data on bacterial numbers, especially at low concentrations.

  10. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility determination of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens by use of ATP bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Vesna; Mastali, Mitra; Percy, Neil; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M; Bruckner, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first direct testing of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples by the use of ATP bioluminescence. We developed an ATP bioluminescence assay that eliminates somatic sources of ATP to selectively quantify the bacterial load in clinical urine specimens with a sensitivity of ATP bioluminescence assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens tested in a blinded manner. ATP bioluminescent bacterial density quantitation was used to determine the inoculation volume in growth medium with and without antibiotics. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 120 min, the ATP bioluminescence assay was repeated to evaluate the uropathogen response to antibiotics. The ability of the ATP bioluminescence assay to discriminate between antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance was determined by comparison of the results obtained by the ATP bioluminescence assay with the results obtained by standard clinical microbiology methods. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for discriminating between susceptibility and resistance. Susceptibility and resistance were correctly predicted in 87% and 95% of cases, respectively, for an overall unweighted accuracy of 91%, when the results were stratified by antibiotic. For samples in which the pathogen was susceptible, the accuracy improved to 95% when the results for samples with less than a 25-fold increase in the amount of bacterial ATP in the medium without antibiotics were excluded. These data indicate that a rapid bioluminescent antimicrobial susceptibility assay may be useful for the management of urinary tract infections.

  11. Long Term Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence, Chlorophyll, And Their Environmental Correlates In Southern California Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    1 Long Term Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence, Chlorophyll, and Their Environmental Correlates in Southern California Coastal Waters David Lapota...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Long Term Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence, Chlorophyll, And Their Environmental Correlates In Southern California... dinoflagellates were identified to the species level when possible. Chlorophyll a was extracted from the seawater samples using standard methods (APHA 1981) and

  12. Förster resonance energy transfer and protein-induced fluorescence enhancement as synergetic multi-scale molecular rulers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Evelyn; Lerner, Eitan; Husada, Florence; Roelfs, Martin; Chung, Sangyoon; Hohlbein, Johannes; Weiss, Shimon; Cordes, Thorben

    2016-09-01

    Advanced microscopy methods allow obtaining information on (dynamic) conformational changes in biomolecules via measuring a single molecular distance in the structure. It is, however, extremely challenging to capture the full depth of a three-dimensional biochemical state, binding-related structural changes or conformational cross-talk in multi-protein complexes using one-dimensional assays. In this paper we address this fundamental problem by extending the standard molecular ruler based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) into a two-dimensional assay via its combination with protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE). We show that donor brightness (via PIFE) and energy transfer efficiency (via FRET) can simultaneously report on e.g., the conformational state of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) following its interaction with unlabelled proteins (BamHI, EcoRV, and T7 DNA polymerase gp5/trx). The PIFE-FRET assay uses established labelling protocols and single molecule fluorescence detection schemes (alternating-laser excitation, ALEX). Besides quantitative studies of PIFE and FRET ruler characteristics, we outline possible applications of ALEX-based PIFE-FRET for single-molecule studies with diffusing and immobilized molecules. Finally, we study transcription initiation and scrunching of E. coli RNA-polymerase with PIFE-FRET and provide direct evidence for the physical presence and vicinity of the polymerase that causes structural changes and scrunching of the transcriptional DNA bubble.

  13. A homogeneous europium cryptate-based assay for the diagnosis of mutations by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Crapez, E; Bazin, H; Andre, E; Noletti, J; Grenier, J; Mathis, G

    2001-07-15

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is considered to be a very useful methodology for the detection and characterization of mutations, particularly for clinical purposes. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorescent donor and a suitable fluorophore as acceptor has been applied in the past to several scientific fields. This technique is well adapted to nucleic acid analysis such as DNA sequencing, DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. We describe here a homogeneous format based on the use of a rare earth cryptate label as donor: tris-bipyridine-Eu(3+). The long-lived fluorescence of this label makes it possible to reach a high sensitivity by using a time-resolved detection mode. A non-radiative energy transfer technology, known as time-resolved amplification of cryptate emission (TRACE((R))) characterized by a temporal and spectral selectivity has been developed. The TRACE((R)) detection of characterized single nucleotide polymorphism using the OLA for allelic discrimination is proposed. We demonstrate the potentialities of this OLA-TRACE((R)) methodology through the analysis of K-ras oncogene point mutations.

  14. Enzymatic activity characterization of SARS coronavirus 3C-like protease by fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai CHEN; Hua-liang JIANG; Li-li CHEN; Hai-bin LUO; Tao SUN; Jing CHEN; Fei YE; Jian-hua CAI; Jing-kang SHEN; Xu SHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To characterize enzymatic activity of severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS) coronavirus (CoV) 3C-like protease (3CLpro) and its four site-directed mutants. Methods: Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)principle using 5-[(2'-aminoethyl)-amino] naphthelenesulfonic acid (EDANS) and 4-[[4-(dimethylamino) phenyl] azo] benzoic acid (Dabcyl) as the energy transfer pair, one fluorogenic substrate was designed for the evaluation of SARS-CoV 3CLpro proteolytic activity. Results: The kinetic parameters of the fluorogenic substrate have been determined as Km=404 μmol.L-1, kcat=1.08 min-1, and kcat/Km=2.7 gered activity switches, and site-directed mutagenesis analysis of SARS-CoV 3CLpro revealed that substitutions of His41, Cys145, and His163 resulted in complete loss of enzymatic activity, while replacement of Met162 with Ala caused strongly increased activity. Conclusion: This present work has provided valuable information for understanding the catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV 3CLpro. This FRET-based assay might supply an ideal approach for the exploration SARSCoV 3CLpro putative inhibitors.

  15. Förster resonance energy transfer between pyrene and bovine serum albumin: Effect of the hydrophobic pockets of cyclodextrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arnab; Mukherjee, Puspal; Das, Tarasankar; Ghosh, Prasun; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    The phenomenon of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between pyrene and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein in presence of cyclodextrins (CDs) is explored in the present work. CDs provide hydrophobic environment and thus the aromatic molecules get encapsulated in them depending on the relative size and space. In this work we revealed that along with pyrene monomer, the side chains of amino acids in BSA can get trapped partly in the hydrophobic cavities of CDs if space permits. While being encapsulated by β-CD as pyrene monomer, it can interact with the BSA tryptophan moiety exposed toward the aqueous environment to form a dimer through π-π interaction. This, in turn, affects the energy transfer process by reducing the efficiency. On the other hand, pyrene excimer gets encapsulated in a γ-CD molecule due to availability of enough space. The excimer shows a new band at a higher wavelength. This further reduces FRET efficiency due to scarcity of acceptor for the tryptophan moieties in BSA.

  16. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Braicovich, L; Dellea, G; Tacon, M Le; Sala, M Moretti; Morawe, C; Peffen, J-Ch; Supruangnet, R; Yakhou, F; Ghiringhelli, G; Brookes, N B

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B4C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF; it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L3 edge on a high-Tc superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the ...

  17. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braicovich, L., E-mail: lucio.braicovich@polimi.it; Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, Milano I-20133 (Italy); Le Tacon, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38043 (France); Supruangnet, R. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  18. Förster resonance energy transfer and protein-induced fluorescence enhancement as synergetic multi-scale molecular rulers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Evelyn; Lerner, Eitan; Husada, Florence; Roelfs, Martin; Chung, SangYoon; Hohlbein, Johannes; Weiss, Shimon; Cordes, Thorben

    2016-01-01

    Advanced microscopy methods allow obtaining information on (dynamic) conformational changes in biomolecules via measuring a single molecular distance in the structure. It is, however, extremely challenging to capture the full depth of a three-dimensional biochemical state, binding-related structural changes or conformational cross-talk in multi-protein complexes using one-dimensional assays. In this paper we address this fundamental problem by extending the standard molecular ruler based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) into a two-dimensional assay via its combination with protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE). We show that donor brightness (via PIFE) and energy transfer efficiency (via FRET) can simultaneously report on e.g., the conformational state of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) following its interaction with unlabelled proteins (BamHI, EcoRV, and T7 DNA polymerase gp5/trx). The PIFE-FRET assay uses established labelling protocols and single molecule fluorescence detection schemes (alternating-laser excitation, ALEX). Besides quantitative studies of PIFE and FRET ruler characteristics, we outline possible applications of ALEX-based PIFE-FRET for single-molecule studies with diffusing and immobilized molecules. Finally, we study transcription initiation and scrunching of E. coli RNA-polymerase with PIFE-FRET and provide direct evidence for the physical presence and vicinity of the polymerase that causes structural changes and scrunching of the transcriptional DNA bubble. PMID:27641327

  19. A Paper-Based Sandwich Format Hybridization Assay for Unlabeled Nucleic Acid Detection Using Upconversion Nanoparticles as Energy Donors in Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioassays based on cellulose paper substrates are gaining increasing popularity for the development of field portable and low-cost diagnostic applications. Herein, we report a paper-based nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET. UCNPs with intense green emission served as donors with Cy3 dye as the acceptor. The avidin functionalized UCNPs were immobilized on cellulose paper and subsequently bioconjugated to biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. Introduction of unlabeled oligonucleotide targets resulted in a formation of probe-target duplexes. A subsequent hybridization of Cy3 labeled reporter with the remaining single stranded portion of target brought the Cy3 dye in close proximity to the UCNPs to trigger a LRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye. The hybridization assays provided a limit of detection (LOD of 146.0 fmol and exhibited selectivity for one base pair mismatch discrimination. The assay was functional even in undiluted serum samples. This work embodies important progress in developing DNA hybridization assays on paper. Detection of unlabeled targets is achieved using UCNPs as LRET donors, with minimization of background signal from paper substrates owing to the implementation of low energy near-infrared (NIR excitation.

  20. Effect of compartmentalization of donor and acceptor on the ultrafast resonance energy transfer from DAPI to silver nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Roopali; Chatterjee, Surajit; Kannaujiya, Krishna K.; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence of cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been demonstrated using steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond fluorescence upconversion techniques. The synthesized Ag NCs were characterized using FTIR, mass spectrometry, XPS, HRTEM, DLS, UV-Vis and PL spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals the formation of ultrasmall Ag4 NCs with a small amount of Ag5 NCs. UV-Vis and PL spectra reveal distinct molecular-like optoelectronic behaviour of these ultrasmall Ag NCs. The dihydrolipoic acid-capped Ag NCs strongly quench the fluorescence of DAPI with concomitant increase in its photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 675 nm. This steady-state fluorescence quenching proceeds with a significant shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of DAPI in the presence of Ag NCs, signifying the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from DAPI to Ag NCs. Various energy transfer parameters have been estimated from FRET theory. The present FRET pair shows a characteristic Förster distance of 2.45 nm and can be utilized as a reporter of short-range distances in various FRET based applications. Moreover, this nonradiative FRET is completely suppressed in the presence of both 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA. Our results reveal selective compartmentalization of Ag NCs and DAPI in the presence of 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA, respectively. This selective compartmentalization of donor and acceptor and the subsequent modification of the FRET process may find application in various sensing, photovoltaic, and light harvesting applications.The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence