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Sample records for bioluminescence resonance energy

  1. Comparison of Static and Microfluidic Protease Assays Using Modified Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Nan; Dacres, Helen; Anderson, Alisha; Stephen C Trowell; Zhu, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (F/BRET) are two forms of Förster resonance energy transfer, which can be used for optical transduction of biosensors. BRET has several advantages over fluorescence-based technologies because it does not require an external light source. There would be benefits in combining BRET transduction with microfluidics but the low luminance of BRET has made this challenging until now. Methodology We used a thrombin bioprobe based on...

  2. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  3. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues. PMID:27424898

  4. Design and development of high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer efficiency hybrid-imaging constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Kovalski, Letícia; Broyles, David; Hunt, Eric A; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the design and construction of an imaging construct with high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) efficiency that is composed of multiple quantum dots (QDs; λem = 655 nm) self-assembled onto a bioluminescent protein, Renilla luciferase (Rluc). This is facilitated by the streptavidin-biotin interaction, allowing the facile formation of a hybrid-imaging construct (HIC) comprising up to six QDs (acceptor) grafted onto a light-emitting Rluc (donor) core. The resulting assembly of multiple acceptors surrounding a donor permits this construct to exhibit high resonance energy transfer efficiency (∼64.8%). The HIC was characterized using fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application of our construct, a generation-5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) nanocarrier was loaded with our HIC for in vitro and in vivo imaging. We envision that this design of multiple acceptors and bioluminescent donor will lead to the development of new BRET-based systems useful in sensing, imaging, and other bioanalytical applications. PMID:26772160

  5. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L;

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  6. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P;

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  7. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27144967

  8. Protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated protein via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential biological reactions occurring at inter- and intra-cellular levels. The analysis of their mechanism is generally required in order link to understand their various cellular functions. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), which is based on an enzymatic activity of luciferase, is a useful tool for investigating protein-protein interactions in live cells. The combination of the BRET system and biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) would provide us a better understanding of the hetero-oligomeric structural states of protein complexes. In this review, we discuss the application of BRET to the protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated proteins and discuss its physiological relevance. PMID:27493852

  9. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase—quantum dot bionanoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor–acceptor distances (∼5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ∼5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications. (paper)

  10. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase—quantum dot bionanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M.; Doane, Tennyson L.; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2014-12-01

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor-acceptor distances (˜5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ˜5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications.

  11. Measuring ligand-dependent and ligand-independent interactions between nuclear receptors and associated proteins using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET2)

    OpenAIRE

    Koterba, Kristen L.; Rowan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET2) is a recently developed technology for the measurement of protein-protein interactions in a live, cell-based system. BRET2 is characterized by the efficient transfer of excited energy between a bioluminescent donor molecule (Renilla luciferase) and a fluorescent acceptor molecule (a mutant of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP2)). The BRET2 assay offers advantages over fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) because it does not require an ext...

  12. Quantum dot-NanoLuc bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables tumor imaging and lymph node mapping in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Anyanee; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G; Cheng, Liang; Liu, Zhuang; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-19

    A small luciferase protein (Nluc) was conjugated to QDs as a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) pair. The conjugate showed 76% BRET efficiency and lymph node mapping was successfully performed. The cRGD peptide was conjugated to QD-Nluc for tumor targeting. The self-illuminating QD-Nluc showed excellent energy transfer in a living system and offered an optimal tumor-to-background ratio (>85). PMID:27157466

  13. Investigating Protein-protein Interactions in Live Cells Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Sara B.; Fisher, Simon E.

    2014-01-01

    Assays based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) provide a sensitive and reliable means to monitor protein-protein interactions in live cells. BRET is the non-radiative transfer of energy from a 'donor' luciferase enzyme to an 'acceptor' fluorescent protein. In the most common configuration of this assay, the donor is Renilla reniformis luciferase and the acceptor is Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP). Because the efficiency of energy transfer is strongly distance-dependent, observation of the BRET phenomenon requires that the donor and acceptor be in close proximity. To test for an interaction between two proteins of interest in cultured mammalian cells, one protein is expressed as a fusion with luciferase and the second as a fusion with YFP. An interaction between the two proteins of interest may bring the donor and acceptor sufficiently close for energy transfer to occur. Compared to other techniques for investigating protein-protein interactions, the BRET assay is sensitive, requires little hands-on time and few reagents, and is able to detect interactions which are weak, transient, or dependent on the biochemical environment found within a live cell. It is therefore an ideal approach for confirming putative interactions suggested by yeast two-hybrid or mass spectrometry proteomics studies, and in addition it is well-suited for mapping interacting regions, assessing the effect of post-translational modifications on protein-protein interactions, and evaluating the impact of mutations identified in patient DNA. PMID:24893771

  14. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  15. Comparison of static and microfluidic protease assays using modified bioluminescence resonance energy transfer chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (F/BRET are two forms of Förster resonance energy transfer, which can be used for optical transduction of biosensors. BRET has several advantages over fluorescence-based technologies because it does not require an external light source. There would be benefits in combining BRET transduction with microfluidics but the low luminance of BRET has made this challenging until now. METHODOLOGY: We used a thrombin bioprobe based on a form of BRET (BRET(H, which uses the BRET(1 substrate, native coelenterazine, with the typical BRET(2 donor and acceptor proteins linked by a thrombin target peptide. The microfluidic assay was carried out in a Y-shaped microfluidic network. The dependence of the BRET(H ratio on the measurement location, flow rate and bioprobe concentration was quantified. Results were compared with the same bioprobe in a static microwell plate assay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The BRET(H thrombin bioprobe has a lower limit of detection (LOD than previously reported for the equivalent BRET(1-based version but it is substantially brighter than the BRET(2 version. The normalised BRET(H ratio of the bioprobe changed 32% following complete cleavage by thrombin and 31% in the microfluidic format. The LOD for thrombin in the microfluidic format was 27 pM, compared with an LOD of 310 pM, using the same bioprobe in a static microwell assay, and two orders of magnitude lower than reported for other microfluidic chip-based protease assays. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that BRET based microfluidic assays are feasible and that BRET(H provides a useful test bed for optimising BRET-based microfluidics. This approach may be convenient for a wide range of applications requiring sensitive detection and/or quantification of chemical or biological analytes.

  16. General Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Homogeneous Immunoassay for Small Molecules Based on Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuezhi; Wen, Kai; Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Xiya; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    Here, we describe a general bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) homogeneous immunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) as the acceptor and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) as the donor (QD-BRET) for the determination of small molecules. The ratio of the donor-acceptor that could produce energy transfer varied in the presence of different concentrations of free enrofloxacin (ENR), an important small molecule in food safety. The calculated Förster distance (R0) was 7.86 nm. Under optimized conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for ENR was less than 1 ng/mL and the linear range covered 4 orders of magnitude (0.023 to 25.60 ng/mL). The cross-reactivities (CRs) of seven representative fluoroquinolones (FQs) were similar to the data obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The average intra- and interassay recoveries from spiked milk of were 79.8-118.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 10%, meeting the requirement of residue detection, which was a satisfactory result. Furthermore, we compared the influence of different luciferase substrates on the performance of the assay. Considering sensitivity and stability, coelenterazine-h was the most appropriate substrate. The results from this study will enable better-informed decisions on the choice of Rluc substrate for QD-BRET systems. For the future, the QD-BRET immunosensor could easily be extended to other small molecules and thus represents a versatile strategy in food safety, the environment, clinical diagnosis, and other fields. PMID:26948147

  17. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons From Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAYOUB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in real time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly versus the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gi1 and G12, but also -arrestin 1, can be regulated.

  18. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  19. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  20. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift. PMID:26760436

  1. Interaction of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 with G Proteins and Beta-Arrestin 1 Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are well recognized as being able to activate several signaling pathways through the activation of different G proteins as well as other signaling proteins such as beta-arrestins. Therefore, understanding how such multiple GPCR-mediated signaling can be integrated constitute an important aspect. Here, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to shed more light on the G protein coupling profile of trypsin receptor, or protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, and its interaction with beta-arrestin1. Using YFP and Rluc fusion constructs expressed in COS-7 cells, BRET data revealed a pre-assembly of PAR2 with both Galphai1 and Galphao and a rapid and transient activation of these G proteins upon receptor activation. In contrast, no preassembly of PAR2 with Galpha12 could be detected and their physical association can be measured with a very slow and sustained kinetics similar to that of beta-arrestin1 recruitment. These data demonstrate the coupling of PAR2 with Galphai1, Galphao and Galpha12 in COS-7 cells with differences in the kinetics of GPCR-G protein coupling, a parameter that very likely influences the cellular response. Moreover, this further illustrates that preassembly or agonist-induced G protein interaction depends on receptor-G protein pairs indicating another level of complexity and regulation of the signaling of GPCR-G protein complexes and its multiplicity.

  2. Setting up a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer high throughput screening assay to search for protein/protein interaction inhibitors in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril eCouturier

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the cell life and its response or adaptation to its environment are mediated by a network of protein/protein interactions termed interactome. Our knowledge of this network keeps growing due to the development of sensitive techniques devoted to study these interactions. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique was primarily developed to allow the dynamic monitoring of protein-protein interactions in living cells, and has widely been used to study receptor activation by intra- or extra-molecular conformational changes within receptors and activated complexes in mammal cells. Some interactions are described as crucial in human pathological processes, and a new class of drugs targeting them has recently emerged. The BRET method is well suited to identify inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and here is described why and how to set up and optimize a High Throughput Screening assay based on BRET to search for such inhibitory compounds. The different parameters to take into account when developing such BRET assays in mammal cells are reviewed to give general guidelines: considerations on the targeted interaction, choice of BRET version, inducibility of the interaction, kinetic of the monitored interaction, and of the BRET reading, influence substrate concentration, number of cells and medium composition used on the Z’ factor, and expected interferences for colored or fluorescent compounds.

  3. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  4. Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail

    1993-01-01

    Describes bioluminescence and the chemistry of how it occurs. Presents information for conducting the following classroom activities: (1) firefly mimic; (2) modeling deep-sea fish; (3) sea fireflies; and (4) the chemistry of light. (PR)

  5. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Förster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► First experimental determination of Förster distance (R0) for enhanced BRET systems. ► Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. ► Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R0 of the BRET1 system. ► Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2–9%) R0 of the BRET2 system. ► Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET1 and BRET2 systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Förster distance (R0), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R0 provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor–acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R0 for BRET1 systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R0 of the original BRET1 system. R0 for BRET2 systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP2) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2–9% greater than the original BRET2 system despite being ∼30-fold brighter.

  6. Bioluminescence for determining energy state of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, T. M.

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence produced by the luciferin-luciferase system is a very sensitive assay for ATP content in extracts of plant materials. The ATP test for seed and pollen viability and vigor is presented, along with prediction of high growth potential and productivity in new crosses and selections of breeding materials. ATP as an indicator for environmental quality, stresses, and metabolic regulation is also considered.

  7. The Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer from Firefly Luciferase to a Synthetic Dye and its Application for the Rapid Homogeneous Immunoassay of Progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Daria V; Samsonova, Jeanne V; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2016-01-01

    The sensitive BRET system for the homogeneous immunoassay of a low-molecular weight antigen was developed using progesterone as an example. Two thermostable mutants of the Luciola mingrelica firefly luciferase (Luc)-the "red" mutant with λmax.em = 590 nm (RedLuc) and the "green" mutant with λmax.em = 550 nm (GreenLuc)-were tested as the donors. The water-soluble Alexa Fluor 610× (AF) dye was selected as the acceptor because its two absorption maxima, located at 550 and 610 nm, are close to the bioluminescence maxima of the GreenLuc and RedLuc, respectively. The methods for the synthesis of the luciferase-progesterone (Luc-Pg) conjugate and the conjugate of the dye and the polyclonal antiprogesterone antibody (AF-Ab) were developed. Both conjugates retained their functional properties, had high antigen-antibody binding activity, and demonstrated a high BRET signal. The homogeneous immunoassay system based on the BRET from the firefly luciferase to the synthetic dye was established to assay progesterone as a model antigen. Optimization of the assay conditions, the composition of the reaction mixture, and the concentrations of the donor and the acceptor made it possible to reach the minimum detectable progesterone concentration of 0.5 ng mL(-1) . PMID:26650341

  8. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  9. Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, David; Bradshaw, David; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Scholes, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer, also known as Förster- or fluorescence- resonance energy transfer, or electronic energy transfer, is a photonic process whose relevance in many major areas of science is reflected both by a wide prevalence of the effect and through numerous technical applications. The process, operating through an optical near-field mechanism, effects a transport of electronic excitation between physically distinct atomic or molecular components, based on transition dipole-dipole co...

  10. Bioluminescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence refers to the process of visible light emission in living organisms. Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful methodology that has been developed over the last decade as a tool for molecular imaging of small laboratory animals, enabling the study of ongoing biological processes in vivo. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. In this article, we provide a brief int...

  11. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  12. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  13. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-12-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow-orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C(15)H(10)O(5), which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence. PMID:24760626

  14. Analytical Applications of Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W. (Editor); Picciolo, G. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence and chemiluminescence studies were used to measure the amount of adenosine triphosphate and therefore the amount of energy available. Firefly luciferase - luciferin enzyme system was emphasized. Photometer designs are also considered.

  15. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  16. Vortex dipole resonance in the giant dipole resonance energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The velocity fields associated with isovector excitations of spherical nuclei in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) energy region have been studied within a semiclassical approach based on the solution of the Vlasov kinetic equation for finite two-component Fermi systems with a moving surface. The neutron-proton asymmetry and dynamical surface effects lead to the fragmentation of the isovector dipole strength in the energy region of the GDR on two resonances. It was found that the velocity field has a potential character in the energy range near the main (low-energy) maximum of the GDR. However, the velocity field reveals a vortex character in the surface region at the energy of the high-energy maximum of the GDR

  17. 238U + n resolved resonance energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron transmission measurements from 100 eV to 170 keV at 150 m through four 238U samples are reported. The energy calibration is described, and the resultant 233U resolved resonance energies are found to be intermediate between those from other workers. In addition, some energies for sharp resonances in 23Na, 27Al, 32S, and 206Pb are given

  18. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  19. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2013-05-05

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioluminescence-Sensing Assay for Microbial Growth Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Heba Ramadan Eed; Abdel-Kader, Nora S.; Mahmoud Helmy El Tahan; Tianhong Dai; Rehab Amin

    2016-01-01

    The conventional methods for microbial viability quantification require cultivation and are laborious. There is consequently a widespread need for cultivation-free methods. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence-sensing assay is considered an extremely effective biosensor; hence ATP is the energy currency of all living microbes and can be used as a rapid indicator of microbial viability. We developed an ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay to detect microbial viability. A biolumine...

  1. Resonant Wave Energy Converters: Concept development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Resonant Wave Energy Converter (REWEC) is a device for converting sea wave energy to electrical energy. It belongs to the family of Oscillating Water Columns and is composed by an absorbing chamber connected to the open sea via a vertical duct. The paper gives a holistic view on the concept development of the device, starting from its implementation in the context of submerged breakwaters to the recently developed vertical breakwaters.

  2. Internal resonance for nonlinear vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D. X.; Leadenham, S.; Erturk, A.

    2015-11-01

    The transformation of waste vibration energy into low-power electricity has been heavily researched over the last decade to enable self-sustained wireless electronic components. Monostable and bistable nonlinear oscillators have been explored by several research groups in an effort to enhance the frequency bandwidth of operation. Linear two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) configurations as well as the combination of a nonlinear single-DOF harvester with a linear oscillator to constitute a nonlinear 2-DOF harvester have also been explored to develop broadband energy harvesters. In the present work, the concept of nonlinear internal resonance in a continuous frame structure is explored for broadband energy harvesting. The L-shaped beam-mass structure with quadratic nonlinearity was formerly studied in the nonlinear dynamics literature to demonstrate modal energy exchange and the saturation phenomenon when carefully tuned for two-to-one internal resonance. In the current effort, piezoelectric coupling and an electrical load are introduced, and electromechanical equations of the L-shaped energy harvester are employed to explore primary resonance behaviors around the first and the second linear natural frequencies for bandwidth enhancement. Simulations using approximate analytical frequency response equations as well as numerical solutions reveal significant bandwidth enhancement as compared to a typical linear 2-DOF counterpart. Vibration and voltage responses are explored, and the effects of various system parameters on the overall dynamics of the internal resonance-based energy harvesting system are reported.

  3. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment. PMID:22184664

  4. BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING: PROGRESS AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Badr, Christian E.; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2011-01-01

    Application of bioluminescence imaging has grown tremendously in the past decade and has significantly contributed to the core conceptual advances in biomedical research. This technology provides valuable means for monitoring of different biological processes for immunology, oncology, virology and neuroscience. In this review, we will discuss current trends in bioluminescence and its application in different fields with emphasis on cancer research.

  5. Energy localization in weakly dissipative resonant chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2016-08-01

    Localization of energy in oscillator arrays has been of interest for a number of years, with special attention paid to the role of nonlinearity and discreteness in the formation of localized structures. This work examines a different type of energy localization arising due to the presence of dissipation in nonlinear resonance arrays. As a basic model, we consider a Klein-Gordon chain of finite length subjected to a harmonic excitation applied at an edge of the chain. It is shown that weak dissipation may be a key factor preventing the emergence of resonance in the entire chain, even if its nondissipative analog is entirely captured into resonance. The resulting process in the dissipative oscillator array represents large-amplitude resonant oscillations in a part of the chain adjacent to the actuator and small-amplitude oscillations in the distant part of the chain. The conditions of the emergence of resonance as well as the conditions of energy localization are derived. An agreement between the obtained analytical results and numerical simulations is demonstrated.

  6. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva; Duran Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  7. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackerdien, Zeena E.; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. Conclusions/Significance The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate. PMID:18301749

  8. Quorum sensing influences Vibrio harveyi growth rates in a manner not fully accounted for by the marker effect of bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeena E Nackerdien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate.

  9. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process

  10. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement. PMID:22184663

  11. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence microbe detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Chappelle, E.; Picciolo, G. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated biosensors for online use with NASA Water Monitoring System employs bioluminescence and chemiluminescence techniques to rapidly measure microbe contamination of water samples. System eliminates standard laboratory procedures requiring time duration of 24 hours or longer.

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Dey, Dibyendu; CHAKRABORTY, SEKHAR; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Bas...

  13. Intercombination effects in resonant energy transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaillant, C. L.; Potvliege, R. M.; Jones, M.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a ne...

  14. Bioluminescence tomography with Gaussian prior

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Hao; Zhao, Hongkai; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Parameterizing the bioluminescent source globally in Gaussians provides several advantages over voxel representation in bioluminescence tomography. It is mathematically unique to recover Gaussians [Med. Phys. 31(8), 2289 (2004)] and practically sufficient to approximate various shapes by Gaussians in diffusive medium. The computational burden is significantly reduced since much fewer unknowns are required. Besides, there are physiological evidences that the source can be modeled by Gaussians....

  15. Active and reactive power in stochastic resonance for energy harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Madoka; Takahashi, Ryo(Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, 690-8504, Japan); Hikihara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    A power allocation to active and reactive power in stochastic resonance is discussed for energy harvesting from mechanical noise. It is confirmed that active power can be increased at stochastic resonance, in the same way of the relationship between energy and phase at an appropriate setting in resonance.

  16. Low-Energy Constants from Resonance Chiral Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Pich, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    I discuss the recent attempts to build an effective chiral Lagrangian incorporating massive resonance states. A useful approximation scheme to organize the resonance Lagrangian is provided by the large-Nc limit of QCD. Integrating out the resonance fields, one recovers the usual chiral perturbation theory Lagrangian with explicit values for the low-energy constants, parameterized in terms of resonance masses and couplings. The resonance chiral theory generates Green functions that interpolate...

  17. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Based on the mechanism of FRET a variety of novel chemical sensors and Biosensors have been developed. This review highlights the recent applications of sensitive and selective ratiometric FRET based sensors.

  18. Intercombination Effects in Resonant Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillant, C L; Jones, M P A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a near-degeneracy between the initial state and a state with a different spin quantum number. We also consider a case of four atoms in a spin chain, and show that a spin impurity can resonantly hop along the chain. By engineering the many-body energy levels of the spin-chain, the breakdown of $LS$ coupling due to inter-electronic effects in individual atoms can be mapped onto a spatial separation of the total spin and the total orbital angular momentum along the spin chain.

  19. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  20. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeena E Nackerdien; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensi...

  1. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeena E Nackerdien; Alexander Keynan; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Joshua Lederberg; Thaler, David S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sen...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Reina, Rafael

    In today's society there is high demand to have access to energy for portable devices in different forms. Capacitors with high performance in small package to achieve high charge/discharge rates, and batteries with their ability to store electricity and make energy mobile are part of this demand. The types of internal dielectric material strongly affect the characteristics of a capacitor, and its applications. In a battery, the choice of the electrolyte plays an important role in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) formation, and the cathode material for high output voltage. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are research techniques that exploit the magnetic properties of the electron and certain atomic nuclei to determine physical and chemical properties of the atoms or molecules in which they are contained. Both EPR and NMR spectroscopy technique can yield meaningful structural and dynamic information. Three different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, High energy density capacitors where EPR measurements described herein provide an insight into structural and chemical differences in the dielectric material of a capacitor. Next, as the second project, Electrolyte solutions where an oxygen-17 NMR study has been employed to assess the degree of preferential solvation of Li+ ions in binary mixtures of EC (ethylene carbonate) and DMC (dimethyl carbonate) containing LiPF6 (lithium hexafluo-rophosphate) which may be ultimately related to the SEI formation mechanism. The third project was to study Bismuth fluoride as cathode material for rechargeable batteries. The objective was to study 19F and 7Li MAS NMR of some nanocomposite cathode materials as a conversion reaction occurring during lithiation and delithation of the BiF3/C nanocomposite.

  3. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) is the principal mechanism for the intermolecular or intramolecular redistribution of electronic energy following molecular excitation. In terms of fundamental quantum interactions, the process is properly described in terms of a virtual photon transit between the pre-excited donor and a lower energy (usually ground-state) acceptor. The detailed quantum amplitude for RET is calculated by molecular quantum electrodynamical techniques with the observable, the transfer rate, derived via application of the Fermi golden rule. In the treatment reported here, recently devised state-sequence techniques and a novel calculational protocol is applied to RET and shown to circumvent problems associated with the usual method. The second-rank tensor describing virtual photon behavior evolves from a Green's function solution to the Helmholtz equation, and special functions are employed to realize the coupling tensor. The method is used to derive a new result for energy transfer systems sensitive to both magnetic- and electric-dipole transitions. The ensuing result is compared to that of pure electric-dipole-electric-dipole coupling and is analyzed with regard to acceptable transfer separations. Systems are proposed where the electric-dipole-magnetic-dipole term is the leading contribution to the overall rate

  4. Energy harvesting with coupled magnetostrictive resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Suketu; Phipps, Alex; In, Visarath; Cavaroc, Peyton; Matus-Vargas, Antonio; Palacios, Antonio; Gonzalez-Hernandez, H. G.

    2014-03-01

    We report the investigation of an energy harvesting system composed of coupled resonators with the magnetostrictive material Galfenol (FeGa). A coupled system of meso-scale (1-10 cm) cantilever beams for harvesting vibration energy is described for powering and aiding the performance of low-power wireless sensor nodes. Galfenol is chosen in this work for its durability, compared to the brittleness often encountered with piezoelectric materials, and high magnetomechanical coupling. A lumped model, which captures both the mechanical and electrical behavior of the individual transducers, is first developed. The values of the lumped element parameters are then derived empirically from fabricated beams in order to compare the model to experimental measurements. The governing equations of the coupled system lead to a system of differential equations with all-to-all coupling between transducers. An analysis of the system equations reveals different patterns of collective oscillations. Among the many different patterns, a synchronous state appears to yield the maximum energy that can be harvested by the system. Experiments on coupled system shows that the coupled system exhibits synchronization and an increment in the output power. Discussion of the required power converters is also included.

  5. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  6. Atomic Structure of Benzene Which Accounts for Resonance Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Benzene is a hexagonal molecule of six carbon atoms, each of which is bound to six hydrogen atoms. The equality of all six CC bond lengths, despite the alternating double and single bonds, and the surplus (resonance) energy, led to the suggestion of two resonanting structures. Here, the new atomic structure shows that the bond length equality is due to three carbon atoms with double bond radii bound to three other carbon atoms with resonance bond radii (as in graphene). Consequently, there are two kinds of CH bonds of slightly different lengths. The bond energies account for the resonance energy.

  7. The Hadronic Cross-Section in the Resonance Energy Region

    OpenAIRE

    Portoles, J.; Ruiz-Femenia, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    We study the hadronic vacuum polarization in the resonance energy region, using the framework given by the Resonance Effective Theory of QCD. We consider the incorporation of vector-pseudoscalar meson loops that give, inclusively, three and four pseudoscalar meson cuts. After resummation we achieve a QCD-based inclusive parameterization of the correlator, hence of the hadronic cross-section in the energy region populated by resonances.

  8. Detection of Antibodies in Blood Plasma Using Bioluminescent Sensor Proteins and a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Remco; den Hartog, Ilona; Zijlema, Stefan E; Thijssen, Vito; van der Beelen, Stan H E; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-04-19

    Antibody detection is of fundamental importance in many diagnostic and bioanalytical assays, yet current detection techniques tend to be laborious and/or expensive. We present a new sensor platform (LUMABS) based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) that allows detection of antibodies directly in solution using a smartphone as the sole piece of equipment. LUMABS are single-protein sensors that consist of the blue-light emitting luciferase NanoLuc connected via a semiflexible linker to the green fluorescent acceptor protein mNeonGreen, which are kept close together using helper domains. Binding of an antibody to epitope sequences flanking the linker disrupts the interaction between the helper domains, resulting in a large decrease in BRET efficiency. The resulting change in color of the emitted light from green-blue to blue can be detected directly in blood plasma, even at picomolar concentrations of antibody. Moreover, the modular architecture of LUMABS allows changing of target specificity by simple exchange of epitope sequences, as demonstrated here for antibodies against HIV1-p17, hemagglutinin (HA), and dengue virus type I. The combination of sensitive ratiometric bioluminescent detection and the intrinsic modularity of the LUMABS design provides an attractive generic platform for point-of-care antibody detection that avoids the complex liquid handling steps associated with conventional immunoassays. PMID:27018236

  9. A vibration energy harvesting device with bidirectional resonance frequency tunability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibration energy harvesting is an attractive technique for potential powering of wireless sensors and low power devices. While the technique can be employed to harvest energy from vibrations and vibrating structures, a general requirement independent of the energy transfer mechanism is that the vibration energy harvesting device operate in resonance at the excitation frequency. Most energy harvesting devices developed to date are single resonance frequency based, and while recent efforts have been made to broaden the frequency range of energy harvesting devices, what is lacking is a robust tunable energy harvesting technique. In this paper, the design and testing of a resonance frequency tunable energy harvesting device using a magnetic force technique is presented. This technique enabled resonance tuning to ± 20% of the untuned resonant frequency. In particular, this magnetic-based approach enables either an increase or decrease in the tuned resonant frequency. A piezoelectric cantilever beam with a natural frequency of 26 Hz is used as the energy harvesting cantilever, which is successfully tuned over a frequency range of 22–32 Hz to enable a continuous power output 240–280 µW over the entire frequency range tested. A theoretical model using variable damping is presented, whose results agree closely with the experimental results. The magnetic force applied for resonance frequency tuning and its effect on damping and load resistance have been experimentally determined

  10. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment. PMID:27226972

  11. Protein-protein complexation in bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Titushin, Maxim S.; Feng, Yingang; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2011-01-01

    In this review we summarize the progress made towards understanding the role of protein-protein interactions in the function of various bioluminescence systems of marine organisms, including bacteria, jellyfish and soft corals, with particular focus on methodology used to detect and characterize these interactions. In some bioluminescence systems, protein-protein interactions involve an “accessory protein” whereby a stored substrate is efficiently delivered to the bioluminescent enzyme lucife...

  12. A Nisin Bioassay Based on Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, G.; Saris, P. E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain that can sense the bacteriocin nisin and transduce the signal into bioluminescence was constructed. By using this strain, a bioassay based on bioluminescence was developed for quantification of nisin, for detection of nisin in milk, and for identification of nisin-producing strains. As little as 0.0125 ng of nisin per ml was detected within 3 h by this bioluminescence assay. This detection limit was lower than in previously described methods.

  13. A comparison of approaches to estimate the resonance energy

    OpenAIRE

    Zielinski, M.L.; Havenith, R.W.A.; Jenneskens, L. W.; Lenthe, J.H. van

    2010-01-01

    We discuss Ab Initio approaches to calculate the energy lowering (stabilisation) due to aromaticity. We compare the valence bond method and the block-localised wave function approaches to calculate the resonance energy. We conclude that the valence bond approach employs a Pauling–Wheland resonance energy and that the block-localised approach employs a delocalisation criterion. The latter is shown to be more basis set dependent in a series of illustrative calculations.

  14. Atomic Structure of Benzene Which Accounts for Resonance Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Benzene is a hexagonal molecule of six carbon atoms, each of which is bound to six hydrogen atoms. The equality of all six CC bond lengths, despite the alternating double and single bonds, and the surplus (resonance) energy, led to the suggestion of two resonanting structures. Here, the new atomic structure shows that the bond length equality is due to three carbon atoms with double bond radii bound to three other carbon atoms with resonance bond radii (as in graphene). Consequently, there ar...

  15. An Introduction to Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) provides a way to measure and understand different biological systems and molecular interactions in nanometer order. In this report the introduction and principle of the FRET process have been explained.

  16. REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. he unifying...

  17. Plasmon-mediated resonance energy transfer by metallic nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yi-Cong; Liu, Jia-Ming; Jin, Chong-Jun; Wang, Xue-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We investigate the enhancement of the resonance energy transfer rate between donor and acceptor associated by the surface plasmons of the Ag nanorods on a SiO2 substrate. Our results for a single nanorod with different cross sections reveal that the cylinder nanorod has the strongest ability to enhance the resonance energy transfer rate. Moreover, for donor and acceptor with nonparallel polarization directions, we propose simple V-shaped nanorod structures which lead to the remarkabl...

  18. Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer on Exciton Dimensionality

    OpenAIRE

    Junis Rindermann, Jan; Pozina, Galia; Monemar, Bo; Hultman, Lars; Amano, Hiroshi; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of resonance energy transfer from Wannier-Mott excitons to an organic overlayer on exciton dimensionality. We exploit the excitonic potential disorder in a single quantum well to tune the balance between localized and free excitons by scaling the Boltzmann distribution of excitons through temperature. Theoretical calculations predict the experimentally observed temperature dependence of resonance energy transfer and allow us to quantify the contribution of locali...

  19. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour

  20. Integer ratios in resonance energies of the compound nucleus based on time coherency at resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an isolated neutron resonance, time coherency is required by S-matrix theory between incident wave and the response function of the compound nucleus. Dynamical behaviors of the compound nucleus, assumed to be decomposed into many normal modes, must fulfil the time boundary condition determined by the period of the de Broglie frequency of the incident neutron wave. The energies of these normal modes are restricted to be commensurable (integer ratios) with each other. Integer rations among Ex, En* and Sn(=Ex - En*) are deduced from these relations. Among resonance energies of the same nucleus, integer ratios are expected. Ex/Sn=4/3 or 5/3 are tabulated for resonances of light nuclei. Neutron resonance reaction mechanism is discussed. (author)

  1. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results

  2. Extracting complex resonance energies from real calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durand, Ph.; Paidarová, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 7 (2013), 075001. ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/12/0665 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : states * dynamics * modeling quantum resonance Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2013

  3. Bioluminescence imaging characteristics and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) by luciferase gene marked cells or DNA, in the presence of ATP and oxygen, catalytic oxidation reaction of fluorescein luminescence. So that it can directly monitor in vivo cell activity and gene behavior. In this paper, by comparing the BLI and MRI, PET, radiography of the similarities and differences, as well as about their cancer, stem cells and immune cells transportation, apoptosis and other aspects of the application, in order to better provide the basis for promoting the application of BLI. (authors)

  4. ANALYSIS OF PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING DEVICE WITH ADJUSTABLE RESONANCE FREQUENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Lei; Li Yuejuan; Marvin Cheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytic method that adjusts resonance frequency of a piezoelectric vibration energy harvester.A mathematical model that estimates resonance frequency of cantilever is also proposed.Through moving an attached mass and changing its weight on the cantilever beam,resonance frequency of adopted piezoelectric device can be adjusted to match the frequency of ambient vibration sources,which is critical in order to harvest maximum amount of energy.The theoretical results are validated by experiments that move different masses along experimental cantilever beams.The results demonstrate that resonance frequency can be adjusted by an attached mass located at different positions on the cantilever beam.Different combinations of operational conditions that harvest maximum amount of energy are also discussed in this paper.

  5. Understanding bioluminescence in dinoflagellates — how far have we come?

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Valiadi; Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    Some dinoflagellates possess the remarkable genetic, biochemical, and cellular machinery to produce bioluminescence. Bioluminescent species appear to be ubiquitous in surface waters globally and include numerous cosmopolitan and harmful taxa. Nevertheless, bioluminescence remains an enigmatic topic in biology, particularly with regard to the organisms’ lifestyle. In this paper, we review the literature on the cellular mechanisms, molecular evolution, diversity, and ecology of bioluminescence ...

  6. Bioluminescence tomography based on the phase approximation model

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, W.; Wang, G

    2010-01-01

    A reconstruction method of bioluminescence sources is proposed based on a phase approximation model. Compared with the diffuse approximation, this phase approximation model more correctly predicts bioluminescence photon propagation in biological tissues, so that bioluminescence tomography can accurately locate and quantify the distribution of bioluminescence sources. The compressive sensing (CS) technique is applied to regularize the inverse source reconstruction to enhance numerical stabilit...

  7. Wave energy driven resonant sea water pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czitrom, S.P.R. [UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia

    1996-12-31

    A wave driven sea-water pump which operates by resonance is described. Oscillations in the resonant and exhaust ducts perform similar to two mass-spring systems coupled by a third spring acting for the compression chamber. Performance of the pump is optimized by means of a variable volume air compression chamber (patents pending) which tunes the system to the incoming wave frequency. Wave tank experiments with an instrumented, 1:20 scale model of the pump are described. Performance was studied under various wave and tuning conditions and compared to a numerical model which was found to describe the system accurately. Successful sea trials at an energetic coastline provide evidence of the system`s viability under demanding conditions.

  8. Energy sliced neutron tomography using neutron resonance absorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron tomography was studied using a neutron resonance absorption spectrometer installed on a pulsed neutron source. The neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy (N-RAS) is a method to study the dynamics of nuclides by analyzing the Doppler broadening of their resonance spectra. N-RAS can combine with the computer tomography (CT) technique to obtain the tomogram of an object. We developed the CT reconstructions which were repeated at each time-of-flight (TOF) channel and piled up the reconstructed images in order to make the resonance spectrum over the wide energy range. Finally, we could deduce the information of nuclides and its temperature distributions in the sample non-destructively. We call this new TOF tomography technique as neutron resonance imaging (NRI).

  9. Cluster structure of a low-energy resonance in tetraneutron

    CERN Document Server

    Lashko, Y; Filippov, Gennady; Lashko, Yuliya

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility for a tetraneutron to exist as a low-energy resonance state. We explore a microscopic model based on the assumption that the tetraneutron can be treated as a compound system where $^3$n+n and $^2$n+$^2$n coupled cluster configurations coexist. The influence of the Pauli principle on the kinetic energy of the relative motion of the neutron clusters is shown to result in their attraction. The strength of such attraction is high enough to ensure the existence of a low-energy resonance in the tetraneutron, provided that the oscillator length is large enough.

  10. Information Exchange via Surface Modified Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, Mathias; Huang, Dan; Ninham, Barry W; Sernelius, Bo E

    2013-01-01

    The theory is presented for resonance interaction between two atoms in an excited configuration: one atom, the "receptor" of information (i.e. energy), adsorbed on a phospholipid surface and the other atom, the "emitter" of information (i.e. energy), a long distance away. The dielectric function for a specific phospholipid membrane is obtained from density functional theory calculations. We present numerical results comparing the range and magnitude of non-specific Casimir-Polder interactions with the much more long-ranged, and highly specific, resonance interaction. A study of the resonance interaction with one or both atoms adsorbed on a phospholipid membrane surface reveals a possibility to have a cross over from attraction to repulsion or from repulsion to attraction at separations between receptor and emitter atoms exceeding several hundred {\\AA}ngstr\\"oms. The energy transfer and the observed transitions in the sign of the interaction energies near surfaces provide potential new ways to start recognitio...

  11. High Q diamond hemispherical resonators: fabrication and energy loss mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated polycrystalline diamond hemispheres by hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) in spherical cavities wet-etched into a high temperature glass substrate CTE matched to silicon. Hemispherical resonators 1.4 mm in diameter have a Q of up to 143 000 in the fundamental wineglass mode, for a ringdown time of 2.4 s. Without trimming, resonators have the two degenerate wineglass modes frequency matched as close as 2 Hz, or 0.013% of the resonant frequency (∼16 kHz). Laser trimming was used to match resonant modes on hemispheres to 0.3 Hz. Experimental and FEA energy loss studies on cantilevers and hemispheres examine various energy loss mechanisms, showing that surface related losses are dominant. Diamond cantilevers with a Q of 400 000 and a ringdown time of 15.4 s were measured, showing the potential of polycrystalline diamond films for high Q resonators. These resonators show great promise for use as hemispherical resonant gyroscopes (HRGs) on a chip. (paper)

  12. Studies of giant multipole resonances with intermediate energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of intermediate energy heavy ions in the study of giant multipole resonances is explored, with emphasis on gamma decay coincidence experiments. Experiments on 208Pb bombarded by 22 MeV/nucleon and 84 MeV/nucleon 17O are discussed and compared. The role of Coulomb excitation in the 84 MeV/nucleon data is emphasized and some consequences for study of isovector resonance strength are explored. A comparison of the excitation and decay of the isovector giant dipole resonance in 208Pb and 209Bi excited with 84 MeV/nucleon 17O scattering is presented. 19 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  13. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Sivarajah, I; Wells, J E; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2013-01-01

    Linear Paul r.f. ion traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  14. Resonance energy-exchange-free detection and "welcher Weg" experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Pavicic, Mladen

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that a monolithic total-internal-reflection resonator can be used for energy-exchange-free detections of objects without recoils. Related energy-exchange-free detection of "welcher Weg" is discussed and an experiment with an atom interferometer is proposed. The obtained results are in agreement with quantum theory.

  15. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Using Spiropyran and Diarylethene Photochromic Acceptors

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Jares-Erijman; Irie, M.; Jovin, T M; Song, L.; Macareno, J.; GIORDANO, L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the preparation and photophysical characterization of two model compounds designed to test a new approach for the quantitative determination of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in biological systems. The method enables modulation of FRET by exploiting the unique reversible spectral properties of photochromic diarylethenes and spiropyrans to create switchable energy acceptors.

  16. Energy Spectra of Magnetostatic Oscillations in Ferrite Disk Resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.; Sigalov, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonators with short-wavelength, so-called magnetostatic (MS), oscillations can be considered in microwaves as point (with respect to the external electromagnetic fields) particles. It was shown recently [E. O. Kamenetskii, Phys. Rev. E, 63, 066612 (2001)] that MS oscillations in a small ferrite disk resonator can be characterized by a discrete spectrum of energy levels. This fact allows analyzing the MS oscillations similarly to quantum mechanical problems. In this paper we gi...

  17. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  18. Phonon-induced dynamic resonance energy transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, James; Tame, Mark; Yee, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Joong-Sung; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2013-01-01

    In a network of interacting quantum systems achieving fast coherent energy transfer is a challenging task. While quantum systems are susceptible to a wide range of environmental factors, in many physical settings their interactions with quantized vibrations, or phonons, of a supporting structure are the most prevalent. This leads to noise and decoherence in the network, ultimately impacting the energy-transfer process. In this work, we introduce a novel type of coherent energy-transfer mechan...

  19. Wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Breinbjerg, Olav; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    could be properly designed to minimize undesired energy dissipation in the source coil when the power receiver is out of the range. Our basic observation paves the way for more flexible design and fabrication of non-resonant mid-range wireless energy transfer systems, thus potentially impacting......We demonstrate by theoretical analysis and experimental verification that mid-range wireless energy transfer systems may take advantage of de-tuned coupling devices, without jeopardizing the energy transfer efficiency. Allowing for a modest de-tuning of the source coil, energy transfer systems...... practical implementations of wireless energy transfer....

  20. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Irish, E K; Lovett, B W

    2013-01-01

    Coherent quantum energy transfer, as observed in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, is inhibited by energetic disorder. While this difficulty can be overcome to some extent by the addition of environmental noise, it has recently has begun to be appreciated that discrete intra- and/or intermolecular vibrational modes may play an important role in quantum dynamics. We present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrational modes create resonant energy transfer pathways, enhancing the efficiency of both coherent and dephasing-assisted transfer. The principles of this vibration-assisted resonance are illustrated in a simple model based on one energy-transfer branch of the well-characterised Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. Despite its simplicity, this model captures the interplay between strong electronic coupling that produces delocalised exciton states and resonance-enhanced weak coupling to local vibrational modes. Analytical and numerical results show that intramolecular vibrations can enhance...

  1. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  2. Resonant intermolecular transfer of vibrational energy in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    1999-12-01

    Many biological, chemical and physical processes involve the transfer of energy. In the case of electronic excitations, transfer between molecules is rapid, whereas for vibrations in the condensed phase, resonant energy transfer is an unlikely process because the typical timescale of vibrational relaxation (a few picoseconds) is much shorter than that of resonant intermolecular vibrational energy transfer. For the OH-stretch vibration in liquid water, which is of particular importance due to its coupling to the hydrogen bond, extensive investigations have shown that vibrational relaxation takes place with a time constant of 740 +/- 25 femtoseconds (ref. 7). So for resonant intermolecular energy transfer to occur in liquid water, the interaction between the OH-stretch modes of different water molecules needs to be extremely strong. Here we report time-resolved pump-probe laser spectroscopy measurements that reveal the occurrence of fast resonant intermolecular transfer of OH-stretch excitations over many water molecules before the excitation energy is dissipated. We find that the transfer process is mediated by dipole-dipole interactions (the Förster transfer mechanism) and additional mechanisms that are possibly based on intermolecular anharmonic interactions involving hydrogen bonds. Our findings suggest that liquid water may play an important role in transporting vibrational energy between OH groups located on either different biomolecules or along extended biological structures. OH groups in a hydrophobic environment should accordingly be able to remain in a vibrationally excited state longer than OH groups in a hydrophilic environment.

  3. A bright cyan-excitable orange fluorescent protein facilitates dual-emission microscopy and enhances bioluminescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jun; Oh, Younghee; Sens, Alex; Ataie, Niloufar; Dana, Hod; Macklin, John J; Laviv, Tal; Welf, Erik S; Dean, Kevin M; Zhang, Feijie; Kim, Benjamin B; Tang, Clement Tran; Hu, Michelle; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Kay, Mark A; Fiolka, Reto; Yasuda, Ryohei; Kim, Douglas S; Ng, Ho-Leung; Lin, Michael Z

    2016-07-01

    Orange-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in biomedical research for multiplexed epifluorescence microscopy with GFP-based probes, but their different excitation requirements make multiplexing with new advanced microscopy methods difficult. Separately, orange-red FPs are useful for deep-tissue imaging in mammals owing to the relative tissue transmissibility of orange-red light, but their dependence on illumination limits their sensitivity as reporters in deep tissues. Here we describe CyOFP1, a bright, engineered, orange-red FP that is excitable by cyan light. We show that CyOFP1 enables single-excitation multiplexed imaging with GFP-based probes in single-photon and two-photon microscopy, including time-lapse imaging in light-sheet systems. CyOFP1 also serves as an efficient acceptor for resonance energy transfer from the highly catalytic blue-emitting luciferase NanoLuc. An optimized fusion of CyOFP1 and NanoLuc, called Antares, functions as a highly sensitive bioluminescent reporter in vivo, producing substantially brighter signals from deep tissues than firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent proteins. PMID:27240196

  4. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S; Smith, W Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world's oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication. PMID:27276229

  5. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew P.; Sparks, John S.; Smith, W. Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world’s oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication. PMID:27276229

  6. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devendraa Siingh; Shubha Singh; R P Singh

    2006-02-01

    In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and -value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the disturbed conditions when the magnetosphere is depleted in electron density, the resonance energy of the electron enhances by an order of magnitude at higher latitudes, whereas the effect is small at low latitudes. An attempt is made to explain the enhanced wave activity observed during magnetic storm periods.

  7. Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Anderson G.; Cassius V. Stevani; Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Jay C Dunlap

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi – only 71 species, all within the ~9000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales Order - are reported from among ~100,000 described fungal species [6,7]. All require oxygen [8] a...

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE IN DEEP SEA

    OpenAIRE

    Chikawa, M.; Kitamura, T; Nakagawa, Nakagawa; Yamamoto, I.; Wada, T.; Okei, K; Yamashita, Y.

    1996-01-01

    [Abstract] We have designed and built a photon counting system which measures low intensities of bioluminescence in deep sea. The system comprises a CCD-TV camera, two-dimensional image intensifier and video cassette recorder. Using this system we measured the vertical profile of bioluminescence in situ at the Suruga Trough and Nankai Trough to a depth of 3600 m and analyzed cultivated them.

  9. Noninvasive Bioluminescence Imaging in Small Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Zinn, Kurt R.; Chaudhuri, Tandra R.; Szafran, April Adams; O’Quinn, Darrell; Weaver, Casey; Dugger, Kari; Lamar, Dale; Kesterson, Robert A.; Wang, Xiangdong; Frank, Stuart J.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of bioluminescence imaging applications in small animal models in recent years, propelled by the availability of instruments, analysis software, reagents, and creative approaches to apply the technology in molecular imaging. Advantages include the sensitivity of the technique as well as its efficiency, relatively low cost, and versatility. Bioluminescence imaging is accomplished by sensitive detection of light emitted following chemical reaction of the luciferase...

  10. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. PMID:17143867

  11. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices. PMID:27481652

  12. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  13. Non resonant transmission modelling with Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Maxit, Laurent; Totaro, Nicolas; Guyader, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) can be used as an alternative to Statistical Energy Analysis for describing subsystems with low modal overlap. In its original form, SmEdA predicts the power flow exchanged between the resonant modes of different subsystems. In the case of sound transmission through a thin structure, it is well-known that the non resonant response of the structure plays a significant role in transmission below the critical frequency. In this paper, we present an extension of SmEdA that takes into account the contributions of the non resonant modes of a thin structure. The dual modal formulation (DMF) is used to describe the behaviour of two acoustic cavities separated by a thin structure, with prior knowledge of the modal basis of each subsystem. Condensation in the DMF equations is achieved on the amplitudes of the non resonant modes and a new coupling scheme between the resonant modes of the three subsystems is obtained after several simplifications. We show that the co...

  14. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) systems for biomedical sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bird , Aoibheann

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for biomedical sensor applications. FRET is a process by which energy is transferred, via long range dipole-dipole interactions, from a donor molecule (D) in an excited electronic state to an acceptor molecule (A). The emission band of D must overlap the absorption band of A in order for FRET to occur. FRET is employed in a variety of biomedical applications, including the study of cell biology an...

  15. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, the particles trapped in a wave are found to form phase space holes or clumps that enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause increased saturation levels of instabilities and even allow the free energy associated with instability to be tapped in a system in which background dissipation suppresses linear instability

  16. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that as the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, that the particles trapped in the wave will form phase space holes or clumps that can enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause much larger saturation levels of instabilities, and even allow the free energy associated with instability, to be tapped in a system that is linearly stable due to background dissipation

  17. A Classical Approach to Multichromophoric Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Duque, Sebastian; Pachon, Leonardo A

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced rates in multichromophoric resonance energy transfer are shown to be well described by a classical theory based on classical electrodynamics. In a coupling configuration between $N_A$ acceptors and $N_D$ donors, the theory correctly predicts an enhancement of the energy transfer rate dependent on the total number of donor-acceptor pairs, $N_A N_D$. As an example, the theory, applied to the transfer rate in LH II, gives results in excellent agreement with experiment.

  18. Nanophotonic control of Forster Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zijlstra, Niels; Vos, Willem L; Subramaniam, Vinod; Blum, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the experimental details of a study on the influence of the photonic environment on the emission of a FRET system. We modified the local density of optical states (LDOS) by placing the FRET system at precisely defined distances to a metallic mirror. We measured the energy donor lifetime in the presence of the FRET acceptor and the lifetime of an identical sample lacking an acceptor fluorophore for different LDOS. From the lifetimes we determined the FRET rate as well as the FRET efficiency for each sampled LDOS.

  19. Novel mechanism of bioluminescence: oxidative decarboxylation of a moiety adjacent to the light emitter of Fridericia luciferin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinnyi, Maxim A; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Rodionova, Natalja S; Baranov, Mikhail S; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Kotlobay, Alexey; Solntsev, Kyril M; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petushkov, Valentin N; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-06-01

    A novel luciferin from a bioluminescent Siberian earthworm Fridericia heliota was recently described. In this study, the Fridericia oxyluciferin was isolated and its structure elucidated. The results provide insight into a novel bioluminescence mechanism in nature. Oxidative decarboxylation of a lysine fragment of the luciferin supplies energy for light generation, while a fluorescent CompX moiety remains intact and serves as the light emitter. PMID:25913753

  20. Photonic band gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. The authors provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. They provide a brief discussion of their test program, which is currently in progress

  1. Harvesting energy from airflow with a michromachined piezoelectric harvester inside a Helmholtz resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matova, S.P.; Elfrink, R.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Schaijk, R. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report an airflow energy harvester that combines a piezoelectric energy harvester with a Helmholtz resonator. The resonator converts airflow energy to air oscillations which in turn are converted into electrical energy by a piezoelectric harvester. Two Helmholtz resonators with adju

  2. Role of near threshold resonances in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Jain; N J Upadhyay

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a resonance close to the threshold strongly effects the dynamics of the interacting particles at low energies. Production of 12C, the element for life, in 4He burning in Sun is a classic example of such a situation. In intermediate energy nuclear physics, this situation arises in the interactions of an -meson with a nucleon and that of a −-meson with a proton at low energies, where both these systems have a resonance or a bound state near their thresholds, resulting in a strong attractive interaction. If putting these mesons in nuclear environment produces a strong attraction, it is possible that, in nature there may exist - and −-nuclear bound states. Such a tantalizing possibility has led to experimental and theoretical programmes to search for them. These efforts have produced positive results. This paper gives a brief critical overview of these studies, emphasizing especially the efforts led by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC).

  3. Studies of giant multipole resonances with intermediate energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The role of intermediate energy heavy ions in the study of giant multipole resonances is explored, with emphasis on gamma decay coincidence experiments. Experiments on /sup 208/Pb bombarded by 22 MeV/nucleon and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O are discussed and compared. The role of Coulomb excitation in the 84 MeV/nucleon data is emphasized and some consequences for study of isovector resonance strength are explored. A comparison of the excitation and decay of the isovector giant dipole resonance in /sup 208/Pb and /sup 209/Bi excited with 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O scattering is presented. 19 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Currier, Michael C; Moore, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  5. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  6. Bioluminescence microscopy using a short focal-length imaging lens

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoh, K; Akiyoshi, R.; May-Maw-Thet,; Sugiyama, T; Dosaka, S; Hatta-Ohashi, Y; Suzuki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence from cells is so dim that bioluminescence microscopy is performed using an ultra low-light imaging camera. Although the image sensor of such cameras has been greatly improved over time, such improvements have not been made commercially available for microscopes until now. Here, we customized the optical system of a microscope for bioluminescence imaging. As a result, bioluminescence images of cells could be captured with a conventional objective lens and colour imaging camera....

  7. Bacteria bioluminescent activity as an indicator of geomagnetic disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of geomagnetic disturbances and storms on bioluminescence activity of bacterium were investigated. The bioluminescence intensity change depended on amplitude and continuous of geomagnetic storms. It is assumed, that the synchronization of luminous radiation take place in cellos when frequency of geomagnetic disturbances approached to an intrinsic one of a bioluminescence system. High sensitivity of bioluminescence of geomagnetic storms was detected. 5 refs., 4 figs

  8. Nanostructured bioluminescent sensor for rapidly detecting thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyan; Bao, Yige; Denstedt, John; Zhang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Thrombin plays a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The abnormal level of thrombin in body fluids may lead to different diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, etc. Detection of thrombin level in blood and/or urine is one of important methods for medical diagnosis. Here, a bioluminescent sensor is developed for non-invasively and rapidly detecting thrombin in urine. The sensor is assembled through conjugating gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and a recombinant protein containing Renilla luciferase (pRluc) by a peptide, which is thrombin specific substrate. The luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence can be quenched by peptide-conjugating Au NPs. In the presence of thrombin, the short peptide conjugating luciferase and Au NPs is digested and cut off, which results in the recovery of bioluminescence due to the release of luciferase from Au NPs. The bioluminescence intensity at 470 nm is observed, and increases with increasing concentration of thrombin. The bioluminescence intensity of this designed sensor is significantly recovered when the thrombin digestion time lasts for 10 min. In addition, a similar linear relationship between luminescence intensity and the concentration of thrombin is found in the range of 8 nM to 8 μM in both buffer and human urine spiked samples. The limit of detection is as low as 80 pM. It is anticipated that our nanosensor could be a promising tool for clinical diagnosis of thrombin in human urine. PMID:26397418

  9. Fluorescence and bioluminescence of bacterial luciferase intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intermediate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescent oxidation of FMNH2, isolated and purified by chromatography at --200, was postulated to be an oxygenated reduced flavine-luciferase. Maintained and studied at --20 to --300, this material exhibits a relatively weak fluorescence emission peaking at about 505 nm when excited at 370 nm. It may comprise more than one species. Upon continued exposure to light at 370 nm, the intensity of this fluorescence increases, often by a factor of 5 or more, and its emission spectrum is blue shifted to a maximum at about 485 nm. Upon warming this fluorescence is lost and the fluorescence of flavine mononucleotide appears. If warming is carried out in the presence of a long chain aldehyde, bioluminescence occurs, with the appearance of a similar amount of flavine fluorescence. The bioluminescence yield is about the same with irradiated and nonirradiated samples. The bioluminescence emission spectrum corresponds exactly to the fluorescence emission spectrum of the intermediate formed by irradiation, implicating the latter as being structurally close to the emitting species in bioluminescence. (auth)

  10. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbietti, L. [e12, Physik Department Technische Universität München Excellence Cluster “Origin and Structure of the Universe” (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N{sup *} resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c{sup 2} in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000){sup ++} are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  11. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system. PMID:26896339

  12. Multispectral Bioluminescence Tomography: Methodology and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent imaging has proven to be a valuable tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities at cellular and molecular levels in living small animals. Using biological techniques, target cells can be tagged with reporters encoding several kinds of luciferase enzymes, which generate characteristic photons in a wide spectrum covering the infrared range. Part of the diffused light can reach the body surface of the small animal, be separated into several spectral bands using appropriate filters, and collected by a sensitive CCD camera. Here we present a bioluminescence tomography (BLT method for a bioluminescent source reconstruction from multispectral data measured on the external surface, and demonstrate the advantages of multispectral BLT in a numerical study using a heterogeneous mouse chest phantom. The results show that the multispectral approach significantly improves the accuracy and stability of the BLT reconstruction even if the data are highly noisy.

  13. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed

  14. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  15. Optimisation of acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Mason, Suzannah K. G.; Glinton, Sophie; Cobbold, Mark; Styles, Iain B.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-03-01

    Decreasing the acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT) will enable animals to be imaged within the window of stable emission of the bioluminescent source, a higher imaging throughput and minimisation of the time which an animal is anaesthetised. This work investigates, through simulation using a heterogeneous mouse model, two methods of decreasing acquisition time: 1. Imaging at fewer wavelengths (a reduction from five to three); and 2. Increasing the bandwidth of filters used for imaging. The results indicate that both methods are viable ways of decreasing the acquisition time without a loss in quantitative accuracy. Importantly, when choosing imaging wavelengths, the spectral attenuation of tissue and emission spectrum of the source must be considered, in order to choose wavelengths at which a high signal can be achieved. Additionally, when increasing the bandwidth of the filters used for imaging, the bandwidth must be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm.

  16. Photon statistics and dynamics of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Andrew J.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    We report high time-resolution measurements of photon statistics from pairs of dye molecules coupled by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition to quantum-optical photon antibunching, we observe photon bunching on a time scale of several nanoseconds. We show by numerical simulation that configuration fluctuations in the coupled fluorophore system could account for minor deviations of our data from predictions of basic Förster theory. With further characterization we believe...

  17. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X. (Xuedong); Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  18. Chemistry and biology of insect bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colepicolo Neto, P.; Bechara, E.J.H. (Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica)

    1984-12-01

    Basic aspects on the Chemistry and Biology of bioluminescence are reviewed, with emphasis on insects. Data from the investigation of Lampyridae (fireflies) are collected from literature. With regard to Elateridae (click beetles) and Phengodidae (rail road worms), the least explored families of luminescent insects, new data are presented on the following aspects: (i) 'in vivo' emission spectra, (ii) chemical nature of the luciferin, (iii) conection between bioluminescence and 'oxygen toxicity' as a result of molecular oxygen storage and (iv) the role of light emission by larvae and pupae.

  19. Chemistry and biology of insect bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic aspects on the Chemistry and Biology of bioluminescence are reviewed, with emphasis on insects. Data from the investigation of Lampyridae (fireflies) are collected from literature. With regard to Elateridae (click beetles) and Phengodidae (rail road worms), the least explored families of luminescent insects, new data are presented on the following aspects: (i) 'in vivo' emission spectra, (ii) chemical nature of the luciferin, (iii) conection between bioluminescence and 'oxygen toxicity' as a result of molecular oxygen storage and (iv) the role of light emission by larvae and pupae. (Author)

  20. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays. PMID:27424912

  1. A dual resonance model for high energy electroweak reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to propose an original model for the weak interaction at high energy (about 1 TeV) that is inspired from resonance dual models established for hadron physics. The first chapter details the basis and assumptions of the standard model. The second chapter deals with various scenarios that go beyond the standard model and that involve a strong interaction and a perturbative approach to assess coupling. The third chapter is dedicated to the main teachings of hadron physics concerning resonances, the model of Regge poles and the concept of duality. We present our new model in the fourth chapter, we build a scenario in which standard fermions and the 3 massive gauge bosons would have a sub-structure alike that of hadrons. In order to give non-null values to the width of resonances we use the K matrix method, we describe this method in the last chapter and we apply it for the computation of the width of the Z0 boson. Our model predicts a large spectra of states particularly with the 143-up-lets of ff-bar states. The K matrix method has allowed us to compute amplitudes for helicity, then to collapse them in amplitudes invariant with SU(2) and to project these amplitudes in partial waves of helicity. For most resonances partial widths are very low compared to their mass

  2. Symmetry Energy and Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance in Finite Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Li-Gang; MA Zhong-Yu

    2008-01-01

    We study the relationship between the properties of the isovector giant dipole resonance of finite nuclei and the symmetry energy in the framework of the relativistic mean field theory with six different parameter sets of nonlinear effective Lagrangian.A strong linear correlation of excited energies of the dipole resonance in finite nuclei and symmetry energy at and below the saturation density is found.This linear correlation leads to the symmetry energy at the saturation density at the interval 33.0 MeV ≤ S(ρo)≤37.0 MeV.The comparison to the present experimental data in the soft dipole mode of 132 Sn constrains approximately the symmetry energy at ρ = 0.1 fm-3 at the interval 21.2MeV~ 22.5 MeV.It is proposed that a precise measurement of the soft dipole mode in neutron rich nuclei could set up an important constraint on the equation of state for asymmetric nuclear matter.

  3. Complementary split ring resonator arrays for electromagnetic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavikia, Babak; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2015-07-01

    This work demonstrates the viability of Ground-backed Complementary Split-Ring Resonator (G-CSRR) arrays with significant power conversion efficiency and bandwidth enhancement in comparison to the technology used in current electromagnetic energy harvesting systems. Through numerical full-wave analysis, we demonstrated correlation between either the resonance frequency or the input impedance of G-CSRR cells with the periodicity of the array. A comparative study of power harvesting efficiency through numerical analysis and laboratory measurement was presented where an array of G-CSRRs is compared to an array of microstrip patch antennas. We demonstrated that a G-CSRR array yields power conversion efficiency of 92%, which represents a significant improvement in comparison to the single G-CSRR reported in our earlier work.

  4. Investing relational energy: the hallmark of resonant leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta

    2004-11-01

    Recent research has shown that hospital restructuring that included staff layoff has adversely affected the role, health and well-being of nurses who remained employed. Further research found that nurses working in environments that reflected resonant (emotionally intelligent) leadership reported the least negative effects to their healt and well-being following hospital restructuring. What remained unclear was the mechanism by which this mitigation occurred. The purpose of this paper is to explore additional findings from this leadership research and discuss one explanation unique to the academic literature for the mitigation variable--the investment of relational energy by resonant nursing leadership to build relationships with nurses and manage emotion in the workplace. PMID:15656250

  5. Bioluminescent Bioreporters Encapsulated in Silica Gel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, J.; Demnerová, K.; Ripp, S.; Sayler, G. S.

    -: -, 2008, O08-2 - 1-O08-2 - 4. [XVI International Conference on Bioencapsulation. Dublin (IE), 04.09.2008-06.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bioluminescent bioreporter * silica gel * biosensor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  6. Bioluminescence lights the way to food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2003-07-01

    The food industry is increasingly adopting food safety and quality management systems that are more proactive and preventive than those used in the past which have tended to rely on end product testing and visual inspection. The regulatory agencies in many countries are promoting one such management tool, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), as a way to achieve a safer food supply and as a basis for harmonization of trading standards. Verification that the process is safe must involve microbiological testing but the results need not be generated in real-time. Of all the rapid microbiological tests currently available, the only ones that come close to offering real-time results are bioluminescence-based methods. Recent developments in application of bioluminescence for food safety issues are presented in the paper. These include the use of genetically engineered microorganisms with bioluminescent and fluorescent phenotypes as a real time indicator of physiological state and survival of food-borne pathogens in food and food processing environments as well as novel bioluminescent-based methods for rapid detection of pathogens in food and environmental samples. Advantages and pitfalls of the methods are discussed.

  7. Bioluminescence: diplôme 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Giachino, Vincent; Geiser, Martial

    2016-01-01

    Dans le cadre du projet européen BRAAVOO, qui vise à mesurer les concentrations de différents polluants présents dans la mer, nous développons un lecteur de bioluminescence embarqué dans une bouée.

  8. Harvesting energy from airflow with a michromachined piezoelectric harvester inside a Helmholtz resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report an airflow energy harvester that combines a piezoelectric energy harvester with a Helmholtz resonator. The resonator converts airflow energy to air oscillations which in turn are converted into electrical energy by a piezoelectric harvester. Two Helmholtz resonators with adjustable resonance frequencies have been designed—one with a solid bottom and one with membrane on the bottom. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were matched to the complementing piezoelectric harvesters during harvesting. The aim of the presented work is a feasibility study on using packaged piezoelectric energy harvesters with Helmholtz resonators for airflow energy harvesting. The maximum energy we were able to obtain was 42.2 µW at 20 m s−1

  9. Nanosecond Dynamics of Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, G O; Wang, Z; Walther, H; Scully, M O

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on photon statistics from individual dye pairs planted on biomolecules and coupled by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we show here that the FRET dynamics can be modelled by Gaussian random processes with colored noise. Using Monte-Carlo numerical simulations, the photon intensity correlations from the FRET pairs are calculated, and are turned out to be very close to those observed in experiment. The proposed stochastic description of FRET is consistent with existing theories for microscopic dynamics of the biomolecule that carries the FRET coupled dye pairs.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from allophycocyanin to malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, O. J.; Birch, D. J. S.; McCartney, L. J.; Pickup, J. C.

    1999-08-01

    The near-infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer kinetics of the phycobiliprotein allophycocyanin (APC) to malachite green (MG) have been investigated. A model is proposed to account for the fluorescence decay whereby MG binds to APC with a donor-acceptor site distribution which can be best described by 2D quenching kinetics. The results highlight a potential fallacy when interpreting the dimensionality of complex systems or the location of binding sites from Förster decay kinetics. The use of APC in trans-dermal measurements is proposed.

  11. Quantum electrodynamics of resonance energy transfer in nanowire systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Andrews, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Nonradiative resonance energy transfer (RET) provides the ability to transfer excitation energy between contiguous nanowires (NWs) with high efficiency under certain conditions. Nevertheless, the well-established Förster formalism commonly used to represent RET was developed for energy transfer primarily between molecular blocks (i.e., from one molecule, or part of a molecule, to another). Although deviations from Förster theory for functional blocks such as NWs have been studied previously, the role of the relative distance, the orientation of transition dipole moment pairs, and the passively interacting matter on electronic energy transfer are to a large extent unknown. Thus, a comprehensive theory that models RET in NWs is required. In this context, analytical insights to give a deeper and more intuitive understanding of the distance and orientation dependence of RET in NWs is presented within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. Additionally, the influence of an included intermediary on the rate of excitation energy transfer is illustrated, embracing indirect energy transfer rate and quantum interference. The results deliver equations that afford new intuitions into the behavior of virtual photons. In particular, results indicate that RET efficiency in a NW system can be explicitly expedited or inhibited by a neighboring mediator, depending on the relative spacing and orientation of NWs.

  12. Non-resonant energy harvesting via an adaptive bistable potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Narrow bandwidth and easy detuning, inefficiency in broadband and non-stationary excitations, and difficulties in matching a linear harvester’s resonance frequency to low-frequency excitations at small scales, have convinced researchers to investigate nonlinear, and in particular bistable, energy harvesters in recent years. However, bistable harvesters suffer from co-existing low and high energy orbits, and sensitivity to initial conditions, and have recently been proven inefficient when subjected to many real-world random and non-stationary excitations. Here, we propose a novel non-resonant buy-low-sell-high strategy that can significantly improve the harvester’s effectiveness at low frequencies in a much more robust fashion. This strategy could be realized by a passive adaptive bistable system. Simulation results confirm the high effectiveness of the adaptive bistable system following a buy-low-sell-high logic when subjected to harmonic and random non-stationary walking excitations compared to its conventional bistable and linear counterparts.

  13. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.). PMID:24785025

  14. Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO2 fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for 240Pu and 242Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

  15. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography using the reciprocity approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, Hamid; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved bioluminescence optical tomography is an approach to recover images of, for example, Luciferase activity within a volume using multiwavelength emission data from internal bioluminescence sources. The underlying problem of uniqueness associated with nonspectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography is demonstrated and it is shown that using a non-negative constraint inverse algorithm, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from th...

  16. Bioluminescent Probe for Detecting Mercury(II) in Living Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Ke, Bowen; Chen, Hui; Wang, Weishan; Du, Lupei; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    A novel bioluminescence probe for mercury(II) was obtained on the basis of the distinct deprotection reaction of dithioacetal to decanal, so as to display suitable sensitivity and selectivity toward mercury(II) over other ions with bacterial bioluminescence signal. These experimental results indicated such a probe was a novel promising method for mercury(II) bioluminescence imaging in environmental and life sciences ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:27412583

  17. Construction of a bioluminescence reporter plasmid for Francisella tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Bina, Xiaowen R.; Miller, Mark A.; James E Bina

    2010-01-01

    A Francisella tularensis shuttle vector that constitutively expresses the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon in type A and type B strains of F. tularensis was constructed. The bioluminescence reporter plasmid was introduced into the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis and used to follow F. tularensis growth in a murine intranasal challenge model in real time by bioluminescence imaging. The results show that the new bioluminescence reporter plasmid represents a useful tool for tularemia rese...

  18. Bioluminescence in the high Arctic during the polar night

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jørgen; Båtnes, Anna Solvang; Johnsen, Geir; Blackwell, Susan; Mark A. Moline

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the composition and activity of the planktonic community during the polar night in the high Arctic Kongsfjord, Svalbard. Our results are the first published evidence of bioluminescence among zooplankton during the Arctic polar night. The observations were collected by a bathyphotometer detecting bioluminescence, integrated into an autonomous underwater vehicle, to determine the concentration and intensity of bioluminescent flashes as a function of time of day and depth. To...

  19. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of the Murine Pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Pickard, Karen M.; Peng, Katian; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Frankel, Gad

    2006-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a natural mouse pathogen related to enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. We have previously utilized bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to determine the in vivo colonization dynamics of C. rodentium. However, due to the oxygen requirement of the bioluminescence system and the colonic localization of C. rodentium, in vivo localization studies were performed using harvested organs. Here, we report the detection of bioluminescent C. rodentium and commensal...

  20. Reliability of a bioluminescence ATP assay for detection of bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Selan, L.; Berlutti, F; Passariello, C.; Thaller, M C; Renzini, G

    1992-01-01

    The reliability of bioluminescence assays which employ the luciferin-luciferase ATP-dependent reaction to evaluate bacterial counts was studied, both in vitro and on urine specimens. Bioluminescence and cultural results for the most common urinary tract pathogens were analyzed. Furthermore, the influence of the culture medium, of the assaying method, and of the phase of growth on bioluminescence readings was studied. Results show that Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella strains are not corre...

  1. Effect of electromagnetic fields on the bacteria bioluminescent activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electromagnetic field with frequency from 36.2 to 55.9 GHz on bioluminescence activity of bacterium were investigated. Electromagnetic field results in decrease of bioluminescence, which depends from frequency. The electromagnetic field adaptation time is higher of intrinsic time parameters of bioluminescence system. The effect has nonthermal nature. It is suggested that electromagnetic field influence connects with structure rearrangements near cell emitter. 8 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Construction of a Bioluminescent Reporter Strain To Detect Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, A C; Muccini, M.; Ghosh, M. M.; Sayler, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    A bioluminescent reporter strain, Ralstonia eutropha ENV307(pUTK60), was constructed for the detection of polychlorinated biphenyls by inserting the biphenyl promoter upstream of the bioluminescence genes. In the presence of a nonionic surfactant, which enhances the solubility of chlorinated biphenyls, bioluminescence was induced three- to fourfold over background by biphenyl, monochlorinated biphenyls, and Aroclor 1242. The minimum detection limits for these compounds ranged from 0.15 mg/lit...

  3. Resonance behavior of internal conversion coefficients at low γ-ray energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A resonance-like structure of internal conversion coefficients (ICCs) at low γ-ray energy (< or approx.100 keV) is studied. Our calculations revealed new, previously unknown resonance minima in the energy dependence of ICCs for the ns shells at E2-E5 transitions. The resonances are the most defined for ICCs in light and medium elements with Z < or approx. 50. It is shown that ICCs may have up to four resonances for outer shells while it has been assumed so far that only one resonance exists. Well-pronounced resonances in ICCs at E1 transition were discovered for the ns shells with n≥2 as well as for the np shells with n≥3 and the nd shells with n≥4 of all elements up to superheavy ones. Simple expressions for approximate values of the E1 resonance energy were obtained which are of importance for determination of the resonance energy range where the interpolation of ICCs taken from tables or databases may give significant errors. The occurrence of resonances in ICCs is explained by vanishing conversion matrix elements under changes of sign. The peculiarities of the behavior of the matrix elements and electron wave functions at the resonance energy are considered. Available experimental ICCs for electric transitions with energies near the expected position of resonances satisfactory agree with our calculations.

  4. Resonance behavior of internal conversion coefficients at low γ-ray energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.; Kibédi, T.; Nikulin, V. K.

    2010-02-01

    A resonance-like structure of internal conversion coefficients (ICCs) at low γ-ray energy (≲100 keV) is studied. Our calculations revealed new, previously unknown resonance minima in the energy dependence of ICCs for the ns shells at E2-E5 transitions. The resonances are the most defined for ICCs in light and medium elements with Z≲ 50. It is shown that ICCs may have up to four resonances for outer shells while it has been assumed so far that only one resonance exists. Well-pronounced resonances in ICCs at E1 transition were discovered for the ns shells with n⩾2 as well as for the np shells with n⩾3 and the nd shells with n⩾4 of all elements up to superheavy ones. Simple expressions for approximate values of the E1 resonance energy were obtained which are of importance for determination of the resonance energy range where the interpolation of ICCs taken from tables or databases may give significant errors. The occurrence of resonances in ICCs is explained by vanishing conversion matrix elements under changes of sign. The peculiarities of the behavior of the matrix elements and electron wave functions at the resonance energy are considered. Available experimental ICCs for electric transitions with energies near the expected position of resonances satisfactory agree with our calculations.

  5. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  6. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm2. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  7. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  8. Resonant tunneling: A method for simultaneous determination of resonance energy and energy eigenvalue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: Fethi_maiz@yahoo.fr [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); Eissa, S.A. [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); AL-AZHAR University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); AlFaify, S. [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-09-15

    Assuming an effective mass approximation and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method for simultaneous determination of the energy levels forming the sub-band structure and the transmissions coefficient of non-symmetrical, non-periodical potential semiconducting heterostructure is being proposed. The method can be applied on a multilayer system with varying thickness and effective mass of the layers, and with potential that is neither periodical nor symmetrical. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, cases of symmetrical rectangular triple-barrier structure with constant effective mass, multi-barrier semiconductor heterostructure (nine barriers–eight-wells), and monomer height barrier superlattices (300 barriers) systems have been examined. Findings show very good agreements with previously published results obtained by different methods on similar systems. The proposed method was found to be useful for any number of semiconducting layers arranged in any random way making it more realistic, simple, and applicable to superlattice analysis and for devices design.

  9. Resonance energy transfer in DNA duplexes labeled with localized dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Paul D; Khachatrian, Ani; Buckhout-White, Susan; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Goldman, Ellen R; Medintz, Igor L; Melinger, Joseph S

    2014-12-18

    The growing maturity of DNA-based architectures has raised considerable interest in applying them to create photoactive light harvesting and sensing devices. Toward optimizing efficiency in such structures, resonant energy transfer was systematically examined in a series of dye-labeled DNA duplexes where donor-acceptor separation was incrementally changed from 0 to 16 base pairs. Cyanine dyes were localized on the DNA using double phosphoramidite attachment chemistry. Steady state spectroscopy, single-pair fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and ultrafast two-color pump-probe methods were utilized to examine the energy transfer processes. Energy transfer rates were found to be more sensitive to the distance between the Cy3 donor and Cy5 acceptor dye molecules than efficiency measurements. Picosecond energy transfer and near-unity efficiencies were observed for the closest separations. Comparison between our measurements and the predictions of Förster theory based on structural modeling of the dye-labeled DNA duplex suggest that the double phosphoramidite linkage leads to a distribution of intercalated and nonintercalated dye orientations. Deviations from the predictions of Förster theory point to a failure of the point dipole approximation for separations of less than 10 base pairs. Interactions between the dyes that alter their optical properties and violate the weak-coupling assumption of Förster theory were observed for separations of less than four base pairs, suggesting the removal of nucleobases causes DNA deformation and leads to enhanced dye-dye interaction. PMID:25397906

  10. Cardiac energy metabolism probed with nuclear magnetic resonance. Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy possesses great potential for studying myocardial energy metabolism. To ensure that the observed NMR signal predominantly originates from the heart, localization is required, which can be achieved by excision or exposure of the heart, or by means of sophisticated NMR localization techniques. A number of different atomic nuclei have been employed. H-1 NMR has been mainly used to follow lactate accumulation is ischemic or anoxic hearts. C-13 NMR has been applied to study the fate of different substrates in the citric acid cycle and amino acid pools, and the role of glycogen metabolism in ischemia or anoxia. F-19, Na-23 and K-39 have been employed to investigate the consequences of altered energy metabolism for myocardial intracellular concentrations of Ca2+, Na+ and K+. The most abundantly used nucleus for studying myocardial energy metabolism is P-31. Numerous contributions have been made to the investigation of ischemia and reperfusion, protection of the heart against the consequences of ischemia and reperfusion, contractile failure, variation of high-energy phosphate levels over the cardiac cycle, regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and intracellular enzyme kinetics of both isolated perfused hearts and hearts in situ. Even human myocardial metabolism can be assessed by P-31 NMR, which is on the verge of becoming a clinical tool for investigating heart disease. 106 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  11. SSC High Energy Booster resonance corrector and dynamic tune scanning simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    A resonance correction system for the High Energy Booster (HEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSCL) was investigated by means of dynamic multiparticle tracking. In the simulation the operating tune is scanned as a function of time so that the bunch goes through a resonance. The performance of the half integer and third integer resonance correction system is demonstrated.

  12. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Feng-lan; Wang, Rui-qin; Zhang, Mao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The production of hadronic resonances $K^{*}(892)$, $\\phi(1020)$, $\\Sigma^{*}(1385)$, and $\\Xi^{*}(1530)$ in central AA collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 17.3, 200, and 2760 GeV are systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization are described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The $p_T$ spectra of $K^{*}(892)$ calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low $p_T \\lesssim 1.5$ GeV and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on $\\phi(1020)$ production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low $p_T$ on the...

  13. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A

    2016-08-21

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules. PMID:27544087

  14. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to...... realize theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall...

  15. Detection of ATP and NADH: A Bioluminescent Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Ted C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Described is a bioluminescent assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) that meets the requirements of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. The 3-hour experiment provides students with experience in bioluminescence and analytical biochemistry yet requires limited instrumentation,…

  16. Use of the liquid scintillation spectrometer in bioluminescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review covers publications concerning analytical bioluminescence which in the main have appeared between mid-1973 and mid-1976. Outlines of some new assays and techniques are given together with modifications of existing procedures. Comments are presented on the use of the liquid scintillation spectrometer and other equipment for measuring bioluminescence. New applications are detailed and discussed

  17. A REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. The unifyin...

  18. In vivo bioluminescence tomography based on multi-view projection and 3D surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Leng, Chengcai; Deng, Kexin; Hu, Yifang; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a powerful optical molecular imaging modality, which enables non-invasive realtime in vivo imaging as well as 3D quantitative analysis in preclinical studies. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct inner light sources accurately, the prior structural information is commonly necessary and obtained from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This strategy requires expensive hybrid imaging system, complicated operation protocol and possible involvement of ionizing radiation. The overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. In this study we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic system (POBTS) and a novel BLT method based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. The POBTS acquired a sparse set of white light surface images and bioluminescent images of a mouse. Then the white light images were applied to an approximate surface model to generate a high quality textured 3D surface reconstruction of the mouse. After that we integrated multi-view luminescent images based on the previous reconstruction, and applied an algorithm to calibrate and quantify the surface luminescent flux in 3D.Finally, the internal bioluminescence source reconstruction was achieved with this prior information. A BALB/C mouse with breast tumor of 4T1-fLuc cells mouse model were used to evaluate the performance of the new system and technique. Compared with the conventional hybrid optical-CT approach using the same inverse reconstruction method, the reconstruction accuracy of this technique was improved. The distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.184 mm.

  19. Lighting up bioluminescence with coelenterazine: strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-04-13

    Bioluminescence-based techniques, such as bioluminescence imaging, BRET and dual-luciferase reporter assay systems, have been widely used to examine a myriad of biological processes. Coelenterazine (CTZ), a luciferin or light-producing compound found in bioluminescent organisms, has sparked great curiosity and interest in searching for analogues with improved photochemical properties. This review summarizes the current development of coelenterazine analogues, their bioluminescence properties, and the rational design of caged coelenterazine towards biotargets, as well as their applications in bioassays. It should be emphasized that the design of caged luciferins can provide valuable insight into detailed molecular processes in organisms and will be a trend in the development of bioluminescent molecules. PMID:27009907

  20. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  1. Single-energy amplitudes for pion photoproduction in the first resonance region

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider multipole amplitudes for low-energy pion photoproduction, constructed with minimal model dependence, at single energies. Comparisons with fits to the full resonance region are made. Explanations are suggested for the discrepancies and further experiments are motivated.

  2. Rotational piezoelectric wind energy harvesting using impact-induced resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Shen, Qinlong; Jin, Jiamei; Wang, Yiping; Qian, Wangjie; Yuan, Dewang

    2014-08-01

    To improve the output power of a rotational piezoelectric wind energy harvester, impact-induced resonance is proposed to enable effective excitation of the piezoelectric cantilevers' vibration modes and obtain optimum deformation, which enhances the mechanical/electrical energy transformation. The impact force is introduced by forming a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever polygon that is fixed at the circumference of the rotating fan's internal surface. Elastic balls are placed inside the polygon. When wind rotates the device, the balls strike the piezoelectric cantilevers, and thus electricity is generated by the piezoelectric effect. The impact point is carefully chosen to use the first bending mode as much as possible, and thus maximize the harvesting efficiency. The design enables each bimorph to be struck in a similar area and every bimorph is struck in that area at different moments. As a result, a relatively stable output frequency can be obtained. The output frequency can also be changed by choosing different bimorph dimensions, which will also make the device simpler and the costs lower. A prototype piezoelectric energy harvester consisting of twelve piezoelectric cantilevers was constructed. The piezoelectric cantilevers were made from phosphor bronze, the lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-based bimorph cantilever had dimensions of 47 mm × 20 mm × 0.5 mm, and the elastic balls were made from steel with a diameter of 10 mm. The optimal DC output power was 613 μW across the 20 kΩ resistor at a rotation speed of 200 r/min with an inscribed circle diameter of 31 mm.

  3. Moment searching algorithm for bioluminescence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludong Jin; Yan Wu; Jie Tian; Heyu Huang; Xiaochao Qu

    2009-01-01

    To avoid the ill-posedness in the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography, a moment searching algorithm fusing the finite element method (FEM) with the moment concept in theoretical mechanics is developed. In the algorithm, the source's information is mapped to the surface photon flux density by FEM, and the source's position is modified with the feedback through the algorithm of barycenter searching, which makes full use of the position information of the photon flux density on surface. The position is modified in every iterative step and will finally converge to the real source's value theoretically.

  4. Low-energy neutron resonances in erbium and gadolinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Shore, F.J.; Sailor, V.L.

    1960-01-01

    The two neutron resonances in Er at 0.46 and 0.58 eV were measured using samples enriched in Er166, Er167 and Er168 It was found that both resonances occur in the target nucleus Er167. The isotopic cross-sections of Gd155 and Gd157 were measured from 0.02 to 0.30 eV and resonances were found in G...

  5. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Mostafa, Salwa [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  6. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs-based resonant energy conversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slo; Datskos, Panos G.

    2012-06-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  7. Concentric Förster resonance energy transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miao; Algar, W Russ

    2015-08-18

    Concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (cFRET) configurations based on semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are promising probes for biological sensing because they offer multiplexing capability in a single vector with robust ratiometric detection by exploiting a network of FRET pathways. To expand the scope and utility of cFRET probes, it is necessary to develop and validate cFRET imaging methodology. In this technical note, we present such a methodology using a protease-sensitive cFRET configuration that comprises a green-emitting QD, Alexa Fluor 555 (A555), and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647). Photoluminescence (PL) images were acquired with three filter-based emission channels to permit measurement of A555/QD and A647/QD PL ratios. With reference to calibration samples, these PL ratios were used to calculate quantitative progress curves for proteolytic activity in regions of interest in the acquired images. Importantly, the imaging methodology reproduces quantitative results obtained with a monochromator-based fluorescence plate reader. Spatiotemporal resolution is demonstrated by tracking the activity of two prototypical proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin, as they diffuse down the length of a capillary. This methodology is expected to enable the future use of cFRET probes for cellular sensing and other imaging assays. PMID:26214686

  8. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is presente

  9. NOTE ON ENERGY FORMULATION OF THE FMR RESONANCE CONDITION

    OpenAIRE

    Maryško, M.; Baselgia, L.; Warden, M.; Waldner, F.; Hutton, S.; Drumheller, J.; He, Y.; Wigen, P.

    1988-01-01

    As is known the classical FMR resonance condition by Smit and Beljers cannot be directly used zero angle between the magnetization and polar axis. This difficulty can be avoided using the new form of resonance condition which has been derived by the transformation from the rectangular coordinate system.

  10. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  11. Low-energy neutron resonances in erbium and gadolinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Shore, F.J.; Sailor, V.L.

    1960-01-01

    The two neutron resonances in Er at 0.46 and 0.58 eV were measured using samples enriched in Er166, Er167 and Er168 It was found that both resonances occur in the target nucleus Er167. The isotopic cross-sections of Gd155 and Gd157 were measured from 0.02 to 0.30 eV and resonances were found in Gd......155 at 0.0268 and in Gd157 at 0.0314 eV. Parameters for these resonances were derived by fitting the data to single-level Breit-Wigner formulae. Isotopic assignments were made for fifteen Gd resonances between 1 and 25 eV from previously unpublished data using samples enriched in 155, 156, 157 and 158...

  12. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products.

  13. Recoilless Resonance Absorption of Tritium Antineutrinos and Time-Energy Uncertainty Relation

    OpenAIRE

    Bilenky, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss neutrino oscillations in an experiment with M\\"ossbauer recoilless resonance absorbtion of tritium antineutrinos, proposed recently by Raghavan. We demonstrate that small energy uncertainty of antineutrinos which ensures a large resonance absorption cross section is in a conflict with the energy uncertainty which, according to the time-energy uncertainty relation, is necessary for neutrino oscillations to happen. The search for neutrino oscillations in the M\\"ossbauer neutrino expe...

  14. Energy calibration by silicon resonance: Completing system calibration with one reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, M.J.F. [Cranfield University, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: m.j.f.healy@cranfield.ac.uk

    2006-08-15

    Accelerator energy calibration is seldom a swift process. A rapid calibration method using the proton elastic scattering resonances of silicon was compared to the gamma resonance method. The silicon method proved rapid and convenient given that silicon is also being explored as a means of solid angle calibration, but only moderately accurate. {sup 13}C was identified as a particularly good material for calibration by the superior and established method of gamma resonance.

  15. Measurement of interaction energy near a Feshbach resonance in a 6Li Fermi gas

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdel, T; Cubizolles, J.; Khaykovich, L.; Magalhaes, K. M. F.; Kokkelmans, S. J. J. M. F.; G. V. Shlyapnikov; Salomon, C

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the strongly interacting regime in an optically trapped $^6$Li Fermi mixture near a Feshbach resonance. The resonance is found at $800(40) $G in good agreement with theory. Anisotropic expansion of the gas is interpreted by collisional hydrodynamics. We observe an unexpected and large shift ($80 $G) between the resonance peak and both the maximum of atom loss and the change of sign of the interaction energy.

  16. Construction of a bioluminescent reporter strain to detect polychlorinated biphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, A.C.; Muccini, M.; Ghosh, M.M.; Sayler, G.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A bioluminescent reporter strain, Ralstonia eutropha ENV307 (pUTK60), was constructed for the detection of polychlorinated biphenyls by inserting the biphenyl promoter upstream of the bioluminescence genes. In the presence of a nonionic surfactant, which enhances the solubility of chlorinated biphenyls, bioluminescence was induced three- to fourfold over background by biphenyl, monochlorinated biphenyls, and Aroclor 1242. The minimum detection limits for these compounds ranged from 0.15 mg/liter for 4-chlorobiphenyl to 1.5 mg/liter for Aroclor 1242.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence of resonance energy transfer mechanism from PbS QDs to bulk silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernechea M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the efficiency of the resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon. We present spectroscopic evidence that resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon can be an efficient process for separation distances below 12 nm. Temperature measurements are also presented for PbS quantum dots deposited on glass and silicon with 5 nm and 20nm spacer thicknesses substrates. Our findings show that the resonance energy transfer efficiency remains constant over the 50K to 300K temperature range.

  18. Estimation of neutron energy for first resonance from absorption cross section for thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Donald

    1951-01-01

    Examination of published data for some 52 isotopes indicates that the neutron energy for which the first resonance occurs is related to the magnitude of the thermal absorption cross section. The empirical relation obtained is in qualitative agreement with the results of a simplified version of the resonance theory of the nucleus of Breit-Wigner.

  19. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  20. Energy dependence of K-bar N interactions and resonance pole of strange dibaryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the resonance energy of the strange dibaryons using two models with the energy-independent and energy-dependent potentials for the s-wave K-bar N interaction, both of which are derived by certain reductions from the leading order term of the effective chiral Lagrangian. These potential models produce rather different off-shell behaviors of the two-body K-bar N - πΣ amplitudes in I=0 channel, i.e., the model with energy-independent (energy-dependent) potential predicts one (two) resonance pole in the Λ(1405) region, while they describe the available data equally well. We find that the energy-independent potential model predicts one resonance pole of the strange dibaryons, whereas the energy-dependent potential model predicts two resonance poles: one is the shallow quasi-bound state of the K-bar NN, and the other is the resonance of the πY N with large width. An investigation of the binding energy of the strange dibaryons will make a significant contribution to clarify resonance structure of s-wave K-bar N - πΣ around the Λ(1405) region. (author)

  1. Production of Hadronic Resonances at LHC Energies with the ALICE Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadronic resonances are strongly decaying particles with extremely short lifetimes of about few fm/c, which are comparable to or smaller than the lifetime of the system formed in relativistic collisions. Due to their short lifetimes, resonance particles can be used to investigate the freeze-out mechanisms after hadronization. This contribution summarizes the results of resonance particle productions measured by the ALICE collaboration at LHC from various colliding systems and energies. Measured mass, width, transverse momentum and particle ratios of those resonances have been reported. Theoretical predictions from thermal model calculations are also presented

  2. Bioluminescent determination of free fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, H; Wieland, E

    1984-08-01

    A simple, highly specific, and sensitive bioluminescent method for determination of free fatty acids in unextracted plasma or serum has been developed. The method is based on the activation of free fatty acids by acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3). The pyrophosphate formed is used to phosphorylate fructose 6-phosphate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme pyrophosphate-fructose-6-phosphate phosphotransferase (EC 4.1.2.13). The triosephosphates produced from fructose 1,6-bisphosphate by aldolase are oxidized by NAD in the presence of arsenate to 3-phosphoglycerate. The NADH is detected via the bacterial NADH-linked luciferase system. Excellent agreement has been obtained by comparison with accepted methods. In addition, for the determination of serum free fatty acids, the method is particularly applicable for following lipolysis of isolated adipocytes. PMID:6486422

  3. Broadband performance of a piezoelectric energy harvester based on the internal resonance of buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liuyang; Tang, Lihua; Ding, Hu; Chen, Liqun; Mace, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Nonlinear internal resonance mechanism is exploited in piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) for the purpose of broadening the resonance band. Conventional linear energy harvester has narrow operating bandwidth. In this research, a buckled piezoelectric beam structure with preload under transverse excitation is investigated to demonstrate the superiority of internal resonance. The condition for 2:1 internal resonance could be established by truncating the continuum beam with geometrical nonlinearity. Integro-partial-differential equations are derived for governing transverse motion measured from a stable equilibrium position. At specific initial axial compressive force, two modes are coupled through the internal resonance interaction. For weak nonlinear perturbations, multiple scales method is used to explore the amplitude-frequency responses of the buckled beam system under primary resonance with 2:1 internal resonance. Numerical examples demonstrate that the resonance bandwidth is broadened thanks to the coexistence of softening and hardening nonlinear characteristics. Moreover, validity of the approximate analytical method is demonstrated by comparing with simulation. Furthermore, the optimal resistance is discussed with a pure resistive load. This research on the internal resonance of buckled beam provides a basis for structure design and optimization in broadband PVEH.

  4. Bioluminescence: a versatile technique for imaging cellular and molecular features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Miranda A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a ubiquitous imaging modality for visualizing biological processes in vivo. This technique employs visible light and interfaces readily with most cell and tissue types, making it a versatile technology for preclinical studies. Here we review basic bioluminescence imaging principles, along with applications of the technology that are relevant to the medicinal chemistry community. These include noninvasive cell tracking experiments, analyses of protein function, and methods to visualize small molecule metabolites. In each section, we also discuss how bioluminescent tools have revealed insights into experimental therapies and aided drug discovery. Last, we highlight the development of new bioluminescent tools that will enable more sensitive and multi-component imaging experiments and, thus, expand our broader understanding of living systems.

  5. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of plasmon resonances in titanium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzing, Andrew A.; Guler, Urcan; Zhou, Xiuli; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir; Norris, Theodore B.

    2016-04-01

    The plasmon resonance characteristics of refractory TiN thin films were analyzed using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A bulk plasmon resonance was observed at 2.81 eV and a weaker surface plasmon resonance peak was detected at 2.05 eV. These findings are compared to finite-difference time-domain simulations based on measured optical data. The calculated values for both the bulk and surface resonances (2.74 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively) show reasonable agreement with those measured via EELS. The amplitude of the experimentally observed surface resonance was weaker than that typically encountered in noble metal nanostructures, and this is discussed in the context of electron density and reduced spatial confinement of the resonance mode in the thin-film geometry.

  6. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  7. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsun Su, Yen; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien; Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  8. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics

  9. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsun Su, Yen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien [Science and Technology of Accelerator Light Source, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei [Department of Resource Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-05

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  10. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse. PMID:27197544

  11. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Cussatlegras; P. Le Gal

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of ...

  12. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Cussatlegras; Gal, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with d...

  13. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    OpenAIRE

    Cussatlegras, A. S.; Gal, P.

    2005-01-01

    International audience Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performe...

  14. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells coordinating a group behavior. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this a...

  15. Bioluminescence Imaging of Chlamydia muridarum Ascending Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Campbell; Yumeng Huang; Yuanjun Liu; Robert Schenken; Bernard Arulanandam; Guangming Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intrav...

  16. Circadian regulation of bioluminescence in Gonyaulax involves translational control.

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, D.; Milos, P M; Roux, E.; Hastings, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    A 10-fold circadian variation in the amount of luciferin binding protein (LBP) in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra is reported. This protein binds and stabilizes luciferin, the bioluminescence substrate. In early night phase, when bioluminescence is increasing and LBP levels are rising in the cell, pulse labeling experiments show that LBP is being rapidly synthesized in vivo. At other times, the rate of LBP synthesis is at least 50 times lower, while the rate of synthesis of most ...

  17. Action of γ-radiation on bioluminescence of Noctiluca miliaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the study in the action of various doses of irradiation on the bioluminescence of Noctiluca miliaris are presented. The doses are found that stimulate the bioluminescence and the dose - effect curves are obtained. It has been shown that stimulation of Noctiluca luminescence by γ-radiation is not of a constant character and extinguishes after a period of time determined by a dose rate

  18. Energy harvesting by dynamic unstability and internal resonance for piezoelectric beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the energy harvesting of a vertical beam with tip mass under vertical excitations. We applied dynamic unstability and internal resonance to improve the efficiency of harvesting. The experiments of harmonic excitation were carried out. Results show that for the beam there exist internal resonances in the dynamically unstable and the buckling bistable cases. The dynamic unstability is a determinant for strong internal resonance or mode coupling, which can be used to create a large output from piezoelectric patches. Then, the experiments of stochastic excitation were carried out. Results prove that the internal resonance or mode coupling can transfer the excitation energy to the low order modes, mainly the first and the second one. This can bring about a large output voltage. For a stochastic excitation, it is proved that there is an optimal weight of tip mass for realizing internal resonance and producing large outputs

  19. Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer (PRET)-based Molecular Imaging of Cytochrome c in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yeonho; Kang, Taewook; Lee, Luke P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development of innovative plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET)-based molecular imaging of biomolecules in living cells. Our strategy of in vivo PRET imaging relies on the resonant plasmonic energy transfer from a gold nanoplasmonic probe to conjugated target molecules, which creates “quantized quenching dips” within the Rayleigh scattering spectrum of the probe. The positions of these quantized quenching dips exactly match with the absorption peaks of the target molecule s...

  20. Study of giant resonances at high excitation energy by alpha inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of 340 and 480 MeV alpha particles inelastically scattered by 208Pb, 116Sn and 58Ni up to 60 MeV of excitation have been measured. The experimental inelastic spectra have been analysed by means of a new global method. The repartition of multipole strength shows the already known low energy giant resonances into more details. New high energy giant resonances are observed

  1. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  2. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Campbell

    Full Text Available Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  3. Interactive graphic editing tools in bioluminescent imaging simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Tian, Jie; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2005-04-01

    It is a challenging task to accurately describe complicated biological tissues and bioluminescent sources in bioluminescent imaging simulation. Several graphic editing tools have been developed to efficiently model each part of the bioluminescent simulation environment and to interactively correct or improve the initial models of anatomical structures or bioluminescent sources. There are two major types of graphic editing tools: non-interactive tools and interactive tools. Geometric building blocks (i.e. regular geometric graphics and superquadrics) are applied as non-interactive tools. To a certain extent, complicated anatomical structures and bioluminescent sources can be approximately modeled by combining a sufficient large number of geometric building blocks with Boolean operators. However, those models are too simple to describe the local features and fine changes in 2D/3D irregular contours. Therefore, interactive graphic editing tools have been developed to facilitate the local modifications of any initial surface model. With initial models composed of geometric building blocks, interactive spline mode is applied to conveniently perform dragging and compressing operations on 2D/3D local surface of biological tissues and bioluminescent sources inside the region/volume of interest. Several applications of the interactive graphic editing tools will be presented in this article.

  4. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  5. Derivative corrections to the symmetry energy and the isovector dipole-resonance structure in nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Blocki, J. P.; Magner, A. G.; Ring, P.

    2014-01-01

    The effective surface approximation is extended accounting for derivatives of the symmetry energy density per particle. Using the analytical isovector surface energy constants within the Fermi-liquid droplet model, one obtains energies and sum rules of the isovector dipole resonance structure in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data and other theoretical approaches.

  6. EXAMINING A SERIES RESONANT INVERTER CIRCUIT TO USE IN THE PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin ÇETİN

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As we know, solar energy is the energy source which is environment friendly, renewable, and can be found easily. Particularly, in the recent years, interest on producing electrical energy by alternative energy sources increased because of the fact that underground sources are not enough to produce energy in the future and also these sources cause enviromental pollution. The solar energy is one of the most popular one among the alternative energy sources. Photovoltaic systems produce the electrical energy from the sunlight. In this study, a series resonant inverter circuit which is used in the photovoltaic energy conversion systems has been examined.Effects of the series resonant inverter circuit on the photovoltaic energy conversion system have been investigated and examined

  7. Performance characteristics of an energy selective electron refrigerator with double resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Min; He Ji-Zhou; Tang Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes the energy selective electron (ESE) engine with double resonances as a refrigerator in one dimensional (ID) system. It consists of two infinitely large electron reservoirs with different temperatures and chemical potentials, and they are perfectly thermally insulated from each other and interaction only via a double 'idealized energy filter' whose widths are all finite. Taking advantage of the density of state and Fermi distribution in the ID system, the heat flux into each reservoir may then be calculated. Moreover, the coefficient of performance may be derived from the expressions for the heat flux into the hot and cold reservoirs. The performance characteristic curves are plotted by numerical analysis. The influences of the resonances widths, the energy position of resonance and the space of two resonances on performance of the ESE refrigerator are discussed. The results obtained here have theoretical significance for the understanding of thermodynamic performance of the micro-nano devices.

  8. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules

  9. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  10. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-10-20

    POLIDENT (POint LIbraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  11. Electron nuclear double resonance near an energy level crossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that double electron-nuclear resonance (DENR) spectra near the intersection of spin-electron levels differ notably from spectra recorded under normal conditions. In particular, hyperfine and quadrupole splittings are notably increased while the nuclear Zeeman interaction is supressed. A giant line splitting (exceeding the line splitting in a standard situation by orders) occurs in a DENR spectrum in the presence of external electric field

  12. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  13. Resonance-induced enhancement of the energy harvesting performance of piezoelectric flags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yifan; Michelin, Sébastien; Doaré, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    The spontaneous flapping of a flag can be used to produce electrical energy from a fluid flow when coupled to a generator. In this paper, the energy harvesting performance of a flag covered by a single pair of polyvinylidene difluoride piezoelectric electrodes is studied both experimentally and numerically. The electrodes are connected to a resistive-inductive circuit that forms a resonant circuit with the piezoelectric's intrinsic capacitance. Compared with purely resistive circuits, the resonance between the circuit and the flag's flapping motion leads to a significant increase in the harvested energy. Our experimental study also validates our fluid-solid-electric nonlinear numerical model.

  14. Resonance-induced enhancement of the energy harvesting performance of piezoelectric flags

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Yifan; Doare, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous flapping of a flag can be used to produce electrical energy from a fluid flow when coupled to a generator. In this paper, the energy harvesting performance of a flag covered by a single pair of PVDF piezoelectric electrodes is studied both experimentally and numerically. The electrodes are connected to a resistive-inductive circuit that forms a resonant circuit with the piezoelectric's intrinsic capacitance. Compared with purely resistive circuits, the resonance between the circuit and the flag's flapping motion leads to a significant increase in the harvested energy. Our experimental study also validates our fluid-solid-electric nonlinear numerical model.

  15. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-11-01

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  16. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J., E-mail: jtang@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  17. Metastable anions of dinitrobenzene: Resonances for electron attachment and kinetic energy release

    OpenAIRE

    Mauracher, Andreas; Denifl, S.; Edtbauer, A.; Hager, M; Probst, M.; Echt, O.; Mark, T.D.; Scheier, P.; Field, Thomas; Graupner, Karola

    2010-01-01

    Attachment of free, low-energy electrons to dinitrobenzene (DNB) in the gas phase leads to DNB as well as several fragment anions. DNB, (DNB-H), (DNB-NO), (DNB-2NO), and (DNB-NO2) are found to undergo metastable (unimolecular) dissociation. A rich pattern of resonances in the yield of these metastable reactions versus electron energy is observed; some resonances are highly isomer-specific. Most metastable reactions are accompanied by large average kinetic energy releases (KER) that range from...

  18. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined

  19. Low-energy three-body recombination near a Feshbach resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kartavtsev, O I

    2002-01-01

    Ultralow-energy three-body recombination of identical particles with internal degrees of freedom is considered. The study reveals two different mechanisms for recombination enhancement below and above resonance, namely, production of loosely bound dimers for positive scattering length a(B) -> infinity and diminishing of the potential barrier in the entrance channel for negative a(B) -> -infinity. The recombination rate on both sides of the Feshbach resonance is found to diverge as a power of the resonance detuning. The results are in agreement with experimental data. Refs. 19 (author)

  20. Analytical energy and bandwidth model for compact silicon photonic microdisk resonators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2009-04-01

    Microdisk resonators for use as low energy modulators in telecom and datacom applications have been fabricated using vertical PN junctions which operate in reverse bias. These devices have demonstrated the lowest energy/bit thus far. In this paper we show that the reverse biased PN junction diodes follow the analytical depletion approximation based on numerical simulation.

  1. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  2. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  3. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  4. A Note on Computer Solution of Wireless Energy Transmit via Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Christianto V.; Smarandache F.

    2008-01-01

    In the present article we argue that it is possible to find numerical solution of coupled magnetic resonance equation for describing wireless energy transmit, as discussed re- cently by Karalis (2006) and Kurs et al. (2007). The proposed approach may be found useful in order to understand the phenomena of magnetic resonance. Further observa- tion is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  5. Symmetry energy constraints from giant resonances: A relativistic mean-field theory overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant resonances encapsulate the dynamic response of the nuclear ground state to external perturbations. As such, they offer a unique view of the nucleus that is often not accessible otherwise. Although interesting in their own right, giant resonances are also enormously valuable in providing stringent constraints on the equation of state of asymmetric matter. With this view in mind, we focus on two modes of excitation that are essential in reaching this goal: the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR). GMR energies in heavy nuclei are sensitive to the symmetry energy because they probe the incompressibility of neutron-rich matter. Unfortunately, access to the symmetry energy is hindered by the relatively low neutron-proton asymmetry of stable nuclei. Thus, the measurement of GMR energies in exotic nuclei is strongly encouraged. In the case of the GDR, we find the electric dipole polarizability of paramount importance. Indeed, the electric dipole polarizability appears as one of two laboratory observables -with the neutron-skin thickness being the other- that are highly sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Finally, we identify the softness of skin and the nature of the pygmy resonance as important unsolved problems in nuclear structure. (orig.)

  6. aequorine bioluminescence response to calcium in vitro and in cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tricoire, Ludovic

    2006-01-01

    During my PhD, I investigated in vitro the calcium-dependent bioluminescence of thephotoprotein aequorin and then used its bioluminescence to image neuronal activities in theneocortical network. This genetically encoded calcium sensor can be expressed in specific cell types and its bioluminescence is not toxic and exhibit a high signal/noise ratio.I first search for mutations modifying aequorin bioluminescence, using a randommutagenesis and in vitro evolution approach. I isolated mutants show...

  7. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinko, Charlotte L.J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasona...

  8. Vegetable seed radiosensitivity and kinetic analysis of super-weak bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence of several vegetable seeds induced by γ-rays was studied. The results show that positive relation exists between seeds bioluminescence and irradiation dose, which fits with equation Y=Y0eKD. The higher the K value is, the more intense the bioluminescence induced by γ-rays is. Significant differences among K values were found with different varieties. The bioluminescence and exterior measurement value of seed radiosensitivity showed good consistency

  9. Hadronic resonance production measured by the ALICE detector at LHC energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badalá A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadronic resonances are a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, they can provide information on particleformation mechanisms and on the properties of the medium at freeze-out, and furthermore they contribute to the systematic study of energy loss and recombination. Measurements of resonances in pp and in p–Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle initial-state effects from medium-induced effects. In this proceedings the latest ALICE results on hadronic resonance production in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energies will be presented. In particular, the production of the K*(8920 and ø(1020 resonances at mid-rapidity has been studied in different collision systems at LHC energies, reconstructing the resonances via their hadronic decay in a wide momentum range. The resonance transverse momentum spectra, mean transverse momenta, ratio to stable particles and nuclear modification factor will be discussed.

  10. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2014-11-01

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  11. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation

  12. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Su

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  13. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  14. Effective theory calculation of resonant high-energy scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin; Signer, A; Zanderighi, G

    2004-01-01

    Tests of the standard model and its hypothetical extensions require precise theoretical predictions for processes involving massive, unstable particles. It is well-known that ordinary weak-coupling perturbation theory breaks down due to intermediate singular propagators. Various pragmatic approaches have been developed to deal with this difficulty. In this paper we construct an effective field theory for resonant processes utilizing the hierarchy of scales between the mass of the unstable particle, M, and its width, Gamma. The effective theory allows calculations to be systematically arranged into a series in g^2 and Gamma/M, and preserves gauge invariance in every step. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by calculating explicitly the inclusive line shape of a scalar resonance in an abelian gauge-Yukawa model at next-to-leading order in Gamma/M and the weak couplings. We also discuss the extension to next-to-next-to-leading order and compute an interesting subset of these corrections.

  15. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy.

  16. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy. PMID:27446674

  17. Rapid detection (4 h) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a bioluminescence method.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, C. H.; Hixon, D L; McLaughlin, C M; Cook, J F

    1988-01-01

    A 4-h bioluminescence method for methicillin susceptibility determination was compared with reference methods. Of the Staphylococcus aureus strains tested, 80 were methicillin resistant, 180 were methicillin susceptible, and 10 were borderline susceptible. There was 100% correlation between bioluminescence and reference methods for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains. All borderline-susceptible strains were identified as methicillin resistant by bioluminescence.

  18. Propensity Scores for Prediction and Characterization of Bioluminescent Proteins from Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescent proteins (BLPs) are a class of proteins with various mechanisms of light emission such as bioluminescence and fluorescence from luminous organisms. While valuable for commercial and medical applications, identification of BLPs, including luciferases and fluorescent proteins (FPs), is rather challenging, owing to their high variety of protein sequences. Moreover, characterization of BLPs facilitates mutagenesis analysis to enhance bioluminescence and fluorescence. Therefore, thi...

  19. Novel bioluminescent coelenterazine derivatives with imidazopyrazinone C-6 extended substitution for Renilla luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xingye; Yuan, Mingliang; Zhang, Tianchao; Zhang, Huateng; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-21

    Two series of novel coelenterazine analogues (alkynes and triazoles) with imidazopyrazinone C-6 extended substitution have been designed and synthesized successfully for the extension of bioluminescent substrates. After extensive evaluation, some compounds display excellent bioluminescence properties compared with DeepBlueC in cellulo, thus becoming potential molecules for bioluminescence techniques. PMID:27197767

  20. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in

  1. Multi-resonance of energy transport and absence of heat pump in a force-driven lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Song; Ren, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2011-01-01

    Energy transport control in low dimensional nano-scale systems has attracted much attention in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the energy transport properties of Frenkel-Kontorova lattice subject to a periodic driving force, in particular, the resonance behavior of the energy current by varying the external driving frequency. It is discovered that in certain parameter ranges, multiple resonance peaks, instead of a single resonance, emerge. By comparing the nonlinear lattice model ...

  2. Probing Nuclear Symmetry Energy with Giant Dipole Resonances in Finite Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Li-gang; MA Zhong-yu

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the centroid energies of the isovector giant dipole resonance of finite nuclei and the symmetry energy has been studied.It is found the excitation energies of the dipole resonance in finite nuclei are correlated linearly with the symmetry energy at and below the saturation density.This linear correlation leads to the symmetry energy at the saturation density at the interval 33.0 MeV ≤ S(ρ_0) ≤ 37.0 MeV,and the symmetry energy at ρ=0.1 fm~(-3) at the interval 21.2-22.5 MeV.It is proposed that a precise measurement of the dipole mode in nuclei could set up an important constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter.

  3. Internal resonance with commensurability induced by an auxiliary oscillator for broadband energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liuyang; Tang, Lihua; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-05-01

    An internal resonance based broadband vibration energy harvester is proposed by introducing an auxiliary oscillator to the main nonlinear harvesting oscillator. Compared to conventional nonlinear energy harvesters, the natural frequencies of this two-degree-of-freedom nonlinear system can be easily adjusted to be commensurable which will result in more resonant peaks and better wideband performance. Experimental measurements and equivalent circuit simulations demonstrate that this design outperforms its linear counterpart. In addition to the open-circuit voltage, the optimal resistance to obtain the maximum power is determined. Nearly 130% increase in the bandwidth is achieved compared to the linear counterpart at an excitation level of 2 m/s2. The findings provide insight for the design of a broadband energy harvester when there is nonlinearity and internal resonance.

  4. Real ${\\mathcal L}^2$ basis-set-size scaling of energies and widths of resonance states

    CERN Document Server

    Pont, Federico M; Osenda, Omar

    2011-01-01

    The resonance states of one-particle Hamiltonians are studied using variational expansions with real basis-set functions. The resonance energies, $E_r$, and widths, $\\Gamma$, are calculated using the density of states and an ${\\mathcal L}^2$ golden rule-like formula, respectively. We present a recipe to select adequately some solutions of the variational problem. The set of approximate energies obtained show a very regular behaviour with the basis-set size, $N$. Indeed, these particular variational eigenvalues show a quite simple scaling behaviour and convergence when $N\\rightarrow \\infty$. Following the same prescription to choose particular solutions of the variational problem we obtain a set of approximate widths. Using the scaling function that characterizes the behaviour of the approximate energies as a guide, it is possible to find a very good approximation to the actual value of the resonance width.

  5. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  6. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  7. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Schreck; Annette Pietzsch; Brian Kennedy; Conny Såthe; Miedema, Piter S.; Simone Techert; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Thorsten Schmitt; Franz Hennies; Jan-Erik Rubensson; Alexander Föhlisch

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at ...

  8. Limiting Phase Trajectories and Resonance Energy Transfer in a System of Two Coupled Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Manevitch; Kovaleva, A. S.; Manevitch, L. I.

    2010-01-01

    We study a problem of energy exchange in a system of two coupled oscillators subject to 1 : 1 resonance. Our results exploit the concept of limiting phase trajectories (LPTs). The LPT, associated with full energy transfer, is, in certain sense, an alternative to nonlinear normal modes characterized by conservation of energy. We consider two benchmark examples. As a first example, we construct an LPT and examine the convergence to stationary oscillations for a Duffing oscillator subjected to r...

  9. Channel Effects in the Kinetic Energy of Fragments of Fission Induced by Low-Energy Resonance Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Blyumkina et al. have noted tfte existence ot fission channel ettects in the total kinetic energy of fragments of fission induced by s- and p-wave neutrons. Effects of this nature can also be expected in the variation of the fragment kinetic energies from resonance to resonance in low-energy (s-wave) neutron-induced fission. A fission-fragment detector whose efficiency is dependent on the kinetic energy of the fragments was used in the study of the slow-neutron-induced fission of U235. Comparing the counting-rate of this detector with a conventional fission detector, whose efficiency is independent of the fragment kinetic energy, shows that there exists a variation in the kinetic energy of certain fragments with neutron energy in the neutron energy region from 0.025 to 1 eV. In order to determine the response of the kinetic-energy-sensitive detector, it was necessary to measure the rangè-energy relations of fission fragments in various media, including noble gases and metallic foils. It was estimated from these data that the variation in the fragment kinetic energy release is ∼500 keV, for those fission events that give the lightest and most energetic of the heavy fragments. The variation in fragment kinetic energy is strongly asymmetric about the 0.28-eV resonance in U235, and suggests that the fragment kinetic energy sensitively reflects the presence of interference effects among resonances in fission. A multi-level multi-channel analysis of the data has been made, based on the parameters of Vogt and under the assumption that different fission channels lead to different configurations at scission, such that the kinetic energy release is also different. Previously a major objection to multi-level multi-channel analysis in fission has been that the parameters obtained are not unique. However, the possibility of observing partial fission cross-sections (fission occurring by way of one channel only) removes one of the ambiguities inherent in the multi

  10. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  11. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively

  12. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca-Maza, X., E-mail: xavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colò, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Li-Gang [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, ITP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sagawa, H. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Center for Mathematics and Physics, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, Wako, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  13. Taming the Yukawa potential singularity: improved evaluation of bound states and resonance energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhaidari, A D [Shura Council, Riyadh 11212 (Saudi Arabia); Bahlouli, H [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abdelmonem, M S [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-01-25

    Using the tools of the J-matrix method, we absorb the 1/r singularity of the Yukawa potential in the reference Hamiltonian, which is handled analytically. The remaining part, which is bound and regular everywhere, is treated by an efficient numerical scheme in a suitable basis using the Gauss quadrature approximation. Analysis of resonance energies and bound states spectrum is performed using the complex scaling method, where we show their trajectories in the complex energy plane and construct a video showing how bound states cross over into resonance states by varying the potential parameters. (fast track communication)

  14. Brightening Gold Nanoparticles: New Sensing Approach Based on Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Shi; Chao Jing; Zhen Gu; Yi-Tao Long

    2015-01-01

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F− ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET p...

  15. Fano resonances in high energy electron transport in nanowires of variable cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, L. M.; Kabardov, M. M.; Sharkova, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron ballistic transport in 2D quantum waveguide with two narrowings is considered. For longitudinal electron motion such narrowings play the role of effective potential barriers and conditions for resonant tunneling arise. If the electron energy is sufficiently high the electron wave can scatter into different quantum states (transverse channels of the leads) which results in complicated E-dependence of the scattering amplitudes. Numerical simulations have shown that the scattering amplitudes resonances are of Fano type. The form of the transmission probability curve is conditioned by interference of the quantum states into which the electron wave is scattered by the narrowings. The suggested interference model makes possible to find the resonance parameters with high precision and to link them to the closed resonator eigenvalues.

  16. Signal summing at energy output from superdimensional 3 cm-range resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments on summing signals from two synchronously operating resonance SHF compressors of 3 cm range with superdimensional resonators and energy output through interference switches are presented. The experiments were conducted in two compressors with cylindrical copper resonators 90 mm in diameter and 210 mm long. The resonators operated at frequency of 9.42 GHz on vibration type H01(12) and they had intrinsic quality factor of ∼ 105. Circuits of summation in a waveguide T-piece and three-decibel slot hybrid junction were considered. Amplification factor of ∼ 11 dB for summary signals was attained at the signal duration of ∼ 30 ns by level 0.5, peak power of ∼ 1 MW and the system efficiency of ∼ 30 %

  17. Effect of irradiation on bioluminescence spectrum of microbial ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation on bioluminescence spectrum of dehydrated cabbage microbial ATP was studied. The results showed that the spectral bandwidth of ATP standard was from 490 to 640 nm and the peak wavelength was at 563 nm. The spectral bandwidths of irradiated dehydrated cabbage microbial ATP and CK did not change. Peak wavelengths of dehydrated cabbage irradiated at different dosages were not significantly different from that of CK. The peaks of bioluminescence spectrum of irradiated samples were higher than that of CK, which may be because of the increasing concentration of ATP, and this effect would be kept for quite a long time after irradiation. (authors)

  18. Space application research of EMCCDs for bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao

    The detection of bioluminescense is widely used on the ground, while the detection of bioluminescence in space is still at the stage of detecting bright bioluminescense. With the rapid development of research in Space Life Sciences, it will be necessary to develop a detection technology to detect weak bioluminescense. Compared to other low-light detection techniques for ground, there are more advantages of EMCCDs for space application. Build a space bioluminescence imaging detection system, analysis the feasibility and capability of its will be significant. Co-Author:Xie Zongbao,Zheng Weibo

  19. Energy loss by resonance line photons in an absorbing medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. G.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mean path length of photons undergoing repeated scatterings in media of large optical thickness is calculated from accurate numerical solutions of the transfer equation including the effect of frequency redistribution characteristic of combined Doppler and natural broadening. Energy loss by continuous absorption processes, such as ionization or dust absorption, is discussed, and asymptotic scaling laws for the energy loss, the mean path length, and the mean number of scatterings are inferred from the numerical data.

  20. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    OpenAIRE

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson; Norma Letícia Duran

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  1. Piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum for multi-directional energy harvesting with internal resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are widely employed in vibration-based energy harvesting schemes. Simple piezoelectric cantilever for energy harvesting is uni-directional and has bandwidth limitation. In this research we explore utilizing internal resonances to harvest vibratory energy due to excitations from an arbitrary direction with the usage of a single piezoelectric cantilever. Specifically, it is identified that by attaching a pendulum to the piezoelectric cantilever, 1:2 internal resonances can be induced based on the nonlinear coupling. The nonlinear effect induces modal energy exchange between beam bending motion and pendulum motions in 3-dimensional space, which ultimately yield multidirectional energy harvesting by a single cantilever. Systematic analysis and experimental investigation are carried out to demonstrate this new concept.

  2. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load. PMID:23918165

  3. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multidimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. Specifically, the methods here utilize the existing continuous energy SCALE5 module, CENTRM, and the multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solver, NEWT to develop a new code, CENTRM()NEWT. The work here addresses specific theoretical limitations in existing CENTRM resonance treatment, as well as investigates advanced numerical and parallel computing algorithms for CENTRM and NEWT in order to reduce the computational burden. The result of the work here will be a new computer code capable of performing problem dependent self-shielding analysis for both existing and proposed GENIV fuel designs. The objective of the work was to have an immediate impact on the safety analysis of existing reactors through improvements in the calculation of fuel temperature effects, as well as on the analysis of more sophisticated GENIV/NGNP systems through improvements in the depletion/transmutation of actinides for Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives.

  4. Energy dependence of barKN interactions and resonance pole of strange dibaryons

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Kamano, Hiroyuki; Sato, Toru

    2010-01-01

    We study the resonance energy of the strange dibaryons using two models with the energy-independent and energy-dependent potentials for the s-wave barKN interaction, both of which are derived by certain reductions from the leading order term of the effective chiral Lagrangian. These potential models produce rather different off-shell behaviors of the two-body barKN - piSigma amplitudes in I=0 channel, i.e., the model with energy-independent (energy-dependent) potential predicts one (two) reso...

  5. Resonant inelastic scattering at intermediate X-ray energies

    CERN Document Server

    Hague, C F; Journel, L; Gallet, J J; Rogalev, A; Krill, G; Kappler, J P

    2000-01-01

    We describe resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) in X-ray fluorescence performed in the 3-5 keV range. The examples chosen are X-ray fluorescence MCD of FeRh and RIXS experiments performed at the L/sub 3/ edge of Ce. Fe Rh is antiferromagnetic at room temperature but has a transition to the ferromagnetic state above 400 K. The Rh MCD signal is compared with an augmented spherical wave calculation. The experiment confirms the predicted spin polarization of the Rh 4d valence states. The RIXS measurements on Ce compounds and intermetallics address the problem of mixed valency especially in systems where degeneracy with the Fermi level remains small. Examples are taken from the 2p to (4f5d) /sup +1/ followed by 3d to 2p RIXS for a highly ionic compound CeF /sub 3/ and for almost gamma -like CeCuSi. (38 refs).

  6. Convective Radial Energy Flux Due To Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Francisco Alberto; Beyer, Peter; Fuhr, Guillaume; Monnier, Arnaud; Benkadda, Sadruddin

    2014-10-01

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code (EMEDGE3D) with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m - 1 , m + 1 . French agency CNRS and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP. Projects Numbers: ANR2010-BLAN-940-01, 560491/2010-7 and 201119296-1.

  7. Study on Energy Stored in Thin Layers of MEMS Ultrasonic Resonance Separator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jie-xiong

    2006-01-01

    The particles suspending in liquid suffer acoustical radiation force from ultrasonic field. The force may cause particles movement and has special advantage to separate particles from liquid in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). It is important to improve the energy stored in liquid layer so as to increase separation ability for decreasing drive demand in MEMS. Resonance may hugely increase the magnitude and generally be employed in micro separator. The summits of admittance spectrum show the resonance frequencies. It may come from resonance in one layer or multi layers in micro separator. This paper studies the difference of energy stored in layers at each rein frequency. It provides the way to select the most effect separation frequency other than admittance spectrum.

  8. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  9. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  10. New perspectives on ultrafast Förster Resonant Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauffmann H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif violate Förster's dipole-dipole interaction picture for energy transfer in the low picosecond to sub-100 femtosecond regime. First theoretical explanations are presented.

  11. Propensity scores for prediction and characterization of bioluminescent proteins from sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescent proteins (BLPs) are a class of proteins with various mechanisms of light emission such as bioluminescence and fluorescence from luminous organisms. While valuable for commercial and medical applications, identification of BLPs, including luciferases and fluorescent proteins (FPs), is rather challenging, owing to their high variety of protein sequences. Moreover, characterization of BLPs facilitates mutagenesis analysis to enhance bioluminescence and fluorescence. Therefore, this study proposes a novel methodological approach to estimating the propensity scores of 400 dipeptides and 20 amino acids in order to design two prediction methods and characterize BLPs based on a scoring card method (SCM). The SCMBLP method for predicting BLPs achieves an accuracy of 90.83% for 10-fold cross-validation higher than existing support vector machine based methods and a test accuracy of 82.85%. A dataset consisting of 269 luciferases and 216 FPs is also established to design the SCMLFP prediction method, which achieves training and test accuracies of 97.10% and 96.28%, respectively. Additionally, four informative physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids are identified using the estimated propensity scores to characterize BLPs as follows: 1) high transfer free energy from inside to the protein surface, 2) high occurrence frequency of residues in the transmembrane regions of the protein, 3) large hydrophobicity scale from the native protein structure, and 4) high correlation coefficient (R = 0.921) between the amino acid compositions of BLPs and integral membrane proteins. Further analyzing BLPs reveals that luciferases have a larger value of R (0.937) than FPs (0.635), suggesting that luciferases tend to locate near the cell membrane location rather than FPs for convenient receipt of extracellular ions. Importantly, the propensity scores of dipeptides and amino acids and the identified properties facilitate efforts to predict, characterize, and apply BLPs

  12. Luminescence resonance energy transfer from an upconverting nanoparticle to a fluorescent phycobiliprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Naccache, Rafik; Morgan, Christopher G.; Capobianco, John A.

    2010-07-01

    Water dispersible upconverting polyethylenimine (PEI)-capped NaYF4 nanoparticles co-doped with trivalent erbium (Er3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) were prepared via solvothermal synthesis with an 18 nm average particle diameter. These upconverting nanoparticles can be used to sensitize a light-harvesting phycobiliprotein (R-Phycoerythrin) via luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET).

  13. Studies of energy transfer processes in triplet states using optically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewellyn, M.T.

    1977-06-01

    The techniques of both continuous wave and pulsed-coherent optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy are used to study energy transfer processes in the lowest triplet states of two aromatic molecular crystals (1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene and pyrimidine). Of particular interest are the effects of crystal dimensionality and isotopic trap states on the efficiency of the transfer process in these systems.

  14. Forster resonance energy transfer rate in any dielectric nanophotonic medium with weak dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study FRET and spontaneous emission in arbitrary nanophotonic media with weak dispersion and weak absorption in the frequency overlap r...

  15. Direct observation of resonance tryptophan-to-chromophore energy transfer in visible fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, NV; Borst, JW; Hink, MA; van Hoek, A; Visser, AJWG

    2005-01-01

    Visible fluorescent proteins from Aequorea victoria contain next to the fluorophoric group a single tryptophan residue. Both molecules form a single donor-acceptor pair for resonance energy transfer (RET) within the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments using tryptophan excitation have sho

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  17. Förster resonance energy transfer by formation of a mechanically interlocked [2]rotaxane

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoshi, T.; Yamafuji, D.; Yamagishi, T.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    A[2]rotaxane has been constructed from a di-pyrene appended pillar[5]arene wheel, a pyridinium axle, and a perylene stopper. It shows efficient Forster resonance energy transfer from pyrene to perylene by formation of a mechanically interlocked [2]rotaxane.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  19. Magnetic resonance as a channel of directed transmission of electromagnetic energy in animate nature

    CERN Document Server

    Fursa, E Y

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of magnetic resonance (either NMR or ESR) is a responce of atomic (molecular) system to the external electromagnetic effect. Electrons and nuclei, which possess magnetic moment, are the "magnetic antennas" in the biosystem "human being". They are able to receive (radiate) electromagnetic energy selectively in coordinates $H$ (magnetic field), $\

  20. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hoke, Eric T.

    2010-02-11

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  1. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C and 12,13C(6Li,d)16,17O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13C and 15-30 keV for 16O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θd = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility

  2. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  3. Steady-State Oscillations in Resonant Electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvesters

    OpenAIRE

    Blokhina, Elena; Galayko, Dimitri; Basset, Philippe; Feely, Orla

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a formal analysis and description of the steady-state behavior of an electrostatic vibration energy harvester operating in constant-charge mode and using different types of electromechanical transducers. The method predicts parameter values required to start oscillations, allows a study of the dynamics of the transient process, and provides a rigorous description of the system, necessary for further investigation of the related nonlinear phenomena and for the optimis...

  4. Resonance Energies, Absorption Oscillator Strengths and Ionization Potentials for the Element Hassium (Z=108)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-Guang; DONG Chen-Zhong; DING Xiao-Bin

    2007-01-01

    @@ On the basis of successfully predicting low-lying energy levels for the element fermium (Z = 100), we calculate the resonance energies, absorption oscillator strengths and the first ionization potential of the element hassium (Z = 108) by taking important relativistic and improved electron correlation effects into account using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. These calculations are carried out with the aim of assisting experimental investigations of hassium.

  5. Isoscalar quadratic energy weighted sum rules and quadrupole moment of giant quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoscalar sum rules homogeneous quadratic in energy weighting are derived for the electric multipole operators. Except for scaling factors the sum rule values for the pure quadrupole and monopole transitions are the same as that for the corresponding linear energy weighted sum rules. Through these sum rules the electric quadrupole moment of giant quadrupole resonance is found to be -2.7 Asup(1/3) efm2. (author)

  6. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  7. Quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer by monitoring sensitized emission in living plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Mareike Müller; Helena eGalliardt; Jessica eSchneider; George Barisas, B.; Thorsten eSeidel

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) describes excitation energy exchange between two adjacent molecules typically in distances ranging from 2 to 10 nm. The process depends on dipole-dipole coupling of the molecules and its probability of occurrence cannot be proven directly. Mostly, fluorescence is employed for quantification as it represents a concurring process of relaxation of the excited singulet state S1 so that the probability of fluorescence decreases as the probability of FR...

  8. Filtering and deconvolution for bioluminescence imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to analysis of bioluminescence images applied to the small animal. This kind of imaging modality is used in cancerology studies. Nevertheless, some problems are related to the diffusion and the absorption of the tissues of the light of internal bioluminescent sources. In addition, system noise and the cosmic rays noise are present. This influences the quality of the images and makes it difficult to analyze. The purpose of this thesis is to overcome these disturbing effects. We first have proposed an image formation model for the bioluminescence images. The processing chain is constituted by a filtering stage followed by a deconvolution stage. We have proposed a new median filter to suppress the random value impulsive noise which corrupts the acquired images; this filter represents the first block of the proposed chain. For the deconvolution stage, we have performed a comparative study of various deconvolution algorithms. It allowed us to choose a blind deconvolution algorithm initialized with the estimated point spread function of the acquisition system. At first, we have validated our global approach by comparing our obtained results with the ground truth. Through various clinical tests, we have shown that the processing chain allows a significant improvement of the spatial resolution and a better distinction of very close tumor sources, what represents considerable contribution for the users of bioluminescence images. (author)

  9. Microtiter plate tests for segregation of bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkus, Remigijus; Meškienė, Rita; Ledas, Žilvinas; Baronas, Romas; Meškys, Rolandas

    2016-02-01

    It has been recently shown that bioluminescence imaging can be usefully applied to provide new insights into bacterial self-organization. In this work we employ bioluminescence imaging to record images of nutrient rich liquid cultures of the lux-gene reporter Escherichia coli in microtiter plate wells. The images show that patterns of inhomogenous bioluminescence form along the three-phase contact lines. The paper analyzes the dependencies of the average number of luminous aggregates (clouds) on various environmental factors. In particular, our results show that optimal (neutral) pH and high aeration rates determine the highest mean number of clouds, and that spatiotemporal patterns do not form in the pH buffered suspensions. In addition, a sigmoidal (switch-like) dependence of the number of aggregates on the rate of aeration was observed. The obtained bioluminescence imaging data was interpreted by employing the Keller-Segel-Fisher (KSF) model of chemotaxis and logistic growth, adapted to systems of metabolically flexible (two-state) bacteria. The modified KSF model successfully simulated the observed switch-like responses. The results of the microtiter plate tests and their simulations indicate that the segregation of bacteria with different activities proceeds in the three-phase contact line region. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26039821

  10. The influence of SHFEMF on bioluminescence of V. Harveyi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of bacteria V. harveyi grown on agar medium to 7 HHz electromagnetic field changes the intensity of their luminescence. It is suggested that the dynamics of the luminescence change reflects the adaptation processes in the microorganisms which accompany the electromao.netic field effect. The changes observed may be attributed to the temperature dependence of bioluminescence

  11. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. ► ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. ► ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. ► ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  12. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  13. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  14. Resonance capture reactions with a total energy detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of nuclear reaction rates is considered; the Moxon--Rae detector and pulse height weighting are reviewed. This method has been especially useful in measuring (n,γ) cross sections. Strength functions and level spacing can be derived from (n,γ) yields. The relevance of neutron capture data to astrophysical nucleosynthesis is pointed out. The total gamma energy detection method has been applied successfully to radiative neutron capture cross section measurements. A bibliography of most of the published papers reporting neutron capture cross sections measured by the pulse height weighting technique is included. 55 references

  15. MEMS fabricated energy harvesting device with 2D resonant structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Wang, Fei; Triches, Marco;

    This paper reports on a MEMS energy harvester able to generate power from two perpendicular ambient vibration directions. CYTOP polymer is used both as the electret material for electrostatic transduction and as a bonding interface for low-temperature wafer bonding. With final chip size of ~1 cm2......, an output power of 32.5 nW is reached with an external load of 17 MΩ, under a harmonic source motion with acceleration RMS amplitude 0.03 g (0.3 m/s2) and frequency 179 Hz....

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  17. Control of subsynchronous resonant modes in a series compensated system through superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, A.H.M.A.; Mohammad, A.M.; Khan, M.R. [Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-03-01

    A simple and novel strategy for damping subsynchronous resonant oscillations through control of converter firing angles of a superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) is proposed. The strategy is derived such that the current injected or drawn by the SMES compensates for any deviation in real and reactive power in the system. The proposed control has been tested on the IEEE second benchmark model for subsynchronous resonance studies. It has been found to eliminate the slowly growing transients resulting from the unstable modes very effectively. The control algorithm is simple and its realization will require very little hardware.

  18. Neural Network for mass reconstruction of resonance particle with missing energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子平

    1996-01-01

    Neural Network can be designed to reconstruct the mass of resonance particle with large missing energy.Taking the Higgs particle search through decaying channel H0→T+T-→eμx and H0→W+W-(ZZ)→llvv at LHC collider(√s=16TeV)as examples,neural network correctly reconstructs its mass with right peak position and better width than conventional method.The network also possesses the capability of suppressing background events.This kind of neural network can be widely used in new particle searc and precise mass measurent of resonance particle.

  19. Polydiacetylene Liposomal Aequorin Bioluminescent Device for Detection of Hydrophobic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryoko; Takegami, Shigehiko; Konishi, Atsuko; Horikawa, Hikari; Yonezawa, Sayumi; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a polydiacetylene liposomal aequorin bioluminescent device (PLABD) that functioned through control of the membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions was developed for detecting hydrophobic compounds. In the PLABD, aequorin was encapsulated in an internal water phase and a calcium ionophore (CI) was contained in a hydrophobic region. Membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions across the CI was suppressed by polymerization between diacetylene molecules. On addition of an analyte, the membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions across the CI increased, and Ca(2+) ions from the external water phase could diffuse into the internal water phase via the CI, which resulted in bioluminescence of the aequorin. Lidocaine, procaine, and procainamide were used as model compounds to test the validity of the detection mechanism of the PLABD. When each analyte was added to a suspension of the PLABD, bioluminescence from the aequorin in the PLABD was observed, and the level of this bioluminescence increased with increasing analyte concentration. There was a linear relationship between the logarithm of the analyte concentration and the bioluminescence for all analytes as follows: R = 0.89 from 10 nmol L(-1) to 10 mmol L(-1) for lidocaine, R = 0.66 from 10 nmol L(-1) to 100 μmol L(-1) for procaine, and R = 0.74 from 100 nmol L(-1) to 100 μmol L(-1) for procainamide. Compared to the traditional colorimetric method using polydiacetylene liposome, the PLABD was superior for both the sensitivity and dynamic range. Thus, PLABD is a valid, simple, and sensitive signal generator for detection of hydrophobic compounds that interact with PLABD membranes. PMID:27146598

  20. Performance optimization of total momentum filtering double-resonance energy selective electron heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ze-Min; Chen, Lin-Gen; Ge, Yan-Lin; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model for energy selective electron (ESE) heat pumps operating with two-dimensional electron reservoirs is established in this study. In this model, a double-resonance energy filter operating with a total momentum filtering mechanism is considered for the transmission of electrons. The optimal thermodynamic performance of the ESE heat pump devices is also investigated. Numerical calculations show that the heating load of the device with two resonances is larger, whereas the coefficient of performance (COP) is lower than the ESE heat pump when considering a single-resonance filter. The performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps in the total momentum filtering condition are generally superior to those with a conventional filtering mechanism. In particular, the performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps considering a conventional filtering mechanism are vastly different from those of a device with total momentum filtering, which is induced by extra electron momentum in addition to the horizontal direction. Parameters such as resonance width and energy spacing are found to be associated with the performance of the electron system.

  1. A Wireless Magnetic Resonance Energy Transfer System for Micro Implantable Medical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the magnetic resonance coupling principle, in this paper a wireless energy transfer system is designed and implemented for the power supply of micro-implantable medical sensors. The entire system is composed of the in vitro part, including the energy transmitting circuit and resonant transmitter coils, and in vivo part, including the micro resonant receiver coils and signal shaping chip which includes the rectifier module and LDO voltage regulator module. Transmitter and receiver coils are wound by Litz wire, and the diameter of the receiver coils is just 1.9 cm. The energy transfer efficiency of the four-coil system is greatly improved compared to the conventional two-coil system. When the distance between the transmitter coils and the receiver coils is 1.5 cm, the transfer efficiency is 85% at the frequency of 742 kHz. The power transfer efficiency can be optimized by adding magnetic enhanced resonators. The receiving voltage signal is converted to a stable output voltage of 3.3 V and a current of 10 mA at the distance of 2 cm. In addition, the output current varies with changes in the distance. The whole implanted part is packaged with PDMS of excellent biocompatibility and the volume of it is about 1 cm3.

  2. Energy scavenging from acousto-elastic metamaterial using local resonance phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Riaz U.; Adiba, Afifa; Banerjee, Sourav

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES) utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM) and use them in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester), simultaneously. Concurrent wave filtering and energy harvesting mechanism is previously presented using local resonance phenomenon in phononic crystal, however energy harvesting capabilities of AEMM is not reported extensively. Traditionally acoustic metamaterials are used in filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this work presents that the trapped dynamic energy inside the soft constituent (matrix) of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell model, we asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies maximum power in the micro Watts (~36μW) range can be generated, which is significantly higher than the existing harvesters of same kind. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. In this work we propose sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a broadband energy scavenger (ES) with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties.

  3. Classification of vibrational resonances in the energy spectrum of the formaldehyde molecule and Katz's branch points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. D.; Duchko, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory of high orders and the algebraic Padé-Hermite approximants are used to determine the singular points of a vibrational energy function of the formaldehyde molecule dependent on a complex perturbation parameter as on the argument. It is shown that the Fermi, Darling-Dennison, and other higher-order vibrational resonances are related to Katz's points—common branch points on the complex plane of the energy of two vibrational states. Analysis of Katz's points that connect different vibrational states allows one to reveal essential resonance perturbations, to introduce an additional classification for them, and to determine the polyad structure of an energy spectrum.

  4. Resonant energy transfer between Eu luminescent sites and their local geometry in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eu-doped GaN is a solid state material with promising features for quantum manipulation. In this study, we investigate the population dynamics of Eu in ions in this system by resonant excitation. From differences in the emission related to transitions between the 5D0 and 7F2 manifold in the Eu ions, we can distinguish different luminescence sites and observe that a resonant energy transfer takes place between two of these sites which are in proximity of each other. The time constants related to this energy transfer are on the order of 100 μs. By using different substrates, the energy transfer efficiency could be strongly altered, and it is demonstrated that the coupling between ions has an out-of-plane character. Based on these results, a microscopic model of this combined center is presented

  5. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  6. Broadband vibration energy harvesting by application of stochastic resonance from rotational environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Kaizuka, T.; Su, D.; Nakano, K.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    A model for energy harvesting from a rotating automotive tyre is suggested in which the principle of stochastic resonance is advantageously exploited. A bistable response characteristic is obtained by recourse a small harvester comprising a magnetically repellant configuration in which an instrumented cantilever beam can flip between two physical response states when suitably excited by the rotation of a car wheel into which it is fitted. The rotation of the wheel creates a periodic modulation which enables stochastic resonance to take place and as a consequence of this for energy to be harvested from road noise transmitted through the tyre. An optimised mathematical model of the system is presented based on a series of experimental tests and it is shown that a ten-fold increase in harvested energy over a comparable monostable case is feasible. The suggested application for this harvester is to provide electrical power for a tyre pressure monitoring system.

  7. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  8. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    resonators storing mechanical energy. These resonators are evanescently coupled by the surface. The dispersion diagram is presented and shows very low group velocities as the wave vector approaches the limit of the first Brillouin zone. ©2009 American Institute of Physics......It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...

  9. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  10. Precise beam energy measurement using resonant spin depolarization in the SOLEIL storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The average electron beam energy for the operational mode of 400 mA in 416 bunches in the SOLEIL storage ring was measured to be 2.73724±0.00016 GeV with an accuracy of 5.9×10−5 using the method of resonant spin depolarization (RSD). A Touschek-dominated electron beam was excited using a shaker magnet, and the beam polarization and depolarization were monitored using the change in beam lifetime and beam loss rate. To establish the primary condition that is required to perform energy measurement using the RSD method, the radiative beam polarization was first simulated using the SLIM beam dynamics code and then measured using the relative increase of beam lifetime for a Touschek-dominated electron beam. With a fast frequency sweep rate, the main depolarization resonance to be used to extract the beam energy, along with sidebands within the range of frequency sweep, was identified during our first trials. Sweeping the frequency of the excitation field around the main resonance with a slower frequency sweep rate, the beam energy measurement accuracy was increased from 1.7×10−4 to 5.9×10−5. Finally, the effects of closed orbit distortions on the radiative polarization and measured energy accuracy are discussed.

  11. Power Take-Off with Integrated Resonator for Energy Extraction from Linear Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    resonate with the waves. The invention relates to the field of energy-harvesting from energy sources, where the energy-harvesting requires the extraction of energy from slow and often irregular reciprocating motion of bodies. The present invention relates to a wave power apparatus for converting power......The invention relates to a magnetic gear for converting linear motion into rotational motion and vice versa. The present invention converts slow linear irregular oscillating motion of wave energy devices into torque on a high speed shaft for powering a generator while making the wave energy device...... of sea or ocean waves into useful energy, such as electricity. The invention relates to the control and operation of a magnetic gear based motor/generator system. The invention provides a high force density electric powered linear actuator....

  12. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  13. Validation of constitutively expressed bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a rapid microbiological quantification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Naseby, D C

    2015-06-15

    Whole cell biosensors have been extensively used for monitoring toxicity and contamination of various compounds and xenobiotics in environmental biology and microbial ecology; their application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries has been limited. According to several pharmacopoeias, pharmaceutical products must be tested for microbial activity using traditional viable count techniques; the use of whole cell microbial biosensors potentially provides an alternative, fast, and efficient method. However there is a lack of a validated bioluminescence method. Prototype whole cell microbial biosensors have already been developed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Validation of the bioluminescent strains was performed in accordance with the pharmacopoeia, Parenteral Drug Association and International Organisation of Standardisation. These strains demonstrated that the bioluminescent method was accurate, precise and equivalent, as compared with plate counting at a range of 10(3)-10(7) CFU/mL. Percentage recoveries using the bioluminescent method were between 70% and 130% for all bioluminescent strains and therefore the bioluminescent method was accurate according to the criteria set in PDA technical report 33. The method was also more precise (relative standard deviation less than 15%) than the traditional plate counting method or the ATP bioluminescent method. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) CFU/mL. Two-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the traditional plate counting and the novel bioluminescent method for all bioluminescent strains. The bioluminescent constructs passed/exceeded pharmacopoeia-specified criteria for range, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and equivalence. PMID:25618377

  14. BLProt: Prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar

    2011-08-17

    Background: Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence.Results: In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated.Conclusion: BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. 2011 Kandaswamy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  16. Three new low-energy resonances in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanna, F; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Böltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Prati, P; Scott, D A; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2015-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between $^{20}$Ne and $^{27}$Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400\\,keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7\\,keV are reported. Their resonance strengths have been derived with 2-7\\% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances have been greatly reduced. Data were taken using a windowless $^{22}$Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National I...

  17. Spectral energy analysis of locally resonant nanophononic metamaterials by molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Hossein; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2016-02-01

    A nanophononic metamaterial is a new type of nanostructured material that features an array, or a forest, of intrinsically distributed resonating substructures. Each substructure exhibits numerous local resonances, each of which may hybridize with the phonon dispersion of the underlying host material, causing significant reductions in the group velocities and consequently a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. In this Rapid Communication, molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate both the dynamics and the thermal transport properties of a nanophononic metamaterial configuration consisting of a freely suspended silicon membrane with an array of silicon nanopillars standing on the surface. The simulations yield results consistent with earlier lattice-dynamics-based predictions which showed a reduction in the thermal conductivity due to the presence of the local resonators. Using a spectral energy density approach, in which only simulation data are utilized and no a priori information on the nanostructure resonant phonon modes is provided, we show direct evidence of the existence of resonance hybridizations as an inherent mechanism contributing to the slowing down of thermal transport in the host medium.

  18. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, F.; Depalo, R.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless 22Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars.

  19. On the generation of resonance cross sections in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 fuel lattice unit cell using the WIMS lattice code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different physical and mathematical models and methods for calculating the resonance group constants or cross sections from resonance integrals in the resonance region of the neutron energy spectrum has been reviewed. The methods as outlined in the WIMS lattice program were used to calculate effective resonance cross sections for unit cell calculations of the five-region fuel lattice of the Ghana Research Reactor-1, using WIMSPC, the PC version of the versatile WIMSD/4 lattice code. The Ludwig Boltzmann multigroup neutron transport equation was solved for this exercise using the discrete ordinate spatial model (DSN) which provides solution to the differential form of the transport equation by the Carlson-Sn approach for the 13 different resonance energy groups defined in the WIMS code. The resonance escape probability, flux depression factors corrected for resonance absorption and evaluated correction factors to the resonance cross sections due to the depression of the neutron flux for the 13 resonance energy groups were also calculated

  20. Bond Energy Sums in Benzene, Cyclohexatriene and Cyclohexane Prove Resonance Unnecessary

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    The recent new structure of benzene shows that it consists of three C atoms of radii as in graphite alternating with three C atoms with double bond radii. This is different from the hypothetical cyclohexatriene (Kekule structure) involving alternate double and single bonds. It was shown that the difference in the bond energy sum of the atomic structure of benzene from that of the Kekule structure is the energy (erroneously) assumed to be due to resonance. Here it is shown that the present structure of benzene also explains the energy of hydrogenation into cyclohexane and its difference from that of cyclohexatriene.

  1. Resonance properties of low-energy electron beams radiation in a two-layer waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is obtained an approximation formula for low-energy impedance of a two-layer cylindrical waveguide, allowing the construction of explicit expressions for the space-time functions that characterize the radiation of a charged particle in the waveguide. The general laws of evolution of impedance and wake potentials with increasing particle energy and with the change of geometric and electrodynamic parameters of the waveguide are obtained. The settings of waveguides convenient for experimental research and having the resonance properties at energies of 20 MeV are revealed

  2. Nanophotonic Control of the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Ad;

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS is...... controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply a...

  3. Resonance Energy Transfer in Hybrid Devices in the Presence of a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima;

    2014-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature, nonradiative resonant energy transfer from InGaN/GaN quantum wells to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals separated by aluminum oxide layers of different thicknesses. Nonradiative energy transfer from the quantum wells to the nanocrystals at separation distances of up to...... approximately 10 nm was observed. By comparing the carrier dynamics of the quantum wells and the nanocrystals, we found that nonradiative recombination via surface states, generated during dry etching of the wafer, counteracts the nonradiative energy-transfer process to the nanocrystals and therefore decreases...

  4. Non-Resonant Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting Utilizing Phase Transformation in Relaxor Ferroelectric Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Finkel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in phase transition transduction enabled the design of a non-resonant broadband mechanical energy harvester that is capable of delivering an energy density per cycle up to two orders of magnitude larger than resonant cantilever piezoelectric type generators. This was achieved in a [011] oriented and poled domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal, mechanically biased to a state just below the ferroelectric rhombohedral (FR-ferroelectric orthorhombic (FO phase transformation. Therefore, a small variation in an input parameter, e.g., electrical, mechanical, or thermal will generate a large output due to the significant polarization change associated with the transition. This idea was extended in the present work to design a non-resonant, multi-domain magnetoelectric composite hybrid harvester comprised of highly magnetostrictive alloy, [Fe81.4Ga18.6 (Galfenol or TbxDy1-xFe2 (Terfenol-D], and lead indium niobate–lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. A small magnetic field applied to the coupled device causes the magnetostrictive element to expand, and the resulting stress forces the phase change in the relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. We have demonstrated high energy conversion in this magnetoelectric device by triggering the FR-FO transition in the single crystal by a small ac magnetic field in a broad frequency range that is important for multi-domain hybrid energy harvesting devices.

  5. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibration energy harvesting is now receiving more interest as a means for powering intelligent wireless sensor systems. In this paper, a resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH) employing double cantilever to convert low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy is presented. The VEH is made up of two cantilever beams, a coil, and magnetic circuits. The electric output performances of the proposed electromagnetic VEH have been investigated. With the enhancement of turns number N, the optimum peak power of electromagnetic VEH increases sharply and the resonance frequency deceases gradually. When the vibration acceleration is 0.5 g, we obtain the optimum output voltage and power of 9.04 V and 50.8 mW at frequency of 14.9 Hz, respectively. In a word, the prototype device was successfully developed and the experimental results exhibit a great enhancement in the output power and bandwidth compared with other traditional electromagnetic VEHs. Remarkably, the proposed resonant electromagnetic VEH have great potential for applying in intelligent wireless sensor systems

  6. Influence of the symmetry energy on the giant monopole resonance of neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Centelles, M; Roca-Maza, X; Sharma, B K; Stevenson, P D; Viñas, X

    2009-01-01

    We explore the influence of the density dependence of the symmetry energy on the average excitation energy of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) in stable and exotic neutron-rich nuclei. To this end we use the relativistic mean field model supplemented by an isoscalar-isovector meson coupling which allows precise control of the density content of the symmetry energy without compromising the success of the model for binding energies and charge radii. The range considered for the density dependence of the symmetry energy roughly covers that associated with the expected uncertainty in the measurement of the neutron radius in 208Pb in the upcoming PREX experiment. We obtain the average excitation energy of the GMR by applying the relativistic extended Thomas-Fermi theory in scaling and constrained calculations. These semiclassical estimates are in good agreement with the results obtained in full RPA calculations. The analysis is performed along the Pb and Zr isotopic chains. In the scaling calculations ...

  7. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Moyet, Richard; Rossetti, George A., E-mail: george.rossetti-jr@uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Stace, Joseph; Amin, Ahmed [Sensors and Sonar Systems Department, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Newport, Newport, Rhode Island 02841 (United States); Finkel, Peter [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]{sub C}-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequency up-conversion.

  8. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes

  9. Electronic Couplings for Resonance Energy Transfer from CCSD Calculations: From Isolated to Solvated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Scalmani, Giovanni

    2015-11-10

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of electronic couplings provide great insights for the study of resonance energy transfer (RET). However, most of these calculations rely on approximate QM methods due to the computational limitations imposed by the size of typical donor-acceptor systems. In this work, we present a novel implementation that allows computing electronic couplings at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of theory. Solvent effects are also taken into account through the polarizable continuum model (PCM). As a test case, we use a dimer of indole, a common model system for tryptophan, which is routinely used as an intrinsic fluorophore in Förster resonance energy transfer studies. We consider two bright π → π* states, one of which has charge transfer character. Lastly, the results are compared with those obtained by applying TD-DFT in combination with one of the most popular density functionals, B3LYP. PMID:26574317

  10. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie [Key laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen [Key laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Smart Sensor Engineering Center, Jiangsu R& D Center for Internet of Things, Wuxi 214315 (China)

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  11. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]C-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequency up-conversion

  12. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  13. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  14. Evaluation of statistical resonance parameters for 232Th in 4 to 41 keV energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exhaustive compilation of mean resonance parameters for 232Th isotope reported by different experimental groups, evaluators and users is presented. A set of mean resonance parameters is obtained for 232Th for use in reactor calculations by adjusting the p wave strength function as a function of energy region for a broad group structure corresponding to the already evaluated total and partial cross sections recommended in the ENDF/B-IV library in 4 to 41 keV energy region. The difficulties associated with the evaluation of mean resonance parameters for given evaluated cross sections in the unresolved resonance region are highlighted. A brief comparison of the American ENDF/B procedure and the German KEDAK procedure for the processing of the unresolved resonance data is also given. A possibility exists to explain part of the discrepancies between the calculated and the experimentally determined integral parameters to be due to the non-uniqueness of the mean resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region for the main fissile and fertile nuclides. It appears more satisfying to evaluate the mean resonance data (and hence the self-shielded cross sections) for a given multigroup structure used in reactor calculations unlike the ENDF/B convention. It is further recommended that the thick sample transmission and self-indication measurements be performed for 232Th in order to determine experimentally the self-shielded cross sections in the unresolved resonance region and to support the above mentioned evaluation of mean resonance parameters. (auth.)

  15. Coumarin meets Fluorescein : a Förster Resonance Energy Transfer enhanced Ammonia Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Widmer, S.; Dorrestijn, M.; Camerlo, A.; Korent Urek, S.; Lobnik, A.; Constable, E. C.; Housecroft, E. C.; Scherer, L J

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of an optical ammonia gas sensor, the sensing mechanism of which is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between coumarin and fluorescein. The dyes were immobilized into an organically modified silicate matrix during polymerizing methyltriethoxysilane with trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate. The resulting dye-doped xerogel films were exposed to different gaseous ammonia concentrations. A logarithmic decre...

  16. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-01-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without int...

  17. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looger Loren L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. Results An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage λ recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. Conclusion The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of inclusive pionic reaction around resonance and higher energy perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe all the inclusive pionic reactions in a variety of nuclei around the resonance region by means of a microscopic many-body calculation that evaluates reaction probabilities, followed by a Monte Carlo simulation which follows the evolution of the pions. We also make an intrusion into the higher energy domain by paying attention to the absorption mechanisms and their repercussions in exclusive single-charge exchange reactions. 27 refs., 11 figs

  19. Methodologies and formalisms of resonance energy transfer in biophysics. Application to membrane model systems

    OpenAIRE

    Luís M. S. Loura; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Manuel Prieto

    2003-01-01

    The formalisms of resonance energy transfer (RET) to a distribution of acceptors are reviewed for several geometries relevant to membranes (planar, bilayer, multilayer) and random probe distribution. Models for nonrandom probe distribution (mean concentration model, phase separation model) are presented. Selected examples of quantitative applications of RET to these systems are described. It is illustrated how information about domain size, partition coefficients, phase composition, phase sep...

  20. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained fro...

  1. Validation of capture yield calculations in the Resolved Resonance Energy Range with CONRAD code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaize, Olivier; Archier, Pascal; Becker, Bjorn; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Kopecky, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    This paper deals with the validation of the multiple scattering corrections developed in the CONRAD code for the capture yield calculations in the Resolved Resonance energy Range (RRR). In order to calculate the capture yields, analytic and stochastic calculation schemes implemented in CONRAD are described and compared with the analysis code SAMMY/SAMSMC. The results are in excellent agreement for a variety of samples. We concentrate the discussion here on 238U, 197Au and 55Mn.

  2. Validation of capture yield calculations in the Resolved Resonance Energy Range with CONRAD code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillebeeckx Peter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the validation of the multiple scattering corrections developed in the CONRAD code for the capture yield calculations in the Resolved Resonance energy Range (RRR. In order to calculate the capture yields, analytic and stochastic calculation schemes implemented in CONRAD are described and compared with the analysis code SAMMY/SAMSMC. The results are in excellent agreement for a variety of samples. We concentrate the discussion here on 238U, 197Au and 55Mn.

  3. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  4. Study on the energy dependence of spin-spin correlation in the range of diproton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coefficients of polarization correlation Csub(NN) (90 deg) at 9 values of energy in the 550-950 MeV range with absolute error less than 0.05 are measured on the beams on JINR and LINP synchrocyclotrons. Csub(NN) values at the angles of 41 deg, 69 deg, 77 deg (T=550, 610, 630 MeV) and 50 deg at other energies have been obtained. The measurement results are presented together with predictions of the Arndt phase analysis and two variants of the Hoshizaki analysis conducted before and after publishing the results of the given experiment. Energy dependence of Csub(NN) (50 deg) does not reveal noticeable peculiarities and it well agrees with all the variants of the analysis. The considered total data do not substantiate certain conclusions on resonance character in pp interaction in the investigated energy range. The structure observed in respect to Csub(NN) (90 deg, p) is the consequence of different energy dependence of amplitudes of triplet and singlet scattering and it may be interpreted as a testify to presence of resonance or as a consequence of threshold phenomena in inelastic channels in the 550-750 MeV energy range

  5. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  6. 239PU(N, f) at Resonance Energies and its Multi-Modal Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Bax, H.; Ruskov, I.; Demattè, L.

    2003-10-01

    A measurement of fission fragment total kinetic energy (TKE) and mass yield distributions Y (A,TKE) in the 239Pu(n,f) resolved resonance region has been performed applying the twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber technique. Special emphasis was devoted to cope with the strong α-activity of this isotope by an improved pile-up rejection system. Up to about 200 eV all fission resonances could be resolved and their two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution, Y(A,TKE), measured. Compared to the results on 235U(n,f), much smaller fluctuations of the fission fragment mass and TKE have been observed in the case of 239Pu. From a physical point of view such fluctuations have been expected for the fission fragment properties, because the only possible lowenergy spin states (Jπ=0+,1+) belong to well separated (about 1.25 MeV) transition state bands. Hence, it was expected to observe differences in the fission fragment mass and TKE distributions between spin 0+ and 1+ resonances. However, no spin dependence and only a slight anti-correlation of the TKE with the prompt neutron multiplicity, νp. has been found in the resolved resonance energy region above 1 eV. Within the multi-modal random neck-rupture (MM-RNR) model the Y(A,TKE) distributions have been fitted assuming three fission modes, two asymmetric and one symmetric one. The branching ratio of the two asymmetric modes shows similar fluctuations as the experimental TKE. Recently, a new theoretical approach has given a solution to the absence of pronounced fluctuations of the fission properties in the case of 239Pu. Since only one transition state is involved in the fission of 0+ and 1+ resonances with a given fission fragment distribution, no fluctuations are expected.

  7. Energy harvesting using rattleback: Theoretical analysis and simulations of spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aditya; Singla, Puneet; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the spin resonance of a rattleback subjected to base oscillations which is able to transduce vibrations into continuous rotary motion and, therefore, is ideal for applications in Energy harvesting and Vibration sensing. The rattleback is a toy with some curious properties. When placed on a surface with reasonable friction, the rattleback has a preferred direction of spin. If rotated anti to it, longitudinal vibrations are set up and spin direction is reversed. In this paper, the dynamics of a rattleback placed on a sinusoidally vibrating platform are simulated. We can expect base vibrations to excite the pitch motion of the rattleback, which, because of the coupling between pitch and spin motion, should cause the rattleback to spin. Results are presented which show that this indeed is the case-the rattleback has a mono-peak spin resonance with respect to base vibrations. The dynamic response of the rattleback was found to be composed of two principal frequencies that appeared in the pitch and rolling motions. One of the frequencies was found to have a large coupling with the spin of the rattleback. Spin resonance was found to occur when the base oscillatory frequency was twice the value of the coupled frequency. A linearized model is developed which can predict the values of the two frequencies accurately and analytical expressions for the same in terms of the parameters of the rattleback have been derived. The analysis, thus, forms an effective and easy method for obtaining the spin resonant frequency of a given rattleback. Novel ideas for applications utilizing the phenomenon of spin resonance, for example, an energy harvester composed of a magnetized rattleback surrounded by ferromagnetic walls and a small scale vibration sensor comprising an array of several magnetized rattlebacks, are included.

  8. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) are measured for position (e+) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV) krypton (6.7-400 eV) and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures are found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke [1] for e+-H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e+-H calculation by Hewitt et al. [2] supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  9. Dynamics of suspended microchannel resonators conveying opposite internal fluid flow: Stability, frequency shift and energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Yan, Han; Jiang, Hui-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of suspended microchannel resonators which convey internal flows with opposite directions are investigated. The fluid-structure interactions between the laminar fluid flow and oscillating cantilever are analyzed by comprehensively considering the effects of velocity profile, flow viscosity and added flowing particle. A new model is developed to characterize the dynamic behavior of suspended microchannel resonators with the fluid-structure interactions. The stability, frequency shift and energy dissipation of suspended microchannel resonators are analyzed and discussed. The results demonstrate that the frequency shifts induced by the added flowing particle which are obtained from the new model have a good agreement with the experimental data. The steady mean flow can cause the frequency shift and influence the stability of the dynamic system. As the flow velocity reaches the critical value, the coupled-mode flutter occurs via a Hamiltonian Hopf bifurcation. The perturbation flow resulted from the vibration of the microcantilever leads to energy dissipation, while the steady flow does not directly cause the damping which increases with the increasing of the flow velocity predicted by the classical model. It can also be found that the steady flow firstly changes the mode shape of the cantilever and consequently affects the energy dissipation.

  10. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greig, A., E-mail: amelia.greig@anu.edu.au; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  11. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N2) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N2 discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N2 added. For mixtures involving argon and N2, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N2 molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N2 mixtures, for N2 percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N2 addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N2 addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N2 addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge

  12. Impact of Anesthesia Protocols on In Vivo Bioluminescent Bacteria Imaging Results

    OpenAIRE

    Chuzel, Thomas; Sanchez, Violette; Vandamme, Marc; Martin, Stéphane; Flety, Odile; Pager, Aurélie; Chabanel, Christophe; Magnier, Luc; Foskolos, Marie; Petit, Océane; Rokbi, Bachra; Chereul, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Infectious murine models greatly benefit from optical imaging using bioluminescent bacteria to non-invasively and repeatedly follow in vivo bacterial infection. In this context, one of the most critical parameters is the bioluminescence sensitivity to reliably detect the smallest number of bacteria. Another critical point is the anesthetic approaches that have been demonstrated to impact the bioluminescence flux emission in studies with luciferase-transfected tumor cells. However, this impact...

  13. In Vivo Mouse Bioluminescence Tomography with Radionuclide-Based Imaging Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yujie; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Bao, Qinan; Stout, David; Herschman, Harvey; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bioluminescence imaging, especially planar bioluminescence imaging, has been extensively applied in in vivo preclinical biological research. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has the potential to provide more accurate imaging information due to its 3D reconstruction compared with its planar counterpart. Methods In this work, we introduce a positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide imaging-based strategy to validate the BLT results. X-ray computed tomography, PET, spectrally ...

  14. Nuclear symmetry energy: constraints from giant quadrupole resonances and parity violating electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a basic ingredient of the nuclear equation of state: it accounts for the energy cost per nucleon to convert all protons into neutrons in symmetric nuclear matter. Experimental and theoretical efforts are being devoted to the study of observables that can shed light on the properties of the nuclear symmetry energy. We present our new results on the excitation energy and polarizability of the Isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance (IVGQR), which has been the object of new experimental investigation. We also present our theoretical analysis on the parity violating asymmetry at the kinematics of the Lead Radius Experiment (PREx) and highlight its relation with the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Most results deal with 208Pb nucleus

  15. How Does the Local Electrostatic Field Influence Emitted Wavelengths and Bioluminescent Intensities of Modified Heteroaromatic Luciferins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Williams, Quinton L; Walters, Wilbur; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-08-20

    The firefly chromophore, oxyluciferin, is in the pocket of the firefly luciferase and is surrounded by the side-chains of some amino acid residues. The charged residues produce the local electrostatic field (LEF) around the oxyluciferin. The emitted wavelengths and intensities of the oxyluciferin and its heterocyclic analogs under the LEF are examined. The common overlapping volumes of the HOMO and LUMO explain why the oscillator strengths vary under the LEF. Three average Ex change rates of the first excited energy are introduced to measure what luciferins are more sensitive to the LEF. The first excited energies and intensities in two enzymatic-like microenvironments are simulated via the LEF. The oscillator strengths and the net electric charges of the O6' and the O4 are applied to explain the experimental bioluminescent intensities. PMID:26218458

  16. Bioluminescence determination of active caspase-3 in single apoptotic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lišková, Marcela; Klepárník, Karel; Matalová, Eva; Hegrová, Jitka; Přikryl, Jan; Švandová, Eva; Foret, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2013), s. 1772-1777. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/2377 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP502/12/1285 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : apoptosis * bioluminescence * caspase-3 Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.161, year: 2013

  17. Bioluminescence imaging of estrogen receptor activity during breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Dell'Omo, Giulia; Ramachandran, Balaji; Manni, Isabella; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are known to play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development as well as in its neoplastic transformation. Although several studies highlighted the contribution of ER signaling in the breast transformation, little is known about the dynamics of ER state of activity during carcinogenesis due to the lack of appropriate models for measuring the extent of receptor signaling in time, in the same animal. To this aim, we have developed a reporter mouse model for the non-invasive in vivo imaging of ER activity: the ERE-Luc reporter mouse. ERE-Luc is a transgenic mouse generated with a firefly luciferase (Luc) reporter gene driven by a minimal promoter containing an estrogen responsive element (ERE). This model allows to measure receptor signaling in longitudinal studies by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we have induced sporadic mammary cancers by treating systemically ERE-Luc reporter mice with DMBA (9,10-dimethyl 1,2-benzanthracene) and measured receptor signaling by in vivo imaging in individual animals from early stage until a clinically palpable tumor appeared in the mouse breast. We showed that DMBA administration induces an increase of bioluminescence in the whole abdominal area 6 h after treatment, the signal rapidly disappears. Several weeks later, strong bioluminescence is observed in the area corresponding to the mammary glands. In vivo and ex vivo imaging analysis demonstrated that this bioluminescent signal is localized in the breast area undergoing neoplastic transformation. We conclude that this non-invasive assay is a novel relevant tool to identify the activation of the ER signaling prior the morphological detection of the neoplastic transformation. PMID:27069764

  18. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    OpenAIRE

    Wigdal, Susan S.; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V.; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily...

  19. Bioluminescent bacteria as indicators of chemical contamination of coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, M E; Danforth, J M; Foy, T F; Juraske, R

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of bioluminescent to total bacteria (bioluminescent ratio, BLR) as an indicator of a variety of types of anthropogenic contamination of estuarine ecosystems was evaluated through a series of laboratory and field studies. Laboratory studies indicated that the BLR of natural bacterioplankton communities was proportionally reduced in the presence of a number of contaminants including diesel fuel and saltmarsh sediments co-contaminated with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Bioluminescent ratio inhibition was observed after short-term exposure to a contaminant suggesting a physiological rather than a population response of native microbial communities. Simulated eutrophication did not suppress the BLR. Field observations of the BLR were conducted weekly for a 2-yr period in the Skidaway River estuary, Georgia, USA. These observations revealed considerable seasonal variability associated with the BLR. Bioluminescent ratios were highest during the summer (25 +/- 15%), lower in the fall (6 +/- 5%) and spring (3 +/- 2%), and near zero during the winter. Although the BLR was not significantly correlated to salinity at a single site (Skidaway River estuary), the BLR was significantly correlated with salinity when sites within the same estuary system were compared (r2 = 0.93). Variation in BLR was not correlated to standard bacteriological indicators of water quality including total and fecal coliform bacteria. Comparison of the BLR from impacted and pristine estuarine sites during the fall suggested that anthropogenically impacted sites exhibited lower BLR than predicted from salinity versus BLR relationships developed in pristine systems. These observations suggest that the BLR could be used as a simple and reliable initial indicator of chemical contamination of estuarine systems resulting from human activity. PMID:15998855

  20. Detection of a bioluminescent milky sea from space

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Steven D.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Thomas F. Lee

    2005-01-01

    On many occasions over the centuries, mariners have reported witnessing surreal nocturnal displays where the surface of the sea produces an intense, uniform, and sustained glow that extends to the horizon in all directions. Although such emissions cannot be fully reconciled with the known features of any light-emitting organism, these so-called “milky seas” are hypothesized to be manifestations of unusually strong bioluminescence produced by colonies of bacteria in association with a microalg...

  1. Mathematical Study and Numerical Simulation of Multispectral Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Weimin Han; Wenxiang Cong; Ge Wang

    2006-01-01

    Multispectral bioluminescence tomography (BLT) attracts increasingly more attention in the area of optical molecular imaging. In this paper, we analyze the properties of the solutions to the regularized and discretized multispectral BLT problems. First, we show the solution existence, uniqueness, and its continuous dependence on the data. Then, we introduce stable numerical schemes and derive error estimates for numerical solutions. We report some numerical results to illust...

  2. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  3. Bioluminescence for USP sterility testing of pharmaceutical suspension products.

    OpenAIRE

    Bussey, D M; K. Tsuji

    1986-01-01

    Bioluminescence measurement significantly improved the accuracy, sensitivity, precision, and reliability of the current visual endpoint determination for the USP sterility test and eliminated the day 7 transfer/dilution step required for testing suspension products. Thirteen strains of bacteria and fungi (representing potential contaminants in sterile products), three pharmaceutical suspension products, and four media were used in the experiment. No interference from suspension products was e...

  4. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Yujie; Tian, Jie; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT), the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs) and a priori permissible s...

  5. Bacterial bioluminescence and Gumbel statistics: From quorum sensing to correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, Domenico; Velardi, Luciano; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Talà, Adelfia; Salvatore Tredici, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We show that, in particular experimental conditions, the time course of the radiant fluxes, measured from a bioluminescent emission of a Vibrio harveyi related strain, collapse after suitable rescaling onto the Gumbel distribution of extreme value theory. We argue that the activation times of the strain luminous emission follow the universal behavior described by this statistical law, in spite of the fact that no extremal process is known to occur.

  6. Measurement of Bacterial Bioluminescence Intensity and Spectrum: Current Physical Techniques and Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2016-01-01

    : Bioluminescence is light production by living organisms, which can be observed in numerous marine creatures and some terrestrial invertebrates. More specifically, bacterial bioluminescence is the "cold light" produced and emitted by bacterial cells, including both wild-type luminescent and genetically engineered bacteria. Because of the lively interplay of synthetic biology, microbiology, toxicology, and biophysics, different configurations of whole-cell biosensors based on bacterial bioluminescence have been designed and are widely used in different fields, such as ecotoxicology, food toxicity, and environmental pollution. This chapter first discusses the background of the bioluminescence phenomenon in terms of optical spectrum. Platforms for bacterial bioluminescence detection using various techniques are then introduced, such as a photomultiplier tube, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based integrated circuit. Furthermore, some typical biochemical methods to optimize the analytical performances of bacterial bioluminescent biosensors/assays are reviewed, followed by a presentation of author's recent work concerning the improved sensitivity of a bioluminescent assay for pesticides. Finally, bacterial bioluminescence as implemented in eukaryotic cells, bioluminescent imaging, and cancer cell therapies is discussed. PMID:25981856

  7. Bioluminescence in the Ocean: Origins of Biological, Chemical, and Ecological Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widder, E. A.

    2010-05-01

    From bacteria to fish, a remarkable variety of marine life depends on bioluminescence (the chemical generation of light) for finding food, attracting mates, and evading predators. Disparate biochemical systems and diverse phylogenetic distribution patterns of light-emitting organisms highlight the ecological benefits of bioluminescence, with biochemical and genetic analyses providing new insights into the mechanisms of its evolution. The origins and functions of some bioluminescent systems, however, remain obscure. Here, I review recent advances in understanding bioluminescence in the ocean and highlight future research efforts that will unite molecular details with ecological and evolutionary relationships.

  8. Bond Energy Sums in Benzene, Cyclohexatriene and Cyclohexane Prove Resonance Unnecessary

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    The recent new structure of benzene shows that it consists of three C atoms of radii as in graphite alternating with three C atoms with double bond radii. This is different from the hypothetical cyclohexatriene (Kekule structure) involving alternate double and single bonds. It was shown that the difference in the bond energy sum of the atomic structure of benzene from that of the Kekule structure is the energy (erroneously) assumed to be due to resonance. Here it is shown that the present str...

  9. Pion-nucleus spin-flip strength at low and resonance energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections have been measured for 65 MeV π+ scattering to the 10B ground and first four excited states. The 1.74 MeV excited state results provide the first measurement of the energy dependence of the isovector spin-flip strength parameter. Our analysis indicates that the observed empirical enhancement of the isovector spin-flip strength has little or no dependence on energy at and below resonance. A mass dependence for the empirical enhancement factor may exist. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. $\\phi$ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from $\\phi N$ resonant interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, D; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The $\\phi$-meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant $\\phi N$ interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several $N^*$-like states are dynamically generated in these models around $2$ GeV, in the vicinity of the $\\phi N$ threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the $\\phi$ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the $\\bar K K$ cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to $\\phi N$) we report a $\\phi$ broadening up to about $40$-$50$ MeV, to be added to the $\\phi\\to\\bar K K$ in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about $35$ MeV at normal matter density. The $\\phi$ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole mo...

  11. Energy distribution and local fluctuations in strongly coupled open quantum systems: The extended resonant level model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Maicol A.; Bruch, Anton; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    We study the energy distribution in the extended resonant level model at equilibrium. Previous investigations [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161306 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161306; Phys. Rev. B 93, 115318 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.115318] have found, for a resonant electronic level interacting with a thermal free-electron wide-band bath, that the expectation value for the energy of the interacting subsystem can be correctly calculated by considering a symmetric splitting of the interaction Hamiltonian between the subsystem and the bath. However, the general implications of this approach were questioned [Phys. Rev. B 92, 235440 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.235440]. Here, we show that, already at equilibrium, such splitting fails to describe the energy fluctuations, as measured here by the second and third central moments (namely, width and skewness) of the energy distribution. Furthermore, we find that when the wide-band approximation does not hold, no splitting of the system-bath interaction can describe the system thermodynamics. We conclude that in general no proper division subsystem of the Hamiltonian of the composite system can account for the energy distribution of the subsystem. This also implies that the thermodynamic effects due to local changes in the subsystem cannot in general be described by such splitting.

  12. Two-dimensional resonance frequency tuning approach for vibration-based energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lin; Prasad, M. G.; Fisher, Frank T.

    2016-06-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting seeks to convert ambient vibrations to electrical energy and is of interest for, among other applications, powering the individual nodes of wireless sensor networks. Generally it is desired to match the resonant frequencies of the device to the ambient vibration source to optimize the energy harvested. This paper presents a two-dimensionally (2D) tunable vibration-based energy harvesting device via the application of magnetic forces in two-dimensional space. These forces are accounted for in the model separately, with the transverse force contributing to the transverse stiffness of the system while the axial force contributes to a change in axial stiffness of the beam. Simulation results from a COMSOL magnetostatic 3D model agree well with the analytical model and are confirmed with a separate experimental study. Furthermore, analysis of the three possible magnetization orientations between the fixed and tuning magnets shows that the transverse parallel magnetization orientation is the most effective with regards to the proposed 2D tuning approach. In all cases the transverse stiffness term is in general significantly larger than the axial stiffness contribution, suggesting that from a tuning perspective it may be possible to use these stiffness contributions for coarse and fine frequency tuning, respectively. This 2D resonant frequency tuning approach extends earlier 1D approaches and may be particularly useful in applications where space constraints impact the available design space of the energy harvester.

  13. Dynamics and coherence resonance of tri-stable energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitao, Li; Weiyang, Qin; Chunbo, Lan; Wangzheng, Deng; Zhiyong, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of energy harvesting, this paper presents a tri-stable energy harvesting device, which can realize inter-well oscillation at low-frequency base excitation and obtain a high harvesting efficiency by tri-stable coherence resonance. First, the model of a magnetic coupling tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester is established and the corresponding equations are derived. The formula for the magnetic repulsion force between three magnets is given. Then, the dynamic responses of a system subject to harmonic excitation and Gaussian white noise excitation are explored by a numerical method and validated by experiments. Compared with a bi-stable energy harvester, the threshold for inter-well oscillation to occur can be moved forward to the low frequency, and the tri-stable device can create a dense high output voltage and power at the low intensity of stochastic excitation. Results show that for a definite deterministic or stochastic excitation, the system can be optimally designed such that it increases the frequency bandwidth and achieves a high energy harvesting efficiency at coherence resonance.

  14. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  15. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  16. A deterministic and statistical energy analysis of tyre cavity resonance noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Tyre cavity resonance was studied using a combination of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis where its deterministic part was implemented using the impedance compact mobility matrix method and its statistical part was done by the statistical energy analysis method. While the impedance compact mobility matrix method can offer a deterministic solution to the cavity pressure response and the compliant wall vibration velocity response in the low frequency range, the statistical energy analysis method can offer a statistical solution of the responses in the high frequency range. In the mid frequency range, a combination of the statistical energy analysis and deterministic analysis methods can identify system coupling characteristics. Both methods have been compared to those from commercial softwares in order to validate the results. The combined analysis result has been verified by the measurement result from a tyre-cavity physical model. The analysis method developed in this study can be applied to other similar toroidal shape structural-acoustic systems.

  17. Effect of functionalization and charging on resonance energy and radial breathing modes of metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, S.; Adjizian, J.-J.; Erbahar, D.; Rio, J.; Humbert, B.; Dossot, M.; Soldatov, A.; Lefrant, S.; Mevellec, J.-Y.; Briddon, P.; Rayson, M. J.; Ewels, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    While changes in resonant Raman scattering measurements are commonly used to measure the effect of chemical functionalization on single-walled carbon nanotubes, the precise effects of functionalization on these spectra have yet to be clearly identified. In this density functional theory study, we explore the effects of functionalization on both the nanotube resonance energy and frequency shifts in radial breathing mode. Charge transfer effects cause a shift in the first Van Hove singularity spacings, and hence resonance excitation energy, and lead to a decrease in the radial breathing mode frequency, notably when the Fermi level decreases. By varying stochastically the effective mass of carbon atoms in the tube, we simulate the mass effect of functionalization on breathing mode frequency. Finally, full density functional calculations are performed for different nanotubes with varying functional group distribution and concentration using fluorination and hydrogenation, allowing us to determine overall effect on radial breathing mode and charge transfer. The results concur well with experiment, and we discuss the importance when using Raman spectroscopy to interpret experimental functionalization treatments.

  18. Nuclear Poincaré cycle synchronizes with the incident de Broglie wave to predict regularity in neutron resonance energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Makio

    2016-06-01

    In observed neutron resonances, long believed to be a form of quantum chaos, regular family structures are found in the s-wave resonances of many even-even nuclei in the tens keV to MeV region [M.Ohkubo, Phys. Rev. C 87, 014608(2013)]. Resonance reactions take place when the incident de Broglie wave synchronizes with the Poincaré cycle of the compound nucleus, which is composed of several normal modes with periods that are time quantized by inverse Fermi energy. Based on the breathing model of the compound nucleus, neutron resonance energies in family structures are written by simple arithmetic expressions using Sn and small integers. Family structures in observed resonances of 40Ca+n and 37Cl+n are described as simple cases. A model for time quantization is discussed.

  19. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Dastoor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  20. Multi-mode wide range subsynchronous resonance stabilization using superconducting magnetic energy storage unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabbani, M.G.; Devotta, J.B.X.; Elangovan, S. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a novel strategy to stabilize the torsional oscillations due to subsynchronous resonance (SSR) of a capacitor compensated power system through control of firing angles of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit. The control strategy of SMES is based on artificial neural network (ANN). The gain of the controller is generated on-line depending on the operating conditions and the type of the disturbance. The proposed method of control of SMES for power system stabilization has been tested on the IEEE first benchmark model for subsynchronous resonance studies. Dynamic simulations are performed using the non-linear system model. It has been found that the SMES unit is very effective to eliminate the slowly growing transients resulting from the unstable modes. (author)

  1. Resonant behaviour of an oscillating wave energy converter in a channel

    CERN Document Server

    Renzi, E

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the behaviour of an oscillating wave energy converter in a channel. During recent laboratory tests in a wave tank, peaks in the hydrodynamic actions on the converter occurred at certain frequencies of the incident waves. This resonant mechanism is known to be generated by the transverse sloshing modes of the channel. Here the influence of the channel sloshing modes on the performance of the device is further investigated. Within the framework of a linear inviscid potential-flow theory, application of the Green theorem yields a hypersingular integral equation for the velocity potential in the fluid domain. The solution is found in terms of a fast-converging series of Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind. The physical behaviour of the system is then analysed, showing sensitivity of the resonant sloshing modes to the geometry of the device, that concurs in increasing the maximum efficiency. Analytical results are validated with available numerical and experimental d...

  2. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l2 data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used rather

  3. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie [Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China) and School of Life Sciences and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Magnetic Resonance : Introduction, Advanced Topics and Applications to Fossil Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at an Advanced Study Institute on "Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Fossil Energy Problems," which was held at the village of Maleme, Crete, in July of 1983. As of this writing, a different popular attitude prevails from that when the ASI was proposed as far as how critical the world energy picture is. In the popular press, a panglossian attitude (the "petroleum glut" of the 80's) has replaced the jeremiads of the 70's ( a catastrophic "energy crisis"). Yet, there are certain important constants: (a) for the foreseeable future, fossil energy sources (petroleum, coal, oil shale, etc. ) will continue to be of paramount importance; and (b) science and technology of the highest order are needed to extend the fossil ener~y resource base and to utilize it in a cost-effective manner that is also environmentally acceptable. It is precisely this second item that this volume addresses. The volume introduces the phenomenology of magnetic resonance ~n a unified and detailed man...

  5. Non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for car-key applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Hehn, T.; Thewes, M.; Kuehne, I.; Frey, A.; Scholl, G.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for application in a remote car-key, to extend the lifetime of the battery or even to realize a fully energy autonomous, maintenance-free car-key product. Characteristic for a car-key are low frequency and large amplitude motions during normal daily operation. The basic idea of this non-resonant generator is to use a round flat permanent magnet moving freely in a round flat cavity, which is packaged on both sides by printed circuit boards embedded with multi-layer copper coils. The primary goal of this structure is to easily integrate the energy harvester with the existing electrical circuit module into available commercial car-key designs. The whole size of the energy harvester is comparable to a CR2032 coin battery. To find out the best power-efficient and optimal design, several magnets with different dimensions and magnetizations, and various layouts of copper coils were analysed and built up for prototype testing. Experimental results show that with an axially magnetized NdFeB magnet and copper coils of design variant B a maximum open circuit voltage of 1.1V can be observed.

  6. Resonance energy transfer in nano-bio hybrid structures can be modulated by UV laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for targeted variation of the radiation properties of quantum dots (QDs) to control the efficiency of resonance energy transfer in nanocrystal assemblies and nano-bio hybrid materials has been developed. The method is based on strong ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation of QDs and allows the extinction and luminescence spectra to be controlled and the luminescence quantum yield and decay kinetics to be varied. Water-soluble QDs have been synthesized and used for analyzing the effect of energy transfer from semiconductor nanocrystals on the photocycle of the photosensitive protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in bR–QD complexes. The UV irradiation mode has been selected in a way permitting the modulation of QD optical parameters without modification of their structure or physico-chemical properties. It is concluded that the QD interaction with bR accelerates its photocycle, but this acceleration is determined by electrostatic interactions, rather than Förster resonance energy transfer from QDs to bR. The method of UV laser irradiation of fluorescent semiconductor QDs has proven to be an efficient technique for variation of nanocrystal optical properties without affecting their structure, as well as for fine modulation of the energy transfer processes in the nanocrystal assemblies and nano-bio hybrid materials. (letter)

  7. Synchronization of circadian bioluminescence as a group-foraging strategy in cave glowworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Andrew J; Merritt, David J

    2013-07-01

    Flies of the genus Arachnocampa are sit-and-lure predators that use bioluminescence to attract flying prey to their silk webs. Some species are most common in rainforest habitat and others inhabit both caves and rainforest. We have studied the circadian regulation of bioluminescence in two species: one found in subtropical rainforest with no known cave populations and the other found in temperate rainforest with large populations in limestone caves. The rainforest species is typical of most nocturnal animals in that individuals are entrained by the light:dark (LD) cycle to be active at night; in this case, their propensity to bioluminesce is greatest at night. The dual-habitat species shows an opposite phase response to the same entrainment; its bioluminescence propensity rhythm is entrained by LD exposure to peak during the day. Nevertheless, in LD environments, individuals do not bioluminesce during the day because ambient light inhibits their bioluminescence (negative masking), pushing bioluminescence into the dark period. This unusual and unexpected phenomenon could be related to their association with caves and has been suggested to be an adaptation of the circadian system that promotes synchronization of a colony's output of bioluminescence. Here, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that individuals do synchronize their bioluminescence rhythms when in visual contact with each other. Entrainment of the bioluminescence rhythm to the biological photophase causes colony-wide synchronization, creating a daily sinusoidal rhythm of the intensity of bioluminescence in the many thousands of individuals making up a colony. This synchronization could provide a group-foraging advantage, allowing the colony to glow most brightly when the prey are most likely to be active. PMID:23575257

  8. Bi-resonant structure with piezoelectric PVDF films for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Shanshan; Crovetto, Andrea; Peng, Zhuoteng;

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a bi-resonant structure of piezoelectric PVDF films energy harvester (PPEH), which consists of two cantilevers with resonant frequencies of 15 Hz and 22 Hz. With increased acceleration, the vibration amplitudes of the two cantilever-mass structures are increased and collision...... and experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with the bi-resonant structure can generate higher power output than that of the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources at low frequency, and hence significantly improves the vibration-to- electricity...

  9. Temporal Homogenization of Linear ODEs, with Applications to Parametric Super-Resonance and Energy Harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Molei; Owhadi, Houman

    2016-04-01

    We consider the temporal homogenization of linear ODEs of the form {dot{x}=Ax+ɛ P(t)x+f(t)}, where P( t) is periodic and {ɛ} is small. Using a 2-scale expansion approach, we obtain the long-time approximation {x(t)≈ exp(At) ( Ω(t)+int_0^t exp(-A τ) f(τ) dτ )}, where {Ω} solves the cell problem {dot{Ω}=ɛ B Ω + ɛ F(t)} with an effective matrix B and an explicitly-known F( t). We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the accuracy of the approximation (over a O(ɛ^{-1})} time-scale), and show how B can be computed (at a cost independent of {ɛ}). As a direct application, we investigate the possibility of using RLC circuits to harvest the energy contained in small scale oscillations of ambient electromagnetic fields (such as Schumann resonances). Although a RLC circuit parametrically coupled to the field may achieve such energy extraction via parametric resonance, its resistance R needs to be smaller than a threshold κ proportional to the fluctuations of the field, thereby limiting practical applications. We show that if n RLC circuits are appropriately coupled via mutual capacitances or inductances, then energy extraction can be achieved when the resistance of each circuit is smaller than nκ. Hence, if the resistance of each circuit has a non-zero fixed value, energy extraction can be made possible through the coupling of a sufficiently large number n of circuits ({n≈ 1000} for the first mode of Schumann resonances and contemporary values of capacitances, inductances and resistances). The theory is also applied to the control of the oscillation amplitude of a (damped) oscillator.

  10. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Griep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies.

  11. Excited-State-Proton-Transfer-Triggered Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: from 2-Naphthylamine to Phenosafranin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Bose, Debosreeta; Sarkar, Deboleena; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2009-09-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been linearly coupled leading to an efficient pH-sensitive energy transfer from 2-naphthylamine (2NA) to a potentially bioactive cationic phenazinium dye, phenosafranin (PSF). The prototropic product produced exclusively from the photoexcited 2NA in the presence of added alkali serves as the donor for the energy transfer process. The energy transfer process is turned on at pH ≥ 12, whereas the process is turned off at a pH lower than that. Within the range of pH 12 to 13, the energy transfer efficiency (E) has been shown to follow a linear relation with the solution pH establishing the governing role of pH of the solution on the energy transfer process. The energy transfer follows a long-range dipole-dipole interaction mechanism. The critical energy transfer distance (R0) and the distance between the acceptor and the donor (r) have been determined for the ESPT-promoted FRET process at an optimum pH of 13. The present study involving the coupled processes is simple but has its implication due to its potential to be exploited for designing a pH-sensitive molecular switch.

  12. la bioluminescence de l'aequorine en réponse au calcium In vitro et dans le Cortex cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Tricoire, Ludovic

    2006-01-01

    During my PhD, I investigated in vitro the calcium-dependent bioluminescence of thephotoprotein aequorin and then used its bioluminescence to image neuronal activities in theneocortical network. This genetically encoded calcium sensor can be expressed in specific cell types and its bioluminescence is not toxic and exhibit a high signal/noise ratio.I first search for mutations modifying aequorin bioluminescence, using a randommutagenesis and in vitro evolution approach. I isolated mutants show...

  13. In vivo bioluminescence tomography with a blocking-off finite-difference SP3 method and MRI∕CT coregistration

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Alexander D.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Vider, Lena; Le, Carl; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Blasberg, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Bioluminescence imaging is a research tool for studying gene expression levels in small animal models of human disease. Bioluminescence light, however, is strongly scattered in biological tissue and no direct image of the light-emitting reporter probe’s location can be obtained. Therefore, the authors have developed a linear image reconstruction method for bioluminescence tomography (BLT) that recovers the three-dimensional spatial bioluminescent source distribution in small animals.

  14. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  15. Development of Energy Efficiency Design Map based on acoustic resonance frequency of suction muffler in compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Development of Energy Efficiency Design Map. • Experimental validation of Energy Efficiency Design Map. • Suggestion regarding the Acoustically Supercharged Energy Efficiency. • Sensitivity analysis of the Energy Efficiency Ratio with respect to acoustic pressure. • Suggestion regarding the hybrid coupling method for acoustic analysis in compressor. - Abstract: The volumetric efficiency of the Internal Combustion (IC) engine and compressor can be increased by properly adjusting the acoustic resonance frequency of the suction muffler or the suction valve timing without any additional equipment or power source. This effect is known as acoustic supercharging. However, the energy efficiency has become more important than the volumetric efficiency because of the energy shortage issue and factors influencing consumers’ purchasing decisions. Therefore, methods for increasing the energy efficiency using the acoustic effect in the suction part of IC engine and compressor should be considered. In this study, a systematic method for improving the energy efficiency using the acoustic effect in the suction part of the compressor used in refrigerators and air conditioners was developed for the first time. This effect is named as the Acoustically Supercharged Energy Efficiency (ASEE). For the ASEE, first, a hybrid coupling method was suggested for the acoustical analysis in the suction part of the compressor. Next, an Energy Efficiency Design Map (EEDM) was proposed. This can serve as a design guide for suction mufflers in terms of the energy efficiency. Finally, sensitivity analyses of the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) and total massflow rate with respect to the acoustic pressure were conducted to identify the relationship between the acoustic pressure and the suction valve motion. This provides the physical background for the EEDM

  16. Observation of resonant energy transfer between identical-frequency laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeyan, B. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Estabrook, K. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; Wharton, K. B.

    1998-12-09

    Enhanced transmission of a low intensity laser beam is observed when crossed with an identical-frequency beam in a plasma with a flow velocity near the ion sound speed. The time history of the enhancement and the dependence on the flow velocity strongly suggest that this is due to energy transfer between the beams via a resonant ion wave with zero frequency in the laboratory frame. The maximum energy transfer has been observed when the beams cross in a region with Mach 1 flow. The addition of frequency modulation on the crossing beams is seen to reduce the energy transfer by a factor of two. Implications for indirect-drive fusion schemes are discussed.

  17. Detection of Parametric Roll Resonance on Ships from Indication of Nonlinear Energy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    and pitch to roll. Both detectors have been validated against experimental data of a scale model of a container vessel excited with both regular and irregular waves. The detector based on the energy flow indicator proved to be very robust to different scenarios (regular/irregular waves) since it does......The detection of the onset of parametric roll resonance on ships is of a central importance in order to activate specific control strategies able to counteract the large roll motion. One of the main priorities is to have detectors with a small detection time, such that warnings can be issued when...... the roll oscillations are about 5◦. This paper proposes two different detection approaches: the first one based on sinusoidal detection in white gaussian noise; the second one utilizes an energy flow indicator in order to catch the onset of parametric roll based upon the transfer of energy from heave...

  18. Nanophotonic enhancement of the F\\"orster resonance energy transfer rate on single DNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ghenuche, Petru; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Nanophotonics achieves accurate control over the luminescence properties of a single quantum emitter by tailoring the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale and modifying the local density of optical states (LDOS). This paradigm could also benefit to F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) by enhancing the near-field electromagnetic interaction between two fluorescent emitters. Despite the wide applications of FRET in nanosciences, using nanophotonics to enhance FRET remains a debated and complex challenge. Here, we demonstrate enhanced energy transfer within single donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs confined in gold nanoapertures. Experiments monitoring both the donor and the acceptor emission photodynamics at the single molecule level clearly establish a linear dependence of the FRET rate on the LDOS in nanoapertures. These findings are applied to enhance the FRET rate in nanoapertures up to six times, demonstrating that nanophotonics can be used to intensify the near-field energy transfer and improve t...

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human serum albumin to a bioactive indoloquinolizine system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramita Das; Arabinda Mallick; Basudeb Haldar; Alok Chakrabarty; Nitin Chattopadhyay

    2007-03-01

    The interaction between a bioactive molecule, 3-acetyl-4-oxo-6,7-dihydro-12H indolo-[2,3-a] quinolizine (AODIQ), with human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied using steady-state absorption and fluorescence techniques. A 1 : 1 complex formation has been established and the binding constant () and free energy change for the process have been reported. The AODIQ-HSA complex results in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the tryptophan moiety of HSA to the probe. The critical energy-transfer distance (0) for FRET and the Stern-Volmer constant (sv) for the fluorescence quenching of the donor in the presence of the acceptor have been determined. Importantly, SV has been shown to be equal to the binding constant itself, implying that the fluorescence quenching arises only from the FRET process. The study suggests that the donor and the acceptor are bound to the same protein at different locations but within the quenching distance.

  20. Nuclear Symmetry Energy: constraints from Giant Quadrupole Resonances and Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Maza, X; Bortignon, P F; Brenna, M; Cao, Li-Gang; Centelles, M; Colò, G; Paar, N; Viñas, X; Vretenar, D; Warda, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical efforts are being devoted to the study of observables that can shed light on the properties of the nuclear symmetry energy. We present our new results on the excitation energy [X. Roca-Maza et al., Phys. Rev. C 87, 034301 (2013)] and polarizability of the Isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance (IVGQR), which has been the object of new experimental investigation [S. S. Henshaw et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 222501 (2011)]. We also present our theoretical analysis on the parity violating asymmetry at the kinematics of the Lead Radius Experiment [S. Abrahamyan et al. (PREx Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 112502 (2012)] and highlight its relation with the density dependence of the symmetry energy [X. Roca-Maza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 252501 (2011)].

  1. Resonant Wave Energy Converters: Small-scale field experiments and first full-scale prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Resonant Wave Energy Converter 3 (REWEC3) is a device belonging to the family of Oscillating Water Columns (OWCs), that can convert the energy of incident waves into electrical energy via turbines. In contrast to classical OWCs, it incorporates a small vertical U-shaped duct to connect the water column to the open wave field. This article shows the results of a small-scale field experiment involving a REWEC3 designed for working with a 2 kW turbine. Then, the next experimental activity on a REWEC3 installed in the NOEL laboratory with the collaboration of ENEA, is presented. Finally, the first prototype of ReWEC3 under construction in Civitavecchia (Rome, Italy) is shown. The crucial features of the construction stage are discussed and some initial performances are provided.

  2. Using bioluminescent biosensors for hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) in wastewater control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valat, C; Champiat, D; Degorce-Dumas, J R; Thomas, O

    2004-01-01

    Starting from a new approach for water pollution control and wastewater treatment plant management, the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) quality concept, the interest for the development of new rapid and sensitive methods such as bioluminescence-based methods is evident. After an introduction of the HACCP procedure, a bibliographic study of the bioluminescence potentiality is presented and discussed. PMID:14979548

  3. The rapid bioluminescence assay method for content of bacteria in dehydrated vegetable and condiment before radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial colony-forming unit (cfu) in dehydrated vegetable and condiment was determined by using ATP bioluminescence method. The result showed that bioluminescence of ATP was correlative to the microbial cfu obviously. The detecting time was within 1-2 h. This method could be applied to determine micro load of products before irradiation sterilization. (authors)

  4. Bacterial Bioluminescence: Spectral Study of the Emitters in the In Vivo Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheson, I.B.C.; Lee, J.; Muller, F.

    1981-01-01

    Transient fluorescent species are observed in the bioluminescent reactions of three reduced flavin mononucleotides with aliphatic aldehydes and oxygen, catalyzed by bacterial luciferase. In each case the fluorescence spectral distribution is similar to that of the bioluminescence but is readily dist

  5. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  6. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Impaired energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    31Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows an in vivo examination of energy metabolism. The present study was designed to evaluate whether in patients with latent hyperthyroidism alterations of muscle energy metabolism could be found similar to those observed in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. In 10 patients with overt hyperthyroidism before therapy and 20 with latent hyperthyroidism (also without therapy) and in 24 healthy volunteers magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed within a 1.5-Tesla magnet. Muscle concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP were quantified compared to an external standard solution of K2HPO4. In the patients with overt hyperthyroidism and with latent hyperthyroidism a significant decrease of phosphocreatine was found. Further, the ATP concentration in patients with latent and manifest hyperthyroidism tended towards lower values. There were no significant differences in the decrease of phosphocreatine and ATP between both patient groups. Therefore, this study for the first time shows that alterations of energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism can be measured and that they are similar to those observed in overt hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  7. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, O.G., E-mail: omr@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico); Moura, C.A., E-mail: celio.moura@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Rua Santa Adélia, 166, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil); Parada, A., E-mail: alexander.parada00@usc.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-05-11

    Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data.

  8. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Miranda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data.

  9. [Identification of high-lying odd energy levels of uranium by resonant ionization mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H; Shi, G; Huang, M; Jin, C

    2000-06-01

    Single-colour and two-colour multiphoton resonant ionization spectra of uranium atom were studied extensively with a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser atomic beam apparatus time-of-flight mass spectrometer in our laboratory. The energy locations of high-lying odd-parity levels in the region 33,003-34,264 cm-1, measured by a two-colour three-step ionization technique, were reported here. The angular momentum quantum number J was uniquely assigned for these levels by using angular momentum selection rules. PMID:12958925

  10. State-selective high-energy excitation of nuclei by resonant positron annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Belov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual γ photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including giant resonances and monopole transitions. In certain cases, it may have higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation and it can even occur with high probability when the latter is energetically forbidden.

  11. State-selective high-energy excitation of nuclei by resonant positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Nikolay A., E-mail: belov@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-02-04

    In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual γ photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including giant resonances and monopole transitions. In certain cases, it may have higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation and it can even occur with high probability when the latter is energetically forbidden.

  12. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based method for histone methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devkota, Kanchan; Lohse, Brian; Nyby Jakobsen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    A simple dye–quencher fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay for methyltransferases was developed and used to determine kinetic parameters and inhibitory activity at EHMT1 and EHMT2. Peptides mimicking the truncated histone H3 tail were functionalized in each end with a dye and a...... quencher, respectively. When lysine-9 residues in the peptides were methylated, they were protected from cleavage by endoproteinase–EndoLysC, whereas unmethylated peptides were cleaved, resulting in an increase in fluorescent intensity....

  13. Local orientational order in liquids revealed by resonant vibrational energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, M R; Shaw, D J; Ensing, B; Woutersen, S

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate that local orientational ordering in a liquid can be observed in the decay of the vibrational anisotropy caused by resonant transfer of vibrational excitations between its constituent molecules. We show that the functional form of this decay is determined by the (distribution of) angles between the vibrating bonds of the molecules between which energy transfer occurs, and that the initial drop in the decay reflects the average angle between nearest neighbors. We use this effect to observe the difference in local orientational ordering in the two hydrogen-bonded liquids ethanol and N-methylacetamide. PMID:25432055

  14. Local Orientational Order in Liquids Revealed by Resonant Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, M. R.; Shaw, D. J.; Ensing, B.; Woutersen, S.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that local orientational ordering in a liquid can be observed in the decay of the vibrational anisotropy caused by resonant transfer of vibrational excitations between its constituent molecules. We show that the functional form of this decay is determined by the (distribution of) angles between the vibrating bonds of the molecules between which energy transfer occurs, and that the initial drop in the decay reflects the average angle between nearest neighbors. We use this effect to observe the difference in local orientational ordering in the two hydrogen-bonded liquids ethanol and N -methylacetamide.

  15. Efficient Exciton Diffusion and Resonance-Energy Transfer in Multi-Layered Organic Epitaxial Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Cadelano, Michele; Quochi, Francesco;

    2015-01-01

    Multi-layered epitaxial nanofibers are exemplary model systems for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. We resort to temperature-dependent cw and picosecond photoluminescence (PL......-to-6T resonance-energy transfer efficiency, and the observed weak PL temperature dependence of the 6T acceptor material together result in an exceptionally high optical emission performance of this all-organic material system, thus making it well suited for example for organic light-emitting devices....

  16. Multiway study of hybridization in nanoscale semiconductor labeled DNA based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of the ternary-binary complex competition of a target sequence and of its two complementary probes in sandwich DNA hybridization is reported. To achieve this goal, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes (QD...... first time. Equilibrium constants illustrated that the extent of hybridization in one side on the target strand depends on hybridization conditions on the other side of the strand. Effects of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) contents of strands on the extent and rate of hybridization were investigated. In...

  17. Highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for rapid detection of clenbuterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigate the fabrication of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for the detection of clenbuterol. The nanosensor consists of CdTe quantum dots coated by clenbuterol recognizable agent naphthol and diazotized clenbuterol. Changes in maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were utilized to measure clenbuterol concentrations. The maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were found to decrease with increasing clenbuterol concentrations, following a linear correlation. We have successfully fabricated a nanosensor for detection of clenbuterol with sensitivity up to 10 pg ml−1. (paper)

  18. Highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for rapid detection of clenbuterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia Nguyen, Duc; Ngo, Trinh Tung; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    In this study we investigate the fabrication of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor for the detection of clenbuterol. The nanosensor consists of CdTe quantum dots coated by clenbuterol recognizable agent naphthol and diazotized clenbuterol. Changes in maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were utilized to measure clenbuterol concentrations. The maximal photoluminescent intensities of the nanosensor were found to decrease with increasing clenbuterol concentrations, following a linear correlation. We have successfully fabricated a nanosensor for detection of clenbuterol with sensitivity up to 10 pg ml‑1.

  19. Application of Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for a detection of DNA mutations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Datinská, Vladimíra; Klepárník, Karel; Belšánová, Barbora; Minárik, M.; Foret, František

    Grupo VLS Print Solution, 2014 - (Guzman, N.; Taveres, M.). s. 93-93 [International Symposium on Electro- and Liquid Phase-Separation Techniques /21./ and Latin-American Symposium on Biotechnology, Biomedical, Biopharmaceutical, and Industrial Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis and Microchip Technology /21./. 04.10.2014-08.10.2014, Natal] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28254S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA02010672 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : quantum dots * Förster resonance energy transfer * CE-LIF Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  20. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data

  1. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    OpenAIRE

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. ...

  2. Compartmentalization of algal bioluminescence: autofluorescence of bioluminescent particles in the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax as studied with image-intensified video microscopy and flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Compartmentalization of specialized functions to discrete locales is a fundamental theme of eucaryotic organization in cells. We report here that bioluminescence of the dinoflagellate alga Gonyaulax originates in vivo from discrete subcellular loci that are intrinsically fluorescent. We demonstrate this localization by comparing the loci of fluorescence and bioluminescence as visualized by image-intensified video microscopy. These fluorescent particles appeared to be the same as the previousl...

  3. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Josh T.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, Eric D.

    2006-07-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (λ=10.6 µm, 0.679 to 2.262 W/cm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, ωL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 W/cm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 W/cm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin and

  4. Toxicity assessment of Hanford Site wastes by bacterial bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the toxicity of the nonradioactive component of low-level wastes stored in tanks on the Hanford reservation. The use of a faster, cheaper bioassay to replace the 96 hour fish acute toxicity test is examined. The new bioassay is based on loss of bioluminescence of Photobacter phosphoreum (commonly called Microtox) following exposure to toxic materials. This bioassay is calibrated and compares well to the standard fish acute toxicity test for characterization of Hanford Wastes. 4 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs

  5. Inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on firefly luciferase bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipoic acid was found to inhibit the firefly luciferin-luciferase reaction. The inhibition is competitive and is the strongest known (Ki 0.026 ± 0.013 μM) compared with other reported inhibitors. Considering the structure-activity correlations, the mechanism of inhibition may originate from the sulfur atom and carboxyl moiety of lipoic acid giving it structural specificity. Subsequent addition of lipoic acid and nitric oxide accelerated the inhibition in vitro, suggesting that lipoic acid may have a functional role in regulating firefly bioluminescence

  6. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lv

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT, the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction.

  7. BIOLUMINESCENCE TOMOGRAPHY: BIOMEDICAL BACKGROUND, MATHEMATICAL THEORY, AND NUMERICAL APPROXIMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Han; Ce Wang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last couple of years molecular imaging has been rapidly developed to study physiological and pathological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular levels. Among molecular imaging modalities, optical imaging stands out for its unique advantages, especially performance and cost-effectiveness. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an emerging optical imaging mode with promising biomedical advantages. In this survey paper, we explain the biomedical significance of BLT, summarize theoretical results on the analysis and numerical solution of a diffusion based BLT model, and comment on a few extensions for the study of BLT.

  8. Influence of quantum dot's quantum yield to chemiluminescent resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and quantum dots (QDs, emission at 593 nm) acceptors (CRET) was investigated. The resonance energy transfer efficiencies were compared while the oil soluble QDs, water soluble QDs (modified with thioglycolate) and QD-HRP conjugates were used as acceptor. The fluorescence of QD can be observed in the three cases, indicating that the CRET occurs while QD acceptor in different status was used. The highest CRET efficiency (10.7%) was obtained in the case of oil soluble QDs, and the lowest CRET efficiency (2.7%) was observed in the QD-HRP conjugates case. This result is coincident with the quantum yields of the acceptors (18.3% and 0.4%). The same result was observed in another similar set of experiment, in which the amphiphilic polymer modified QDs (emission at 675 nm) were used. It suggests that the quantum yield of the QD in different status is the crucial factor to the CRET efficiency. Furthermore, the multiplexed CRET between luminol donor and three different sizes QD acceptors was observed simultaneously. This work will offer useful support for improving the CRET studies based on quantum dots

  9. Recent developments in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) diagnostics using quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Daniel; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2016-07-01

    The exceptional photophysical properties and the nanometric dimensions of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QD) have strongly attracted the bioanalytical community over the last approximately 20 y. In particular, the integration of QDs in the analysis of biological components and interactions, and the related diagnostics using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), have allowed researchers to significantly improve and diversify fluorescence-based biosensing. In this TRENDS article, we review some recent developments in QD-FRET biosensing that have implemented this technology in electronic consumer products, multiplexed analysis, and detection without light excitation for diagnostic applications. In selected examples of smartphone-based imaging, single- and multistep FRET, steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy, and bio/chemiluminescence detection of QDs used as both FRET donors and acceptors, we highlight the advantages of QD-based FRET biosensing for multiplexed and sensitive diagnostics. Graphical Abstract Quantum dots (QDs) can be applied as donors and/or acceptors for Förster resonance energy transfer- (FRET-) based biosensing for multiplexed and sensitive diagnostics in various assay formats. PMID:26970745

  10. Energy operator demodulating of optimal resonance components for the compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compound faults diagnosis is a challenge for rotating machinery fault diagnosis. The vibration signals measured from gearboxes are usually complex, non-stationary, and nonlinear. When compound faults occur in a gearbox, weak fault characteristic signals are always submerged by the strong ones. Therefore, it is difficult to detect a weak fault by using the demodulating analysis of vibration signals of gearboxes directly. The key to compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes is to separate different fault characteristic signals from the collected vibration signals. Aiming at that problem, a new method for the compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes is proposed based on the energy operator demodulating of optimal resonance components. In this method, the genetic algorithm is first used to obtain the optimal decomposition parameters. Then the compound faults vibration signals of a gearbox are subject to resonance-based signal sparse decomposition (RSSD) to separate the fault characteristic signals of the gear and the bearing by using the optimal decomposition parameters. Finally, the separated fault characteristic signals are analyzed by energy operator demodulating, and each one’s instantaneous amplitude can be calculated. According to the spectra of instantaneous amplitudes of fault characteristic signals, the faults of the gear and the bearing can be diagnosed, respectively. The performance of the proposed method is validated by using the simulation data and the experiment vibration signals from a gearbox with compound faults. (paper)

  11. Detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in coffee using chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun-Jung; Mun, Hyoyoung; Kim, Su-Ji; Shim, Won-Bo; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-03-01

    We report a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in roasted coffee beans. The aptamer sequences used in this study are 5'-DNAzyme-Linker-OTA aptamer-3'-dabcyl. Dabcyl at the end of the OTA aptamer region plays as a quencher in CRET aptasensor. When hemin and OTA are added, the dabcyl-labeled OTA aptamer approaches to the G-quadruplex-hemin complex by formation of the G-quadruplex-OTA complex. The G-quadruplex-hemin complexes possess horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-like activity, and therefore, the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (HRPzyme) catalyzes peroxidation in the presence of luminol and H2O2. Resonance energy transfer between luminol (donor) and dabcyl (acceptor) enables quenching of chemiluminescence signals. The signal decreases with increasing the concentration of OTA within the range of 0.1-100ngmL(-1) (limit of detection 0.22ngmL(-1)), and the level of recovery of the respective 1ngmL(-1) and 10ngmL(-1) spiked coffee samples was 71.5% and 93.3%. These results demonstrated the potential of the proposed method for OTA analysis in diverse foods. PMID:26471659

  12. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis. PMID:26807518

  13. Study of the giant multipole resonances especially of the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by medium and high energy resolution inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nucleus 208Pb giant multipole resonances up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV were looked for by medium resolution inelastic electron scattering. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of E0 = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 930 to 1650. The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. On the base of this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1-, ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0+, ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3+ giant resonance. Besides under forward angles a further weak excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV appears which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2+. At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3- resonance was found which recently is observed also in (α, α') experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also a Jsup(π) = 3- character but has to be partly assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1-, ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2+ excitation was found which gets because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI)

  14. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny F. Chou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Förster (or fluorescence resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting.

  15. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias-Garcia, A; Garcia, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C, E-mail: aiglesiasg@santafe-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (INTEC-CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, CC91, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the {Gamma} point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  16. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  17. Correlation of Resonance Charge Exchange Cross-Section Data in the Low-Energy Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1962-01-01

    During the course of a literature survey concerning resonance charge exchange, an unusual degree of agreement was noted between an extrapolation of the data reported by Kushnir, Palyukh, and Sena and the data reported by Ziegler. The data of Kushnir et al. are for ion-atom relative energies from 10 to 1000 ev, while the data of Ziegler are for a relative energy of about 1 ev. Extrapolation of the data of Kushnir et al. was made in accordance with Holstein's theory, 3 which is a combination of time-dependent perturbation methods and classical orbit theory. The results of this theory may be discussed in terms of a critical impact parameter b(sub c).

  18. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-García, A; García, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C

    2011-02-01

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the Γ point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems. PMID:21406877

  19. Measurement of energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy for resonance neutron induced fission of 235U aligned target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the experiment on measuring the energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy in resonance neutron induced fission of 235U aligned target in energy region up to 42 eV are presented. The agreement with the data of Pattenden and Postma in resonances is good enough, while the theoretical curve, calculated using the R-matrix multilevel two fission channel approach, does not seem to describe the energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy property. The necessity of taking into account the interference between levels with different spins is discussed. 11 refs., 2 figs

  20. Possibilities for polarized pulsed neutron instrumentation based on the time-of-flight spin-resonance energy filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new approach for dynamic energy filtering at spallation neutron sources, based on the original concept of the Drabkin spin-resonance flipper. The setup takes advantage of the neutron magnetic moment, and consists of a wavelength-selective magnetic resonator and a supermirror polarizer/analyzer system. We are proposing refinements (time dependence and revised magnetic field profiles) to the basic concepts of the setup, making it suitable for time-of-flight experiments at spallation neutron sources. We outline here possibilities for using this spin resonator as the core of new neutron instruments. (orig.)

  1. Resonant Structure Described by a Deep Folded Potential for the 12C+12C Scattering at Lower-Energy Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-Xu; LI Qing-Run; ZHAO Wei-Qin

    2002-01-01

    Based on the analyses of the elastic angular distributions,an energy-dependent folding potential for the 12C+12C system is established.This potential has a deep real part,and can reasonably well describe the resonant structure in the 12C+12C elastic scattering in the low-energy region of 10 ~ 70 MeV.

  2. Förster resonance energy transfer between acridinediones and selected fluorophores—Medium dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaveni, R. [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai-600113 (India); Ramamurthy, P., E-mail: prm60@hotmail.com [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai-600113 (India)

    2013-06-15

    We report highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer process between acridinedione dyes and basic fluorophores. FRET between free and β-cyclodextrin modified acridinediones as donors and fluorophoric dyes like safranine as acceptor were investigated in an alcoholic medium, polymer solution and a polymeric film. Efficiency of the processes were experimentally found by steady-state and time-resolved experiments for different donor and acceptor combinations. The associated spectral parameters viz., R{sup 0}, J(λ) were calculated, the Stern–Volmer relations based on fluorescence intensity and lifetime were constructed and the rates of energy transfer were calculated. The results indicated that the dominant mechanism responsible for the excitation energy transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole–dipole interaction and the process was found to be highly efficient when the medium was a constrained one as in the case of a polymeric film. A multifold enhancement in efficiency of energy transfer was also observed when the donor was a modified acridinedione when compared to a free acridinedione. The reason is attributed to the effective binding of the acceptor into the cavity of β-cyclodextrin. Highlights: ► FRET between acridinediones and fluorophoric acceptors were investigated. ► FRET analysis was carried out in methanol, a 5% PVA solution and in PVA matrix. ► FRET efficiency was maximum when the medium was PVA matrix. ► FRET efficiency was also more when β-CD modified ADR is used as the donor. ► Efficiency enhancement is due to the inclusion of acceptor into the cavity of β-CD.

  3. Influence of high energy phosphate metabolism in postischemic myocardial dysfunction using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recovery of left ventricular function after reperfusion is delayed in general by several hours, days or weeks and this phenomenon is known as myocardial stunning. One of the theories to explain the pathogenesis of this postischemic myocardial dysfunction is the production of not enough energy by mitochondria, leading to decreased adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) levels. We evaluated the influence of high energy phosphate metabolism in postischemic myocardial dysfunction, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction, successfully reperfused, within the first six hours from the onset of the symptoms. Twenty-nine patients were studied in the acute phase (on average four days after the onset of myocardial infarction) and 21 repeated the examination in the follow-up phase (average 39 days). Regional left ventricular function was evaluated by cine-resonance and high energy phosphate metabolism by phosphorus-31 spectroscopy, using the phosphocreatine β ATP (P Cr/βATP ratio. The existence of myocardial stunning was suggested by the improvement of the related regional contractility during the follow-up. The contractility improved in the septal wall from 2.46± 0.68 to 1.54 ± 0.78 (p<0.001), in the anteroseptal wall from 2.0 ± 0.89 to 1.40 ± 0.75 (p<0.001) and in the anterior wall from 2.37 ± 0.71 to 1.41 ± 0.59 (p<0.001). The P Cr/βATP ratio did not change from acute to follow-up phase (1.51 ± 0.17 vs. 1.53 ± 0.17; p = 0.6). This study suggests that decreased high energy phosphate metabolism after reperfusion does not have an important role in the genesis of the myocardial stunning in patients with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction. (author)

  4. Modeling the neutron spin-flip process in a time-of-flight spin-resonance energy filter

    CERN Document Server

    Parizzi, A A; Klose, F

    2002-01-01

    A computer program for modeling the neutron spin-flip process in a novel time-of-flight (TOF) spin-resonance energy filter has been developed. The software allows studying the applicability of the device in various areas of spallation neutron scattering instrumentation, for example as a dynamic TOF monochromator. The program uses a quantum-mechanical approach to calculate the local spin-dependent spectra and is essential for optimizing the magnetic field profiles along the resonator axis. (orig.)

  5. Investigations and system design for simultaneous energy and data transmission through inductively coupled resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Lloret Fuentes, E.; Buchholz, M.

    2015-11-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) with simultaneous data transmission through coupled magnetic resonators is investigated in this paper. The development of this system is dedicated to serve as a basis for applications in the field of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), for example tracking vital parameters remotely, charge and control sensors and so on. Due to these different scenarios we consider, it is important to have a system which is reliable under the circumstance of changing positioning of the receiving device. State of the art radio systems would be able to handle this. Nevertheless, energy harvesting from far field sources is not sufficient to power the devices additionally on mid-range distances. For this reason, coupled magnetic resonant circuits are proposed as a promising alternative, although suffering from more complex positioning dependency. Based on measurements on a simple prototype system, an equivalent circuit description is used to model the transmission system dependent on different transmission distances and impedance matching conditions. Additionally, the simulation model is used to extract system parameters such as coupling coefficients, coil resistance and self-capacitance, which cannot be calculated in a simple and reliable way. Furthermore, a mathematical channel model based on the schematic model has been built in MATLAB©. It is used to point out the problems occurring in a transmission system with variable transmission distance, especially the change of the passband's centre frequency and its bandwidth. Existing solutions dealing with this distance dependent behaviour, namely the change of the transmission frequency dependent on distance and the addition of losses to the resonators to increase the bandwidth, are considered as not inventive. First, changing the transmission frequency increases the complexity in the data transmission system and would use a disproportional total bandwidth compared to the actually available bandwidth

  6. How synthetic biology will reconsider natural bioluminescence and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Benjamin; Sanderson, Theo; Ellis, Tom; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As our understanding of natural biological systems grows, so too does our ability to alter and rebuild them. Synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to biology in order to design and construct novel biological systems for specific applications. Bioluminescent organisms offer a treasure trove of light-emitting enzymes that may have applications in many areas of bioengineering, from biosensors to lighting. A few select bioluminescent organisms have been well researched and the molecular and genetic basis of their luminescent abilities elucidated, with work underway to understand the basis of luminescence in many others. Synthetic biology will aim to package these light-emitting systems as self-contained biological modules, characterize their properties, and then optimize them for use in other chassis organisms. As this catalog of biological parts grows, synthetic biologists will be able to engineer complex biological systems with the ability to emit light. These may use luminescence for an array of disparate functions, from providing illumination to conveying information or allowing communication between organisms. PMID:25216951

  7. Bioluminescence Imaging to Detect Late Stage Infection of African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell-Saward, Hollie; Ward, Theresa H

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a multi-stage disease that manifests in two stages; an early blood stage and a late stage when the parasite invades the central nervous system (CNS). In vivo study of the late stage has been limited as traditional methodologies require the removal of the brain to determine the presence of the parasites. Bioluminescence imaging is a non-invasive, highly sensitive form of optical imaging that enables the visualization of a luciferase-transfected pathogen in real-time. By using a transfected trypanosome strain that has the ability to produce late stage disease in mice we are able to study the kinetics of a CNS infection in a single animal throughout the course of infection, as well as observe the movement and dissemination of a systemic infection. Here we describe a robust protocol to study CNS infections using a bioluminescence model of African trypanosomiasis, providing real time non-invasive observations which can be further analyzed with optional downstream approaches. PMID:27284970

  8. A genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for illuminating proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Bae; Ozawa, Takeaki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method to evaluate the activities of cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB. A pair of bioluminescent indicators was made for conferring cytokine sensitivity to cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells. The principle is based on reconstitution of split fragments of Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) by protein splicing with a DnaE intein from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The bioluminescence intensity of thus reconstituted RLuc in the HeLa cells was used as a measure of the activities for cytokines. With the present method, we evaluated the activities of various cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB in human cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells carrying the indicators. The present approach to evaluating the activities of cytokines may provide a potential clinical value in monitoring drug activity and directing treatment for various diseases related with NF-κB. The method highlights the experimental procedure from our original publications, Anal. Biochem. 2006, 359, 147-149 and Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2004, 101, 11542. The summary of the method is: •Cytokine activities are determined within 2 h after stimulation.•Temporarily inactivated split-luciferase fragments are reconstituted by protein splicing.•Nucleartrafficking of NF-κB was illuminated for gauging the ligand-driven activity. PMID:27489781

  9. Enhanced Landweber algorithm via Bregman iterations for bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality aimed at visualizing physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. While the forward process of light propagation is described by the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer equation, BLT is the inverse problem to reconstruct the 3D localization and quantification of internal bioluminescent sources distribution. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of the BLT problem, regularization is generally indispensable to obtain more favorable reconstruction. In particular, total variation (TV) regularization is known to be effective for piecewise-constant source distribution which can permit sharp discontinuities and preserve edges. However, total variation regularization generally suffers from the unsatisfactory staircasing effect. In this work, we introduce the Bregman iterative regularization to alleviate this degeneration and enhance the numerical reconstruction of BLT. Based on the existing Landweber method (LM), we put forward the Bregman-LM-TV algorithm for BLT. Numerical experiments are carried out and preliminary simulation results are reported to evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that Bregman-LM-TV can significantly outperform the individual Landweber method for BLT when the source distribution is piecewise-constant.

  10. Resonance energy transfer between fluorescent BSA protected Au nanoclusters and organic fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Rich, Ryan; Fudala, Rafal; Butler, Susan; Kokate, Rutika; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-12-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to their unique fluorescence properties and lack of toxicity. These metal nanoclusters have utility in a variety of disciplines including catalysis, biosensing, photonics, imaging and molecular electronics. However, they suffer from several disadvantages such as low fluorescence quantum efficiency (typically near 6%) and broad emission spectrum (540 nm to 800 nm). We describe an approach to enhance the apparent brightness of BSA Au clusters by linking them with a high extinction donor organic dye pacific blue (PB). In this conjugate PB acts as a donor to BSA Au clusters and enhances its brightness by resonance energy transfer (RET). We found that the emission of BSA Au clusters can be enhanced by a magnitude of two-fold by resonance energy transfer (RET) from the high extinction donor PB, and BSA Au clusters can act as an acceptor to nanosecond lifetime organic dyes. By pumping the BSA Au clusters using a high extinction donor, one can increase the effective brightness of less bright fluorophores like BSA Au clusters. Moreover, we prepared another conjugate of BSA Au clusters with the near infrared (NIR) dye Dylight 750 (Dy750), where BSA Au clusters act as a donor to Dy750. We observed that BSA Au clusters can function as a donor, showing 46% transfer efficiency to the NIR dye Dy750 with a long lifetime component in the acceptor decay through RET. Such RET-based probes can be used to prevent the problems of a broad emission spectrum associated with the BSA Au clusters. Moreover, transferring energy from BSA Au clusters to Dy750 will result in a RET probe with a narrow emission spectrum and long lifetime component which can be utilized in imaging applications.Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to

  11. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  12. Foraging in the darkness of the Southern Ocean: influence of bioluminescence on a deep diving predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Royer, François; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Frédéric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES's main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments. PMID:22952706

  13. Foraging in the darkness of the Southern Ocean: influence of bioluminescence on a deep diving predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Vacquié-Garcia

    Full Text Available How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES (Mirounga leonina have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES's main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments.

  14. Onset of quenching of the giant dipole resonance at high excitation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Delaunay, F.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Hongmei, F.; Lima, V.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Wieland, O.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) properties in nuclei of mass A =120 to 132 has been investigated in an excitation energy range between 150 and 270 MeV through the study of complete and nearly complete fusion reactions using 116Sn beams at 17 A and 23 A MeV from the cyclotron of the Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud impinging on 12C and 24Mg targets. γ rays and light charged particles were detected using the multi-element detector array MEDEA in coincidence with evaporation residues detected by using mass and charge identification spectrometry with telescope (MACISTE). Light-charged-particle energy spectra were analyzed within the framework of a multiple-source-emission scenario by using a fitting procedure to determine the amount of pre-equilibrium emission and deduce the excitation energies reached in the compound nuclei. A detailed analysis of the γ -ray spectra and their comparison with statistical model calculations is presented. Evidence of a quenching of the GDR gamma yield was found at 270 MeV excitation energy. The quenching effect becomes progressively more important with increasing excitation energy, as observed when the comparison is extended to data from the reaction 36Ar+96Mo at 37 A MeV where hot nuclei were populated up to 430 MeV excitation energy. A coherent scenario emerges indicating the existence of a limiting excitation energy for the collective motion of about E*/A =2.1 MeV for systems of mass A =105 to 111 while a slightly lower value was observed for nuclei of mass A ˜132 . The existence of a possible link between GDR disappearance and the liquid-gas phase transition is discussed.

  15. Bremsstrahlung from nuclear scattering at low energy near a resonance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of almost all low-energy reaction processes depends upon a distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis. DWBA procedures, in turn, depend crucially upon a correct optical model description of the projectile-target elastic scattering process. An assumption that the potential is local together with measurements of the elastic scattering data at all energies (0 -infinity) would completely determine that potential, including its off-shell or short-range properties. However, one does not have the luxury of knowing the elastic scattering phase shifts for all energies nor are we so naive as to believe that the potential is completely local. Thus, an alternative approach is called for. The present proposal describes a program to contribute to the general understanding of nuclear reactions by determining as many of the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus interaction as possible through the study of the proton-nucleus bremsstrahlung process. We seek to establish the limits of validity of a model independent analysis of these reactions in the neighborhood of a resonance or a breakup threshold, and to utilize the differences between this analysis and the data to elucidate those off-shell constraints which any valid proton-nucleus model interaction must satisfy. The bremsstrahlung process provides a method for determining the off-shell properties of the proton-nucleus potential, and the Brooklyn College program offers a unique opportunity to measure these crucial aspects of the low energy proton-nucleus interaction. 18 references

  16. Measurement of multiplicity and total energy of gamma radiation following the U-235 fission induced by resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of γ-radiation following the fission of U-235 induced by resonance neutrons with energies from 0.7 eV to 36 eV from the IBR-30 pulsed source was studied. The ionization chamber containing 10 g of uranium enriched to 90% with U-235 and the Ge(Li) detector abour 30 cm3 in volume having an energy resolution of 2.8 keV at 1333 keV energy were operating in coincidence. The results were analysed within the multidimensional procedure. After reconstructing the measured spectrum the γ-spectrum in the energy range from 0.1 to 1.6 MeV has been obtained. The following integral characteristics have been calculated: multiplicity, total and average energies. The average energies for the 3- and 4- resonances are reported

  17. Raman Regime Energy Dependence of Alignment and Orientation of KrIi States Populated by Resonant Auger Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagutin, B. M.; Petrov, I. D.; Sukhorukov, V. L.; Kammer, S.; Mickat, S.; Schill, R.; Schartner, K.-H.; Ehresmann, A.; Shutov, Yu. A.; Schmoranzer, H.

    2003-02-01

    The energy dependencies of alignment parameters A20 for KrII 4p45p states after the Auger decay of the KrI 3d9np resonances were investigated theoretically and experimentally for the first time in the Raman regime with the bandwidth of the exciting radiation (ΔEFWHM=20 meV) smaller than the natural width of the resonances (Γ≈80 meV). The observed energy dependence is due to the in­terference between the different resonance channels and the direct photoionization channel. A strong energy dependence for both the orientation parameter O10 and the photoelectron angular distribution parameter βel is also predicted.

  18. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N2 Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N2 are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14 ±1 fs , while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance.

  19. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N_{2} Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J J; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-22

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N_{2} are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14±1  fs, while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance. PMID:27152799

  20. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  1. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Okubo, Toshiyuki [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Tojo, Arinobu; Sekine, Rieko; Soda, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Nomura, Akiko; Izawa, Kiyoko [University of Tokyo, Division of Molecular Therapy, Advanced Clinical Research Centre, Tokyo (Japan); Kitamura, Toshio [University of Tokyo, Division of Cellular Therapy, Advanced Clinical Research Centre, Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  2. Multipolarity analysis for 14C high-energy resonance populated by (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12C(18O,16O)14C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition

  3. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Tumor Cells Using Optimized Firefly Luciferase luc2

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to establish a tumor cell line stably expressing luciferase luc2, and to develop the technique to observe primary tumor nodes and metastases using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Materials and Methods. In this research we used pLuc2-N plasmid, lentiviral vector pLVT-1, Colo 26 cell line and BALB/c mice to generate new bioluminescent tumor model. Bioluminescence imaging in vitro и in vivo was carried out on IVIS-Spectrum system (Caliper Life Sciences, USA). Pri...

  4. Influence of culture conditions on mycelial growth and bioluminescence of Gerronema viridilucens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz F; Bastos, Erick L; Desjardin, Dennis E; Stevani, Cassius V

    2008-05-01

    Herein we describe a procedure for measuring the total light emission of the naturally bioluminescent tropical fungus Gerronema viridilucens and the optimization of culture conditions using multivariate factorial anova. Cultures growing on an agar surface in 35 mm Petri dishes at 90% humidity show optimal bioluminescence emission at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1.0% sugar cane molasses, 0.10% yeast extract and pH 6.0 (nonbuffered). Temperature and pH are the most important factors for both mycelial growth and bioluminescence. PMID:18355288

  5. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  6. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μm to 10 μm and from 110 μm to 13 μm for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  8. A novel reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescent tomography based on Bayesian compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqi; Feng, Jinchao; Jia, Kebin; Sun, Zhonghua; Wei, Huijun

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is becoming a promising tool because it can resolve the biodistribution of bioluminescent reporters associated with cellular and subcellular function through several millimeters with to centimeters of tissues in vivo. However, BLT reconstruction is an ill-posed problem. By incorporating sparse a priori information about bioluminescent source, enhanced image quality is obtained for sparsity based reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, sparsity based BLT reconstruction algorithm has a great potential. Here, we proposed a novel reconstruction method based on Bayesian compressive sensing and investigated its feasibility and effectiveness with a heterogeneous phantom. The results demonstrate the potential and merits of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Study of firefly luciferin oxidation and isomerism as possible inhibition pathways for firefly bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence presents a light emitting profile with a form of a flash, due to the firefly luciferase-catalyzed formation of inhibitory products. These impair the binding of the substrate luciferin to the active site of the enzyme. However, this luciferase catalyzed pathways may not be the only ones responsible for the flash profile. The oxidation and isomerisation of the substrate luciferin lead to the formation of compounds that are also known inhibitors of firefly bioluminescence. So, the objective of this Letter was to analyze if these reactions could be capable of interfering with the bioluminescence reaction.

  10. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabella, L.; Gigliotti, C. R.; Perani, L.; Crippa, M. P.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μ m to 10 μ m and from 110 μ m to 13 μ m for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells.

  11. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  12. Performance analysis and experimental verification of mid-range wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Wang, Jingyu; Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, L.;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency analysis of a mid-range wireless energy transfer system is performed through non-resonant magnetic coupling. It is shown that the self-resistance of the coils and the mutual inductance are critical in achieving a high efficiency, which is indicated by our theoretical...... and show that careful design of the de-tuned system can intrinsically minimize the power dissipated in the source part. Our non-resonant scheme presented in this paper allows flexible design and fabrication of a wireless energy transfer systems with transfer distance being several times of the coils...

  13. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  14. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  15. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    OpenAIRE

    Sergi M.L.; Spitaleri C.; La Cognata M.; Lamia L.; Pizzone R.G.; Rapisarda G.G.; Mukhamedzhanov A.; Irgaziev B.; Tang X.D.; Wischer M.; Mrazek J.; Kroha V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in ...

  16. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments

  17. Ballistic electrons in an open square geometry: Selective probing of resonant-energy states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the interplay between classical trajectories and quantum-mechanical effects in a square geometry. At low magnetic fields the four-terminal resistance is dominated by phenomena that depend on ballistic trajectories in a classical billiard. Superimposed on these classical effects are quantum interference effects manifested by highly periodic conductance oscillations. Numerical analysis shows that these oscillations are directly related to excitations of particular eigenstates in the square. In spite of open leads, transport through an open cavity is effectively mediated by just a few (or even a single) resonant-energy states. The leads injecting electrons into the cavity play a decisive role in a selection of the particular set of states excited in the dot. The above selection rule sets a specific frequency of the oscillations seen in the experiment. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Coumarin meets fluorescein: a Förster resonance energy transfer enhanced optical ammonia gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Susanne; Dorrestijn, Marko; Camerlo, Agathe; Urek, Špela Korent; Lobnik, Aleksandra; Housecroft, Catherine E; Constable, Edwin C; Scherer, Lukas J

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the development of an optical ammonia gas sensor, the sensing mechanism of which is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between coumarin and fluorescein. The dyes were immobilized into an organically modified silicate matrix during polymerizing methyltriethoxysilane with trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate. The resulting dye-doped xerogel films were exposed to different gaseous ammonia concentrations. A logarithmic decrease of the coumarin fluorescence emission band at 442 nm was observed with increasing gaseous ammonia concentrations, which was due to enhanced FRET between coumarin and fluorescein. The coumarin/fluorescein composition was optimized in order to obtain the best ammonia sensitivity. First experiments in a flow cell gas sensor setup demonstrated a sensitive and reversible response to gaseous ammonia. PMID:25004956

  19. Biosensing with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Coupling between Fluorophores and Nanocarbon Allotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocarbon allotropes (NCAs, including zero-dimensional carbon dots (CDs, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs and two-dimensional graphene, exhibit exceptional material properties, such as unique electrical/thermal conductivity, biocompatibility and high quenching efficiency, that make them well suited for both electrical/electrochemical and optical sensors/biosensors alike. In particular, these material properties have been exploited to significantly enhance the transduction of biorecognition events in fluorescence-based biosensing involving Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET. This review analyzes current advances in sensors and biosensors that utilize graphene, CNTs or CDs as the platform in optical sensors and biosensors. Widely utilized synthesis/fabrication techniques, intrinsic material properties and current research examples of such nanocarbon, FRET-based sensors/biosensors are illustrated. The future outlook and challenges for the research field are also detailed.

  20. Low-energy $DD^{*+}$ Scattering and the Resonance-like Structure $Z_c(3900)$

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ying; Lei, Yu-Hong; Li, Ning; Liang, Jian; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Hang; Liu, Jin-Long; Liu, Liuming; Liu, Yong-Fu; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhaofeng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Wang, Zhan-Lin; Yang, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory lattice study, low-energy scattering of $D$ and $D^*$ meson are analyzed using lattice QCD with $N_f=2$ twisted mass fermion configurations with three pion mass values. The calculation is performed within single-channel L\\"uscher's finite-size formalism. The threshold scattering parameters, namely the scattering length $a_0$ and the effective range $r_0$, for the $s$-wave scattering in $J^P=1^+$ channel are extracted. For the cases in our study, the interaction between the two charmed mesons is weakly repulsive. Our lattice results therefore do not support the possibility of a shallow bound state for the two charmed mesons for the pion mass values we studied. This calculation provides some useful information on the nature of the newly discovered resonance-like structure $Z_c(3900)$ by various experimental groups.