WorldWideScience

Sample records for biology-driven cancer drug

  1. Implementation of mechanism of action biology-driven early drug development for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Andrew D J; Herold, Ralf; Rousseau, Raphaël; Copland, Chris; Bradley-Garelik, Brigid; Binner, Debbie; Capdeville, Renaud; Caron, Hubert; Carleer, Jacqueline; Chesler, Louis; Geoerger, Birgit; Kearns, Pamela; Marshall, Lynley V; Pfister, Stefan M; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Spadoni, Cesare; Sterba, Jaroslav; van den Berg, Hendrick; Uttenreuther-Fischer, Martina; Witt, Olaf; Norga, Koen; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    An urgent need remains for new paediatric oncology drugs to cure children who die from cancer and to reduce drug-related sequelae in survivors. In 2007, the European Paediatric Regulation came into law requiring industry to create paediatric drug (all types of medicinal products) development programmes alongside those for adults. Unfortunately, paediatric drug development is still largely centred on adult conditions and not a mechanism of action (MoA)-based model, even though this would be more logical for childhood tumours as these have much fewer non-synonymous coding mutations than adult malignancies. Recent large-scale sequencing by International Genome Consortium and Paediatric Cancer Genome Project has further shown that the genetic and epigenetic repertoire of driver mutations in specific childhood malignancies differs from more common adult-type malignancies. To bring about much needed change, a Paediatric Platform, ACCELERATE, was proposed in 2013 by the Cancer Drug Development Forum, Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer, the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents and the European Society for Paediatric Oncology. The Platform, comprising multiple stakeholders in paediatric oncology, has three working groups, one with responsibility for promoting and developing high-quality MoA-informed paediatric drug development programmes, including specific measures for adolescents. Key is the establishment of a freely accessible aggregated database of paediatric biological tumour drug targets to be aligned with an aggregated pipeline of drugs. This will enable prioritisation and conduct of early phase clinical paediatric trials to evaluate these drugs against promising therapeutic targets and to generate clinical paediatric efficacy and safety data in an accelerated time frame. Through this work, the Platform seeks to ensure that potentially effective drugs, where the MoA is known and thought to be relevant to paediatric

  2. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer, including drugs for basal cell carcinoma and melanoma. ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) Afinitor (Everolimus) ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Denosumab Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  16. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic and brand names. This page also lists common drug combinations used in lung ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel Doxorubicin Hydrochloride 5- ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  5. Cancer-drug associations: a complex system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Dalkic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Network analysis has been performed on large-scale medical data, capturing the global topology of drugs, targets, and disease relationships. A smaller-scale network is amenable to a more detailed and focused analysis of the individual members and their interactions in a network, which can complement the global topological descriptions of a network system. Analysis of these smaller networks can help address questions, i.e., what governs the pairing of the different cancers and drugs, is it driven by molecular findings or other factors, such as death statistics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We defined global and local lethality values representing death rates relative to other cancers vs. within a cancer. We generated two cancer networks, one of cancer types that share Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs (FDA cancer network, and another of cancer types that share clinical trials of FDA approved drugs (clinical trial cancer network. Breast cancer is the only cancer type with significant weighted degree values in both cancer networks. Lung cancer is significantly connected in the FDA cancer network, whereas ovarian cancer and lymphoma are significantly connected in the clinical trial cancer network. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that global lethality impacts the drug approval and trial numbers, whereas, local lethality impacts the amount of drug sharing in trials and approvals. However, this effect does not apply to pancreatic, liver, and esophagus cancers as the sharing of drugs for these cancers is very low. We also collected mutation target information to generate cancer type associations which were compared with the cancer type associations derived from the drug target information. The analysis showed a weak overlap between the mutation and drug target based networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical and FDA cancer networks are differentially connected, with only breast cancer significantly

  6. Scaffold Repurposing of Old Drugs Towards New Cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Wu, Jianlei; Gao, Yu; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    As commented by the Nobelist James Black that "The most fruitful basis of the discovery of a new drug is to start with an old drug", drug repurposing represents an attractive drug discovery strategy. Despite the success of several repurposed drugs on the market, the ultimate therapeutic potential of a large number of non-cancer drugs is hindered during their repositioning due to various issues including the limited efficacy and intellectual property. With the increasing knowledge about the pharmacological properties and newly identified targets, the scaffolds of the old drugs emerge as a great treasure-trove towards new cancer drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of novel small molecules for cancer therapy by scaffold repurposing with highlighted examples. The relevant strategies, advantages, challenges and future research directions associated with this approach are also discussed.

  7. Scaffold Repurposing of Old Drugs Towards New Cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Wu, Jianlei; Gao, Yu; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    As commented by the Nobelist James Black that "The most fruitful basis of the discovery of a new drug is to start with an old drug", drug repurposing represents an attractive drug discovery strategy. Despite the success of several repurposed drugs on the market, the ultimate therapeutic potential of a large number of non-cancer drugs is hindered during their repositioning due to various issues including the limited efficacy and intellectual property. With the increasing knowledge about the pharmacological properties and newly identified targets, the scaffolds of the old drugs emerge as a great treasure-trove towards new cancer drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of novel small molecules for cancer therapy by scaffold repurposing with highlighted examples. The relevant strategies, advantages, challenges and future research directions associated with this approach are also discussed. PMID:26881709

  8. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  9. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  10. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-Juen; Litvin, Oren; Ungar, Lyle; Pe’er, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression), an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should—and should not—be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features. PMID:26274927

  11. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Juen Chen

    Full Text Available Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression, an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should-and should not-be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features.

  12. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Epithelioid Sarcoma: Opportunities for Biology-driven Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNoujaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of children and young adults for which the preferred treatment for localised disease is wide surgical resection. Medical management is to a great extent undefined, and therefore for patients with regional and distal metastases, the development of targeted therapies is greatly desired. In this review we will summarize clinically-relevant biomarkers (e.g., SMARCB1, CA125, dysadherin and others with respect to targeted therapeutic opportunities. We will also examine the role of EGFR, mTOR and polykinase inhibitors (e.g., sunitinib in the management of local and disseminated disease. Towards building a consortium of pharmaceutical, academic and non-profit collaborators, we will discuss the state of resources for investigating epithelioid sarcoma with respect to cell line resources, tissue banks, and registries so that a roadmap can be developed towards effective biology-driven therapies.

  14. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José;

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances that have taken place in the past decade, including the development of novel molecular targeted agents, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of cancer treatment. In breast cancer, anthracyclines and taxanes are the two main chemotherapeutic options used on a routine...

  15. Drug cocktail optimization in chemotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Preissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP. Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy.

  16. Liposomal drug delivery in multimodal cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating cytostatics into lipid vesicles, i.e. liposomes, improves tumour drug accumulation and reduce adverse effects. Liposomal doxorubicin (DXR) has been used in the treatment of a variety of cancers and may also be suitable for combining with other treatment modalities. By modulating liposomal membranes, liposomes can be made ultrasound (US) sensitive releasing encapsulated drug in tumour tissue upon external US stimulation and may thereby improve therapeutic outcome. Moreover, as DX...

  17. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  18. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  19. Carbon materials for drug delivery & cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes and graphene are both low-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterials exhibiting many unique physical and chemical properties that are interesting in a wide range of areas including nanomedicine. Since 2004, carbon nanotubes have been extensively explored as drug delivery carriers for the intracellular transport of chemotherapy drugs, proteins, and genes. In vivo cancer treatment with carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated in animal experiments by several different groups. Recently, graphene, another allotrope of carbon, has also shown promise in various biomedical applications. In this article, we will highlight recent research on these two categories of closely related carbon nanomaterials for applications in drug delivery and cancer therapy, and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this rapidly growing field.

  20. Peptide based platforms for cancer drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Perillo, Emiliana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of main causes of death in humans, accounting for 8.2 milion deaths worldwide in 2012. Chemotherapy, the most widely used cancer therapy, is the most effective and potent strategy to treat malignant tumors, but has the disadvantage of not delivering the therapeutic agents only to tumor sites. Nanomedicine may allow the controlled release of drugs by biodegradation and self-regulation of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. The goal of this PhD project was to create a del...

  1. Antiangiogenic cancer drug using the zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Massimo M

    2014-09-01

    The process of de novo vessel formation, called angiogenesis, is essential for tumor progression and spreading. Targeting of molecular pathways involved in such tumor angiogenetic processes by using specific drugs or inhibitors is important for developing new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery remains to be the main focus for biomedical research and represents the essence of antiangiogenesis cancer research. To pursue these molecular and pharmacological goals, researchers need to use animal models that facilitate the elucidation of tumor angiogenesis mechanisms and the testing of antiangiogenic therapies. The past few years have seen the zebrafish system emerge as a valid model organism to study developmental angiogenesis and, more recently, as an alternative vertebrate model for cancer research. In this review, we will discuss why the zebrafish model system has the advantage of being a vertebrate model equipped with easy and powerful transgenesis as well as imaging tools to investigate not only physiological angiogenesis but also tumor angiogenesis. We will also highlight the potential of zebrafish for identifying antitumor angiogenesis drugs to block tumor development and progression. We foresee the zebrafish model as an important system that can possibly complement well-established mouse models in cancer research to generate novel insights into the molecular mechanism of the tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24903092

  2. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management.

  3. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management. PMID:11762966

  4. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti......-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill...... are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process...

  5. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Farideh Ordikhani; Mustafa Erdem Arslan; Raymundo Marcelo; Ilyas Sahin; Perry Grigsby; Schwarz, Julie K.; Abdel Kareem Azab

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  6. Use of analgesic drugs and risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammundsen, Henriette B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan;

    2012-01-01

    The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types.......The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types....

  7. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  8. Vascular permeability and drug delivery in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy eAzzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents.

  9. Nanomedicine therapeutic approaches to overcome cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, Janet L; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging form of therapy that focuses on alternative drug delivery and improvement of the treatment efficacy while reducing detrimental side effects to normal tissues. Cancer drug resistance is a complicated process that involves multiple mechanisms. Here we discuss the major forms of drug resistance and the new possibilities that nanomedicines offer to overcome these treatment obstacles. Novel nanomedicines that have a high ability for flexible, fast drug design and production based on tumor genetic profiles can be created making drug selection for personal patient treatment much more intensive and effective. This review aims to demonstrate the advantage of the young medical science field, nanomedicine, for overcoming cancer drug resistance. With the advanced design and alternative mechanisms of drug delivery known for different nanodrugs including liposomes, polymer conjugates, micelles, dendrimers, carbon-based, and metallic nanoparticles, overcoming various forms of multi-drug resistance looks promising and opens new horizons for cancer treatment. PMID:24120656

  10. Development of Combination Therapy with Anti-Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes early clinical trials with anti-cancer drugs in combination with commonly applied and registered chemotherapy and single agent studies with compounds that are intended for use in combination with registered or other targeted anti-cancer drugs. Gemcitabine is a prodrug that fi

  11. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer ...

  12. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system.

  13. Nanodrug Formed by Coassembly of Dual Anticancer Drugs to Inhibit Cancer Cell Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Fei; Pan, Yuanming; Li, Zhipeng; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, Chukwunweike Ikechukwu; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Chan; Peng, Ling; Wang, Paul C; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Carrier-free pure nanodrugs (PNDs) that are composed entirely of pharmaceutically active molecules are regarded as promising candidates to be the next generation of drug formulations and are mainly formulated from supramolecular self-assembly of drug molecules. It benefits from the efficient use of drug compounds with poor aqueous solubility and takes advantage of nanoscale drug delivery systems. Here, a type of all-in-one nanoparticle consisting of multiple drugs with enhanced synergistic antiproliferation efficiency against drug-resistant cancer cells has been created. To nanoparticulate the anticancer drugs, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as a typical model. The resulting HD nanoparticles (HD NPs) were formulated by a "green" and convenient self-assembling method, and the water-solubility of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) was improved 50-fold after nanosizing by coassembly with DOX. The formation process was studied by observing the morphological changes at various reaction times and molar ratios of DOX to HCPT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that DOX molecules tend to assemble around HCPT molecules through intermolecular forces. With the advantage of nanosizing, HD NPs could improve the intracellular drug retention of DOX to as much as 2-fold in drug-resistant cancer cells (MCF-7R). As a dual-drug-loaded nanoformulation, HD NPs effectively enhanced drug cytotoxicity to drug-resistant cancer cells. The combination of HCPT and DOX exhibited a synergistic effect as the nanosized HD NPs improved drug retention in drug-resistant cancer cells against P-gp efflux in MCF-7R cells. Furthermore, colony forming assays were applied to evaluate long-term inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and these assays confirmed the greatly improved cytotoxicity of HD NPs in drug-resistant cells compared to free drugs. PMID:26270258

  14. Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159602.html Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study ... increase risk for joint and tissue disease, including arthritis, new research suggests. "We keep having referrals coming ...

  15. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1 in vitro studies using cell line models; (2 serum pharmacology; (3 in vivo studies using animal models; and (4 clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance.

  16. FRET Biosensors for Cancer Detection and Evaluation of Drug Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive and specific FRET biosensor was developed by Mizutani et al. and applied to detect the activity of BCR-ABL kinase in live cells. This biosensor allowed the detection of cancerous and drug-resistant cells, and the evaluation of kinase inhibitor efficacy. Future biosensor development and imaging can increasingly contribute to cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  17. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Preissner; Mathias Dunkel; Michael F Hoffmann; Preissner, Sarah C.; Nikolai Genov; Wen Wei Rong; Robert Preissner; Karlheinz Seeger

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into acco...

  18. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  19. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeseung Lee

    Full Text Available An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity.

  20. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  1. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  2. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Davies

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gerald F Davies1, Bernhard HJ Juurlink2, Troy AA Harkness11Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1 and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX. The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1, and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. Keywords: chemotherapy, doxorubicin, breast cancer resistance protein-1, multiple drug resistance, multiple drug resistance protein 1

  3. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Jin-Ku Bao; Jin-Ming Yang; Yan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process,has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases,such as cancer.Notably,autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer.To date,substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators,such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs),PI3K,mTOR,p53,and Beclin-1,may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression.Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer,it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics.With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy,we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy.

  4. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  5. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance.Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in

  6. A to Z List of Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Y Z Get email updates from NCI on cancer health information, news, and other topics Get email updates from NCI A Abiraterone Acetate Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) ABVD ABVE ...

  7. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Saini; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  8. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  9. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihide Nishimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib and TARCEVA (Erlotinib treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care.

  10. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  11. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben K. Becker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are at an increased risk for QT interval prolongation and subsequent potentially fatal Torsade de pointes tachycardia due to the multiple drugs used for treatment of malignancies and the associated symptoms and complications. Based on a systematic review of the literature, this article analyzes the risk for prolongation of the QT interval with antineoplastic agents and commonly used concomitant drugs. This includes anthracyclines, fluorouracil, alkylating agents, and new molecularly targeted therapeutics, such as vascular disruption agents. Medications used in the supportive care can also prolong QT intervals, such as methadone, 5-HT3-antagonists and antihistamines, some antibiotics, antifungals, and antivirals. We describe the presumed mechanism of QT interval prolongation, drug-specific considerations, as well as important clinical interactions. Multiple risk factors and drug–drug interactions increase this risk for dangerous arrhythmias. We propose a systematic approach to evaluate cancer patients for the risk of QT interval prolongation and how to prevent adverse effects.

  12. Chemical genetics and drug screening in Drosophila cancer models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara Gladstone; Tin Tin Su

    2011-01-01

    Drug candidates often fail in preclinical and clinical testing because of reasons of efficacy and/or safety.It would be time- and cost-efficient to have screening models that reduce the rate of such false positive candidates that appear promising at first but fail later.In this regard,it would be particularly useful to have a rapid and inexpensive whole animal model that can pre-select hits from high-throughput screens but before testing in costly rodent assays.Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a potential whole animal model for drug screening.Of particular interest have been drugs that must act in the context of multi-cellularity such as those for neurological disorders and cancer.A recent review provides a comprehensive summary of drug screening in Drosophila,but with an emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders.Here,we review Drosophila screens in the literature aimed at cancer therapeutics.

  13. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  14. Drug delivery with carbon nanotubes for in vivo cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhuang; Chen, Kai; Davis, Corrine; Sherlock, Sarah; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Dai, Hongjie

    2008-01-01

    Chemically functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown promise in tumor targeted accumulation in mice and exhibit biocompatibility, excretion and little toxicity. Here, we demonstrate in-vivo SWNT drug delivery for tumor suppression in mice. We conjugate paclitaxel (PTX), a widely used cancer chemotherapy drug to branched polyethylene-glycol (PEG) chains on SWNTs via a cleavable ester bond to obtain a water soluble SWNT-paclitaxel conjugate (SWNT-PTX). SWNT-PTX affords hi...

  15. Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System: Milestone for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gousia Chashoo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of modern drug therapy is the optimization of the pharmacological action of the drugs coupled with the reduction of their toxic effects in vivo. The prime objectives in the design of drug delivery systems (DDS are the controlled delivery of the drug to its site of action at a therapeutically optimal rate and dosage to avoid toxicity and improve the drug effectiveness and therapeutic index. DDS has improved many of the pharmacological properties of conventional ("free" drugs including particulate carriers which are primarily composed of lipids and/or polymers and their associated therapeutics. It alters the pharmacokinetics (PK and biodistribution (BD of the associated drugs or functions as drug reservoir or both. Nanoparticles provide a range of new opportunities to increase the targeting of currently approved diagnostic and therapeutic agents to cancers. Nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapeutic can reduce the undesirable distribution of such agents. The problems related to cancer chemotherapy can partially be overcome by direct intratumoral delivery of controlled release biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs.

  16. Functional liposomes in the cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tila, Dena; Ghasemi, Saeed; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyedeh Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is considered as one of the most severe health problems and is currently the third most common cause of death in the world after heart and infectious diseases. Novel therapies are constantly being discovered, developed and trialed. Many of the current anticancer agents exhibit non-ideal pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties and are distributed non-specifically throughout the body. This results in death of the both normal healthy and malignant cells and substantially leads to accruing a variety of serious toxic side effects. Therefore, the efficient systemic therapy of cancer is almost impossible due to harmful side effects of anticancer agents to the healthy organs and tissues. Furthermore, several problems such as low bioavailability of the drugs, low drug concentrations at the site of action, lack of drug specificity and drug-resistance also cause many restrictions on clinical applications of these drugs in the tumor therapy. Different types of the liposomal formulations have been used in medicine due to their distinctive advantages associated with their structural flexibility in the encapsulation of various agents with different physicochemical properties. They can also mediate delivery of the cargo to the appropriate cell type and subcellular compartment, reducing the effective dosage and possible side effects which are related to high systemic concentrations. Therefore, these novel systems were found very promising and encouraging dosage forms for the treatment of different types of cancer by increasing efficiency and reducing the systemic toxicity due to the specific drug delivery and targeting. PMID:25823898

  17. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  18. Targeting anti-cancer drug resistance in mouse models of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to anti-cancer drugs is one of the biggest challenges in clinical oncology. In contrast to the success of local therapy (e.g. surgery or radiotherapy), the treatment of disseminated cancers using classical DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and novel specific inhibitors frequently fails

  19. Are isothiocyanates potential anti-cancer drugs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang WU; Qing-hua ZHOU; Ke XU

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are naturally occurring small molecules that are formed from glucosinolate precursors of cruciferous vegetables. Many isothiocyanates, both natural and synthetic, display anticarcinogenic activity because they reduce activation of carcinogens and increase their detoxification. Recent studies show that they exhibit anti-tumor activity by affecting multiple pathways including apoptosis, MAPK signaling, oxidative stress, and cell cycle progression. This review summarizes the current knowledge on isothiocyanates and focuses on their role as potential anti-cancer agents.

  20. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  1. Partnership to Explore New Drug Combination for Pancreatic Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer Scientists at NCI and Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) are partnering with the Lustgarten Foundation to test whether a vitamin D derivative will make a difference when combined with a conventional anticancer drug in treating tumors of the pancreas.

  2. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  3. Prescription patterns for psychotropic drugs in cancer patients; a large population study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, Chong Guan; Boks, Marco P. M.; Smeets, Hugo Matthias; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; de Wit, Niek J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychotropic drugs are commonly prescribed for various psychological complaints in cancer patients. We aim to examine the prescription pattern in cancer patients of three common psychotropic drugs: benzodiazepine, antidepressant and antipsychotic. Methods This is a retrospective case-cont

  4. [Erythropoietin and drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenajch, Jolanta M; Synowiec, Agnieszka E

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is used in breast and ovarian cancer patients to alleviate cancer- and chemotherapy-related anemia. Some clinical trials have reported that rhEPO may adversely impact survival and increase the risk of thrombovascular events in patients with breast cancer but not with ovarian cancer. The latter may potentially benefit the most from rhEPO treatment due to the nephrotoxic and myelosuppresive effects of standard platinum-based chemotherapy used in ovarian cancer disease. However, over the last decade the preclinical data have revealed that EPO is not only the principal growth factor and the hormone which regulates erythropoiesis, but also a cytokine with a pleiotropic activity which also can affect cancer cells. EPO can stimulate survival, ability to form metastases and drug resistance not only in continuous breast- and ovarian cancer cell lines but also in breast cancer stem-like cells. EPO receptor (EPOR) can also be constitutively active in both these cancers and, in breast cancer cells, may act in an interaction with estrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). EPOR, by an EPO-independent mechanism, promotes proliferation of breast cancer cells in cooperation with estrogen receptor, resulting in decreased effectiveness of tamoxifen treatment. In another interaction, as a result of the molecular antagonism between EPOR and HER2, rhEPO protects breast cancer cells against trastuzumab. Both clinical and preclinical evidence strongly suggest the urgent need to reevaluate the traditional use of rhEPO in the oncology setting. PMID:27321103

  5. Bone Drugs Linked to Fewer Cases of Breast Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new analysis from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study has found that the use of drugs called bisphosphonates, which are taken to improve bone health, was associated with a nearly 33 percent reduction in the incidence of invasive breast cancer compared with women who did not take the drugs. |

  6. Cancer nanomedicines: so many papers and so few drugs!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditto, Vincent J; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-01-01

    This review identifies a timeline to nanomedicine anticancer drug approval using the business model of inventors, innovators and imitators. By evaluating the publication record of nanomedicine cancer therapeutics we identified a trend of very few publications prior to FDA approval. We first enumerated the publications related to cancer involving polymers, liposomes or monoclonal antibodies and determined the number of citations per publication as well as the number of published clinical trials among the publications. Combining these data with the development of specific nanomedicines, we are able to identify an invention phase consisting of seminal papers in basic science necessary for the development of a specific nanomedicine. The innovation phase includes the first report, the development and the clinical trials involving that nanomedicine. Finally, the imitation phase begins after approval when others ride the wave of success by using the same formulation for new drugs or using the same drug to validate other nanomedicines. We then focused our analysis on nanomedicines containing camptothecin derivatives, which are not yet approved including two polymers considered innovations and one liposomal formulation in the imitation phase. The conclusion that may be drawn from the analysis of the camptothecins is that approved drugs reformulated in polymeric and liposomal cancer nanomedicines have a more difficult time navigating through the approval process than the parent molecule. This is probably due to the fact that for most currently approved drugs, reformulating them in a nanocarrier provides a small increase in performance that large pharmaceutical companies do not consider being worth the time, effort and expense of development. It also appears that drug carriers have a more difficult path through the clinic than monoclonal antibodies. The added complexity of nanocarriers also deters their use to deliver new molecular entities. Thus, the new drug candidates that

  7. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  8. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  9. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  10. tcTKB: an integrated cardiovascular toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-01-01

    Targeted cancer drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Systematic approaches to studying CV events associated with targeted anticancer drugs have high potential for elucidating the complex pathways underlying targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we built tcTKB, a comprehensive CV toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs, by extracting drug-CV pairs from five large-scale and complementary data sources. The data sources include FDA d...

  11. Drug delivery by a self-assembled DNA tetrahedron for overcoming drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Kim, Da-Rae; Lee, Taemin; Yhee, Ji Young; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kwon, Ick Chan; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-03-11

    A DNA tetrahedron is employed for efficient delivery of doxorubicin into drug-resistant breast cancer cells. The drug delivered with the DNA nanoconstruct is considerably cytotoxic, whereas free doxorubicin is virtually non-cytotoxic for the drug-resistant cells. Thus, the DNA tetrahedron, made of the inherently natural and biocompatible material, can be a good candidate for the drug carrier to overcome MDR in cancer cells.

  12. Nanotechnology-based intelligent drug design for cancer metastasis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Haijun; Gu, Songen; Zhao, Rongli; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy used today at clinics is mainly inherited from the thinking and designs made four decades ago when the Cancer War was declared. The potency of those chemotherapy drugs on in-vitro cancer cells is clearly demonstrated at even nanomolar levels. However, due to their non-specific effects in the body on normal tissues, these drugs cause toxicity, deteriorate patient's life quality, weaken the host immunosurveillance system, and result in an irreversible damage to human's own recovery power. Owing to their unique physical and biological properties, nanotechnology-based chemotherapies seem to have an ability to specifically and safely reach tumor foci with enhanced efficacy and low toxicity. Herein, we comprehensively examine the current nanotechnology-based pharmaceutical platforms and strategies for intelligent design of new nanomedicines based on targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) for cancer metastasis treatment, analyze the pros and cons of nanomedicines versus traditional chemotherapy, and evaluate the importance that nanomaterials can bring in to significantly improve cancer metastasis treatment.

  13. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  14. Treatment of cancer by using Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimendra J Patel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the “war on cancer” is now in its fourth decade and despite much progress has been made in categorizing the environmental causes and cellular and molecular biological basis for this dreaded disease, we still do not have a precise understanding of the differences between a cancer cell and its normal counterpart. If we do not understand cancer, we cannot control, conquer, and eliminate it. The completion of the human genome sequence and its subsequent improvements in the sequence data are important steps to fully comprehend cancer cell biology. Nanotechnology, a new, novel focus of research evolved from the convergence and coalescence of many diverse scientific disciplines and as a general term for the creation, manipulation, and application of structures in the nanometer size range. In this article, Nano medicine aspects of nanotechnology will be stressed and will cover areas such as drug delivery systems and new drug therapies as they relate to cancer. One of the ultimate goals of Nano medicine is to create medically useful Nano devices that can function inside the body. It is envisioned that Nano devices will be hybrids of biologic molecules and synthetic polymers that can enter cells and the organelles to interact directly with DNA and proteins. Additionally, Nano medicine will have an impact on the key challenges in cancer therapy: localized drug delivery and specific targeting. Among the newly developed Nano medicine and Nano devices such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, Nano cantilevers, and Nano pores, Nano shells and nanoparticles are the most promising applications for various cancer treatments.

  15. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are inv...

  16. Multi drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy: Genes involved and blockers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, important and considerable research efforts had been performed to investigate the mechanism through which cancer cells overcome the cytotoxic effects of a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. Most of the previously published work has been focused on the resistance of tumor cells to those anticancer drugs of natural source. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cellular cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of natural products used in cancer chemotherapy and is believed to be the major cause of the therapeutic failures of the drugs belonging to different naturally obtained or semisynthetic groups including vinca alkaloids, taxans, epipodophyllotoxins and certain antibiotics. This phenomenon results from overexpression of four MDR genes and their corresponding proteins that act as membrane-bound ATP consuming pumps. These proteins mediate the efflux of many structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs of natural source. MDR may be intrinsic or acquired following exposure to chemotherapy. The existence of intrinsically resistant tumor cell clone before and following chemotherapeutic treatment has been associated with a worse final outcome because of increased incidence of distant metasis. In view of irreplaceability of natural product anticancer drugs as effective chemotherapeutic agents, and in view of MDR as a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy, this review is aimed to highlight the genes involved in MDR, classical MDR blockers and gene therapy approaches to overcome MDR. (author)

  17. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer drug resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    The presence or emergence of chemoresistance in tumor cells is a major burden in cancer therapy. While drug resistance is a multifactorial phenomenon arising from altered membrane transport of drugs, altered drug metabolism, altered DNA repair, reduced apoptosis rate and alterations of drug metabolism, it can also be linked to genetic and epigenetic factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important regulatory roles in many aspects of genome function including gene transcription, splicing, and epigenetics as well as biological processes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, development, and pluripotency. As such, it may not be surprising that some lncRNAs have been recently linked to carcinogenesis and drug resistance/sensitivity. Research is accelerating to decipher the exact molecular mechanism of lncRNA-regulated drug resistance and its therapeutic implications. In this article, we will review the structure, biogenesis, and mode of action of lncRNAs. Then, the involvement of lncRNAs in drug resistance will be discussed in detail. PMID:27427176

  18. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  19. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  20. PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PREVENT program provides a structure for the introduction of new agents, drugs and vaccines to inhibit, retard or reverse the cancer process. The program was designed to optimize translational opportunities from discovery to the clinic, and provide a mechanism to identify and study efficacy and pharmacodynamics biomarkers that will help in phase II trials to evaluate drug effects.  | Research pipeline for new prevention interventions and biomarkers headed toward clinical trials.

  1. Chemopreventive drugs: Mechanisms via inhibition of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Il

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies, basic research and clinical trials on colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention have helped identify candidates for effective chemopreventive drugs. However, because of the conflicting results of clinical trials or side effects, the effective use of chemopreventive drugs has not been generalized, except for patients with a high-risk for developing hereditary CRC. Advances in genetic and molecular technologies have highlighted the greater complexity of carcinogenesis, ...

  2. The antihelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate targets aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available WNT signaling plays a key role in the self-renewal of tumor initiation cells (TICs. In this study, we used pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an FDA-approved antihelmintic drug that inhibits WNT signaling, to test whether pharmacologic inhibition of WNT signaling can specifically target TICs of aggressive breast cancer cells. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line, and SUM-159, a metaplastic basal-type breast cancer cell line, were used in these studies. We found that PP inhibited primary and secondary mammosphere formation of cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, at least 10 times less than the dose needed to have a toxic effect on cancer cells. A comparable mammosphere formation IC50 dose to that observed in cancer cell lines was obtained using malignant pleural effusion samples from patients with IBC. A decrease in activity of the TIC surrogate aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed in PP-treated cells, and inhibition of WNT signaling by PP was associated with down-regulation of a panel of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In vivo, intratumoral injection was associated with tumor necrosis, and intraperitoneal injection into mice with tumor xenografts caused significant tumor growth delay and a trend toward decreased lung metastasis. In in vitro mammosphere-based and monolayer-based clonogenic assays, we found that PP radiosensitized cells in monolayer culture but not mammosphere culture. These findings suggest WNT signaling inhibition may be a feasible strategy for targeting aggressive breast cancer. Investigation and modification of the bioavailability and toxicity profile of systemic PP are warranted.

  3. Exploring a structural protein-drug interactome for new therapeutics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaodong; Wang, Fang; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Xu, David; Wang, Bo; Sinn, Anthony A; Pollok, Karen E; Sandusky, George E; Li, Lang; Turchi, John J; Jalal, Shadia I; Meroueh, Samy O

    2014-03-01

    The pharmacology of drugs is often defined by more than one protein target. This property can be exploited to use approved drugs to uncover new targets and signaling pathways in cancer. Towards enabling a rational approach to uncover new targets, we expand a structural protein-ligand interactome () by scoring the interaction among 1000 FDA-approved drugs docked to 2500 pockets on protein structures of the human genome. This afforded a drug-target network whose properties compared favorably with previous networks constructed using experimental data. Among drugs with the highest degree and betweenness two are cancer drugs and one is currently used for treatment of lung cancer. Comparison of predicted cancer and non-cancer targets reveals that the most cancer-specific compounds were also the most selective compounds. Analysis of compound flexibility, hydrophobicity, and size showed that the most selective compounds were low molecular weight fragment-like heterocycles. We use a previously-developed screening approach using the cancer drug erlotinib as a template to screen other approved drugs that mimic its properties. Among the top 12 ranking candidates, four are cancer drugs, two of them kinase inhibitors (like erlotinib). Cellular studies using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells revealed that several drugs inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation. We mined patient records at the Regenstrief Medical Record System to explore the possible association of exposure to three of these drugs with occurrence of lung cancer. Preliminary in vivo studies using the non-small cell lung cancer (NCLSC) xenograft model showed that losartan- and astemizole-treated mice had tumors that weighed 50 (p < 0.01) and 15 (p < 0.01) percent less than the treated controls. These results set the stage for further exploration of these drugs and to uncover new drugs for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24402119

  4. Roles of sildenafil in enhancing drug sensitivity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Patel, Atish S; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has decreased the hope for successful cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transmembrane family. The overexpression of ABC transporters is a major determinant of MDR in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Unfortunately, until recently, most of the strategies used to surmount ABC-transporter-mediated MDR have had limited success. An ideal modulator of MDR would be one that has a low liability to induce toxicity and alter the pharmacokinetic profile of antineoplastic drugs. Sildenafil, an inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, was found to significantly reverse ABC-transporter-mediated MDR. Our results indicate that sildenafil has differential inhibitory effects on ABC transporters: It significantly decreases the efflux activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2, but has no significant effects on ABCC1. Emerging evidence indicates that sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors may enhance the sensitivity of certain types of cancer to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21610107

  5. The new concepts on overcoming drug resistance in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weisan Zhang,1 Ping Lei,1 Xifeng Dong,2 Cuiping Xu31Department of Geriatrics, 2Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. The current first-line therapies include chemotherapy using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapies. With the current progress in identifying new molecular targets, acquired drug resistance stands as an obstacle for good prognosis. About half the patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatments develop resistance. Although extensive studies have been applied to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, evidence is far from enough to establish a well-defined picture to correct resistance. In the review, we will discuss four different currently developed strategies that have the potential to overcome drug resistance in lung cancer therapies and facilitate prolonged anticancer effects of the first-line therapies.Keywords: ALK receptors cancer stem cell, chemotherapy, EGFR-TKI, target therapy, pharmacology, molecular biology, biotherapy

  6. Surgical radiation and drug therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There main components of the program of radical therapy of breast cancer are distinguished: surgical, radiation and drug. The surgical operation continues to be one of the main therapeutic methods, though there is a trend towards limitation of the amount of surgical interventions. Investigations are carried out in the performance of rational operations of the cancer of the 1 and 2 stages supplemented with pre- and postoperative irradiation. Techniques of large dose fractionation are doveloped. It is shown that in case of 2b and 3a,b stages it is oppropriate to assign a combined or complex therapy: operation, irradiation and chemotherapy. The advantages of polychemotherapy via monochemotherapy are noted. The effect of immunotherapy on the efficiency of the therapy of brest cancer is studied. A conclusion is made that a certain progress has been reached recently in the treatment of breast cancer and that only an individual approach should be used when choosing therapy tactics taking into account all vital factors

  7. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R. (Einstein); (UNC); (North Carolina Central University)

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  8. Ziconotide in severe, drug-resistant cancer pain. preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Lavano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Author reports the case of ziconotide intrathecal treatment in three terminal cancer patients, with nociceptive and neuropathic pain, unresponsive to the treatment with intrathecal opioid and adjuvant drugs. An external pump for continuous subarachnoid infusion was implanted to the three patients. The initial dose was 2,4 mcg/die, with increments of 1,2 mcg/die every three days till the maximum dose of 4,8 mcg/die in two patients (survival 61 and 45 days and 7,2 mcg/die in a patient (survival 52 days. VAS reduction was 50% in the fi rst patient, of 57% in the second one and 70% in the third one. In one case, at the dose of 4,8 mcg/die, the treatment was associated with important collateral effects, that requested the temporary suspension of the drug.

  9. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  10. Ziconotide in severe, drug-resistant cancer pain. preliminary experience

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Lavano

    2008-01-01

    The Author reports the case of ziconotide intrathecal treatment in three terminal cancer patients, with nociceptive and neuropathic pain, unresponsive to the treatment with intrathecal opioid and adjuvant drugs. An external pump for continuous subarachnoid infusion was implanted to the three patients. The initial dose was 2,4 mcg/die, with increments of 1,2 mcg/die every three days till the maximum dose of 4,8 mcg/die in two patients (survival 61 and 45 days) and 7,2 mcg/die in a pat...

  11. TWO OPTIMAL CONTROL PROBLEMS IN CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY WITH DRUG RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Krabs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate two well-known basic optimal control problems forchemotherapeutic cancer treatment modified by introducing a timedependent “resistance factor”. This factor should be responsible for the effect of the drug resistance of tumor cells on the dynamical growth for the tumor. Both optimal control problems have common pointwise but different integral constraints on the control. We show that in both models the usually practised bang-bang control is optimal if the resistance is sufficiently strong. Further, we discuss different optimal strategies in both models for general resistance.

  12. Tumor burden talks in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PEGylated liposomes are important drug carriers that can passively target tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect in neoplasm lesions. This study demonstrated that tumor burden determines the tumor uptake, and also the tumor response, in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs in a C26/tk-luc colon carcinoma-bearing mouse model. METHODS: Empty PEGylated liposomes (NanoX and those encapsulated with VNB (NanoVNB were labeled with In-111 to obtain InNanoX and InVNBL in high labeling yield and radiochemical purity (all >90%. BALB/c mice bearing either small (58.4±8.0 mm(3 or large (102.4±22.0 mm(3 C26/tk-luc tumors in the right dorsal flank were intravenously administered with NanoVNB, InNanoX, InVNBL, or NanoX as a control, every 7 days for 3 times. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by body weight loss, tumor growth inhibition (using calipers and bioluminescence imaging and survival fraction. The scintigraphic imaging of tumor mouse was performed during and after treatment. RESULTS: The biodistribution study of InVNBL revealed a clear inverse correlation (r (2 = 0.9336 between the tumor uptake and the tumor mass ranged from 27.6 to 623.9 mg. All three liposomal drugs showed better therapeutic efficacy in small-tumor mice than in large-tumor mice. Tumor-bearing mice treated with InVNBL (a combination drug showed the highest tumor growth inhibition rate and survival fraction compared to those treated with NanoVNB (chemodrug only and InNanoX (radionuclide only. Specific tumor targeting and significantly increased tumor uptake after periodical treatment with InVNBL were evidenced by scintigraphic imaging, especially in mice bearing small tumors. CONCLUSION: The significant differences in the outcomes of cancer treatment and molecular imaging between animals bearing small and large tumors revealed that tumor burden is a critical and discriminative factor in cancer therapy using PEGylated liposomal drugs.

  13. Molecular Basis of Drug Interactions of Methotrexate, Cyclophosphamide and 5-Fluorouracil as Chemotherapeutic Agents in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Sarder; Md. Golam Rabbani; A. S. M. Homaun Kabir Chowdhury; Mahbub-E-Sobhani

    2015-01-01

    At present, chemotherapy is one of the principal methods of treatment of cancer. For many years, chemotherapy is possibly the only way to control cancers that do not respond to either surgery or radiation. To date a good number of chemotherapeutic drugs have been developed which are effective in the treatment of human cancers. But, A few drugs have been known to be safe and promising. The most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs include methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouraci...

  14. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  15. New Methods to Screen for Cancer Drugs and to Evaluate their Mechanism of Action

    OpenAIRE

    Rickardson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease and due to problems with resistance against cancer drugs and the limited benefit from chemotherapy in many diagnoses, there is a need to develop new cancer drugs. In this thesis new methods to screen for cancer drugs and to evaluate their mechanism of action are discussed. In Paper I, it was found that by studying the gene expression of a cell line panel and combining the data with sensitivity data of a number of cytotoxic drugs, it was possible to cluster compounds...

  16. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  17. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfen Ma

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differential gene expression profile is negatively correlated with the differentially expressed genes in the target disease. However, many of the potentially useful drugs (PUDs identified by gene expression profile correlation are likely false positives because, in C-Map, the cultured cell lines to which the drug is applied are not derived from diseased tissues. To solve this problem, we developed a combined approach for predicting candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer. We first identified PUDs for pancreatic cancer by using C-Map-based gene expression correlation analyses. We then applied an algorithm (Met-express to predict key pancreatic cancer (KPC enzymes involved in pancreatic cancer metabolism. Finally, we selected candidates from the PUDs by requiring that their targets be KPC enzymes or the substrates/products of KPC enzymes. Using this combined approach, we predicted seven candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer, three of which are supported by literature evidence, and three were experimentally validated to be inhibitory to pancreatic cancer celllines.

  18. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs

  19. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  20. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Chiodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  1. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  2. Inferences of drug responses in cancer cells from cancer genomic features and compound chemical and therapeutic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongcui; Fang, Jianwen; Chen, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Accurately predicting the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a core goal of precision medicine. Existing approaches were mainly relied primarily on genomic alterations in cancer cells that have been treated with different drugs. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on integration of the heterogeneously pharmacogenomics data from both cell and drug sides. Through a systematical approach, named as PDRCC (Predict Drug Response in Cancer Cells), the cancer genomic alterations and compound chemical and therapeutic properties were incorporated to determine the chemotherapeutic response in cancer patients. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) study as the benchmark dataset, all pharmacogenomics data exhibited their roles in inferring the relationships between cancer cells and drugs. When integrating both genomic resources and compound information, the prediction coverage was significantly increased. The validity of PDRCC was also supported by its effective in uncovering the unknown cell-drug associations with database and literature evidences. It set the stage for clinical testing of novel therapeutic strategies, such as the sensitive association between cancer cell ‘A549_LUNG’ and compound ‘Topotecan’. In conclusion, PDRCC offers the possibility for faster, safer, and cheaper the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics in the early-stage clinical trails. PMID:27645580

  3. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  4. Designing anti-cancer drugs and directing anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Elinor; Soto-Andrade, Jorge; Bongalon, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A prototype for a web application was designed and implemented as a guide to be used by clinicians when designing the best drug therapy for a specific cancer patient, given biological data derived from the patients tumor tissue biopsy. A representation of the patients metabolic pathways is displayed as a graph in the application, with nodes as substrates and products and edges as enzymes. The top metabolically active sub- paths in the pathway, ranked using an algorithm based on both the patie...

  5. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-01-01

    “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mit...

  6. A novel magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier for enhanced cancer chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs loaded with antitumor drugs in combination with an external magnetic field (EMF-guided delivery can improve the efficacy of treatment and may decrease serious side effects. The purpose of this study was 1 to investigate application of PEG modified GMNPs (PGMNPs as a drug carrier of the chemotherapy compound doxorubicin (DOX in vitro; 2 to evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of DOX-conjugated PGMNPs (DOX-PGMNPs using an EMF-guided delivery in vivo. METHODS: First, DOX-PGMNPs were synthesized and the cytotoxicity of DOX-PGMNPs was assessed in vitro. Second, upon intravenous administration of DOX-PMGPNs to H22 hepatoma cell tumor-bearing mice, the DOX biodistribution in different organs (tissues was measured. The antitumor activity was evaluated using different treatment strategies such as DOX-PMGPNs or DOX-PMGPNs with an EMF-guided delivery (DOX-PGMNPs-M. RESULTS: The relative tumor volumes in DOX-PGMNPs-M, DOX-PGMNPs, and DOX groups were 5.46±1.48, 9.22±1.51, and 14.8±1.64, respectively (each p<0.05, following treatment for 33 days. The life span of tumor-bearing mice treated with DOX-PGMNPs-M, DOX-PGMNPs, and DOX were 74.8±9.95, 66.1±13.5, and 31.3±3.31 days, respectively (each p<0.05. CONCLUSION: This simple and adaptive nanoparticle design may accommodate chemotherapy for drug delivery optimization and in vivo drug-target definition in system biology profiling, increasing the margin of safety in treatment of cancers in the near future.

  7. Cancer drugs inhibit morphogenesis in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushree M Routh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida infections are very common in cancer patients and it is a common practice to prescribe antifungal antibiotics along with anticancer drugs. Yeast to hyphal form switching is considered to be important in invasive candidiasis. Targeting morphogenetic switching may be useful against invasive candidiasis. In this study, we report the antimorphogenetic properties of thirty cancer drugs.

  8. The reduction of anti-cancer drug antagonism by the spatial protection of drugs with PLA-TPGS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guang-Rong; Feng, Si-Shen; Leong, David T

    2014-03-01

    Docetaxel (DCL) and tamoxifen (TAM) individually are potent drugs in the fight against breast cancer. However when used in combination, they become antagonistic because of differential metabolism of both drugs. We reasoned that by spatially protecting them from metabolizing enzymes with poly (lactide)-D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS) nanoparticles (NPs), we might reduce this drug antagonism. We now report that the drug antagonism between DCL and TAM in MCF7 cell line, was significantly reduced when co-delivered in PLA-TPGS NPs. In addition, this effect of NPs attenuated at high drug concentrations. To investigate the role of NPs in the reduction of drug antagonism, we quantified cellular uptake of the fluorescent model drug coumarin 6 (C6) encapsulated in a rigorous permutation of drugs-nanoparticles ratios. NPs carrying C6 exhibited enhanced cellular uptake over their free C6 counterparts at correspondingly low drug concentrations. This led us to conclude that the reduction of drug antagonism by NPs is correlated to cellular uptake and being in NPs therefore protects both drugs until they are released intracellular for therapeutic anti-cancer effect. PMID:24439415

  9. Market access of cancer drugs in European countries: improving resource allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Kim; Huys, Isabelle; Casteels, Minne; De Nys, Katelijne; Simoens, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Public health systems need to make well-founded choices in order to distribute their scarce resources in the most efficient way. Given the number of cancer patients, public/private investments in oncology research, the growing number of new anti-cancer agents and consequent budget impact of cancer care, market access of cancer drugs has become delicate over the last decade. Furthermore, decision makers are challenged by ethical objections and endeavour to provide fair and equal access to treatments for cancer patients. The aim of this study is to generate an overview of market access procedures for cancer drugs in eight European countries and formulate advice for improvement of resource allocation. Results are obtained through a literature review and a qualitative questionnaire and validated by experts with proven knowledge about procedures for price setting and reimbursement of drugs. Diverse measures are applied in the studied countries to optimize reimbursement of cancer drugs such as adjusted cost-effectiveness threshold, regulations for off-label use and new market access agreements. Additionally, innovative cancer drugs are excluded from explicit cost control measures such as payback of budget excess by pharmaceutical companies and lump-sum payments per diagnostic related groups (DRG) in the hospital. The results suggest that cancer is prioritized above other disease areas. Further research is necessary to address the question if society attaches higher value to cancer drugs than to treatments for other diseases. PMID:24243526

  10. Neoadjuvant Window Studies of Metformin and Biomarker Development for Drugs Targeting Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Simon R; Patel, Neel; Liu, Dan; Fenwick, John; Gleeson, Fergus; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential of the altered metabolic state typical of cancer cells as a drug target. The antidiabetes drug, metformin, is now under intense investigation as a safe method to modify cancer metabolism. Several studies have used window of opportunity in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to correlate gene expression analysis, metabolomics, immunohistochemical markers, and metabolic serum markers with those likely to benefit. We review the role metabolite measurement, functional imaging and gene sequencing analysis play in elucidating the effects of metabolically targeted drugs in cancer treatment and determining patient selection. PMID:26063894

  11. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  12. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  13. Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: A potential drug carrier for cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvamuthukumar Subramanian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology having developed exponentially, the aim has been on therapeutic undertaking, particularly for cancerous disease chemotherapy. Nanostructured lipid carriers have attracted expanding scientific and commercial vigilance in the last couple of years as alternate carriers for the pharmaceutical consignment, particularly anticancer pharmaceuticals. Shortcomings often came across with anticancer mixtures, such as poor solubility, normal tissue toxicity, poor specificity and steadiness, as well as the high incidence rate of pharmaceutical resistance and the rapid degradation, need of large-scale output procedures, a fast release of the pharmaceutical from its carrier scheme, steadiness troubles, the residues of the organic solvents utilized in the output method and the toxicity from the polymer with esteem to the carrier scheme are anticipated to be overcome through use of the Nanostructured Lipid Carrier. In this review the benefits, types, drug release modulations, steadiness and output techniques of NLCs are discussed. In supplement, the function of NLC in cancer chemotherapy is presented and hotspots in research are emphasized. It is foreseen that, in the beside future, nanostructured lipid carriers will be further advanced to consign cytotoxic anticancer compounds in a more efficient, exact and protected manner.

  14. Diversity-Oriented Synthetic Strategies Applied to Cancer Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Collins; Jones, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    How can diversity-oriented strategies for chemical synthesis provide chemical tools to help shape our understanding of complex cancer pathways and progress anti-cancer drug discovery efforts? This review (surveying the literature from 2003 to the present) considers the applications of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS), biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS) and associated strategies to cancer biology and drug discovery, summarising the syntheses of novel and often highly complex scaffolds from p...

  15. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Stella; To, Kenneth KW; Lin, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studie...

  16. Breast Cancer in 2013: Genomics, drug approval pathways, and optimal treatment duration

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Adrian V.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    2013 was another rich year for breast cancer research. Advances in high throughput technologies continue to refine our knowledge of the molecular biology of breast cancer, and are beginning to give insight into cancer evolution, drug resistance, and deployment of precision therapeutics.

  17. Anticancer drug-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles to enhance the chemotherapeutic efficacy in lung cancer metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    LONG, JIAN-TING; Cheang, Tuck-yun; Zhuo, Shu-Yu; Zeng, Rui-Fang; Dai, Qiang-sheng; Li, He-Ping; Fang, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhalation of chemotherapeutic drugs directly into the lungs augments the drug exposure to lung cancers. The inhalation of free drugs however results in over exposure and causes severe adverse effect to normal cells. In the present study, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-modified gelatin nanoparticles (EGNP) was developed to administer doxorubicin (DOX) to lung cancers. Results The EGNP released DOX in a sustained manner and effectively internalized in EGFR overexpressing A549 and H22...

  18. The Local Influence of Pioneer Investigators on Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Cancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Agha; David Molitor

    2015-01-01

    Local opinion leaders may play a key role in easing information frictions associated with technology adoption. This paper analyzes the influence of physician investigators who lead pivotal clinical trials for new cancer drugs. By comparing diffusion patterns across many drugs, we separate correlated regional demand for new technology from information spillovers. Using original data on clinical trial study authors for 21 new cancer drugs along with Medicare claims data from 1998-2008, we find ...

  19. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  20. Alpinetin inhibits lung cancer progression and elevates sensitization drug-resistant lung cancer cells to cis-diammined dichloridoplatium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu L

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lin Wu, Wei Yang, Su-ning Zhang, Ji-bin Lu Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Alpinetin is a novel flavonoid that has demonstrated potent antitumor activity in previous studies. However, the efficacy and mechanism of alpinetin in treating lung cancer have not been determined. Methods: We evaluated the impact of different doses and durations of alpinetin treatment on the cell proliferation, the apoptosis of lung cancer cells, as well as the drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Results: This study showed that the alpinetin inhibited the cell proliferation, enhanced the apoptosis, and inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling in lung cancer cells. Moreover, alpinetin significantly increased the sensitivity of drug-resistant lung cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic effect of cis-diammined dichloridoplatium. Taken together, this study demonstrated that alpinetin significantly suppressed the development of human lung cancer possibly by influencing mitochondria and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and sensitized drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Conclusion: Alpinetin may be used as a potential compound for combinatorial therapy or as a complement to other chemotherapeutic agents when multiple lines of treatments have failed to reduce lung cancer. Keywords: alpinetin, cell proliferation and apoptosis, drug resistance reversal, PI3K/Akt, lung cancer

  1. Gellan gum nanohydrogel containing anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs: a multi-drug delivery system for a combination therapy in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Navarro, Gemma; Di Meo, Chiara; Matricardi, Pietro; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, it has become evident that inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis: tumor microenvironment is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells. In the present work, a novel gellan gum nanohydrogel system (NH) able to carry and deliver simultaneously anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs was developed. Prednisolone was chemically linked to the carboxylic groups of gellan gum to serve as a hydrophobic moiety promoting nanohydrogel formation, whereas paclitaxel was then physically entrapped in it. NH improved drug performances, acting as paclitaxel and prednisolone solubility enhancer and favoring the drug uptake in the cells. Moreover, NH allowed an increased cytotoxic effect in vitro on several types of cancer cells due to the synergistic effect of the combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs. Thus, NH can be useful in a combination therapy that attacks both, malignant cells and tumor inflammatory components. PMID:24215783

  2. An MMP-2 Responsive Liposome Integrating Antifibrosis and Chemotherapeutic Drugs for Enhanced Drug Perfusion and Efficacy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tianjiao; Li, Suping; Zhang, Yinlong; Lang, Jiayan; Ding, Yanping; Zhao, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Li, Yiye; Shi, Jian; Hao, Jihui; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-02-10

    Fibrotic stroma, a critical character of pancreatic tumor microenvironment, provides a critical barrier against the penetration and efficacy of various antitumor drugs. Therefore, new strategies are urgently needed to alleviate the fibrotic mass and increase the drug perfusion within pancreatic cancer tissue. In our current work, we developed a β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) modified matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) responsive liposome, integrating antifibrosis and chemotherapeutic drugs for regulation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a key source of the fibrosis, and targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs for pancreatic cancer therapy. These liposomes disassembed into two functional parts upon MMP-2 cleavage at the tumor site. One part was constituted by the β-CDs and the antifibrosis drug pirfenidone, which was kept in the stroma and inhibited the expression of collagen I and TGF-β in PSCs, down-regulating the fibrosis and decreasing the stromal barrier. The other segment, the RGD peptide-modified-liposome loading the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine, targeted and killed pancreatic tumor cells. This integrated nanomedicine, showing an increased drug perfusion without any overt side effects, may provide a potential strategy for improvement of the pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26759926

  3. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  4. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  5. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  6. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed. PMID:23170959

  7. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  8. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  9. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  10. Advanced drug delivery systems of curcumin for cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shyam S; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-08-01

    Since ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticarcinogenic, and antiangiogenic activity in various cell cultures and some animal studies. Research over the past 4 decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been shown to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician's armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  11. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  12. Cancer Research UK Centre for Drug Development: translating 21st-century science into the cancer medicines of tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, James W A; Williams, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Research UK Centre (CRUK) for Drug Development (CDD) can trace its origins back to the Cancer Research Campaign Phase I/II Committee (created in 1980) and to date has tested over 120 potential cancer medicines in early-phase clinical trials. Five drugs are now registered, providing benefit to thousands of patients with cancer as part of their routine standard of care. In recent years, the CDD has established several different business and operating models that provide it with access to the pipelines of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This has enabled potential new treatments to be taken into clinical development that might have otherwise languished on companies' shelves and has increased the number of drug combinations being explored in early-phase clinical trials. PMID:25794601

  13. Acid-mediated Lipinski’s second rule: application to drug design and targeting in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Omran, Ziad; Rauch, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    With a predicted 382.4 per 100,000 people expected to suffer from some form of malignant neoplasm by 2015, and a current death toll of 1 out of 8 deaths worldwide, improving treatment and/or drug design is an essential focus of cancer research. Multi-drug resistance is the leading cause of chemotherapeutic failure, and delivery of anticancer drugs to the inside of cancerous cells is another major challenge. Fifteen years ago, in a completely different field in which improving drug delivery is...

  14. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  15. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery. PMID:27229857

  16. The reversal of antineoplastic drug resistance in cancer cells by β-elemene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Ashby, Charles R; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Guo, Huiqin

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), defined as the resistance of cancer cells to compounds with diverse structures and mechanisms of actions, significantly limits the efficacy of antitumor drugs. A major mechanism that mediates MDR in cancer is the overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters. These transporters bind to their respective substrates and catalyze their efflux from cancer cells, thereby lowering the intracellular concentrations of the substrates and thus attenuating or even abolishing their efficacy. In addition, cancer cells can become resistant to drugs via mechanisms that attenuate apoptosis and cell cycle arrest such as alterations in the p53, check point kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which β-elemene, a compound extracted from Rhizoma zedoariae that has clinical antitumor efficacy, overcomes drug resistance in cancer. PMID:26370907

  17. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano-Hernandez, Alejandro D; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Laura L. Valdez-Velazquez; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC ...

  18. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  19. Trabectedin, a drug acting on both cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    D'Incalci, M; Badri, N; Galmarini, C M; Allavena, P

    2014-01-01

    Trabectedin is the first marine-derived anti-neoplastic drug approved for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and, in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, for the treatment of patients with relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. From the beginning of its development, trabectedin showed some peculiar properties that clearly distinguished it from other anti-cancer drugs. In this mini-review, we will outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mode of action ...

  20. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti...

  1. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  2. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  3. Role of the Drug Transporter ABCC3 in Breast Cancer Chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Sai A.; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Chamallamudi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Gupta, Vaijayanti; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of ABC-family of transporters is associated with chemotherapy failure. Although the drug transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC1 have been majorly implicated in cancer drug resistance, recent studies have associated ABCC3 with multi drug resistance and poor clinical response. In this study, we have examined the expression of ABCC3 in breast cancers and studied its role in drug resistance and stemness of breast cancer cells in comparison with the more studied ABCC1. We observed that similar to ABCC1, the transcripts levels of ABCC3 was significantly high in breast cancers compared to adjacent normal tissue. Importantly, expression of both transporters was further increased in chemotherapy treated patient samples. Consistent with this, we observed that treatment of breast cancer cell lines with anti-cancer agents increased their mRNA levels of both ABCC1 and ABCC3. Further, similar to knockdown of ABCC1, knockdown of ABCC3 also significantly increased the retention of chemotherapeutic drugs in breast cancer cells and rendered them more chemo-sensitive. Interestingly, ABCC1 and ABCC3 knockdown cells also showed reduction in the expression of stemness genes, while ABCC3 knockdown additionally led to a reduction in the CD44high/CD24low breast cancer stem-like subpopulation. Consistent with this, their ability to form primary tumours was compromised. Importantly, down-modulation of ABCC3 rendered these cells increasingly susceptible to doxorubicin in xenograft mice models in vivo. Thus, our study highlights the importance of ABCC3 transporters in drug resistance to chemotherapy in the context of breast cancer. Further, these results suggest that combinatorial inhibition of these transporters together with standard chemotherapy can reduce therapy-induced resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27171227

  4. Amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to fabricate excipient-free stable nanodispersions of hydrophobic drugs for cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqi; Lee, Eunhye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Jinqiang; Zhou, Zhuxian; Li, Yixian; Li, Xiaoyi; Tang, Jianbin; Lee, Don Haeng; Liu, Xiangrui; Shen, Youqing

    2015-12-28

    Nanoformulations have been extensively explored to deliver water-insoluble drugs, but they generally use exotic new materials, for instance, amphiphilic block copolymers, which must first go through extensively clinical trials and be approved as drug excipients before any clinical uses. We hypothesize that using clinical amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to self-assemble with and thus solubilize hydrophobic drugs will lead to readily translational nanoformulations as they contain no new excipients. Herein, we show the first example of such excipient-free nanodispersions using an amphiphilic anti-tumor drug, irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT11). CPT11 self-assembles with its insoluble active parent drug, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN38), into stable and water-dispersible nanoparticles, increasing SN38's water solubility by thousands of times up to 25 mg/mL with a loading efficiency close to 100%. The versatility of this approach is also demonstrated by fabricating nanodispersions of CPT11 with other water-insoluble drugs including paclitaxel (PTX) and camptothecin (CPT). These nanodispersions have much increased bioavailability and thereby improved anti-cancer activities. Thus, this strategy, using clinically proven amphiphilic drugs as excipients to fabricate nanodispersions, avoids new materials and makes readily translational nanoformulations of hydrophobic drugs.

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  6. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Nanna; Baandrup, Louise; Dehlendorff, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We examined the association between use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endometrial cancer risk in a nationwide case-control study. METHODS: Cases were all women in Denmark diagnosed with endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. Age...... for potential confounders. Analyses were stratified by endometrial cancer type, and potential effect modification by parity, obesity, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use was investigated. RESULTS: We identified 5,382 endometrial cancer cases and 72,127 controls. Endometrial cancer was not associated...

  7. Mechanism of cancer drug resistance and the involvement of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Hui, Kam M

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer therapies. Although our understanding of resistance to targeted cancer drugs remains incomplete, new and more creative approaches are being exploited to intercept this phenomenon. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding that cancer drug resistance can be caused by alterations of drug efflux, increases in drug metabolism, mutations of drug targets, alterations in DNA repair and cell cycle, changes in cell apoptosis and autophagy, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Furthermore, intracellular signalling pathways have been shown to play key physiological roles and the abnormal activation of signalling pathways may be correlated with drug resistance. Recently, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important regulators of gene expression and alternative splicing, which provides cells with yet another mode to greatly increase regulatory complexity and fine-tune their transcriptome and can rapidly adjust their proteome in response to stimuli. Consequently, a wide variety of biological functions have been shown to depend on the coordinated interactions between noncoding RNAs and cellular signalling networks to achieve a concerted desired physiological outcome, whereas mutations and dysregulation of ncRNAs have been linked to diverse human diseases, including cancer drug resistance. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory ncRNAs on the signalling pathways involved in cancer drug resistance and the therapeutic potential of reverse drug resistance.

  8. Nano-mechanical Phenotype as a Promising Biomarker to Evaluate Cancer Development, Progression, and Anti-cancer Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeun

    2016-06-01

    Since various bio-mechanical assays have been introduced for studying mechanical properties of biological samples, much progress has been made in cancer biology. It has been noted that enhanced mechanical deformability can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis. The relation between mechanical compliances and the metastatic potential of cancer cells has been suggested to be a promising prognostic marker. Although it is yet to be conclusive about its clinical application due to the complexity in the tissue integrity, the nano-mechanical compliance of human cell samples has been evaluated by several groups as a promising marker in diagnosing cancer development and anticipating its progression. In this review, we address the mechanical properties of diverse cancer cells obtained by atomic force microscopy-based indentation experiments and reiterate prognostic relations between the nano-mechanical compliance and cancer progression. We also review the nano-mechanical responses of cancer cells to the anti-cancer drug treatment in order to interrogate a possible use of nano-mechanical compliance as a means to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Systematic repurposing screening in xenograft models identifies approved drugs with novel anti-cancer activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Roix

    Full Text Available Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10-15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity.

  10. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yan; Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili; Zhu Hong; Hu Sainan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was signiifcantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion:UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  11. Testing whether drugs that weaken norepinephrine signaling prevent or treat various types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fitzgerald

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Recently, I put forth the hypothesis that the signaling molecule, norepinephrine (NE, is an etiological factor in a number of types of cancer. In this brief commentary, I summarize evidence that NE plays a role in cancer and describe details involved in testing the hypothesis in humans through epidemiological investigation of existing medical records of persons who have taken pharmaceutical drugs that affect NE. If NE plays an etiological role in cancers of a number of organs, then taking a single pharmaceutical drug (such as clonidine, prazosin, or propranolol that weakens NE signaling systemically, may simultaneously prevent or treat many different types of cancer, and this may represent a breakthrough in pharmaceutical prevention and possibly treatment of cancer.Keywords: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cancer, clonidine, prazosin, propranolol

  12. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was significantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion: UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  13. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:27185870

  14. Drug treatment for cancer of the corpus uteri: Protracted stagnation or breakthrough expectation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Artamonova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the specific features of the course and therapy of cancer of the corpus uteri on the basis of some clinical and biological characteristics of the tumor. The objective of ongoing and future clinical trials is to expand the arsenal of active drugs and to individualize therapy in patients with endometrial cancer.

  15. Drug treatment for cancer of the corpus uteri: Protracted stagnation or breakthrough expectation

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Artamonova

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers the specific features of the course and therapy of cancer of the corpus uteri on the basis of some clinical and biological characteristics of the tumor. The objective of ongoing and future clinical trials is to expand the arsenal of active drugs and to individualize therapy in patients with endometrial cancer.

  16. Multifunctional HER2-antibody conjugated polymeric nanocarrier-based drug delivery system for multi-drug-resistant breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, Raju; Thangam, Ramar; NipunBabu, Varukattu; Rejeeth, Chandrababu; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Gunasekaran, Palani; Muthuchelian, Krishnasamy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-05-14

    Nanotechnology-based medical approaches have made tremendous potential for enhancing the treatment efficacy with minimal doses of chemotherapeutic drugs against cancer. In this study, using tamoxifen (Tam), biodegradable antibody conjugated polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) was developed to achieve targeted delivery as well as sustained release of the drug against breast cancer cells. Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs were stabilized by coating with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and copolymer polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) was used to conjugate herceptin (antibody) with PLGA NPs for promoting the site-specific intracellular delivery of Tam against HER2 receptor overexpressed breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The Tam-loaded PVP-PLGA NPs and herceptin-conjugated Tam-loaded PVP-PLGA NPs were characterized in terms of morphology, size, surface charge, and structural chemistry by dynamic light scattering (DLS), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ζ potential analysis, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. pH-based drug release property and the anticancer activity (in vitro and in vivo models) of the herceptin conjugated polymeric NPs were evaluated by flow cytometry and confocal image analysis. Besides, the extent of cellular uptake of drug via HER2 receptor-mediated endocytosis by herceptin-conjugated Tam-loaded PVP-PLGA NPs was examined. Furthermore, the possible signaling pathway of apoptotic induction in MCF-7 cells was explored by Western blotting, and it was demonstrated that drug-loaded PLGA NPs were capable of inducing apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. Hence, this nanocarrier drug delivery system (DDS) not only actively targets a multidrug-resistance (MDR) associated phenotype (HER2 receptor overexpression) but also improves therapeutic efficiency by enhancing the cancer cell targeted delivery and sustained release of therapeutic agents. PMID:24780315

  17. Benchmarking of gastric cancer sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs ex vivo as a basis for drug selection in systemic and intraperitoneal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hultman, Bo; Mahteme, Haile; Sundbom, Magnus; Ljungman, Martin; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background   The choice of drugs for treatment of advanced gastric cancer (GC) is empirical. The purpose of the current study was to benchmark ex vivo the sensitivity of GC tumor cells from patients to standard cytotoxic and some newly introduced targeted drugs (TDs), as a basis for drug selection in the treatment of GC. Methods   Tumor cell samples from patients with GC were analyzed for sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, mito­mycin C, doxorubicin and doceta...

  18. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX...

  19. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim eGurpinar; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX...

  20. In vitro characterization of the human biotransformation of marine derived anti-cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Brandon, E.F.A. (Esther Fleur Annette)

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death in The Netherlands. Although the treatment options over the past few decades have substantially improved, the cure rate for patients with advanced cancer remains low. In addition, hopefully new therapies will induce less severe side effects compared to the present therapies. Overall, new anti cancer drugs are still very much needed to improve treatment outcome of patients. Many active cytotoxic agents originate from natural resources, mainly plants (e.g. pa...

  1. Effect of Paullinia cupana on MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to chemotherapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    HERTZ, EVERALDO; CADONÁ, FRANCINE CARLA; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Azzolin, Verônica; HOLMRICH, SABRINA; ASSMANN, CHARLES; LEDUR, PAULINE; RIBEIRO, EULER ESTEVES; DE SOUZA FILHO, OLMIRO CEZIMBRA; MÂNICA-CATTANI, MARIA FERNANDA; DA CRUZ, IVANA BEATRICE MÂNICA

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that certain plants, such as guarana (Paullinia cupana), exert a protective effect against cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, guarana possesses bioactive molecules, such as caffeine and catechin, which may affect the pharmacological properties of antitumor drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guarana on breast cancer cell response to 7 chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the trea...

  2. Intracellular Trafficking Considerations in the Development of Natural Ligand-Drug Molecular Conjugates for Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Dennis J.; Liu, Christina T.; Quinlan, Devin S.; Nafisi, Parsa M.; Kamei, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Overexpressed receptors, characteristic of many cancers, have been targeted by various researchers to achieve a more specific treatment for cancer. A common approach is to use the natural ligand for the overexpressed receptor as a cancer-targeting agent which can deliver a chemically or genetically conjugated toxic molecule. However, it has been found that the therapeutic efficacy of such ligand-drug molecular conjugates can be limited, since they naturally follow the intracellular traffickin...

  3. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, “EGFR-addicted” cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erl...

  4. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  5. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of ion...... discuss the possibility that the development of MDR involves sequential and localized upregulation of ion channels involved in proliferation and migration and a concomitant global and persistent downregulation of ion channels involved in apoptosis. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society....

  6. Insulin-like growth factor 2 silencing restores taxol sensitivity in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone.

  7. Development and characterization of multifunctional nanoparticles for drug delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahire, Rahul Rajaram

    Lipid and polymeric nanoparticles, although proven to be effective drug delivery systems compared to free drugs, have shown considerable limitations pertaining to their uptake and release at tumor sites. Spatial and temporal control over the delivery of anticancer drugs has always been challenge to drug delivery scientists. Here, we have developed and characterized multifunctional nanoparticles (liposomes and polymersomes) which are targeted specifically to cancer cells, and release their contents with tumor specific internal triggers. To enable these nanoparticles to be tracked in blood circulation, we have imparted them with echogenic characteristic. Echogenicity of nanoparticles is evaluated using ultrasound scattering and imaging experiments. Nanoparticles demonstrated effective release with internal triggers such as elevated levels of MMP-9 enzyme found in the extracellular matrix of tumor cells, decreased pH of lysosome, and differential concentration of reducing agents in cytosol of cancer cells. We have also successfully demonstrated the sensitivity of these particles towards ultrasound to further enhance the release with internal triggers. To ensure the selective uptake by folate receptor- overexpressing cancer cells, we decorated these nanoparticles with folic acid on their surface. Fluorescence microscopic images showed significantly higher uptake of folate-targeted nanoparticles by MCF-7 (breast cancer) and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells compared to particles without any targeting ligand on their surface. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these nanoparticles to carry the drugs inside and kill cancer cells, we encapsulated doxorubicin and/or gemcitabine employing the pH gradient method. Drug loaded nanoparticles showed significantly higher killing of the cancer cells compared to their non-targeted counterparts and free drugs. With further development, these nanoparticles certainly have potential to be used as a multifunctional nanocarriers for image

  8. Drugs in development for treatment of patients with cancer-related anorexia and cachexia syndrome [Retraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mantovani G.; Madeddu C; Macciò A

    2013-01-01

     The Editor-in-Chief, Dr Pilch, of Drug Design, Development and Therapy has been alerted to unacceptable levels of duplication between a previously published paper: Macciò A, Madeddu C, Mantovani G. Current pharmacotherapy options for cancer anorexia and cachexia. Expert Opin. Pharmacotherapy 2012 13(17) 2453–2472 and one published subsequently in Drug Design, Development and Therapy: Mantovani G, Madeddu C, Macciò A. Drugs in development for treatment...

  9. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We...

  10. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-chung Lee,1,2 Qing-Dong Ling,1,3 Wan-Chun Yu,4 Chunh-Ming Hung,4 Ta-Chun Kao,4 Yi-Wei Huang,4 Akon Higuchi3–51Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, 2Department of Surgery, Cathay General Hospital, Da'an District, Taipei, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Hsi-Chi City, Taipei, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Reproduction, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Okura, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs.Methods: The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction.Results: Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the

  11. Artificial intelligence techniques for colorectal cancer drug metabolism: ontology and complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romero, Marcos; Vázquez-Naya, José M; Rabuñal, Juan R; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Macenlle, Ramiro; Castro-Alvariño, Javier; López-Roses, Leopoldo; Ulla, José L; Martínez-Calvo, Antonio V; Vázquez, Santiago; Pereira, Javier; Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2010-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent types of cancer in the world and generates important social impact. The understanding of the specific metabolism of this disease and the transformations of the specific drugs will allow finding effective prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the colorectal cancer. All the terms that describe the drug metabolism contribute to the construction of ontology in order to help scientists to link the correlated information and to find the most useful data about this topic. The molecular components involved in this metabolism are included in complex network such as metabolic pathways in order to describe all the molecular interactions in the colorectal cancer. The graphical method of processing biological information such as graphs and complex networks leads to the numerical characterization of the colorectal cancer drug metabolic network by using invariant values named topological indices. Thus, this method can help scientists to study the most important elements in the metabolic pathways and the dynamics of the networks during mutations, denaturation or evolution for any type of disease. This review presents the last studies regarding ontology and complex networks of the colorectal cancer drug metabolism and a basic topology characterization of the drug metabolic process sub-ontology from the Gene Ontology.

  12. Dual drug loaded chitosan nanoparticles-sugar--coated arsenal against pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Karolyn Infanta; Jaidev, Leela Raghav; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive form of cancer with poor survival rates. The increased mortality due to pancreatic cancer arises due to many factors such as development of multidrug resistance, presence of cancer stem cells, development of a stromal barrier and a hypoxic environment due to hypo-perfusion. The present study aims to develop a nanocarrier for a combination of drugs that can address these multiple issues. Quercetin and 5-fluorouracil were loaded in chitosan nanoparticles, individually as well as in combination. The nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, size, zeta potential, percentage encapsulation of drugs as well as their release profiles in different media. The dual drug-loaded carrier exhibited good entrapment efficiency (quercetin 95% and 5-fluorouracil 75%) with chitosan: quercetin: 5-fluorouracil in the ratio 3:1:2. The release profiles suggest that 5-fluorouracil preferentially localized in the periphery while quercetin was located towards the core of chitosan nanoparticles. Both drugs exhibited considerable association with the chitosan matrix. The dual drug-loaded carrier system exhibited significant toxicity towards pancreatic cancer cells both in the 2D as well as in the 3D cultures. We believe that the results from these studies can open up interesting options in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26340358

  13. Accelerated Approval of Cancer Drugs: Improved Access to Therapeutic Breakthroughs or Early Release of Unsafe and Ineffective Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Elizabeth A.; Lyons, E. Alison; Nebeker, Jonathan R.; Shankaran, Veena; McKoy, June M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Trifilio, Steven; Sartor, Oliver; Benson, Al B.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Tallman, Martin S.; West, Dennis P.; Hirschfeld, Steven; Grillo-Lopez, Antonio J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated approval (AA) was initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to shorten development times of drugs for serious medical illnesses. Sponsors must confirm efficacy in postapproval trials. Confronted with several drugs that received AA on the basis of phase II trials and for which confirmatory trials were incomplete, FDA officials have encouraged sponsors to design AA applications on the basis of interim analyses of phase III trials. Methods We reviewed data on orphan drug status, development time, safety, and status of confirmatory trials of AAs and regular FDA approvals of new molecular entities (NMEs) for oncology indications since 1995. Results Median development times for AA NMEs (n = 19 drugs) and regular-approval oncology NMEs (n = 32 drugs) were 7.3 and 7.2 years, respectively. Phase III trials supported efficacy for 75% of regular-approval versus 26% of AA NMEs and for 73% of non–orphan versus 45% of orphan drug approvals. AA accounted for 78% of approvals for oncology NMEs between 2001 and 2003 but accounted for 32% in more recent years. Among AA NMEs, confirmatory trials were nine-fold less likely to be completed for orphan drug versus non–orphan drug indications. Postapproval, black box warnings were added to labels for four oncology NMEs (17%) that had received AA and for two oncology NMEs (9%) that had received regular approval. Conclusion AA oncology NMEs are safe and effective, although development times are not accelerated. A return to endorsing phase II trial designs for AA for oncology NMEs, particularly for orphan drug indications, may facilitate timely FDA approval of novel cancer drugs. PMID:19636013

  14. Astemizole: an old anti-histamine as a new promising anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quiroz, Janice; Camacho, Javier

    2011-03-01

    Mortality-to-incidence ratio in cancer patients is extremely high, positioning cancer as a major cause of death worldwide. Despite hundreds of clinical trials for anti-cancer drugs that are currently in progress, most clinical trials for novel drug treatments fail to pass Phase I. However, previously developed drugs with novel anti-tumor properties offer a viable and cost-effective alternative to fight cancer. Histamine favors the proliferation of normal and malignant cells. Several anti-histamine drugs, including astemizole, can inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Astemizole has gained enormous interest since it also targets important proteins involved in cancer progression, namely, ether à-go-go 1 (Eag1) and Eag-related gene (Erg) potassium channels. Furthermore, Eag1 is thought to be an important marker and a therapeutic target for several different cancers. Astemizole inhibits Eag1 and Erg channel activity, and in cells expressing the Eag1 channel it decreases tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. It should be noted that some cardiovascular side effects have been reported for astemizole in a few rare cases. Nevertheless, astemizole stands as a very promising anti-cancer tool because it displays several anti-proliferative mechanisms, may serve as the basis to synthesize new anti-cancer agents, and has been previously administered clinically. In this review we will summarize the main findings relating to histamine and anti-histamines in cancer cell proliferation focusing on astemizole targets (Eag1 and Erg channels), and its anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. We will also describe the side effects of astemizole and discuss proposals to overcome such effects in cancer patients. Finally, we will remark on the relevance of developing novel astemizole-related compounds. PMID:21443504

  15. The post hoc use of randomised controlled trials to explore drug associated cancer outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; Zoungas, Sophia; Chalmers, John;

    2013-01-01

    on public health before proper regulatory action can be taken. This paper aims to discuss challenges of exploring drug-associated cancer outcomes by post-hoc analyses of Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) designed for other purposes. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES TO CONSIDER: We set out to perform a post......INTRODUCTION: Drug-induced cancer risk is of increasing interest. Both observational studies and data from clinical trials have linked several widely used treatments to cancer. When a signal for a potential drug-cancer association is generated, substantiation is required to assess the impact...... challenges must be addressed to enhance the likelihood of reliable conclusions. Advantages of post-hoc analyses of RCTs include quality of data collected and sometimes randomisation to exposure of interest. Limitations include confounding and sample size, which is fixed to suit the purposes of the trial...

  16. Liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells Are Relatively Resistant to the Reported Anti-Cancer Stem Cell Drug Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Miller, Tyler C.; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Ray, Satyajit; Mullinax, John E.; Hari, Danielle M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Godbout, Jessica D.; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recently, we reported that liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells (LRCC) can initiate tumors with only 10 cells and are relatively resistant to the targeted drug Sorafenib, a standard of practice in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LRCC are the only cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated alive according to a stem cell fundamental function, asymmetric cell division. Metformin has been reported to preferentially target many other types of CSC of different organs, including live...

  17. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro, E-mail: soovro@yahoo.ca

    2013-06-01

    Widely used chemotherapeutic breast cancer drugs such as Tamoxifen citrate (TC), Capecitabine (CP) and Epirubicin (EP) are known to cause various cardiovascular side-effects among long term cancer survivors. Vascular modulation warrants nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction, which targets the vascular endothelium. We hypothesize that TC, CP and EP interference with the nitric oxide downstream signaling specifically, could lead to cardiovascular dysfunctions. The results demonstrate that while all three drugs attenuate NO and cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) production in endothelial cells, they caused elevated levels of NO in the plasma and RBC. However, PBMC and platelets did not show any significant changes under treatment. This implies that the drug effects are specific to the endothelium. Altered eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) localization patterns in endothelial cells were observed following drug treatments. Similarly, the expression of phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) protein was decreased under the treatment of drugs. Altered actin polymerization was also observed following drug treatment, while addition of SpNO and 8Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Incubation with the drugs decreased endothelial cell migration whereas addition of YC-1, SC and 8Br-cGMP recovered the effect. Additionally molecular docking studies showed that all three drugs exhibited a strong binding affinity with the catalytic domain of human sGC. In conclusion, results indicate that TC, CP and EP cause endothelial dysfunctions via the NO–sGC–cGMP pathway and these effects could be recovered using pharmaceutical agonists of NO signaling pathway. Further, the study proposes a combination therapy of chemotherapeutic drugs and cGMP analogs, which would confer protection against chemotherapy mediated vascular dysfunctions in cancer patients. - Highlights: • NO production is reduced in endothelial cells under breast cancer drug treatment. • Cellular cGMP level is decreased under

  18. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response.

  19. Curcumin loaded mesoporous silica: an effective drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcherlakota, Rajesh; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Prashar, Sanjiv; Fajardo, Mariano; Briones, David; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Gómez-Ruiz, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we report the delivery of anti-cancer drug curcumin to cancer cells using mesoporous silica materials. A series of mesoporous silica material based drug delivery systems (S2, S4 and S6) were first designed and developed through the amine functionalization of KIT-6, MSU-2 and MCM-41 followed by the loading of curcumin. The curcumin loaded materials were characterized with several physico-chemical techniques and thoroughly screened on cancer cells to evaluate their in vitro drug delivery efficacy. All the curcumin loaded silica materials exhibited higher cellular uptake and inhibition of cancer cell viability compared to pristine curcumin. The effective internalization of curcumin in cancer cells through the mesoporous silica materials initiated the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the down regulation of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme levels compared to free curcumin leading to the activation of apoptosis. This study shows that the anti-cancer activity of curcumin can be potentiated by loading onto mesoporous silica materials. Therefore, we strongly believe that mesoporous silica based curcumin loaded drug delivery systems may have future potential applications for the treatment of cancers. PMID:26674254

  20. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response. PMID:27609668

  1. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-Xian; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-Hai; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attent...

  2. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  3. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  4. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  5. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-05-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering.

  6. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L.; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  7. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  8. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  9. Risk Assessment of Drug Interaction Potential and Concomitant Dosing Pattern on Targeted Toxicities in Pediatric Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Patel, Dimple; Dombrowsky, Erin; Bajaj, Gaurav; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the impact of potential drug interactions on the incidence of reported toxicities seen with common dosing patterns in children with cancer, with the intent of being able to screen and reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the future. Toxicity reported in pediatric cancer patients treated at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia from 2004 to 2010 were abstracted from a cancer tumor registry and merged with drug order profiles from the medical r...

  10. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  11. Roles of cancer registries in enhancing oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Swee-Sung; Lim, Hwee-Yong; Lopes, Gilberto; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Hu, Min; Ibrahim, Hishamshah Mohd; Jha, Anand; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Lee, Pak Wai; Macdonell, Diana; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer registries help to establish and maintain cancer incidence reporting systems, serve as a resource for investigation of cancer and its causes, and provide information for planning and evaluation of preventive and control programs. However, their wider role in directly enhancing oncology drug access has not been fully explored. We examined the value of cancer registries in oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region on three levels: (1) specific registry variable types; (2) macroscopic strategies on the national level; and (3) a regional cancer registry network. Using literature search and proceedings from an expert forum, this paper covers recent cancer registry developments in eight economies in the Asia-Pacific region - Australia, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand - and the ways they can contribute to oncology drug access. Specific registry variables relating to demographics, tumor characteristics, initial treatment plans, prognostic markers, risk factors, and mortality help to anticipate drug needs, identify high-priority research area and design access programs. On a national level, linking registry data with clinical, drug safety, financial, or drug utilization databases allows analyses of associations between utilization and outcomes. Concurrent efforts should also be channeled into developing and implementing data integrity and stewardship policies, and providing clear avenues to make data available. Less mature registry systems can employ modeling techniques and ad-hoc surveys while increasing coverage. Beyond local settings, a cancer registry network for the Asia-Pacific region would offer cross-learning and research opportunities that can exert leverage through the experiences and capabilities of a highly diverse region. PMID:23725106

  12. Targeting AMPK Signaling Pathway to Overcome Drug Resistance for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Pengxi; Chen, Qianjun; Deng, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Situ, Honglin; Zhong, Shaowen; Hann, Swei; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mulitdrug resistance (MDR) is one of critical factorslimiting the efficacy of cancer chemoor radiotherapy. Emerging evidence has indicated that MDR is a complex process regulated by multiple factors, among which stress response molecules are considered as central players. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major regulator balancing energy supply and ultimately protects cells from harmful stresses via coordinating multiple metabolic pathways Notably, AMPK activation was recently shown to mediate the metabolism reprogramming in drug resistant cancer cells including promoting Warburg effects and mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, AMPK activity has also been shown to regulate the self-renewal ability of cancer stem cells that are often refractory to chemotherapy. In addition, AMPK phosphorylation was critical in mediating autophagy induction, a process demonstrated to be effective in chemosensitivity modulation via degrading cellular components to satisfy nutrients requirement under stressful condition. Meanwhile, drug discovery targeting AMPK has been developed to validate the pathological significance of AMPK in cancer prevention and treatment. Although conflicting evidence focusing on the AMPK modulation for cancer treatment is still remained, this might be attributed to differences in AMPK isotypes in specific tissues, off-targets effects, the degree and duration of drug administration and experimental setting of stress conditions. This review will focus on AMPK mediated resistance to cancer therapy and discuss its potential therapeutic implication and targeting drug development. PMID:25777274

  13. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine as a field has emerged from the early success of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, in particular for treatment of cancer, and the advances made in nano- and biotechnology over the past decade. A prerequisite for nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems to be effective......-based strategies are particularly interesting as they require no prior knowledge of the tumour localization. The basis of this review is an evaluation of the current status of drug delivery strategies focused on triggered drug release by disease-associated enzymes. We limit ourselves to reviewing the liposome...

  14. Exploiting the immunomodulatory properties of chemotherapeutic drugs to improve the success of cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eKersten

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Exploiting the Immunomodulatory Properties of Chemotherapeutic Drugs to Improve the Success of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Kelly; Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, ...

  17. Discovery of Drug Synergies in Gastric Cancer Cells Predicted by Logical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flobak, Åsmund; Baudot, Anaïs; Remy, Elisabeth; Thommesen, Liv; Thieffry, Denis; Kuiper, Martin; Lægreid, Astrid

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of efficient anti-cancer drug combinations is a major challenge, since experimental testing of all possible combinations is clearly impossible. Recent efforts to computationally predict drug combination responses retain this experimental search space, as model definitions typically rely on extensive drug perturbation data. We developed a dynamical model representing a cell fate decision network in the AGS gastric cancer cell line, relying on background knowledge extracted from literature and databases. We defined a set of logical equations recapitulating AGS data observed in cells in their baseline proliferative state. Using the modeling software GINsim, model reduction and simulation compression techniques were applied to cope with the vast state space of large logical models and enable simulations of pairwise applications of specific signaling inhibitory chemical substances. Our simulations predicted synergistic growth inhibitory action of five combinations from a total of 21 possible pairs. Four of the predicted synergies were confirmed in AGS cell growth real-time assays, including known effects of combined MEK-AKT or MEK-PI3K inhibitions, along with novel synergistic effects of combined TAK1-AKT or TAK1-PI3K inhibitions. Our strategy reduces the dependence on a priori drug perturbation experimentation for well-characterized signaling networks, by demonstrating that a model predictive of combinatorial drug effects can be inferred from background knowledge on unperturbed and proliferating cancer cells. Our modeling approach can thus contribute to preclinical discovery of efficient anticancer drug combinations, and thereby to development of strategies to tailor treatment to individual cancer patients.

  18. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  19. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  20. Roles for Sildenafil in Enhancing Drug Sensitivity in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhi; Amit K. Tiwari; Patel, Atish S.; Fu, Li-wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has decreased the hope for successful cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter super-family is the largest transmembrane family. The overexpression of ABC transporters is a major determinant of MDR in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Unfortunately, until recently, most of the strategies used to surmount ABC transporter-mediated MDR have had limited success. An ideal modulator of MDR would be one that has a low liabilit...

  1. ANTI – CANCER DRUGS FROM U.P. HIMALAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Uniyal, M. R.; Tewari, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Many ayurvedic texts mention arbuda which is considered as an equivalent of cancer. Vagbhata mentions arbuda of mouth, tongue, eyes, nose, breast and uterus. Caraka and Susruta also provide plenty of information on this dreaded group of diseases. Considering the importance of this disease in present day health care, the authors mention in this paper several plants of the Himalaya, used in the treatment of cancer.

  2. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

  3. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  4. Integrating Domain Specific Knowledge and Network Analysis to Predict Drug Sensitivity of Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sebo; Sundaresan, Varsha; Zhou, Lei; Kahveci, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    One of fundamental challenges in cancer studies is that varying molecular characteristics of different tumor types may lead to resistance to certain drugs. As a result, the same drug can lead to significantly different results in different types of cancer thus emphasizing the need for individualized medicine. Individual prediction of drug response has great potential to aid in improving the clinical outcome and reduce the financial costs associated with prescribing chemotherapy drugs to which the patient's tumor might be resistant. In this paper we develop a network based classifier (NBC) method for predicting sensitivity of cell lines to anticancer drugs from transcriptome data. In the literature, this strategy has been used for predicting cancer types. Here, we extend it to estimate sensitivity of cells from different tumor types to various anticancer drugs. Furthermore, we incorporate domain specific knowledge such as the use of apoptotic gene list and clinical dose information in our method to impart biological significance to the prediction. Our experimental results suggest that our network based classifier (NBC) method outperforms existing classifiers in estimating sensitivity of cell lines for different drugs. PMID:27607242

  5. Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primarily designed to see whether the drug -- called nilotinib (brand name Tasigna) -- is even safe for Parkinson's patients. It did ... issues that make it difficult to know how nilotinib could fit into Parkinson's treatment, if at all. ...

  6. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies reported June 7, 2012, in NEJM indicate that the drug vismodegib can elicit responses in people with advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma and help shrink or prevent tumors in those with basal cell nevus syndrome.

  7. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 29 new BCCs among those who received a placebo . However, more than half of the patients taking vismodegib discontinued treatment because of side effects. Once patients stopped taking the drug, tumors began ...

  8. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR),which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence,has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades.Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated.Well known Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure.Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic)strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits.In this review,we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  9. The application of prodrug-based nano-drug delivery strategy in cancer combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yanxiu; Ma, Yakun; Li, Lingbing

    2016-10-01

    Single drug therapy that leads to the multidrug resistance of cancer cells and severe side-effect is a thing of the past. Combination therapies that affect multiple signaling pathways have been the focus of recent active research. Due to the successful development of prodrug-based nano-drug delivery systems (P-N-DDSs), their use has been extended to combination therapy as drug delivery platforms. In this review, we focus specifically on the P-N-DDSs in the field of combination therapy including the combinations of prodrugs with different chemotherapeutic agents, other therapeutic agents, nucleic acid or the combination of different types of therapy (e.g. chemotherapy and phototherapy). The relevant examples of prodrug-based nanoparticulate drug delivery strategy in combination cancer therapy from the recent literature are discussed to demonstrate the feasibilities of relevant technology. PMID:27400243

  10. Cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcome in registered nurses potentially exposed to antineoplastic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Le Nhu D; Teschke Kay; Chow Yat; Lorenzi Maria; Beking Kris; Spinelli John J; Ratner Pamela A; Gallagher Richard P; Dimich-Ward Helen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the relationships of potential occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs with cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a historical prospective cohort study of female registered nurses (RNs) from British Columbia, Canada (BC). Methods Female RNs registered with a professional regulatory body for at least one year between 1974 and 2000 formed the cohort (n = 56,213). The identifier file was linked to Canadian cancer registries. An RN offspring coh...

  11. Low Concentration of Quercetin Antagonizes the Cytotoxic Effects of Anti-Neoplastic Drugs in Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Na Li; Chaoyang Sun; Bo Zhou; Hui Xing; Ding Ma; Gang Chen; Danhui Weng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of Quercetin in ovarian cancer treatment remains controversial, and the mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of Quercetin in combination with Cisplatin and other anti-neoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, along with the molecular mechanism of action. METHODS: Quercetin treatment at various concentrations was examined in combination with Cisplatin, taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fu in human epithelial...

  12. Drug resistance, and the role of p53, in lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This thesis sets out to increase our knowledge of mechanisms by which lung cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of the tumour suppressor p53 in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer cell lines was investigated. p53 is a tumour suppressor gene, which is mutated in more than half of all tumours. Most chemotherapeutic drugs cause DNA damage that is sensed by p53, which either arrests the cell cycle to allow DNA repair or induces apoptosis. Wildt...

  13. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  14. Natural products against cancer: A comprehensive bibliometric study of the research projects, publications, patents and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Du; Xiaoli L Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze multi-source data including awards, publications, patents and drugs, and try to draw the whole landscape of the research and development community in the area of natural products (NPs) against cancer. Materials and Methods: Awards, publications, patents and drugs data from National Institute of Health/Natural Science Foundation of China (NIH/NSFC), PubMed, Derwent Innovation Index and Cortellis were collected. Bibliometric methodologies and technology are used to in...

  15. Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite Particles for In Vitro Imaging and Encapsulated Chemotherapeutic Drug Delivery to Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kester, Mark; Heakal, Y.; Sharma, A.; Robertson, Gavin P.; Morgan, Thomas T.; İ Altinoğlu, Erhan; Tabaković, Amra; Parette, Mylisa R.; Rouse, Sarah; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Adair, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Paradigm-shifting modalities to more efficiently deliver drugs to cancerous lesions require the following attributes: nanoscale-size, targetability and stability under physiological conditions. Often, these nanoscale drug delivery vehicles are limited due to agglomeration, poor solubility or cytotoxicity. Thus, we have designed a methodology to encapsulate hydrophobic antineoplastic chemotherapeutics within a 20-30 nm diameter, pH-responsive, non-agglomerating, non-toxic calcium phosphate nan...

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Theranostic Polymeric Micelles for Imaging and Drug Delivery in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajiv; Kulkarni, Apurva; Nagesha, Dattatri K; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade engineered nanoplatforms have seen a momentous progress in developing a multimodal theranostic formulation which can be simultaneously used for imaging and therapy. In this report we describe the synthesis and application of theranostic phospholipid based polymeric micelles for optical fluorescence imaging and controlled drug delivery. CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox), were co-encapsulated into the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The micell...

  17. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovana Calixto, Jéssica Bernegossi, Bruno Fonseca-Santos, Marlus Chorilli School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Drugs and Pharmaceuticals, São Paulo State University (UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers. Keywords: targeted delivery, oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral cancer treatment

  18. Combining targeted drugs to overcome and prevent resistance of solid cancers with some stem-like cell features

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, Elina; Laurila, Niina; Koivunen, Peppi; Koivunen, Jussi P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment resistance significantly inhibits the efficiency of targeted cancer therapies in drug-sensitive genotypes. In the current work, we studied mechanisms for rapidly occurring, adaptive resistance in targeted therapy-sensitive lung, breast, and melanoma cancer cell lines. The results show that in ALK translocated lung cancer lines H3122 and H2228, cells with cancer stem-like cell features characterized by high expression of cancer stem cell markers and/or in vivo tumorigenesis can media...

  19. MicroRNAs and drug modulation in cancer: an intertwined new story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesca FANINI; Ivan VANNINI; Muller FABBRI

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) which play important regulatory roles in physiological processes such as cellular differentiation,proliferation,development,apoptosis and stem cell selfrenewal.An increasing number of papers have clearly claimed their involvement in cancer,providing,in some cases,also the molecular mechanisms implicated.Several studies led to the conclusion that miRNAs can be effectively used as anticancer agents alone or in combination with existing anticancer drugs.In particular,miRNAs can be effectively used to overcome drug resistance,one of the main factors responsible for anticancer treatment insuccess.One of the main questions remains how to modulate the expression of miRNAs in cancer cells.Interestingly,a few studies have shown that the expression of miRNAs is affected by drugs (including some drugs currently used as anticancer agents),therefore providing the rationale for an intertwined scenario in which miRNAs can be modulated by drugs and,in turn,can affect drug sensitivity of cancer cells.

  20. [Up-to-date drug treatment of disseminated lung cancer--which other drugs are available in addition to conventional cytotoxic agents?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Jussi; Knuuttila, Aija; Mali, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In addition to conventional cytotoxic agents, novel drug treatments have in the last few years been introduced for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Whereas some of the novel treatments have brought significant improvement in treatment outcome, the benefit brought about by the treatment has in some cases been quite small in comparison with the costs and adverse effects. In the present review we explore the goals of drug treatments of disseminated lung cancer, assessment of therapeutic benefits as well as most significant research results of novel drug treatments of the lastfew years In addition, we evaluate the effect of the novel drug treatments on Finnish treatment practices.

  1. Looking to the future in an unprecedented time for cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetz, Paul G; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Basic research in cancer biology, genetics and immunology has resulted in improved insights into mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and growth. This improved biologic understanding of the diseases we treat has led to unprecedented therapeutic breakthroughs across multiple tumor types. In this article, we discuss opportunities and challenges in contemporary cancer drug development, highlighting efficacy endpoints, clinical trial design and the thoughtful inclusion of the patient perspective. As the field re-examines old practices and explores new opportunities, we must continue to efficiently utilize the human and scientific resources at our disposal to foster the development and delivery of safe and effective therapies to cancer patients. PMID:26970117

  2. Prodigiosin release from an implantable biomedical device: kinetics of localized cancer drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyuo, Y.; Obayemi, J.D.; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Ani, C.J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Odusanya, O.S. [Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Oni, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY (United States); Anuku, N. [Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY (United States); Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Malatesta, K. [Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY (United States); Soboyejo, W.O., E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 1 Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an implantable encapsulated structure that can deliver localized heating (hyperthermia) and controlled concentrations of prodigiosin (a cancer drug) synthesized by bacteria (Serratia marcesce (subsp. marcescens)). Prototypical Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) packages, containing well-controlled micro-channels and drug storage compartments, were fabricated along with a drug-storing polymer produced by free radical polymerization of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPA) co-monomers of Acrylamide (AM) and Butyl-methacrylate (BMA). The mechanisms of drug diffusion of PNIPA-base gels were elucidated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was also used to study the heterogeneous porous structure of the PNIPA-based gels. The release exponents, n, of the gels were found to between 0.5 and 0.7. This is in the range expected for Fickian (n = 0.5). Deviation from Fickian diffusion was also observed (n > 0.5) diffusion. The gel diffusion coefficients were shown to vary between 2.1 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 2}/s and 4.8 × 10{sup −6} m{sup 2}/s. The implications of the results are then discussed for the localized treatment of cancer via hyperthermia and the controlled delivery of prodigiosin from encapsulated PNIPA-based devices. - Highlights: • Fabricated thermo-sensitive hydrogels for localized drug release from an implantable biomedical device. • Determined the cancer drug diffusion mechanisms of PNIPA-co-AM copolymer hydrogel. • Encapsulated PNIPA-based hydrogels in PDMS capsules for controlled drug delivery. • Established the kinetics of drug release from gels and channels in an implantable biomedical device. • Demonstrated the potential for the controlled release of prodigiosin (PG) as an anticancer drug.

  3. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  4. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  5. 5-FU Metabolism in Cancer and Orally-Administrable 5-FU Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Sasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a key anticancer drug that for its broad antitumor activity, as well as for its synergism with other anticancer drugs, has been used to treat various types of malignancies. In chemotherapeutic regimens, 5-FU has been combined with oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other drugs as a continuous intravenous infusion. Recent clinical chemotherapy studies have shown that several of the regimens with oral 5-FU drugs are not inferior compared to those involving continuous 5-FU infusion chemotherapy, and it is probable that in some regimens continuous 5-FU infusion can be replaced by oral 5-FU drugs. Historically, both the pharmaceutical industry and academia in Japan have been involved in the development of oral 5-FU drugs, and this review will focus on the current knowledge of 5-FU anabolism and catabolism, and the available information about the various orally-administrable 5-FU drugs, including UFT, S-1 and capecitabine. Clinical studies comparing the efficacy and adverse events of S-1 and capecitabine have been reported, and the accumulated results should be utilized to optimize the treatment of cancer patients. On the other hand, it is essential to elucidate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of each of the newly-developed drugs, to correctly select the drugs for each patient in the clinical setting, and to further develop optimized drug derivatives.

  6. Enzyme-Regulated Supramolecular Assemblies of Cholesterol Conjugates against Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wu, Dongdong; Fritzsching, Keith J; Rigney, Mike; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Yujie; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Xu, Bing

    2016-08-31

    We report that phosphotyrosine-cholesterol conjugates effectively and selectively kill cancer cells, including platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells. The conjugate increases the degree of noncovalent oligomerization upon enzymatic dephosphorylation in aqueous buffer. This enzymatic conversion also results in the assembly of the cholesterol conjugates inside and outside cells and leads to cell death. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the formed assemblies of the conjugates not only interact with actin filaments and microtubules but also affect lipid rafts. As the first report of multifaceted supramolecular assemblies of cholesterol conjugates against cancer cells, this work illustrates the integration of enzyme catalysis and self-assembly of essential biological small molecules on and inside cancer cells as a promising strategy for developing multifunctional therapeutics to treat drug-resistant cancers. PMID:27529637

  7. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  8. Dual drug-loaded paclitaxel–thymoquinone nanoparticles for effective breast cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study highlights the beneficial synergistic blend of anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) and thymoquinone (TQ) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We aimed to augment the therapeutic index of PTX using a polymeric nanoparticle system loaded with PTX and TQ. PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating the two drugs, individually or in combination, were prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation method. The formulated nanoparticles were homogenous with an overall negative charge and their size ranging between 200 and 300 nm. Entrapment efficiency of PTX and TQ in the dual drug-loaded nanoparticles was found to be 82.4 ± 2.18 and 65.8 ± 0.45 %, respectively. The release kinetics of PTX and TQ from the nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern characterised by an initial burst, followed by a gradual and continuous release. The anticancer activity of nanoparticles encapsulating both the drugs was higher as compared to the free drugs in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The combination index for the dual drug-loaded NPs was found to be 0.688 which is indicative of synergistic interaction. Thus, here, we propose the synthesis and use of dual drug-loaded TQ and PTX NPs which exhibits enhanced anticancer activity and can additionally help to alleviate the toxic effects of PTX by lowering its effective dose

  9. Dual drug-loaded paclitaxel–thymoquinone nanoparticles for effective breast cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Parth; Kaur, Jasmine; Tikoo, Kulbhushan, E-mail: tikoo.k@gmail.com [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Laboratory of Epigenetics and Diseases, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology (India)

    2015-01-15

    The present study highlights the beneficial synergistic blend of anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) and thymoquinone (TQ) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We aimed to augment the therapeutic index of PTX using a polymeric nanoparticle system loaded with PTX and TQ. PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating the two drugs, individually or in combination, were prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation method. The formulated nanoparticles were homogenous with an overall negative charge and their size ranging between 200 and 300 nm. Entrapment efficiency of PTX and TQ in the dual drug-loaded nanoparticles was found to be 82.4 ± 2.18 and 65.8 ± 0.45 %, respectively. The release kinetics of PTX and TQ from the nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern characterised by an initial burst, followed by a gradual and continuous release. The anticancer activity of nanoparticles encapsulating both the drugs was higher as compared to the free drugs in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The combination index for the dual drug-loaded NPs was found to be 0.688 which is indicative of synergistic interaction. Thus, here, we propose the synthesis and use of dual drug-loaded TQ and PTX NPs which exhibits enhanced anticancer activity and can additionally help to alleviate the toxic effects of PTX by lowering its effective dose.

  10. A new era of cancer treatment: carbon nanotubes as drug delivery tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madani SY

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Yazdan Madani1, Naghmeh Naderi1, Oshani Dissanayake1, Aaron Tan1, Alexander M Seifalian1,21Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, UK; 2Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Cancer is a generic term that encompasses a group of diseases characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of cells. There are over 200 different types of cancer, each of which gains its nomenclature according to the type of tissue the cell originates in. Many patients who succumb to cancer do not die as a result of the primary tumor, but because of the systemic effects of metastases on other regions away from the original site. One of the aims of cancer therapy is to prevent the metastatic process as early as possible. There are currently many therapies in clinical use, and recent advances in biotechnology lend credence to the potential of nanotechnology in the fight against cancer. Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs, quantum dots, and dendrimers have unique properties that can be exploited for diagnostic purposes, thermal ablation, and drug delivery in cancer. CNTs are tubular materials with nanometer-sized diameters and axial symmetry, giving them unique properties that can be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In addition, CNTs have the potential to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. Alongside the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology-based materials, elucidating the toxicity of nanoparticles is also imperative. Hence, in this review, we seek to explore the biomedical applications of CNTs, with particular emphasis on their use as therapeutic platforms in oncology.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cancer, photothermal therapy, drug delivery, cytotoxicity, near infrared

  11. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  12. Dynamic changes and surveillance function of prion protein expression in gastric cancer drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Heng Wang; Jing-Ping Du; Ying-Hai Zhang; Xiao-Jun Zhao; Ru-Ying Fan; Zhi-Hong Wang; Zi-Tao Wu; Ying Han

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes of prion protein (PrPc) in the process of gastric cancer drug resistance and the role of PrPc expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: A series of gastric cancer cell lines resistant to different concentrations of adriamycin was established,and the expression of PrPc, Bcl-2 and Bax was detected in these cells. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of PrPc in patients receiving chemotherapy and to explore the role of PrPc expression in predicting the chemosensitivity and the outcome of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Follow-up was performed for 2 years. RESULTS: PrPc expression was increased with the increase in drug resistance. Bcl-2, together with PrPc, increased the level of anti-apoptosis of cancer cells. Increased PrPc expression predicted the enhanced level of anti-apoptosis and resistance to anticancer drugs. PrPc expression could be used as a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer. Increased PrPc expression predicted both poor chemosensitivity and a low 2-year survival rate. Contrarily, low PrPc expression predicted favorable chemosensitivity and a relatively high 2-year survival rate.CONCLUSION: PrPc expression is associated with histological types and differentiation of gastric cancer cells; The PrPc expression level might be a valuable marker in predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

  13. NIH-supported trial drug shows benefit in children with previously treated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young patients with some types of advanced cancer, for whom standard treatment had failed, had their tumors disappear during treatment with a drug that both targets and blocks a protein associated with their disease. These findings are from a Phase I, mul

  14. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Yang, L.; Jiang, X.; Xu, C.; Wang, M.; Wang, Q.; Zhou, Z.; Xiang, Z.; Cui, H.

    2014-01-01

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of

  15. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  16. Collateral sensitivity to cisplatin in KB-8-5-11 drug-resistant cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Ben

    2014-01-01

    KB-8-5-11 cells are a drug-resistant cervical cell model that overexpresses ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein). KB-8-5-11 has become sensitive to non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Understanding the mechanism of collateral sensitivity to cisplatin may lead to biomarker discovery for platinum sensitivity in patients with cancer.

  17. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  18. Effect of Paullinia cupana on MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Everaldo; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Azzolin, Verônica; Holmrich, Sabrina; Assmann, Charles; Ledur, Pauline; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; DE Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Mânica-Cattani, Maria Fernanda; DA Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that certain plants, such as guarana (Paullinia cupana), exert a protective effect against cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, guarana possesses bioactive molecules, such as caffeine and catechin, which may affect the pharmacological properties of antitumor drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guarana on breast cancer cell response to 7 chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the treatment of breast cancer. To perform this study, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were cultured under controlled conditions and exposed to 1, 5 and 10 µg/ml guarana concentrations, with and without chemotherapeutics (gemcitabine, vinorelbine, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). The effect of these treatments on MCF-7 cell viability and proliferation was spectrophotometrically analyzed with the MTT assay. The main results demonstrated an antiproliferative effect of guarana at concentrations of 5 and 10 µg/ml and a significant effect on chemotherapeutic drug action. In general, guarana improved the antiproliferative effect of chemotherapeutic agents, causing a decrease of >40% in cell growth after 72 h of exposure. The results suggested an interaction of guarana with the chemotherapeutic drugs, which requires confirmation by in vivo complementary studies. PMID:25469267

  19. Candidate Antimetastasis Drugs Suppress the Metastatic Capacity of Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Membrane Fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weina; Prijic, Sara; Urban, Bettina C; Tisza, Michael J; Zuo, Yan; Li, Lin; Tan, Zhi; Chen, Xiaoling; Mani, Sendurai A; Chang, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high mortality from metastatic cancer, therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis are limited. Efforts to identify genetic aberrations that predispose tumors to metastasis have been mostly unsuccessful. To understand the nature of candidate targets for metastatic disease, we performed an in silico screen to identify drugs that can inhibit a gene expression signature associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Compounds discovered through this method, including those previously identified, appeared to restrict metastatic capacity through a common mechanism, the ability to modulate the fluidity of cell membranes. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines with the putative antimetastasis agents reduced membrane fluidity, resulting in decreased cell motility, stem cell-like properties, and EMT in vitro, and the drugs also inhibited spontaneous metastasis in vivo When fluidity was unchanged, the antimetastasis compounds could no longer restrict metastasis, indicating a causal association between fluidity and metastasis. We further demonstrate that fluidity can be regulated by cellular cholesterol flux, as the cholesterol efflux channel ABCA1 potentiated metastatic behaviors in vitro and in vivo The requirement for fluidity was further supported by the finding in breast cancer patients that ABCA1 was overexpressed in 41% of metastatic tumors, reducing time to metastasis by 9 years. Collectively, our findings reveal increased membrane fluidity as a necessary cellular feature of metastatic potential that can be controlled by many currently available drugs, offering a viable therapeutic opportunity to prevent cancer metastasis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2037-49. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26825169

  20. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  1. Palladium telluride quantum dots and cytochrome P450 biosensor for the detection of breast cancer drug – tamoxifen.

    OpenAIRE

    Felini, Usisipho; Beni, Valerio; Iwuoha, Emanuel; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an oral non-steroidal anti-estrogen drug used in the prevention and treatment of all stages of breast cancer. This drug acts by competing with estrogen for binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) and reduces the transcription of estrogen dependent genes. However, approximately 30-50% of ER-positive breast cancer patients either fail to respond or eventually become resistant to tamoxifen resulting in a serious clinical challenge in breast cancer management. This, therefore, calls fo...

  2. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  3. Efficacy of the Oral Fluorouracil Pro-drug Capecitabine in Cancer Treatment: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kouvaris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda® was developed as a pro-drug of fluorouracil (FU, with the aim of improving tolerability and intratumor drug concentrations through its tumorspecific conversion to the active drug. The purpose of this paper is to review the available information on capecitabine, focusing on its clinical effectiveness against various carcinomas. Identification of all eligible English trails was made by searching the PubMed and Cochrane databases from 1980 to 2007. Search terms included capecitabine, Xeloda and cancer treatment. Nowadays, FDA has approved the use of capecitabine as a first line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer when single-agent fluoropyrimidine is preferred. The drug is also approved for use as a single agent in metastatic breast cancer patients who are resistant to both anthracycline and paclitaxel-based regimens or when further anthracycline treatment is contraindicated. It is also approved in combination with docetaxel after failure of prior anthracycline-based chemotherapy. In patients with prostate, pancreatic, renal cell and ovarian carcinomas, capecitabine as a single-agent or in combination with other drugs has also shown benefits. Improved tolerability and comparable efficacy, compared with the intravenous FU/LV combination, in addition to its oral administration, make capecitabine an attractive option for the treatment of several types of carcinomas.

  4. Drug scheduling of cancer chemotherapy based on natural actor-critic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Inkyung; Park, Jooyoung

    2011-11-01

    Recently, reinforcement learning methods have drawn significant interests in the area of artificial intelligence, and have been successfully applied to various decision-making problems. In this paper, we study the applicability of the NAC (natural actor-critic) approach, a state-of-the-art reinforcement learning method, to the drug scheduling of cancer chemotherapy for an ODE (ordinary differential equation)-based tumor growth model. ODE-based cancer dynamics modeling is an active research area, and many different mathematical models have been proposed. Among these, we use the model proposed by de Pillis and Radunskaya (2003), which considers the growth of tumor cells and their interaction with normal cells and immune cells. The NAC approach is applied to this ODE model with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell population and the drug amount while maintaining the adequate population levels of normal cells and immune cells. In the framework of the NAC approach, the drug dose is regarded as the control input, and the reward signal is defined as a function of the control input and the cell populations of tumor cells, normal cells, and immune cells. According to the control policy found by the NAC approach, effective drug scheduling in cancer chemotherapy for the considered scenarios has turned out to be close to the strategy of continuing drug injection from the beginning until an appropriate time. Also, simulation results showed that the NAC approach can yield better performance than conventional pulsed chemotherapy. PMID:21839140

  5. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Predicts Genetic Variants Associated with Drug Responsiveness in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Sanaya; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness to drugs is an important concern in designing personalized treatment for cancer patients. Currently genetic markers are often used to guide targeted therapy. However, deeper understanding of the molecular basis for drug responses and discovery of new predictive biomarkers for drug sensitivity are much needed. In this paper, we present a workflow for identifying condition-specific gene co-expression networks associated with responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia by combining network mining and statistical analysis. Particularly, we have identified multiple gene modules specifically co-expressed in the drug responsive cell lines but not in the unresponsive group. Interestingly, most of these modules are enriched on specific cytobands, suggesting potential copy number variation events on these loci. Our results therefore imply that there are multiple genetic loci with copy number variations associated with the Erlotinib responses. The existence of CNVs in these loci is also confirmed in lung cancer tissue samples using the TCGA data. Since these structural variations are inferred from functional genomics data, these CNVs are functional variations. These results suggest the condition specific gene co- expression network mining approach is an effective approach in predicting candidate biomarkers for drug responses. PMID:27570645

  6. Hypoxia-induced acidification causes mitoxantrone resistance not mediated by drug transporters in human breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; Jong, M.C. de; Scheffer, G.L.; Shvarts, A.; Diest, P.J. van; Wall, E. van der

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia has clinically been associated with resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hypoxia induces resistance to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone, two common drugs in cancer treatment, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and SW1573 non-small lung cancer cells. In addition

  7. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ge

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multi-drug resistance (MDR of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studied for its role in MDR reversal effects. While other MDR reversal mechanisms remain unclear, Pgp inhibition is a criterion for further mechanistic study. More mechanistic studies are needed to fully establish the pharmacological effects of potential MDR reversing agents.

  8. TIMP-1 increases expression and phosphorylation of proteins associated with drug resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hekmat, Omid; Munk, Stephanie; Fogh, Louise;

    2013-01-01

    spectrometry to analyze global proteome and phosphoproteome differences of MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing high or low levels of TIMP-1. In TIMP-1 high expressing cells, 312 proteins and 452 phosphorylation sites were up-regulated. Among these were the cancer drug targets topoisomerase 1, 2A and 2B, which...... high expressing cells may be part of the mechanisms by which TIMP-1 confers resistance to treatment with the widely-used topoisomerase inhibitors in breast- and colorectal cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a protein with a potential biological role in drug resistance. To elucidate the unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the association between high TIMP-1 levels and increased chemotherapy resistance, we employed SILAC-based quantitative mass...

  9. Texosome-based drug delivery system for cancer therapy:from past to present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini; Raheleh Halabian; Mohsen Amin; Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi

    2015-01-01

    Rising worldwide cancer incidence and resistance to current anti-cancer drugs necessitate the need for new pharmaceutical compounds and drug delivery system. Malfunction of the immune system, particularly in the tumor microenvironment, causes tumor growth and enhances tumor progression. Thus, cancer immunotherapy can be an appropriate approach to provoke the systemic immune system to combat tumor expansion. Texosomes, which are endogenous nanovesicles released by all tumor cells, contribute to cell-cell communication and modify the phenotypic features of recipient cells due to the texosomes’ ability to transport biological components. For this reason, texosome-based delivery system can be a valuable strategy for therapeutic purposes. To improve the pharmaceutical behavior of this system and to facilitate its use in medical applications, biotechnology approaches and mimetic techniques have been utilized. In this review, we present the development history of texosome-based delivery systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Dai; Wei-Hong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors,are potential agents for the chemoprevention of gastric cancer. Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that NSAID use is associated with a reduced risk of gastric cancer although many questions remain unanswered such as the optimal dose and duration of treatment. The possible mechanisms for the suppressor effect of NSAIDs on carcinogenesis are the ability to induce apoptosis in epithelial cells and regulation of angiogenesis. Both COX-dependent and COX-independent pathways have a role in the biological activity of NSAIDs. Knowledge of how NSAIDs prevent neoplastic growth will greatly aid the design of better chemopreventive drugs and novel treatments for gastric cancer.

  11. Understanding the Genetic Mechanisms of Cancer Drug Resistance Using Genomic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xueda; Zhang, Zemin

    2016-02-01

    A major obstacle in precision cancer medicine is the inevitable resistance to targeted therapies. Tremendous effort and progress has been made over the past few years to understand the biochemical and genetic mechanisms underlying drug resistance, with the goal to eventually overcome such daunting challenges. Diverse mechanisms, such as secondary mutations, oncogene bypass, and epigenetic alterations, can all lead to drug resistance, and the number of known involved genes is growing rapidly, thus providing many possibilities to overcome resistance. The finding of these mechanisms and genes invariably requires the application of genomic and functional genomic approaches to tumors or cancer models. In this review, we briefly highlight the major drug-resistance mechanisms known today, and then focus primarily on the technological approaches leading to the advancement of this field.

  12. Understanding the Genetic Mechanisms of Cancer Drug Resistance Using Genomic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xueda; Zhang, Zemin

    2016-02-01

    A major obstacle in precision cancer medicine is the inevitable resistance to targeted therapies. Tremendous effort and progress has been made over the past few years to understand the biochemical and genetic mechanisms underlying drug resistance, with the goal to eventually overcome such daunting challenges. Diverse mechanisms, such as secondary mutations, oncogene bypass, and epigenetic alterations, can all lead to drug resistance, and the number of known involved genes is growing rapidly, thus providing many possibilities to overcome resistance. The finding of these mechanisms and genes invariably requires the application of genomic and functional genomic approaches to tumors or cancer models. In this review, we briefly highlight the major drug-resistance mechanisms known today, and then focus primarily on the technological approaches leading to the advancement of this field. PMID:26689126

  13. Microprocessor in controlled transdermal drug delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2009-12-01

    Microprocessor controlled transdermal delivery of anticancer drugs 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) was developed and in vitro evaluation was done. Drugs were loaded based on the pharmacokinetics parameters. In vitro diffusion studies were carried at different current density (0.0, 0.1, 0.22, 0.50 mA/cm2). The patches were evaluated for the drug content, thickness, weight, folding endurance, flatness, thumb tack test and adhesive properties all were well with in the specification of transdermal patches with elegant and transparent in appearance. In vitro permeation studies through human cadaver skin showed, passive delivery (0.0 mA/cm2) of 6-MP was low. As the current density was progressively increased, the flux also increased. the flux also increased with 0.1 mA/cm2 for 15-20 min, but it was less than desired flux, 0.2 mA/cm2 for 30 min showed better flux than 0.1 mA/cm2 current, but lag time was more than 4 h, 0.5 mA/cm2 current for more than 1 h, flux was >159 microg/cm2 h which was desired flux for 6-MP. 5-FU flux reached the minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 54 microg/cm2 h with 0.5 mA/cm2 current for 30-45 min, drug concentration were within the therapeutic window in post-current phase. We concluded from Ohm's Law that as the resistance decreases, current increases. Skin resistance decrease with increase in time and current, increase in the drug permeation. Interestingly, for all investigated current densities, as soon as the current was switched off, 5-FU and 6-MP flux decreased fairly, but the controlled drug delivery can be achieved by switching the current for required period of time.

  14. Use of genome-wide association studies for cancer research and drug repositioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizhun Zhang

    Full Text Available Although genome-wide association studies have identified many risk loci associated with colorectal cancer, the molecular basis of these associations are still unclear. We aimed to infer biological insights and highlight candidate genes of interest within GWAS risk loci. We used an in silico pipeline based on functional annotation, quantitative trait loci mapping of cis-acting gene, PubMed text-mining, protein-protein interaction studies, genetic overlaps with cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes, and functional enrichment analysis to prioritize the candidate genes at the colorectal cancer risk loci. Based on these analyses, we observed that these genes were the targets of approved therapies for colorectal cancer, and suggested that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This study highlights the use of publicly available data as a cost effective solution to derive biological insights, and provides an empirical evidence that the molecular basis of colorectal cancer can provide important leads for the discovery of new drugs.

  15. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W.; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Raj, Deepak Balaji Thimiri Govinda; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties. PMID:26862738

  16. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  17. Boron-based Drug Design for Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Nakamura; R.Horikoshi; T.Usui; H.S.Ban

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Selective inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases is gaining importance as an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of a wide range of human cancers.The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein tyrosine kinase is one of the important kinases that play a fundamental role in cell growth signal pathways.We focused on the 4-anilinoquinazoline framework,which is observed in both compounds as a common structure.A boron atom has a vacant orbital and interconverts with ease between th...

  18. Cigarette smoke promotes drug resistance and expansion of cancer stem cell-like side population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi An

    Full Text Available It is well known that many patients continue to smoke cigarettes after being diagnosed with cancer. Although smoking cessation has typically been presumed to possess little therapeutic value for cancer, a growing body of evidence suggests that continued smoking is associated with reduced efficacy of treatment and a higher incidence of recurrence. We therefore investigated the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC on drug resistance in the lung cancer and head and neck cancer cell lines A549 and UMSCC-10B, respectively. Our results showed that CSC significantly increased the cellular efflux of doxorubicin and mitoxantrone. This was accompanied by membrane localization and increased expression of the multi-drug transporter ABCG2. The induced efflux of doxorubicin was reversed upon addition of the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Fumitremorgin C, confirming the role of ABCG2. Treatment with CSC increased the concentration of phosphorylated Akt, while addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked doxorubicin extrusion, suggesting that Akt activation is required for CSC-induced drug efflux. In addition, CSC was found to promote resistance to doxorubicin as determined by MTS assays. This CSC-induced doxurbicin-resistance was mitigated by mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitor, suggesting that nicotine is at least partially responsible for the effect of CSC. Lastly, CSC increased the size of the side population (SP, which has been linked to a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. In summary, CSC promotes chemoresistance via Akt-mediated regulation of ABCG2 activity, and may also increase the proportion of cancer stem-like cells, contributing to tumor resilience. These findings underscore the importance of smoking cessation following a diagnosis of cancer, and elucidate the mechanisms of continued smoking that may be detrimental to treatment.

  19. Targeting CD44 by Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nano Drug Delivery Systems May Eradicate Cancer Stem Cells in Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassoul Dinarvand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress in cancer diagnosis and therapy, still invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, development of drug resistance and cancer recurrence are the main causes of mortality in cancer patients. Recent researches on cancer stem cells (CSCs along with the role of CD44 marker in drug resistance and as the main marker of breast CSCs, highlight the importance of CD44 in cancer targeted therapy. Additionally, co-localization of MDR1 and CD44 in cancer cell population showed that one protein directly influences the expression of the other and disruption of interaction has significant effects on drug resistance, cell migration and in vitro invasion. Based on the above information, using nanotechnology-derived CD44 targeted drug delivery systems will be able to address recurrence of the disease and other major obstacles in cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, we hypotheses that using combination of cytotoxic agents and CSC specific agents anchored in hyaluronic acid (as the endogenous substrate of CD44, have the potential to develop novel drug delivery systems to eradicate breast cancer.

  20. Preclinical models for interrogating drug action in human cancers using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In this review we compare the advantages and disadvantages of different model biological systems for determining the metabolic functions of cells in complex environments, how they may change in different disease states, and respond to therapeutic interventions. Background All preclinical drug-testing models have advantages and drawbacks. We compare and contrast established cell, organoid and animal models with ex vivo organ or tissue culture and in vivo human experiments in the context of metabolic readout of drug efficacy. As metabolism reports directly on the biochemical state of cells and tissues, it can be very sensitive to drugs and/or other environmental changes. This is especially so when metabolic activities are probed by stable isotope tracing methods, which can also provide detailed mechanistic information on drug action. We have developed and been applying Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to examine metabolic reprogramming of human lung cancer cells in monoculture, in mouse xenograft/explant models, and in lung cancer patients in situ (Lane et al. 2011; T. W. Fan et al. 2011; T. W-M. Fan et al. 2012; T. W. Fan et al. 2012; Xie et al. 2014b; Ren et al. 2014a; Sellers et al. 2015b). We are able to determine the influence of the tumor microenvironment using these models. We have now extended the range of models to fresh human tissue slices, similar to those originally described by O. Warburg (Warburg 1923), which retain the native tissue architecture and heterogeneity with a paired benign versus cancer design under defined cell culture conditions. This platform offers an unprecedented human tissue model for preclinical studies on metabolic reprogramming of human cancer cells in their tissue context, and response to drug treatment (Xie et al. 2014a). As the microenvironment of the target human tissue is retained and individual patient's response to drugs is obtained, this platform promises to transcend current limitations of drug selection

  1. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF PULSED DRUG DELIVERY OF 5- FLUOROURACIL IN TREATING COLO-RECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi V.G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The proposed work aimed to develop a time dependent programmable pulsatile drug delivery system of 5-Fluorouracil, intended for chronotherapy in colorectal cancer. Various batches of tablets were prepared by direct compression method using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC. These tablets were coated with pH sensitive polymers like Eudragit S-100, cellulose acetate succinate(CAS and Ethyl Cellulose (EC at fixed concentration with different coating level (10% & 20%.The prepared tablets were evaluated for lag time and in vitro drug release. FTIR studies revealed that there was no interaction between drug and polymer. Lag time with Eudragit S-100 at (20% coating level was 5 hrs, Cumulative drug released from the formulation ranged from 91-96% within 8-10 hrs. Drug released followed first order kinetics. The rapid release of the drug after a lag time consistent with requirement for chronotherapeutics was achieved. This approach provides a useful means for pulsatile/programmable release (with single pulse of 5-Fluorouracil and may be helpful for patients suffering from cancer.

  2. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  3. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  4. Molecular fundamentals of drug interactions in the therapy of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in the field of chemotherapy have resulted in the introduction of numerous antineoplastic drugs into clinical practice, which increased the efficiency of patient management. Also the prevalent use of combination treatment based on drug action synergy contributed to the improved clinical effect associated with cytotoxic drug administration. It seems, however, obvious that the multidirectional pharmacotherapy in oncology requires a thorough knowledge of drugs’ pharmaceutical behavior in order to maximize their collective action and prevent the occurrence of unintended drug interactions that could potentially impair treatment effectiveness. In fact, drug interactions constitute a serious problem for current oncology primarily resulting from a narrow therapeutic index specific for the majority of anticancer drugs. This, in turn, indicates that even slight deviations of their pharmacokinetics could cause significant clinical consequences, manifested by alteration of the toxicological profile or reduction of therapeutic efficiency. Hence, the investigation of molecular aspects underlying the mechanisms of various drug interactions seems to be essential for proper and safe patient management. The present article is devoted to the extensive subject of drug interactions occurring in the therapy of colorectal cancer. It presents the available literature data on both positive and negative effects of interactions and it discusses their mechanisms complying with their classification into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic ones.

  5. Zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets: a biocompatible nanomaterial for drug delivery to cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vipin; Diaz, Agustin; Clearfield, Abraham; Batteas, James D.; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets (NPs), and their use in drug delivery. ZrP and doxorubicin-intercalated ZrP (DOX:ZrP) NPs were characterized by using X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Transmission Electron Micrography (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Biocompatibility of ZrP NPs was evaluated in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293), breast cancer (MCF-7), metastatic breast cancer (MDA-MB-231), ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3), resistant cancer (NCI-RES/ADR) cells and mouse macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines. Hemocompatibility of ZrP NPs was evaluated with human red blood cells. Simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 was used to determine the in vitro release of doxorubicin from DOX:ZrP NPs. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity studies of DOX:ZrP NPs were determined in MDA-MB-231. The ZrP nanomaterial can be prepared in the 100-200 nm size range with a platelet-like shape. The ZrP NPs themselves are biocompatible, hemocompatible and showed no toxicity to the macrophage cells. ZrP NPs can intercalate high loads (35% w/w) of doxorubicin between their layers. The release of DOX was sustained for about 2 weeks. DOX:ZrP NPs showed higher cellular uptake and increased cytotoxicity than free DOX in MDA-MB-231 cells. ZrP NPs are highly biocompatible, can intercalate large amounts of drugs and sustain the release of drugs. ZrP NPs improved the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of DOX to MDA-MB-231 cells. ZrP NPs are promising nanocarriers for drug delivery in cancer therapy.The objective of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets (NPs), and their use in drug delivery. ZrP and doxorubicin-intercalated ZrP (DOX:ZrP) NPs were characterized by using X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Transmission Electron Micrography (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM

  6. Challenges in pre-clinical testing of anti-cancer drugs in cell culture and in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    HogenEsch, Harm; Yu Nikitin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Experiments with cultures of human tumor cell lines, xenografts of human tumors into immunodeficient mice, and mouse models of human cancer are important tools in the development and testing of anti-cancer drugs. Tumors are complex structures composed of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous cancer cells that interact in a reciprocal manner with the stromal microenvironment and the immune system. Modeling the complexity of human cancers in cell culture and in mouse models for preclinic...

  7. DRUG-REPOSITIONING SCREENING IDENTIFIED PIPERLONGUMINE AS A DIRECT STAT3 INHIBITOR WITH POTENT ACTIVITY AGAINST BREAST CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Eckols, T. Kris; Kolosov, Mikhail; Kasembeli, Moses M.; Adam, Abel; Torres, David; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lacey E Dobrolecki; Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Chang, Jenny C.; Landis, Melissa D.; Creighton, Chad J.; Mancini, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 regulates many cardinal features of cancer including cancer cell growth, apoptosis resistance, DNA damage response, metastasis, immune escape, tumor angiogenesis, the Warburg effect, and oncogene addiction and has been validated as a drug target for cancer therapy. Several strategies have been employed to identify agents that target Stat3 in breast cancer but none has yet entered into clinical use. We used a high-throughput fluorescenc...

  8. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Castro, Nathan J.; Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and novel drug loaded core-shell nanoparticles and evaluate its underlying mechanism for targeted breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via co-axial electrospraying. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) was selected as the polymer shell to encapsulate anti-cancer therapeutics. Results demonstrated uniform size distribution and high drug encapsulation efficacy of the electrosprayed nanoparticles. Cell studies demonstrated the effectiveness of drug loaded nanoparticles and CAP for synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell growth when compared to each treatment separately. Importantly, we found CAP induced down-regulation of metastasis related gene expression (VEGF, MTDH, MMP9, and MMP2) as well as facilitated drug loaded nanoparticle uptake which may aid in minimizing drug resistance-a major problem in chemotherapy. Thus, the integration of CAP and drug encapsulated nanoparticles provides a promising tool for the development of a new cancer treatment strategy. PMID:26917087

  9. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Castro, Nathan J; Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and novel drug loaded core-shell nanoparticles and evaluate its underlying mechanism for targeted breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via co-axial electrospraying. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) was selected as the polymer shell to encapsulate anti-cancer therapeutics. Results demonstrated uniform size distribution and high drug encapsulation efficacy of the electrosprayed nanoparticles. Cell studies demonstrated the effectiveness of drug loaded nanoparticles and CAP for synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell growth when compared to each treatment separately. Importantly, we found CAP induced down-regulation of metastasis related gene expression (VEGF, MTDH, MMP9, and MMP2) as well as facilitated drug loaded nanoparticle uptake which may aid in minimizing drug resistance-a major problem in chemotherapy. Thus, the integration of CAP and drug encapsulated nanoparticles provides a promising tool for the development of a new cancer treatment strategy.

  10. NANOMEDICINE: will it offer possibilities to overcome multiple drug resistance in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas M

    2016-01-01

    This review is written with the purpose to review the current nanomedicine literature and provide an outlook on the developments in utilizing nanoscale drug constructs in treatment of solid cancers as well as in the potential treatment of multi-drug resistant cancers. No specific design principles for this review have been utilized apart from our active choice to avoid results only based on in vitro studies. Few drugs based on nanotechnology have progressed to clinical trials, since most are based only on in vitro experiments which do not give the necessary data for the research to progress towards pre-clinical studies. The area of nanomedicine has indeed spark much attention and holds promise for improved future therapeutics in the treatment of solid cancers. However, despite much investment few targeted therapeutics have successfully progressed to early clinical trials, indicating yet again that the human body is complicated and that much more understanding of the fundamentals of receptor interactions, physics of nanomedical constructs and their circulation in the body is indeed needed. We believe that nanomedical therapeutics can allow for more efficient treatments of resistant cancers, and may well be a cornerstone for RNA based therapeutics in the future given their general need for shielding from the harsh environment in the blood stream. PMID:26955956

  11. Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery for Therapy of Lung Cancer: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed enormous advances in the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy culminating in the development of the nascent field of “cancer nanomedicine.” A nanoparticle as per the National Institutes of Health (NIH guidelines is any material that is used in the formulation of a drug resulting in a final product smaller than 1 micron in size. Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic therapies, and preferentially target disease sites. Currently, many formulations of nanocarriers are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. Innovative strategies have been employed to exploit the multicomponent, three-dimensional constructs imparting multifunctional capabilities. Engineering such designs allows simultaneous drug delivery of chemotherapeutics and anticancer gene therapies to site-specific targets. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. However, translating such advances from the bench to the bedside has been severely hampered by challenges encountered in the areas of pharmacology, toxicology, immunology, large-scale manufacturing, and regulatory issues. This review summarizes current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, citing recent examples targeted at lung cancer treatment.

  12. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided.

  13. The cost and value of cancer drugs - are new innovations outpacing our ability to pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Stemmer, Salomon M; Gordon, Noa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer drug expenditures have been increasing significantly in countries around the world. A recent paper in the IJHPR provides new knowledge and insights into this global phenomenon by analyzing how it is playing out in an Israeli health plan with over two million members, whose state-of-the-art information systems provide an opportunity to explore these changes in a comprehensive, detailed and reliable manner. There is a wide variation in both the cost-effectiveness and the budget impact of individual drugs. These issues also vary when analyzing drugs in other countries due to differential pricing mechanisms. In addition to drug expenditure, the overall cost of cancer care is increasing, partly due to expenditures on non-pharmacologic treatments and diagnostic testing. With the arrival of new therapies, the future of cancer care is exciting. However, there will be many challenges ahead with regard to the ability to pay for such innovations. In this commentary we discuss the current problems and anticipate the future challenges. PMID:27688873

  14. Phospholipid-chitosan hybrid nanoliposomes promoting cell entry for drug delivery against cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saesoo, Somsak; Bunthot, Suphawadee; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Gonil, Pattarapond; Phunpee, Sarunya; Songkhum, Patsaya; Laohhasurayotin, Kritapas; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Yata, Teerapong; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Saengkrit, Nattika

    2016-10-15

    This study emphasizes the development of a novel surface modified liposome as an anticancer drug nanocarrier. Quaternized N,O-oleoyl chitosan (QCS) was synthesized and incorporated into liposome vesicles, generating QCS-liposomes (Lip-QCS). The Lip-QCS liposomes were spherical in shape (average size diameter 171.5±0.8nm), with a narrow size distribution (PDI 0.1±0.0) and zeta potential of 11.7±0.7mV. In vitro mucoadhesive tests indicated that Lip-QCS possesses a mucoadhesive property. Moreover, the presence of QCS was able to induce the cationic charge on the surface of liposome. Cellular internalization of Lip-QCS was monitored over time, with the results revealing that the cell entry level of Lip-QCS was elevated at 24h. Following this, Lip-QCS were then employed to load cisplatin, a common platinum-containing anti-cancer drug, with a loading efficiency of 27.45±0.78% being obtained. The therapeutic potency of the loaded Lip-QCS was investigated using a 3D spheroid cervical cancer model (SiHa) which highlighted their cytotoxicity and apoptosis effect, and suitability as a controllable system for sustained drug release. This approach has the potential to assist in development of an effective drug delivery system against cervical cancer. PMID:27442151

  15. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  16. Hydrophilic mesoporous carbon nanospheres with high drug-loading efficiency for doxorubicin delivery and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Li, Xiangui; Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dan; Wang, Linzhao; Zhan, Jieqiong; She, Lan; Yang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a highly effective transmembrane delivery vehicle based on PEGylated oxidized mesoporous carbon nanosphere (oMCN@PEG) was successfully fabricated in a facile strategy. oMCN@PEG exhibited a narrow size distribution of 90 nm, excellent hydrophilicity, good biocompatibility, and a very high loading efficiency for doxorubicin (DOX). The drug system (oMCN@DOX@PEG) exhibited excellent stability under neutral pH conditions, but with dramatic releases of DOX at reduced pH conditions. Pharmacokinetics study revealed that oMCN@DOX@PEG could prolong the circulation of DOX in the blood stream. The endocytosis, cytotoxicity, and anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo of the drug-loaded nanoparticles were also evaluated. Our results showed that the nanoparticles efficiently penetrated the membrane of tumor cells, subsequently released drugs, and efficiently inhibited the growth of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Especially, oMCN@DOX@PEG also exhibited significant antimetastasis effect in advanced stage of malignant cancer, improving the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. The results suggested that oMCN@PEG might be a promising anticancer drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. PMID:27175077

  17. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  18. Emerging integrated nanoclay-facilitated drug delivery system for papillary thyroid cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Long, Mei; Huang, Peng; Yang, Huaming; Chang, Shi; Hu, Yuehua; Tang, Aidong; Mao, Linfeng

    2016-09-01

    Nanoclay can be incorporated into emerging dual functional drug delivery systems (DDSs) to promote efficiency in drug delivery and reduce the toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX) used for thyroid cancer treatment. This paper reports the expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite nanoclay was expanded from 0.72 nm to 0.85 nm, which could provide sufficiently spacious site for hosting doxorubicin molecules and controlling the diffusion rate. A targeted design for papillary thyroid cancer cells was achieved by introducing KI, which is consumed by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS). As indicated by MTT assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM observations, methoxy-intercalated kaolinite (KaolinMeOH) exhibited negligible cytotoxicity against papillary thyroid cancer cells. By contrast, DOX-KaolinMeOH showed dose-dependent therapeutic effects in vitro, and KI@DOX-KaolinMeOH was found to act as a powerful targeted therapeutic drug. Furthermore, active and passive targeting strategies played a role in the accumulation of the drug molecules, as verified by an in vivo bio-distribution analysis.

  19. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer. PMID:26978341

  20. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  1. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  2. Anthracycline Drugs on Modified Surface of Quercetin-Loaded Polymer Nanoparticles: A Dual Drug Delivery Model for Cancer Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabita Saha

    Full Text Available Polymer nanoparticles are vehicles used for delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs, like doxorubicin, paclitaxel or chemopreventors like quercetin (Q. The present study deals with the synthesis and characterisation of nano formulations (NFs from Q loaded PLGA (poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nano particles (NPs by surface modification. The surface of Q-loaded (NPs is modified by coating with biopolymers like bovine serum albumin (BSA or histones (His. Conventional chemotherapeutic drugs adriamycin (ADR and mitoxantrone (MTX are bound to BSA and His respectively before being coated on Q-loaded NPs to nano formulate NF1 and NF2 respectively. The sizes of these NFs are in the range 400-500 nm as ascertained by SEM and DLS measurements. Encapsulation of Q in polymer NPs is confirmed from shifts in FT-IR, TGA and DSC traces of Q-loaded NPs compared to native PLGA and Q. Surface modification in NFs is evidenced by three distinct regions in their TEM images; the core, polymer capsule and the coated surface. Negative zeta potential of Q-loaded NPs shifted to positive potential on surface modification in NF1 and NF2. In vitro release of Q from the NFs lasted up to twenty days with an early burst release. NF2 is better formulation than NF1 as loading of MTX is 85% compared to 23% loading of ADR. Such NFs are expected to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR by reaching and treating the target cancerous cells by virtue of size, charge and retention.

  3. Anthracycline Drugs on Modified Surface of Quercetin-Loaded Polymer Nanoparticles: A Dual Drug Delivery Model for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Chabita; Kaushik, Agrima; Das, Asmita; Pal, Sandip; Majumder, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticles are vehicles used for delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs, like doxorubicin, paclitaxel or chemopreventors like quercetin (Q). The present study deals with the synthesis and characterisation of nano formulations (NFs) from Q loaded PLGA (poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) nano particles (NPs) by surface modification. The surface of Q-loaded (NPs) is modified by coating with biopolymers like bovine serum albumin (BSA) or histones (His). Conventional chemotherapeutic drugs adriamycin (ADR) and mitoxantrone (MTX) are bound to BSA and His respectively before being coated on Q-loaded NPs to nano formulate NF1 and NF2 respectively. The sizes of these NFs are in the range 400-500 nm as ascertained by SEM and DLS measurements. Encapsulation of Q in polymer NPs is confirmed from shifts in FT-IR, TGA and DSC traces of Q-loaded NPs compared to native PLGA and Q. Surface modification in NFs is evidenced by three distinct regions in their TEM images; the core, polymer capsule and the coated surface. Negative zeta potential of Q-loaded NPs shifted to positive potential on surface modification in NF1 and NF2. In vitro release of Q from the NFs lasted up to twenty days with an early burst release. NF2 is better formulation than NF1 as loading of MTX is 85% compared to 23% loading of ADR. Such NFs are expected to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) by reaching and treating the target cancerous cells by virtue of size, charge and retention. PMID:27196562

  4. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use. PMID:23687927

  5. Ephrin receptor A10 is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancers including triple negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Maeda, Yuka; Kanasaki, So-Ichiro; Watanabe, Takanobu; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi

    2014-09-10

    Ephrin receptor A10 (EphA10) is a relatively uncharacterized protein which is expressed in many breast cancers but not expressed in normal breast tissues. Here, we examined the potential of EphA10 as a drug target in breast cancer. Immunohistochemical staining of clinical tissue sections revealed that EphA10 was expressed in various breast cancer subtypes, including triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs), with no expression observed in normal tissues apart from testis. Ligand-dependent proliferation was observed in EphA10-transfected MDA-MB-435 cells (MDA-MB-435(EphA10)) and native TNBC cells (MDA-MB-436). However, this phenomenon was not observed in parental MDA-MB-435 cells which express a low level of EphA10. Finally, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by administration of an anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody in a xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that inhibition of EphA10 signaling may be a novel therapeutic option for management of breast cancer, including TNBCs which are currently not treated with molecularly targeted agents. PMID:24946238

  6. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival: protocol for a cohort study using the CPRD primary care database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Martin, Fabiola; Watt, Ian; Doran, Tim; Bland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-inhibiting drugs are commonly used to treat epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. VGSCs are also widely expressed in various cancers, including those of the breast, bowel and prostate. A number of VGSC-inhibiting drugs have been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, invasion, tumour growth and metastasis in preclinical models, suggesting that VGSCs may be novel molecular targets for cancer treatment. Surprisingly, we previously found that prior exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs may be associated with reduced overall survival in patients with cancer, but we were unable to control for the cause of death or indication for prescription. The purpose of the present study is to interrogate a different database to further investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer-specific survival. Methods and analysis A cohort study using primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database will include patients with diagnosis of breast, bowel and prostate cancer (13 000). The primary outcome will be cancer-specific survival from the date of cancer diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards regression will be used to compare survival of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs (including antiepileptic drugs and class I antiarrhythmic agents) with patients with cancer not taking these drugs, adjusting for cancer type, age and sex. Drug exposure will be treated as a time-varying covariate to account for potential immortal time bias. Various sensitivity and secondary analyses will be performed. Ethics and dissemination The project has been reviewed and approved by the University of York Ethical Review Process. Results will be presented at an international conference and published in open access peer-reviewed journals according to the STROBE and RECORD guidelines. PMID:27601493

  7. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design. PMID:25587128

  8. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer

  9. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Xu, Chuan [Division of Scientific Research and Training, General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Military Area Command, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: zhouzhans@sina.com [Institute of Urinary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xiang, Zhonghuai [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins in relation to colorectal cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mazyar Shadman; Polly A Newcomb; John M Hampton; Karen J Wernli; Amy Trentham-Dietz

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between individual or combined use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or statins and colorectal cancer risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study in women, we examined the association between NSAIDs and statin use and the risk of colorectal cancers. We further investigated whether the use of statins modifies the protective effect of NSAIDs. Female cases ( n = 669)of colorectal cancer aged 50-74 years were identified from a statewide registry in Wisconsin during 1999-2001. Community control women ( n = 1375) were randomly selected from lists of licensed drivers and Medicare beneficiaries. Medication use and risk factor information were gathered during a structured telephone interview. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Overall, NSAIDs users had a 30% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (95% CI: 0.56-0.88). Statin use was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.74-1.85), regardless of structural type (lipophilic or hydrophilic), duration of use, or recency. There was no evidence of an interaction between NSAIDs and statins and colorectal cancer risk ( P-interaction = 0.28). CONCLUSION: Although our results confirm the inverse association between NSAIDs use and colorectal cancer risk, they do not support a risk reduction in statin users, or an interaction effect of combined NSAIDs and statin use.

  11. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  12. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  13. Targeted pancreatic cancer therapy with the small molecule drug conjugate SW IV-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Spitzer, Dirk; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Hornick, Mary C; Garg, Gunjal; Hornick, John R; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to conventional therapeutics and has been shown to evade apoptosis by deregulation of the X-linked and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (XIAP and cIAP). Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) induces and amplifies cell death by reversing the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. Thus, Smac-derived peptide analogues (peptidomimetics) have been developed and shown to represent promising cancer therapeutics. Sigma-2 receptors are overexpressed in many proliferating tumor cells including pancreatic cancer. Selected ligands to this receptor are rapidly internalized by cancer cells. These characteristics have made the sigma-2 receptor an attractive target for drug delivery because selective delivery to cancer cells has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. Here, we describe the initial characterization of SW IV-134, a chemically linked drug conjugate between the sigma-2 ligand SW43 and the Smac mimetic SW IV-52 as a novel treatment option for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor killing characteristics of our dual-domain therapeutic SW IV-134 was far greater than either component in isolation or in an equimolar mix and suggests enhanced cellular delivery when chemically linked to the sigma-2 ligand. One of the key findings was that SW IV-134 retained target selectivity of the Smac cargo with the involvement of the NF-κB/TNFα signaling pathway. Importantly, SW IV-134 slowed tumor growth and improved survival in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Our data support further study of this novel therapeutic and this drug delivery strategy because it may eventually benefit patients with pancreatic cancer.

  14. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim eGurpinar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  15. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  16. Four clinically utilized drugs were identified and validated for treatment of adrenocortical cancer using quantitative high-throughput screening

    OpenAIRE

    Nilubol Naris; Zhang Lisa; Shen Min; Zhang Ya-Qin; He Mei; Austin Christopher P; Kebebew Electron

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach to discover clinically approved drugs that demonstrate antineoplastic effect. The effective therapeutics for patients with advanced adrenocortical carcinoma(ACC) are greatly needed. The objective of this study was to identify and validate drugs with antineoplastic effect in ACC cells using a novel quantitative high-throughput drug screening (qHTS) technique. Methods A quantitative high-throughput proliferation a...

  17. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  18. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  19. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen;

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti...... with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier...

  20. Effects of Combined Chinese Drugs and Chemotherapy in Treating Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈衍智; 李占东; 高非; 张莹; 孙红; 李萍萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of combined Chinese drugs and chemotherapy in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods:Sixty-three patients with stageⅢB andⅣNSCLC hospitalized from October 2001 to October 2008 were enrolled and assigned to two groups using a randomizing digital table,with 33 patients in the treatment group and 30 in the control group. They were all treated with the Navelbine and Cisplatin(NP) chemotherapy,but to the treatment group the Chinese drugs...

  1. Repositioning "old" drugs for new causes: identifying new inhibitors of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha T; Upadhyaya, Akanksha; Philp, Lisa K; Tang, Tiffany; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gunter, Jennifer; Nelson, Colleen C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G

    2016-04-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) deaths occur due to the metastatic spread of tumor cells to distant organs. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies once tumor cells have spread outside the prostate. It is therefore imperative to rapidly develop therapeutics to inhibit the metastatic spread of tumor cells. Gain of cell motility and invasive properties is the first step of metastasis and by inhibiting motility one can potentially inhibit metastasis. Using the drug repositioning strategy, we developed a cell-based multi-parameter primary screening assay to identify drugs that inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of metastatic PC-3 PCa cells. Following the completion of the primary screening assay, 33 drugs were identified from an FDA approved drug library that either inhibited migration or were cytotoxic to the PC-3 cells. Based on the data obtained from the subsequent validation studies, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, simvastatin, fluvastatin and vandetanib were identified as strong candidates that can inhibit both the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells without significantly affecting cell viability. By employing the drug repositioning strategy instead of a de novo drug discovery and development strategy, the identified drug candidates have the potential to be rapidly translated into the clinic for the management of men with aggressive forms of PCa.

  2. Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructures for the detection of cancer cells and anticancer drug activity by potential sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jingjie; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shaowei; Gao, Li; Xu, Ping; Li, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a cell dysfunction disease. The detection of cancer cells is extremely important for early diagnosis and clinical treatments. At present, the pretreatment for the detection of cancer cells is costly, complicated and time-consuming. As different species of the analytes may give rise to specific voltammetric signals at distinctly different potentials, simple potential sensing has the specificity to detect different cellular species. By taking advantage of the different electrochemical characteristics of normal cells, cancer cells and biointeractions between anticancer drugs and cancer cells, we develop a specific, sensitive, direct, cost-effective and rapid method for the detection of cancer cells by electrochemical potential sensing based on Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructure electrodes that will be of significance in early cancer diagnosis, in vitro screening of anticancer drugs and molecular biology research.

  3. Mammaglobin 1 promotes breast cancer malignancy and confers sensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Nadia; Guerrette, Roxann; Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Jean, Stéphanie; Michaud, Pascale; Harquail, Jason; Benzina, Sami; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2016-07-01

    Mammaglobin 1 (MGB1), a member of the secretoglobin family, is expressed in mammary epithelial tissues and is overexpressed in most mammary carcinomas. Despite the extensive research correlating MGB1 expression profiles to breast cancer pathogenesis and disease outcome, the biological significance of MGB1 in cancer processes is still unclear. We have thus set out to conduct a functional evaluation of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes leading to disease progression. Using a series of breast cancer cell models with conditional MGB1 expression, we demonstrate that MGB1 promotes cancer cell malignant features. More specifically, loss of MGB1 expression resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation, soft agar spheroid formation, migration, and invasion capacities of breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, we also observed that MGB1 expression activates signaling pathways mediated by MAPK members (p38, JNK, and ERK), the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and NFκB. Moreover, MGB1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) features and modulates Snail, Twist and ZEB1 expression levels. Interestingly, we also observed that expression of MGB1 confers breast cancer cell sensitivity to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results support a role for MGB1 in tumor malignancy in exchange for chemosensitivity. These findings provide one of the first descriptive overview of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes and may offer new insight to the development of therapeutic and prognostic strategies in breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207726

  4. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  5. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  6. Using Gold Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine Phosphate to Treat Hematological Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Steven; Hao, Yuzhi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging paradigm for creating functional nanoscale materials for various biomedical applications. In this study, a new nanotechnology-based drug delivery method was developed using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a delivery vehicle to reduce adverse drug side effects. Fludarabine Phosphate is a commercial chemotherapy drug used in cancer treatment, and has ability to kill various cancer cells. KG-1 cell, a type of acute cancer leukemia cell, was selected as a proof-of-concept target in this study. Due to the small size of GNPs, they can help Fludarabine Phosphate enter cancer cells more efficiently and better interfere with DNA synthesis in the cancer cells. To enhance targeting ability, folic acid molecules were also covalently linked to GNPs, resulting in GNP-Fludarabine-folic acid (GNP-F/f). Compared to treatments with GNP-F or drugs on its own (Fludarabine Phosphate), the GNP-F/f achieves much improved cell-killing effects. The UV-Vis spectra results also revealed that the drugs had successfully bonded covalently to the GNPs. The higher cell-killing efficiency of GNP-F/f compared with GNP-Fludarabine (GNP-F) or drugs on their own further validates the effectiveness of both the vectors (GNPs) and folic acid in enhancing the drug delivery to the cancer cells. The MTT viability tests showed that the GNPs had no cytotoxicity.

  7. A new application of plant virus nanoparticles as drug delivery in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esfandiari, Neda; Arzanani, Mohsen Karimi; Soleimani, Masoud;

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles based on non-pathogenic viruses have opened up a novel sector in nanotechnology. Viral nanoparticles based on plant viruses have clear advantages over any synthetic nanoparticles as they are biocompatible and biodegradable self-assembled and can be produced inexpensively on a large...... scale. From several such under-development platforms, only a few have been characterized in the target-specific drugs into the cells. Potato virus X is presented as a carrier of the chemotherapeutic drug Herceptin that is currently used as a targeted therapy in (HER2+) breast cancer patients. Here, we...... used nanoparticles formed from the potato virus X to conjugate the Herceptin (Trastuzumab) monoclonal antibody as a new option in specific targeting of breast cancer. Bioconjugation was performed by EDC/sulfo-n-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) in a two-step protocol. Then, the efficiency of conjugation...

  8. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Development Drugs Against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia eVasconcelos-dos-Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc, and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac, donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs.

  9. The role of miRNA regulation in cancer progression and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal

    RNAs in the context of cancer biology, drug resistance and disease progression. The first project described in Chapter 6 addresses the problem of tamoxifen resistance, an anti-estrogen drug that is generally highly effective in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. The underlying molecular mechanisms......This PhD thesis presents the work carried out at Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark. The projects presented in this thesis are a purely bioinformatic in nature. Included in this thesis are the two projects that focus on the gene regulatory events mediated by mi...... for the acquired resistance to tamoxifen are not very well understood. Therefore, with the aid of miRNA and gene expression profiles for MCF7/S0.5 (tamoxifen sensitive) and three MCF7/S0.5 derived tamoxifen resistant cell lines, we obtained several miRNA-mediated regulatory events in the tamoxifen resistant cell...

  10. Cationic Albumin Nanoparticles for Enhanced Drug Delivery to Treat Breast Cancer: Preparation and In Vitro Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Sana Abbasi; Arghya Paul; Wei Shao; Satya Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Most anticancer drugs are greatly limited by the serious side effects that they cause. Doxorubicin (DOX) is an antineoplastic agent, commonly used against breast cancer. However, it may lead to irreversible cardiotoxicity, which could even result in congestive heart failure. In order to avoid these harmful side effects to the patients and to improve the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin, we developed DOX-loaded polyethylenimine- (PEI-) enhanced human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles. The f...

  11. Functional genomic analysis of drug sensitivity pathways to guide adjuvant strategies in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, Charles; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Brenton, James D.;

    2008-01-01

    ) as well as endocrine therapies such as tamoxifen. Given the limited power of microarray signatures to predict therapeutic response in associative studies of small clinical trial cohorts, the use of functional genomic data combined with expression or sequence analysis of genes and microRNAs implicated...... in drug response in human tumours may provide a more robust method to guide adjuvant treatment strategies in breast cancer that are transferable across different expression platforms and patient cohorts....

  12. Multifunctional aptamer-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to circumvent cancer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yuanyu; Deng, Hua; Kumar, Anil; Wang, Chenxuan; Liang, Zicai; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-06-01

    By its unique advantages over traditional medicine, nanomedicine has offered new strategies for cancer treatment. In particular, the development of drug delivery strategies has focused on nanoscale particles to improve bioavailability. However, many of these nanoparticles are unable to overcome tumor resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, new opportunities for drug delivery have been provided by oligonucleotides that can self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures. In this work, we have designed and developed functional DNA nanostructures to deliver the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (Dox) to resistant cancer cells. These nanostructures have two components. The first component is a DNA aptamer, which forms a dimeric G-quadruplex nanostructure to target cancer cells by binding with nucleolin. The second component is double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is rich in -GC- base pairs that can be applied for Dox delivery. We demonstrated that Dox was able to efficiently intercalate into dsDNA and this intercalation did not affect the aptamer's three-dimensional structure. In addition, the Aptamer-dsDNA (ApS) nanoparticle showed good stability and protected the dsDNA from degradation in bovine serum. More importantly, the ApS&Dox nanoparticle efficiently reversed the resistance of human breast cancer cells to Dox. The mechanism circumventing doxorubicin resistance by ApS&Dox nanoparticles may be predominantly by cell cycle arrest in S phase, effectively increased cell uptake and decreased cell efflux of doxorubicin. Furthermore, the ApS&Dox nanoparticles could effectively inhibit tumor growth, while less cardiotoxicity was observed. Overall, this functional DNA nanostructure provides new insights into the design of nanocarriers to overcome multidrug resistance through targeted drug delivery. PMID:26994877

  13. The contribution of drug resistant cancer stem cells to paediatric brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Punjaruk, Wiyada

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have revealed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in malignant disease. Additionally, it is proposed that these cells may survive following chemotherapy, and hence contribute to tumour relapse. A significant mechanism of drug resistance in CSCs is believed to be the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that efflux cytotoxic agents out of cells. The objective of this study was to study the existence of CSCs in a panel of primary paediatric brain tu...

  14. [Development of three-dimensional breast cancer cell culture drug resistance model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Hou, Liang; Lu, Ying-Jin; Chen, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Can; Feng, Di; Kong, Li; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2016-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop three-dimensional (3D) culture model, a more pathologically relevant model, of human breast cancer for drug resistance study. MCF-7 cells were embedded within collagen gel to establish 3D culture model. Cellular morphology was observed using Carmine and HE staining. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay, and cell activity was detected by Live/Dead staining kit. Drug sensitivities of the 3D culture to doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were assayed and compared with those of monolayer (2D) culture. In addition, the levels of drug resistance-related genes P-glycoprotein (P-gp), mrp2 mRNA expressions were detected by real time RT-PCR. Expression level of P-gp protein was detected by Western blot. The results showed that MCF-7 cells in 3D culture formed a number of cell aggregates, and most of them displayed good cell viability. The IC50 values of doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were all increased significantly in 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture. Moreover, compared with MCF-7 cells in 2D culture, the cells in 3D culture showed increased mRNA levels of P-gp and mrp2, as well as up-regulated protein expression of P-gp. These results suggest that in vitro collagen-embedded culture system of human breast cancer cells represents an improved pathologically relevant 3D microenvironment for breast cancer cells, providing a robust tool to explore the mechanism of drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:27108905

  15. Archaeosome: As New Drug Carrier for Delivery of Paclitaxel to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alavi, Seyed Ebrahim; Mansouri, Hamidreza; Esfahani, Maedeh Koohi Moftakhari; Movahedi, Fatemeh; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Chiani, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, paclitaxel was archaeosomed to reduce side effects and improve its therapeutic index. Carriers have made a big evolution in treatment of many diseases in recent years. Lipid carriers are of special importance among carriers. Archaeosome is one of the lipid carriers. Paclitaxel is one of the drugs used to treat breast cancer which has some unwanted side effects despite its therapeutic effects. Archaeosomes were extracted from methanogenic archi bacteria and synthesized wi...

  16. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the prevention of colon cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, D.; Berkel, H J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the results of animal and human studies of the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on neoplastic growth in the colon and to outline the possible mechanisms involved. DATA SOURCES: Research articles published in English before June 1992 were identified from MEDLINE. STUDY SELECTION: Nine articles on the polyp-cancer sequence were reviewed, 8 on the apparent pathophysiologic aspects of tumour inhibition by NSAIDs and 22 on animal and human research in...

  17. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto; Jéssica Bernegossi; Laura Marise de Freitas; Carla Raquel Fontana; Marlus Chorilli

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug deliver...

  18. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  19. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  20. The anthelmintic drug niclosamide induces apoptosis, impairs metastasis and reduces immunosuppressive cells in breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinghong Ye

    Full Text Available Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Discovery of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of metastatic breast cancer is still needed. Here, we reported our finding with niclosamide, an FDA approved anthelmintic drug. The potency of niclosamide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that niclosamide showed a dramatic growth inhibition against breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Western blot analysis demonstrated the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of Cleaved caspases-3, down-regulation of Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Survivin. Moreover, niclosamide blocked breast cancer cells migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated STAT3(Tyr705, phosphorylated FAK(Tyr925 and phosphorylated Src(Tyr416 were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg/d niclosamide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth without detectable toxicity. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells, VEGF-positive cells and microvessel density (MVD and an increase in Cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon niclosamide. Notably, niclosamide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in tumor tissues and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases. Taken together, these results demonstrated that niclosamide may be a promising candidate for breast cancer.

  1. Non-small-cell lung cancer: molecular targeted therapy and personalized medicine – drug resistance, mechanisms, and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechler M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Marybeth Sechler,1,2 Amber D Cizmic,3 Sreedevi Avasarala,1 Michelle Van Scoyk,1 Christine Brzezinski,1 Nicole Kelley,1 Rama Kamesh Bikkavilli,1 Robert A Winn1–3 1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care, 2Program in Cancer Biology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Targeted therapies for cancer bring the hope of specific treatment, providing high efficacy and in some cases lower toxicity than conventional treatment. Although targeted therapeutics have helped immensely in the treatment of several cancers, like chronic myelogenous leukemia, colon cancer, and breast cancer, the benefit of these agents in the treatment of lung cancer remains limited, in part due to the development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug resistance and the current strategies used to treat lung cancer. A better understanding of these drug-resistance mechanisms could potentially benefit from the development of a more robust personalized medicine approach for the treatment of lung cancer. Keywords: lung cancer, drug targets, personalized medicine, NSCLC

  2. Enhanced effect of photodynamic therapy in ovarian cancer using a nanoparticle drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Sun, Liping; Lu, Zaijun; Su, Xuantao; Yang, Qifeng; Qu, Xun; Li, Li; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles are promising novel drug delivery carriers that allow tumor targeting and controlled drug release. In the present study, we prepared poly butyl-cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA-NP) entrapped with hypocrellin B (HB) to improve the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in ovarian cancer. An ovarian cancer ascites model using Fischer 344 rats and PBCA-NP entrapped with HB (HB-PBCA-NP) were formed successfully. The pharmacodynamic characteristics and biodistribution of the HB-PBCA-NP system were evaluated by comparison with HB dimethyl sulfoxide (HB-DMSO) and testing at various time-points following intraperitoneal drug administration. HB-PBCA-NP-based PDT combined with cytoreductive surgery was then administrated to the tumor-bearing animals. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to assess the therapeutic effect of the nanoparticle system. The serum HB concentration peaked 4 h after drug administration in the nanoparticle system, and 1 h with HB-DMSO. The peak exposure time of tumor tissues was also extended (4 vs. 2 h), and PBCA-NP remained present for much longer than HB-DMSO. Although PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time significantly compared with surgery alone (84 days, Panimals that received either HB-PBCA-NP- or HB-DMSO-based PDT after cytoreductive surgery (99 vs. 95 days, P=0.293). PBCA-NP exhibited potential advantages in controlled drug release and tumor targeting, which was beneficial for HB-based PDT. PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time, suggesting that this might be an alternative treatment option for ovarian cancer. PMID:26165140

  3. Role of integrin-linked kinase in drug resistance of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Z

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhiyang Jia Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The objective of the present investigation was to investigate the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK in the gemcitabine-resistant lung cancer cell line A549 and explore the underlying mechanism.Materials and methods: Gemcitabine-resistant A549 (A549/GemR cell line was established by pulse-exposed to moderate concentration of gemcitabine (Gem, and the drug resistant index was measured by MTT assay. Expression of ILK in A549/GemR cell line was detected by Western blot and real-time PCR. An ILK gene-silencing cell line was constructed using lentivirus-coated ILK shRNA. MTT assay was used to detect the drug sensitivity of the A549/GemR cell line to Gem after the ILK gene silencing. Western blot was used to measure the expression of E-cadherin, fibronectin, and MRP1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 after silencing the ILK gene.Result: The drug resistance index of A549/GemR was 13.5, and the messenger RNA and protein level of ILK was increased in A549/GemR. IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration decreased from 14.69 to 4.13 mg/L when ILK was knocked down in A549/GemR. The expression of fibronectin and MRP1 was upregulated and E-cadherin expression was downregulated in A549/GemR, and these changes were reversed after ILK was knocked down.Conclusion: ILK was involved in drug resistance to Gem in lung cancer, and this function may be mediated by epithelial–mesenchymal transition and the MRP1 pathway.Keywords: lung cancer, drug resistance, gemcitabine, ILK, EMT

  4. Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and acetaminophen use and risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trabert, Britton; Ness, Roberta B; Lo-Ciganic, Wei-Hsuan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. METHODS: We analyzed pooled data from 12 ...

  5. Use of fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer: Danish Population Based Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Allan; Sharif, Heidi; Frederiksen, Kirsten;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of fertility drugs on overall risk of ovarian cancer using data from a large cohort of infertile women. DESIGN: Population based cohort study. SETTING: Danish hospitals and private fertility clinics. PARTICIPANTS: 54,362 women with infertility problems referred to...... confounding factors. RESULTS: Analyses within cohort showed no overall increased risk of ovarian cancer after any use of gonadotrophins (rate ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 1.37), clomifene (1.14, 0.79 to 1.64), human chorionic gonadotrophin (0.89, 0.62 to 1.29), or gonadotrophin releasing...... all Danish fertility clinics during 1963-98. The median age at first evaluation of infertility was 30 years (range 16-55 years), and the median age at the end of follow-up was 47 (range 18-81) years. Included in the analysis were 156 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (cases) and 1241...

  6. Emerging concepts on drug resistance in bladder cancer: Implications for future strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Santoni, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Santini, Daniele; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-10-01

    The combination chemotherapies with methotrexate plus vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin (MVAC or CMV regimens) or gemcitabine plus cisplatin represent the standard as first-line therapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. In Europe, vinflunine is an option for second-line therapy for patients progressed during first-line or perioperative platinum-containing regimen. Alternative regimens containing taxanes and/or gemcitabine may be valuated case by case. Furthermore, carboplatin should be considered in patients unfit for cisplatin both in the first and second-line setting. Based on these findings, a better comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the development of drug resistance in patients with bladder cancer will represent a major step forward in optimizing patients' outcome. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms and emerging strategies to overcome resistance in patients with advanced urothelial cancer.

  7. Progress in Using Combination of Chinese Drug with Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺用和

    2004-01-01

    @@ Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat diseases including cancer in China for several thousand years. TCM holds that the pathogenesis of cancer lies mainly in deficiency of vital qi, accumulation of cold, stagnation of qi, obstruction of phlegm, blood stasis, retention of toxic heat, and that the therapeutic principles for cancer should be mainly to strengthen body resistance and restore normal function (mainly by strengthening the spleen and nourishing the kidney), to warm yang and disperse cold, to soothe the liver and regulate qi circulation, to resolve phlegm and dispel retained water, to promote blood circulation and remove blood stasis, to clear away heat and remove toxicity, to resolve hard mass and to treat malignant or poisoning diseases with poisonous drugs.

  8. [Qualitative Research to Investigate the Needs of Pharmacists and Drug Therapy of Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yusuke; Hanya, Manako; Tatematsu, Michiko; Nakamura, Chikako; Abe, Keiko; Fujisaki, Kazuhiko; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We performed a survey of cancer patients' needs for drug treatment and support from pharmacists during treatment and evaluated the support that cancer patients can expect from community pharmacists in the future. The patients consisted of 16 members of the Cancer Patient Association in Aichi prefecture who underwent chemotherapy. The results of a semistructured group interview were qualitatively analyzed using the grounded theory method. Patients undergoing chemotherapy had high hopes for its effectiveness but were worried about side effects and medical costs. To overcome these problems, they hoped for a decrease in the economic burden, compassionate-use system, and development of novel drugs. The patients had anxiety because the side effects of chemotherapy often caused physical and psychological damage. Despite patients' confusion, pharmacists sometimes did not give adequate explanations to them. The patients expected more from pharmacists regarding medication support and hoped for a system allowing continuous side effect monitoring and consultation without hesitation. For patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy who are confused regarding side effects, pharmacists should understand the patient explanatory model and become more involved with patients as partners in treatment. PMID:26632155

  9. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, "EGFR-addicted" cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erlotinib-resistant cells, we performed a small molecule screen of ~200 established anti-cancer agents using the EGFR mutant NSCLC HCC827 cell line and a corresponding mesenchymal derivative line. The mesenchymal cells were more resistant to most tested agents; however, a small number of agents showed selective growth inhibitory activity against the mesenchymal cells, with the most potent being the Abl/Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Analysis of the tyrosine phospho-proteome revealed several Src/FAK pathway kinases that were differentially phosphorylated in the mesenchymal cells, and RNAi depletion of the core Src/FAK pathway components in these mesenchymal cells caused apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel role for Src/FAK pathway kinases in drug resistance and identify dasatinib as a potential therapeutic for treatment of erlotinib resistance associated with EMT. PMID:25193862

  10. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  11. Infringement of the barriers of cancer via dietary phytoconstituents capsaicin through novel drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Tapan Kumar; Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Maity, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the major cause of fatality and the number of new cases is increasing incessantly. Conventional therapies and existing anticancer agents cause serious side effects and expand the patient's lifespan by a few years. There is the need to exploit alternative anticancer agents and novel drug delivery system to deliver these agents to the tumor site for the prevention of cancer. Recently, biologically active compounds isolated from plants used for the management of cancer have been the heart of interest. Capsaicin is a major pungent agent present in the chili peppers that is heavily consumed in the world. Capsaicin has demonstrated effectiveness as an anticancer agent, but a restraining factor is its pungency, extremely low aqueous solubility, and poor oral bioavailability which impede its use as an anticancer agent. Many technologies have been developed and applied to conquer this drawback. We bring to light the benefits of this phytoconstituent for treating different types of cancer. We also discussed some of the delivery approaches that have already made an impact by either delivering a drug to target tissue or increasing its bioavailability by many folds. PMID:26036845

  12. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  13. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  14. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  15. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  16. Metformin use and gynecological cancers: A novel treatment option emerging from drug repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Biglia, Nicoletta; Tana, Roberta; Cosio, Stefania; Gallo, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Metformin exerts antitumor effects mainly through AMP-activated protein kinase [AMPK] activation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibition. This drug leads to activation of the cellular energy-sensing liver kinase B1 [LKB1]/AMPK pathway. LKB1 is implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in molecular pathogenesis of different malignancies. AMPK is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as an ultra-sensitive cellular energy sensor maintaining the energy balance within the cell. AMPK activation inhibits mRNA translation and proliferation in cancer cells via down-regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, metformin decreases the production of insulin, insulin-like growth factor, inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor, and therefore it exerts anti-mitotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic effects. Recent in vitro and experimental data suggest that metformin electively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth in different cancers. Several epidemiological studies and meta-analysis have shown that metformin use is associated with decreased cancer risk and/or reduced cancer mortality for different malignancies. The present review analyzes the recent biological and clinical data suggesting a possible growth-static effect of metformin also in gynecological cancers. The large majority of available clinical data on the anti-cancer potential of metformin are based on observational studies. Therefore long-term phase II-III clinical trials are strongly warranted to further investigate metformin activity in gynecological cancers. PMID:27378194

  17. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Theranostic Polymeric Micelles for Imaging and Drug Delivery in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar, Apurva Kulkarni, Dattatri K Nagesha, Srinivas Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade engineered nanoplatforms have seen a momentous progress in developing a multimodal theranostic formulation which can be simultaneously used for imaging and therapy. In this report we describe the synthesis and application of theranostic phospholipid based polymeric micelles for optical fluorescence imaging and controlled drug delivery. CdSe quantum dots (QDs and anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox, were co-encapsulated into the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The micelles are characterized using optical spectroscopy for characteristic absorbance and fluorescence features of QDs and Dox. TEM and DLS studies yielded a size of <50 nm for the micellar formulations with very narrow size distribution. A sustained release of the drug was observed from the co-encapsulated micellar formulation. In vitro optical fluorescence imaging and cytotoxicity studies with HeLa cell line demonstrated the potential of these micellar systems as efficient optical imaging and therapeutic probes.

  19. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  20. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  1. Parallel screening of FDA-approved antineoplastic drugs for identifying sensitizers of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to death receptor 4 and 5 are promising candidates for cancer therapy due to their ability to induce apoptosis selectively in a variety of human cancer cells, while demonstrating little cytotoxicity in normal cells. Although TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to DR4 and DR5 are considered safe and promising candidates in cancer therapy, many malignant cells are resistant to DR-mediated, TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In the current work, we screened a small library of fifty-five FDA and foreign-approved anti-neoplastic drugs in order to identify candidates that sensitized resistant prostate and pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods FDA-approved drugs were screened for their ability to sensitize TRAIL resistant prostate cancer cells to TRAIL using an MTT assay for cell viability. Analysis of variance was used to identify drugs that exhibited synergy with TRAIL. Drugs demonstrating the highest synergy were selected as leads and tested in different prostate and pancreatic cancer cell lines, and one immortalized human pancreatic epithelial cell line. Sequential and simultaneous dosing modalities were investigated and the annexin V/propidium iodide assay, in concert with fluorescence microscopy, was employed to visualize cells undergoing apoptosis. Results Fourteen drugs were identified as having synergy with TRAIL, including those whose TRAIL sensitization activities were previously unknown in either prostate or pancreatic cancer cells or both. Five leads were tested in additional cancer cell lines of which, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, and mithramycin demonstrated synergy in all lines. In particular, mitoxantrone and mithramycin demonstrated significant synergy with TRAIL and led to reduction of cancer cell viability at concentrations lower than 1 μM. At these low concentrations, mitoxantrone demonstrated selectivity toward

  2. Chemotherapeutic response to cisplatin-like drugs in human breast cancer cells probed by vibrational microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista de Carvalho, A L M; Pilling, M; Gardner, P; Doherty, J; Cinque, G; Wehbe, K; Kelley, C; Batista de Carvalho, L A E; Marques, M P M

    2016-06-23

    Studies of drug-cell interactions in cancer model systems are essential in the preclinical stage of rational drug design, which relies on a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying cytotoxic activity and biological effects, at a molecular level. This study aimed at applying complementary vibrational spectroscopy methods to evaluate the cellular impact of two Pt(ii) and Pd(ii) dinuclear chelates with spermine (Pt2Spm and Pd2Spm), using cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2) as a reference compound. Their effects on cellular metabolism were monitored in a human triple-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) by Raman and synchrotron-radiation infrared microspectroscopies, for different drug concentrations (2-8 μM) at 48 h exposure. Multivariate data analysis was applied (unsupervised PCA), unveiling drug- and concentration-dependent effects: apart from discrimination between control and drug-treated cells, a clear separation was obtained for the different agents studied - mononuclear vs. polynuclear, and Pt(ii) vs. Pd(ii). Spectral biomarkers of drug action were identified, as well as the cellular response to the chemotherapeutic insult. The main effect of the tested compounds was found to be on DNA, lipids and proteins, the Pd(ii) agent having a more significant impact on proteins while its Pt(ii) homologue affected the cellular lipid content at lower concentrations, which suggests the occurrence of distinct and unconventional pathways of cytotoxicity for these dinuclear polyamine complexes. Raman and FTIR microspectroscopies were confirmed as powerful non-invasive techniques to obtain unique spectral signatures of the biochemical impact and physiological reaction of cells to anticancer agents. PMID:27063935

  3. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ki Bae

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK, a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R], or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  4. CaV channels and cancer: canonical functions indicate benefits of repurposed drugs as cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Paul J.; McCloskey, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of ion channels in the hallmarks of many cancers is increasingly recognised. This article reviews current knowledge of the expression of members of the voltage-gated calcium channel family (CaV) in cancer at the gene and protein level and discusses their potential functional roles. The ten members of the CaV channel family are classified according to expression of their pore-forming α-subunit; moreover, co-expression of accessory α2δ, β and γ confers a spectrum of biophysical c...

  5. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer

  6. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  7. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Effective combination treatment of lung cancer cells by single vehicular delivery of siRNA and different anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xue, Shanshan; Sun, Jinghua; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Ping; Ji, Liangnian; Mao, Zongwan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, lung cancer has become one of the fastest growing cancers in the world. Thus, the development of efficient combination therapy to treat lung cancer has attracted significant attention in the cancer therapy field. In this article, we developed a single vehicle drug delivery system, based on quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA; target Bcl-2) and different anticancer drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) simultaneously for treating A549 lung cancer cells efficiently by combination therapy. The QD nanoparticles were conjugated with l-arginine (l-Arg) and different kinds of hydroxypropyl-cyclodextrins (HP-α-CDs, HP-β-CDs, and HP-γ-CDs) on the surface to form the delivery nanocarriers (QD nanocarriers). They were able to not only bind and transport the siRNA through electrostatic interactions with l-Arg residues but also accommodate various disparate anticancer drugs using different HP-CD modifications. Compared with free drug treatments, the use of QD nanocarriers to deliver Bcl-2 siRNA and different anticancer drugs simultaneously exerted a threefold to fourfold increase in cytotoxicity in A549 cells, which greatly improved the treatment efficacy through combined action. Furthermore, the QD nanocarriers could be used as a probe for real-time imaging of the drug delivery and release because of their strong fluorescence properties. These findings indicate that multifunctional QD nanocarriers hold great promise as a powerful tool for combination therapy for lung cancer.

  9. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  10. Purine nucleoside analog--sulfinosine modulates diverse mechanisms of cancer progression in multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Dačević

    Full Text Available Achieving an effective treatment of cancer is difficult, particularly when resistance to conventional chemotherapy is developed. P-glycoprotein (P-gp activity governs multi-drug resistance (MDR development in different cancer cell types. Identification of anti-cancer agents with the potential to kill cancer cells and at the same time inhibit MDR is important to intensify the search for novel therapeutic approaches. We examined the effects of sulfinosine (SF, a quite unexplored purine nucleoside analog, in MDR (P-gp over-expressing non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC and glioblastoma cell lines (NCI-H460/R and U87-TxR, respectively. SF showed the same efficacy against MDR cancer cell lines and their sensitive counterparts. However, it was non-toxic for normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT. SF induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death and autophagy in MDR cancer cells. After SF application, reactive oxygen species (ROS were generated and glutathione (GSH concentration was decreased. The expression of key enzyme for GSH synthesis, gamma Glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (γGCS was decreased as well as the expression of gst-π mRNA. Consequently, SF significantly decreased the expression of hif-1α, mdr1 and vegf mRNAs even in hypoxic conditions. SF caused the inhibition of P-gp (coded by mdr1 expression and activity. The accumulation of standard chemotherapeutic agent--doxorubicin (DOX was induced by SF in concentration- and time-dependent manner. The best effect of SF was obtained after 72 h when it attained the effect of known P-gp inhibitors (Dex-verapamil and tariquidar. Accordingly, SF sensitized the resistant cancer cells to DOX in subsequent treatment. Furthermore, SF decreased the experssion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on mRNA and protein level and modulated its secretion. In conclusion, the effects on P-gp (implicated in pharmacokinetics and MDR, GSH (implicated in detoxification and VEGF (implicated in tumor-angiogenesis and

  11. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly change it. The solubilization of both drugs by the mixed micelles was more efficient than by micelles made of PEG-PE alone. Solubilization of camptothecin in micelles prevented also the hydrolysis of active lactone form of the drug to inactive carboxylate form. Drug loaded mixed micelles and mAb 2C5-immunomicelles demonstrated significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity than free drug against various cancer cell lines. PMID:18583114

  12. Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells by IGF1R Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Combined with Conventional Systemic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  13. Treatment of breast cancer cells by IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with conventional systemic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boezen, H.M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  14. Synthesis of a drug delivery vehicle for cancer treatment utilizing DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, Tyler

    The treatment of cancer with chemotherapeutic agents has made great strides in the last few decades but still introduces major systemic side effects. The potent drugs needed to kill cancer cells often cause irreparable damage to otherwise healthy organs leading to further morbidity and mortality. A therapy with intrinsic selective properties and/or an inducible activation has the potential to change the way cancer can be treated. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are biocompatible and chemically versatile tools that can be readily functionalized to serve as molecular vehicles. The ability of these particles to strongly absorb light with wavelengths in the therapeutic window combined with the heating effect of surface plasmon resonance makes them uniquely suited for noninvasive heating in biologic applications. Specially designed DNA aptamers have shown their ability to serve as drug carriers through intercalation as well as directly acting as therapeutic agents. By combining these separate molecules a multifaceted drug delivery vehicle can be created with great potential as a selective and controllable treatment for cancer. Oligonucleotide-coated GNPs have been created using spherical GNPs but little work has been reported using gold nanoplates in this way. Using the Diasynth method gold nanoplates were produced to absorb strongly in the therapeutic near infrared (nIR) window. These particles were functionalized with two DNA oligonucleotides: one serving as an intercalation site for doxorubicin, and another, AS1411, serving directly as an anticancer targeting/therapeutic agent. These functional particles were fully synthesized and processed along with confirmation of DNA functionalization and doxorubicin intercalation. Doxorubicin is released via denaturation of the DNA structure into which doxorubicin is intercalated upon the heating of the gold nanoplate well above the DNA melting temperature. This temperature increase, due to light stimulation of surface plasmon

  15. Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso for Identifying Anti-Cancer Drug Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Park

    Full Text Available Uncovering driver genes is crucial for understanding heterogeneity in cancer. L1-type regularization approaches have been widely used for uncovering cancer driver genes based on genome-scale data. Although the existing methods have been widely applied in the field of bioinformatics, they possess several drawbacks: subset size limitations, erroneous estimation results, multicollinearity, and heavy time consumption. We introduce a novel statistical strategy, called a Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso, for high dimensional genomic data analysis and investigation of driver genes. For time-effective analysis, we consider a recursive bootstrap procedure in line with the random lasso. Furthermore, we introduce a parametric statistical test for driver gene selection based on bootstrap regression modeling results. The proposed RRLasso is not only rapid but performs well for high dimensional genomic data analysis. Monte Carlo simulations and analysis of the "Sanger Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer dataset from the Cancer Genome Project" show that the proposed RRLasso is an effective tool for high dimensional genomic data analysis. The proposed methods provide reliable and biologically relevant results for cancer driver gene selection.

  16. Acceleration of Apoptosis by Transfection of Bak Gene in Multi-drug Resistant Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYing; ZENGFuqing

    2004-01-01

    To study the killing effects of bak gene on multi-drug resistant (MDR) bladder cancer cells and the mechanisms. Methods: Bak gene was transfected into MDR bladder cancer cells by liposome. The expression of bak and Bcl-2 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization. The expression of bak and Bcl-2 proteins was detected by SABC immunohistochemistry. The growth rate of human bladder cancer cells was studied by constructing the growth curve, cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, and the morphology of cells was observed by fluorescence stain. Results: The expression of bak mRNA was positive in EJ/bak cells (P<0.05). Bak protein expression of EJ/bak cells was positive and Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased (P<0.05). The growth of MDR bladder cancer cells was significantly inhibited after bak gene was transfected (P<0.05). Apoptosis cells were increased significantly. The apoptosis rate was 35%. Apoptotic bodies can be found in these cells by fluorescence stain. Conclusion: Bak gene could inhibit the growth of MDR bladder cancer cells effectively. Inducing cell apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 gene might be one of its mechanisms.

  17. Methotrexate-conjugated quantum dots: synthesis, characterisation and cytotoxicity in drug resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Barar, Jaleh; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Davaran, Soodabeh; Omidi, Yadollah; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a folic acid derivative, is a potent anticancer used for treatment of different malignancies, but possible initiation of drug resistance to MTX by cancer cells has limited its applications. Nanoconjugates (NCs) of MTX to quantum dots (QDs) may favour the cellular uptake via folate receptors (FRs)-mediated endocytosis that circumvents the efflux functions of cancer cells. We synthesised MTX-conjugated l-cysteine capped CdSe QDs (MTX-QD nanoconjugates) and evaluated their internalisation and cytotoxicity in the KB cells with/without resistancy to MTX. The NCs were fully characterised by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical spectroscopy. Upon conjugation with MTX, the photoluminescence (PL) properties of QDs altered, while an obvious quenching in PL of QDs was observed after physical mixing. The MTX-QD nanoconjugates efficiently internalised into the cancer cells, and induced markedly high cytotoxicity (IC50, 12.0 µg/mL) in the MTX-resistant KB cells as compared to the free MTX molecules (IC50,105.0 µg/mL), whereas, these values were respectively about 7.0 and 0.6 µg/mL in the MTX-sensitive KB cells. Based on these findings, the MTX-QD nanoconjugates are proposed for the targeted therapy of MTX-resistant cancers, which may provide an improved outcome in the relapsed FR-overexpressing cancers. PMID:26176269

  18. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  19. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Metastatic squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): disrupting the drug treatment paradigm with immunotherapies

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpace, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Unlike non-squamous NSCLC, squamous NSCLC rarely harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutations for which there are directed therapies, and until the recent approval of immunotherapies for squamous NSCLC, a limited number of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs have been FDA-approved for use in the treatment of advanced ...

  1. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhu; Se-Jun Lee; Castro, Nathan J.; Dayun Yan; Michael Keidar; Lijie Grace Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and nove...

  2. Human Serum Albumin Nanoparticles for Use in Cancer Drug Delivery: Process Optimization and In Vitro Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Lomis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSA-NPs are widely-used drug delivery systems with applications in various diseases, like cancer. For intravenous administration of HSA-NPs, the particle size, surface charge, drug loading and in vitro release kinetics are important parameters for consideration. This study focuses on the development of stable HSA-NPs containing the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX via the emulsion-solvent evaporation method using a high-pressure homogenizer. The key parameters for the preparation of PTX-HSA-NPs are: the starting concentrations of HSA, PTX and the organic solvent, including the homogenization pressure and its number cycles, were optimized. Results indicate a size of 143.4 ± 0.7 nm and 170.2 ± 1.4 nm with a surface charge of −5.6 ± 0.8 mV and −17.4 ± 0.5 mV for HSA-NPs and PTX-HSA-NPs (0.5 mg/mL of PTX, respectively. The yield of the PTX-HSA-NPs was ~93% with an encapsulation efficiency of ~82%. To investigate the safety and effectiveness of the PTX-HSA-NPs, an in vitro drug release and cytotoxicity assay was performed on human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7. The PTX-HSA-NPs showed dose-dependent toxicity on cells of 52%, 39.3% and 22.6% with increasing concentrations of PTX at 8, 20.2 and 31.4 μg/mL, respectively. In summary, all parameters involved in HSA-NPs’ preparation, its anticancer efficacy and scale-up are outlined in this research article.

  3. Isoquinoline-based analogs of the cancer drug clinical candidate tipifarnib as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents

    OpenAIRE

    Chennamaneni, Naveen Kumar; Arif, Jenifer; Buckner, Frederick S.; Gelb, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    We developed a synthetic route to prepare isoquinoline analogs of the cancer drug clinical candidate tipifarnib. We show that these compounds kill Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes grown in mammalian host cells at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. These isoquinolines represent new leads for the development of drugs to treat Chagas disease.

  4. Selective pulmonary artery perfusion for the treatment of primary lung cancer : Improved drug exposure of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putte, Bart P.; Grootenboers, Marco; van Boven, Wim-Jan; van Oosterhout, M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Folkerts, Gert; Schramel, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Selective pulmonary artery perfusion (SPAP) is an experimental drug infusion method for the treatment of lung cancer that aims to achieve more effective T(umour) and lymph N(ode) down-staging. The aim of this experiment was to compare drug uptake of gemcitabine and carboplatin during S

  5. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-06-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer.

  6. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer. PMID:27324595

  7. Validating drug repurposing signals using electronic health records: a case study of metformin associated with reduced cancer mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Hua; Aldrich, Melinda C; Chen, Qingxia; Liu, Hongfang; Peterson, Neeraja B.; Dai, Qi; Levy, Mia; Shah, Anushi; Han, Xue; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Min; Ying LI; Julien, Jamii St.; Warner, Jeremy; Friedman, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Drug repurposing, which finds new indications for existing drugs, has received great attention recently. The goal of our work is to assess the feasibility of using electronic health records (EHRs) and automated informatics methods to efficiently validate a recent drug repurposing association of metformin with reduced cancer mortality. Methods By linking two large EHRs from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Mayo Clinic to their tumor registries, we constructed a cohort includ...

  8. Polymer Nanoparticles Prepared by Sup ercritical Carb on Dioxide for in Vivo Anti-cancer Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maofang Hua; Xiufu Hua

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for producing polymer nanoparticles made of bovine serum albumin-poly(methyl methacrylate) conjugate by precipitating in supercritical CO2 is reported. The nanoparticles were loaded with the anti-tumor drug camptothecin. With albumin serving as a nutrient to cells, the drug-encapsulated nanoparticle shows an enhanced ability to kill cancer cells compared to that of the free drug in solution both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Potential of vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic therapy for recurrent and drug-resistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua F. Heiber; Xiang-Xi Xu; Glen N. Barber

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade,we have gained significant understanding of the mechanism by which vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) specifically kills cancer cells.Dysregulation of translation and defective innate immunity are beth thought to contribute to VSV oncolysis.Safety and efficacy are important objectives to consider in evaluating VSV as a therapy for malignant disease.Ongoing efforts may enable VSV virotherapy to be considered in the near future to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer when other options have been exhausted.In this article,we review the development of VSV as a potential therapeutic approach for recurrent or drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  10. Structural Basis for Induction of Peripheral Neuropathy by Microtubule-Targeting Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Slusher, Barbara S; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Farah, Mohamed H; Smiyun, Gregoriy; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a serious, dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment with microtubule-targeting drugs. Symptoms present in a "stocking-glove" distribution, with longest nerves affected most acutely, suggesting a length-dependent component to the toxicity. Axonal transport of ATP-producing mitochondria along neuronal microtubules from cell body to synapse is crucial to neuronal function. We compared the effects of the drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone that bind along the lengths of microtubules and the drugs eribulin and vincristine that bind at microtubule ends, on mitochondrial trafficking in cultured human neuronal SK-N-SH cells and on axonal transport in mouse sciatic nerves. Antiproliferative concentrations of paclitaxel and ixabepilone significantly inhibited the anterograde transport velocity of mitochondria in neuronal cells, whereas eribulin and vincristine inhibited transport only at significantly higher concentrations. Confirming these observations, anterogradely transported amyloid precursor protein accumulated in ligated sciatic nerves of control and eribulin-treated mice, but not in paclitaxel-treated mice, indicating that paclitaxel inhibited anterograde axonal transport, whereas eribulin did not. Electron microscopy of sciatic nerves of paclitaxel-treated mice showed reduced organelle accumulation proximal to the ligation consistent with inhibition of anterograde (kinesin based) transport by paclitaxel. In contrast, none of the drugs significantly affected retrograde (dynein based) transport in neuronal cells or mouse nerves. Collectively, these results suggest that paclitaxel and ixabepilone, which bind along the lengths and stabilize microtubules, inhibit kinesin-based axonal transport, but not dynein-based transport, whereas the microtubule-destabilizing drugs, eribulin and vincristine, which bind preferentially to microtubule ends, have significantly less effect on all microtubule-based axonal transport. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5115-23.

  11. Cancer therapy disparity: unequal access to breast cancer therapeutics and drug funding in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, S.; Sehdev, S.; Joy, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Adjuvant therapy has made a significant contribution in reducing breast cancer–specific mortality. Standard chemotherapeutics and tamoxifen have been the mainstay treatment for years, but recent clinical evidence supports the use of novel small-molecule therapy and aromatase inhibitor therapy in selected settings, challenging not only the traditional paradigm of breast cancer treatment, but also provincial funding of oncologic care across Canada. The disparity in access to aromatase inhibitor...

  12. Long-term cultivation of colorectal carcinoma cells with anti-cancer drugs induces drug resistance and telomere elongation: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochizuki Hidetaka

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of telomerase activation in the expression and/or maintenance of drug resistance is not clearly understood. Therefore, we investigated the relationships, among the telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes in colorectal cancer cell lines cultivated with anti-cancer drugs. Methods LoVo and DLD-1 cells were continuously grown in the presence of both CDDP and 5-FU for up to 100 days. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes were serially monitored as the PDL increased. Results The expression of multidrug resistance genes tended to increase as the PDL increased. However, an abnormal aneuploid clone was not detected as far as the cells were monitored by a DNA histogram analysis. Tumor cells showing resistance to anti-cancer drugs revealed a higher cell proliferation rate. The telomere length gradually increased with a progressive PDL. The telomerase activity reached a maximum level at 15 PDL in LoVo cells and at 27 PDL in DLD-1 cells. An increase in the mRNA expression of the telomerase components, especially in hTERT and in hTR, was observed at the same PDLs. Conclusions These results suggest that a high telomerase activity and an elongation of telomeres both appear to help maintain and/or increase drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells. Cancer cells with long telomeres and a high proliferative activity may thus be able to better survive exposure to anti-cancer drugs. This is presumably due to an increased chromosome stability and a strong expression of both mdr-1 and MRP genes.

  13. Collections of simultaneously altered genes as biomarkers of cancer cell drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-03-15

    Computational analysis of cancer pharmacogenomics data has resulted in biomarkers predictive of drug response, but the majority of response is not captured by current methods. Methods typically select single biomarkers or groups of related biomarkers but do not account for response that is strictly dependent on many simultaneous genetic alterations. This shortcoming reflects the combinatorics and multiple-testing problem associated with many-body biologic interactions. We developed a novel approach, Multivariate Organization of Combinatorial Alterations (MOCA), to partially address these challenges. Extending on previous work that accounts for pairwise interactions, the approach rapidly combines many genomic alterations into biomarkers of drug response, using Boolean set operations coupled with optimization; in this framework, the union, intersection, and difference Boolean set operations are proxies of molecular redundancy, synergy, and resistance, respectively. The algorithm is fast, broadly applicable to cancer genomics data, is of immediate use for prioritizing cancer pharmacogenomics experiments, and recovers known clinical findings without bias. Furthermore, the results presented here connect many important, previously isolated observations.

  14. Tocopheryl pullulan-based self assembling nanomicelles for anti-cancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyun, E-mail: wangjingyun67@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cui, Shuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bao, Yongming, E-mail: biosci@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xing, Jishuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hao, Wenbo [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Heihe University, Heihe 164300 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Amphiphilic α-tocopherol pullulan polymers (PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3) with different degrees of substitution were synthesized as new carriers for anticancer drugs. The polymers easily self-assembled into nanomicelles through dialysis method. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) were 38.0, 8.0, and 4.3 mg/L for PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3, respectively. 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) used as a model drug was successfully loaded into the PUTC nanomicelles. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that HCPT-loaded PUTC nanomicelles were almost spherical and had sizes ranging within 171.5–257.8 nm that increased with increased HCPT-loading content, as determined by dynamic laser scattering. The highest encapsulation efficiency of HCPT in PUTC nanomicelles reached 98.3%. The in vitro release of HCPT from PUTC micelles demonstrated sustained release for over 80 h. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays showed that blank PUTC micelles were nontoxic to normal cells and that the HCPT-loaded PUTC2 nanomicelles showed higher cytotoxicity than the free drug, which was attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of drug-loaded nanomicelles. Biodistribution experiments showed that PUTC micelles provided an excellent approach to rapid drug transport into cell nuclei. Moreover, the cellular uptake of micelles was found to be an energy-dependent and actin polymerization-associated endocytic process by endocytosis inhibition experiments. These results suggested that PUTC nanomicelles had considerable potential as a drug carrier for drug intracellular delivery in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Tocopheryl pullulan-based (PUTC) self-assembling nanomicelles were fabricated. • These micelles showed low CMC and dispersed uniformly with regular spherical shape. • High entrapment efficiency and in vitro sustained release of HCPT in PUTC micelles • HCPT–PUTC micelles accumulated in cell nuclei and showed higher anticancer activity.

  15. Targeting the chromatin remodeling enzyme BRG1 increases the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Sharma, Soni; Cui, Hang; LeBlanc, Scott E.; Zhang, Hong; Muthuswami, Rohini; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Brahma related gene product 1 (BRG1) is an ATPase that drives the catalytic activity of a subset of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes. BRG1 is overexpressed in most human breast cancer tumors without evidence of mutation and is required for breast cancer cell proliferation. We demonstrate that knockdown of BRG1 sensitized triple negative breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat breast cancer. An inhibitor of the BRG1 bromodomain had no effect on breast cancer cell viability, but an inhibitory molecule that targets the BRG1 ATPase activity recapitulated the increased drug efficacy observed in the presence of BRG1 knockdown. We further demonstrate that inhibition of BRG1 ATPase activity blocks the induction of ABC transporter genes by these chemotherapeutic drugs and that BRG1 binds to ABC transporter gene promoters. This inhibition increased intracellular concentrations of the drugs, providing a likely mechanism for the increased chemosensitivity. Since ABC transporters and their induction by chemotherapy drugs are a major cause of chemoresistance and treatment failure, these results support the idea that targeting the enzymatic activity of BRG1 would be an effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. PMID:27029062

  16. Hypoxia-Responsive Polymersomes for Drug Delivery to Hypoxic Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia in tumors contributes to overall tumor progression by assisting in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. In this study, we have synthesized a hypoxia-responsive, diblock copolymer poly(lactic acid)-azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol), which self-assembles to form polymersomes in an aqueous medium. The polymersomes did not release any encapsulated contents for 50 min under normoxic conditions. However, under hypoxia, 90% of the encapsulated dye was released in 50 min. The polymersomes encapsulated the combination of anticancer drugs gemcitabine and erlotinib with entrapment efficiency of 40% and 28%, respectively. We used three-dimensional spheroid cultures of pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3 to demonstrate hypoxia-mediated release of the drugs from the polymersomes. The vesicles were nontoxic. However, a significant decrease in cell viability was observed in hypoxic spheroidal cultures of BxPC-3 cells in the presence of drug encapsulated polymersomes. These polymersomes have potential for future applications in imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:27303825

  17. Aptamer-functionalized hydrogel as effective anti-cancer drugs delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Jianfei; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Min; Bi, Sai; Gui, Rijun; Li, Yanhui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2015-10-01

    An aptamer-functionalized hydrogel has been developed, which can be regulated by the AS1411 aptamer with the sol-gel conversion. Also the hydrogel can be further utilized for the controlled encapsulation and release of the cancer drugs. Specially, the AS1411 initiates the hybridization of acrydite-modified oligonucleotides to form the hydrogels and the presence of the target protein nucleolin leads the gel to dissolve as a result of reducing the cross-linking density by competitive target-aptamer binding. Based on the rheology of hydrogels, it is possible to utilize this material for storing and releasing molecules. In this research, the cancer drug doxorubicin is encapsulated inside the gel during the formation of the hydrogel and then released in the presence of nucleolin. Further experiments are carried out to prove the specific recognition of target matter. In vitro researches confirm that the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels can be used as drug carriers in targeted therapy and other biotechnological applications. PMID:26142627

  18. Combined Phosphoproteomics and Bioinformatics Strategy in Deciphering Drug Resistant Related Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the absence of a clear therapeutic target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC, conventional chemotherapy is the only available systemic treatment option for these patients. Despite chemotherapy treatment, TNBC patients still have worse prognosis when compared with other breast cancer patients. The study is to investigate unique phosphorylated proteins expressed in chemoresistant TNBC cell lines. In the current study, twelve TNBC cell lines were subjected to drug sensitivity assays against chemotherapy drugs docetaxel, doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and cisplatin. Based on their half maximal inhibitory concentrations, four resistant and two sensitive cell lines were selected for further analysis. The phosphopeptides from these cells were enriched with TiO2 beads and fractionated using strong cation exchange. 1,645 phosphoprotein groups and 9,585 unique phosphopeptides were identified by a high throughput LC-MS/MS system LTQ-Orbitrap. The phosphopeptides were further filtered with Ascore system and 1,340 phosphoprotein groups, 2,760 unique phosphopeptides, and 4,549 unique phosphosites were identified. Our study suggested that differentially phosphorylated Cdk5, PML, AP-1, and HSF-1 might work together to promote vimentin induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in the drug resistant cells. EGFR and HGF were also shown to be involved in this process.

  19. Combined phosphoproteomics and bioinformatics strategy in deciphering drug resistant related pathways in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinyu; Kohanfars, Morris; Hsu, Huan Ming; Souda, Puneet; Capri, Joe; Whitelegge, Julian P; Chang, Helena R

    2014-01-01

    Because of the absence of a clear therapeutic target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), conventional chemotherapy is the only available systemic treatment option for these patients. Despite chemotherapy treatment, TNBC patients still have worse prognosis when compared with other breast cancer patients. The study is to investigate unique phosphorylated proteins expressed in chemoresistant TNBC cell lines. In the current study, twelve TNBC cell lines were subjected to drug sensitivity assays against chemotherapy drugs docetaxel, doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and cisplatin. Based on their half maximal inhibitory concentrations, four resistant and two sensitive cell lines were selected for further analysis. The phosphopeptides from these cells were enriched with TiO2 beads and fractionated using strong cation exchange. 1,645 phosphoprotein groups and 9,585 unique phosphopeptides were identified by a high throughput LC-MS/MS system LTQ-Orbitrap. The phosphopeptides were further filtered with Ascore system and 1,340 phosphoprotein groups, 2,760 unique phosphopeptides, and 4,549 unique phosphosites were identified. Our study suggested that differentially phosphorylated Cdk5, PML, AP-1, and HSF-1 might work together to promote vimentin induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the drug resistant cells. EGFR and HGF were also shown to be involved in this process. PMID:25478227

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Escherichia coli Liposomes as a New Drug Delivery System to Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liposomes are spherical vesicles composed of concentric phospholipid bilayers that can entrap hydrophilic, hydrophobic drugs. Liposomes can be prepared from natural phospholipids, synthetic lipids or bacterial lipids. The aim of this study was to formulate liposome from bacterial lipids and evaluate physicochemical properties. Materials and methods: This study was performed experimentally on E.coli. The lipids were extracted from E.coli. using chloroform and methanol. Film method was used for preparing nano-systems and methylene blue was used as a drug model. Then their particle sizes were determined using particle sizer. The release methylene blue was carried out using dialysis membrane. Also, trailing them in cancer cells was evaluated by using carboxyfluorescein. Results: The average particle size of E.coli. liposomal was 338 nm. Encapsulation efficiency was 53.33 ± 2.88% and the value of release after 24 h was 97.54% ± 0.00. Liposomes could deliver the carboxyfluorescein to cancer cells. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that bacterial liposome has probably a suitable nano-particle such as particle size and desirable loading and it is possible to use them as drug delivery system.

  1. Silicon nanowire based biosensing platform for electrochemical sensing of Mebendazole drug activity on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashaani, Hani; Faramarzpour, Mahsa; Hassanpour, Morteza; Namdar, Nasser; Alikhani, Alireza; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2016-11-15

    Electrochemical approaches have played crucial roles in bio sensing because of their Potential in achieving sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and other bio evidences. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with nanomaterials tends to new generations of label-free biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitive area and response signals. Here we applied Silicon Nanowire (SiNW) array electrodes (in an integrated architecture of working, counter and reference electrodes) grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system with VLS procedure to electrochemically diagnose the presence of breast cancer cells as well as their response to anticancer drugs. Mebendazole (MBZ), has been used as antitubulin drug. It perturbs the anodic/cathodic response of the cell covered biosensor by releasing Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of cytochrome C would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by SiNW biosensor. By applying well direct bioelectrical contacts with cancer cells, SiNWs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Our device detected the trace of MBZ drugs (with the concentration of 2nM) on electrochemical activity MCF-7 cells. Also, experimented biological analysis such as confocal and Flowcytometry assays confirmed the electrochemical results. PMID:27196254

  2. Nanopharmaceutics: phytochemical-based controlled or sustained drug-delivery systems for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeetah, Roubeena; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2014-09-01

    This review is an attempt to assess the different classes of phytochemicals and some of their members which have been encapsulated into nanocarrier systems for their chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive properties. Given the broad spectrum of nanomedicines currently in clinical trial and clinical use from polymer-protein conjugates, through nanocrystals, nanogels, dendrimers to ethosomes, the focus of this review will be on block copolymer nanomicelles, nanoparticles, polymer-drug conjugates, liposomes and solid lipid nanocarriers (SLNs). The twenty phytochemicals investigated for encapsulation and targeted delivery were selected from a variety of classes intended to encompass the largest possible chemical compositions, namely flavonoids, aromatic acids, xanthones, terpenes, quinones, lignans and alkaloids. To the best of our knowledge, reviews on the nanoencapsulation of these phytochemicals and their delivery are not available. In this review, the issues associated with the limited use of each phytochemical in cancer therapy in humans are reviewed and the advantages of entrapment into nanocarriers are assessed in terms of drug loading efficiency, size of nanocarriers, drug release profiles and in vitro and/or in vivo testing specific to cancer research, e.g., cytotoxicity assay, cell inhibition/viability, scavenging of reactive oxygen species and biodistribution studies (elimination half-life and mean residence time). PMID:25992442

  3. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  4. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline. PMID:26970137

  5. Efficient pH Dependent Drug Delivery to Target Cancer Cells by Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alle Madhusudhan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX was immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs capped with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC for effective delivery to cancer cells. The carboxylic group of carboxymethyl chitosan interacts with the amino group of the doxorubicin (DOX forming stable, non-covalent interactions on the surface of AuNPs. The carboxylic group ionizes at acidic pH, thereby releasing the drug effectively at acidic pH suitable to target cancer cells. The DOX loaded gold nanoparticles were effectively absorbed by cervical cancer cells compared to free DOX and their uptake was further increased at acidic conditions induced by nigericin, an ionophore that causes intracellular acidification. These results suggest that DOX loaded AuNPs with pH-triggered drug releasing properties is a novel nanotheraputic approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  6. An implantable and controlled drug-release silk fibroin nanofibrous matrix to advance the treatment of solid tumour cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Chen, Yufeng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Xiaowen; Li, Gang; Chen, Aizheng; Wu, Xiaojian; Li, Jiashen; Li, Zhi; Hunt, John A; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2016-10-01

    The development of more effective cancer therapeutic strategies are still critically required. The maximization of the therapeutic effect in combination with avoiding the severe side effects on normal tissues when using chemotherapy drugs is still an urgent problem that requires improvements urgently. Here we provide implantable and controllable drug-release that utilises silk fibroin (SF) as a nanofibrous drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer treatment. A nanofibrous structure with controllable fibre diameter (curcumin (CM)-SF nanofibrous matrix had a superior anti-cancer potential when the concentration was >5 μg/mL. The mechanism could be explained by the cell cycle being held in the S phase. The toxic effect on normal cells (NCM460) was minimized by using a treatment concentration range (5-20 μg/mL). Implantation of this DDS into the tumour site inhibited the growth of solid tumour; this offers an alternative approach for novel cancer therapy. PMID:27376557

  7. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  8. Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hee-Jin [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwangil [Department of Pathology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Soon, E-mail: kspark@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven−nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines partly through the MEK−extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Murine xenograft experiments showed that Ell3 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results suggest that Ell3 may play a critical role in promoting oncogenesis in breast cancer by regulating cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  9. Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven−nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines partly through the MEK−extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Murine xenograft experiments showed that Ell3 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results suggest that Ell3 may play a critical role in promoting oncogenesis in breast cancer by regulating cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway

  10. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Apoptosis induction with electric pulses - A new approach to cancer therapy with drug free

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical pulses have been widely used in biomedical fields, whose applications depend on the parameters such as durations and electric intensity. Conventional electroporation (0.1-1 kV/cm, 100 μs) has been used in cell fusion, transfection and electrochemotherapy. Recent studies with high-intensity (MV/cm) electric field applications with durations of several tens of nanoseconds can affect intracellular signal transduction and intracellular structures with plasma intact, resulting in an application of intracellular manipulation. The most recent development is the finding that parameters between those two ranges could be used to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Proposal of apoptosis induction and tumor inhibition has advantages to pursue the treatment of cancer free of cytotoxic drugs.

  14. Apoptosis induction with electric pulses - A new approach to cancer therapy with drug free

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Liling, E-mail: lilingtang@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Chongqing University, Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yao, Chenguo; Sun, Caixin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Electrical pulses have been widely used in biomedical fields, whose applications depend on the parameters such as durations and electric intensity. Conventional electroporation (0.1-1 kV/cm, 100 {mu}s) has been used in cell fusion, transfection and electrochemotherapy. Recent studies with high-intensity (MV/cm) electric field applications with durations of several tens of nanoseconds can affect intracellular signal transduction and intracellular structures with plasma intact, resulting in an application of intracellular manipulation. The most recent development is the finding that parameters between those two ranges could be used to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Proposal of apoptosis induction and tumor inhibition has advantages to pursue the treatment of cancer free of cytotoxic drugs.

  15. Highly sensitive quantitative imaging for monitoring single cancer cell growth kinetics and drug response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mir

    Full Text Available The detection and treatment of cancer has advanced significantly in the past several decades, with important improvements in our understanding of the fundamental molecular and genetic basis of the disease. Despite these advancements, drug-screening methodologies have remained essentially unchanged since the introduction of the in vitro human cell line screen in 1990. Although the existing methods provide information on the overall effects of compounds on cell viability, they are restricted by bulk measurements, large sample sizes, and lack capability to measure proliferation kinetics at the individual cell level. To truly understand the nature of cancer cell proliferation and to develop personalized adjuvant therapies, there is a need for new methodologies that provide quantitative information to monitor the effect of drugs on cell growth as well as morphological and phenotypic changes at the single cell level. Here we show that a quantitative phase imaging modality known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM addresses these needs and provides additional advantages over existing proliferation assays. We demonstrate these capabilities through measurements on the effects of the hormone estradiol and the antiestrogen ICI182,780 (Faslodex on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Along with providing information on changes in the overall growth, SLIM provides additional biologically relevant information. For example, we find that exposure to estradiol results in rapidly growing cells with lower dry mass than the control population. Subsequently blocking the estrogen receptor with ICI results in slower growing cells, with lower dry masses than the control. This ability to measure changes in growth kinetics in response to environmental conditions provides new insight on growth regulation mechanisms. Our results establish the capabilities of SLIM as an advanced drug screening technology that provides information on changes in proliferation

  16. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay. PMID:27552143

  17. Of drug administration, war and oïkos: mediating cancer with nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeve, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on nano-enabled drug delivery systems (NDDS) in the context of cancer medicine. It regards NDDS as relational objects whose modes of existence are defined by their relationships with a complex biocultural environment that includes both the biological processes of our bodies and the values representations and metaphors our societies associate with cancer and cancer therapy. Within this framework the abundant use of war metaphors in NDDS --from 'smart bombs' to 'magic nano-bullets'--is discussed from various angles: in terms of therapeutic efficacy, it limits the potential of the technique by preventing the inclusion of the (patho)biological environment in the nanomedicine's mode of action. In terms of development opportunities, the military strategy of active specific targeting faces cost and complexity bottlenecks. In terms of ethical values, it favors the questionable image of cancer patients as 'fighters'. On the basis of these criticisms different metaphorical frameworks are suggested, in particular that of oïkos, whereby nanomedicine is reframed as a kind of domestic economy addressing the system-environment relationships of embodied processes with further imagination and care.

  18. Potential prostate cancer drug target: bioactivation of androstanediol by conversion to dihydrotestosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L; Titus, Mark A; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2011-09-15

    High-affinity binding of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the androgen receptor (AR) initiates androgen-dependent gene activation, required for normal male sex development in utero, and contributes to prostate cancer development and progression in men. Under normal physiologic conditions, DHT is synthesized predominantly by 5α-reduction of testosterone, the major circulating androgen produced by the testis. During androgen deprivation therapy, intratumoral androgen production is sufficient for AR activation and prostate cancer growth, even though circulating testicular androgen levels are low. Recent studies indicate that the metabolism of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 6 in benign prostate and prostate cancer cells is a major biosynthetic pathway for intratumoral synthesis of DHT, which binds AR and initiates transactivation to promote prostate cancer growth during androgen deprivation therapy. Drugs that target the so-called backdoor pathway of DHT synthesis provide an opportunity to enhance clinical response to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists or antagonists, AR antagonists, and inhibitors of 5α-reductase enzymes (finasteride or dutasteride), and other steroid metabolism enzyme inhibitors (ketoconazole or the recently available abiraterone acetate). PMID:21705451

  19. Clinical management of advanced gastric cancer: The role of new molecular drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vita, Ferdinando; Di Martino, Natale; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Petrillo, Angelica; Gambardella, Valentina; Sforza, Vincenzo; Marano, Luigi; Auricchio, Annamaria; Galizia, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Orditura, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm and the second leading cause of death for cancer in Western countries with more than 20000 new cases yearly diagnosed in the United States. Surgery represents the main approach for this disease but, notwithstanding the advances in surgical techniques, we observed a minimal improvement in terms of overall survival with a significant increasing of relapsing disease rates. Despite the development of new drugs has significantly improved the effectiveness of chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma remains poor. Recently, several molecular target agents have been investigated; in particular, trastuzumab represents the first target molecule showing improvements in overall survival in human epithelial growth factor 2-positive gastric cancer patients. New molecules targeting vascular epithelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and anti hepatocyte growth factor-c-Met pathway are also under investigation, with interesting results. Anyway, it seems necessary to select more accurately the population to treat with new agents by the identification of new biomarkers in order to optimize the results. In this paper we review the actual “scenario” of targeted treatments, also focusing on the new agents in development for gastric cancer and gastro-esophageal carcinoma, discussing their efficacy and potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:25356019

  20. Research Perspective: Potential Role of Nitazoxanide in Ovarian Cancer Treatment. Old Drug, New Purpose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Santo, Nicola, E-mail: nico.disanto@duke.edu; Ehrisman, Jessie [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Among gynecological malignancies epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death. Despite improvements in conventional chemotherapy combinations, the overall cure rate has remained mostly stable over the years, and only 10%–15% of patients maintain a complete response following first-line therapy. To improve the efficacy of ovarian cancer chemotherapy it is essential to develop drugs with new mechanisms of action. Compared to normal tissues, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is overexpressed in ovarian tumors. PDI is a cellular enzyme in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotes or the periplasmic region of prokaryotes. This protein catalyzes the formation and breakage of disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins, which affects protein folding. Selective inhibition of PDI activity has been exhibited both in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity in human ovarian cancer models. PDI inhibition caused accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which led to ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR), and in turn resulted in cell death. Nitazoxanide [NTZ: 2-acetyloxy-N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)benzamide] is a thiazolide antiparasitic agent with excellent activity against a wide variety of protozoa and helminths. In this article, we propose that NTZ, acting as PDI inhibitor, may be a new and potent addition to the chemotherapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer.

  1. Research Perspective: Potential Role of Nitazoxanide in Ovarian Cancer Treatment. Old Drug, New Purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Ehrisman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among gynecological malignancies epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is the leading cause of death. Despite improvements in conventional chemotherapy combinations, the overall cure rate has remained mostly stable over the years, and only 10%–15% of patients maintain a complete response following first-line therapy. To improve the efficacy of ovarian cancer chemotherapy it is essential to develop drugs with new mechanisms of action. Compared to normal tissues, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI is overexpressed in ovarian tumors. PDI is a cellular enzyme in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of eukaryotes or the periplasmic region of prokaryotes. This protein catalyzes the formation and breakage of disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins, which affects protein folding. Selective inhibition of PDI activity has been exhibited both in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity in human ovarian cancer models. PDI inhibition caused accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which led to ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR, and in turn resulted in cell death. Nitazoxanide [NTZ: 2-acetyloxy-N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolylbenzamide] is a thiazolide antiparasitic agent with excellent activity against a wide variety of protozoa and helminths. In this article, we propose that NTZ, acting as PDI inhibitor, may be a new and potent addition to the chemotherapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer.

  2. Ginseng and Anticancer Drug Combination to Improve Cancer Chemotherapy: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, a well-known herb, is often used in combination with anticancer drugs to enhance chemotherapy. Its wide usage as well as many documentations are often cited to support its clinical benefit of such combination therapy. However the literature based on objective evidence to make such recommendation is still lacking. The present review critically evaluated relevant studies reported in English and Chinese literature on such combination. Based on our review, we found good evidence from in vitro and in vivo animal studies showing enhanced antitumor effect when ginseng is used in combination with some anticancer drugs. However, there is insufficient clinical evidence of such benefit as very few clinical studies are available. Future research should focus on clinically relevant studies of such combination to validate the utility of ginseng in cancer.

  3. Cancer cell spheroids for screening of chemotherapeutics and drug-delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niravkumar R; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Abouzeid, Abraham H; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the most popular platform to perform high-throughput screening for viable anti-neoplastic compounds has been monolayer cell culture. However, cells in monolayer culture lose many of their in vivo characteristics. As a result, this platform provides a limited predictive value in determining the clinical outcome of the compounds of interest. Using a technique known as 3D spheroid culture, may be the answer to this conundrum. Spheroids have been shown to mimic the tissue-like properties of tumors necessary for the proper evaluation of compounds. In this review, production of cancer cell spheroids, utilization of these spheroids in understanding various therapeutic mechanisms and the potential for their use in high-throughput screening of drugs and drug-delivery systems are discussed in detail. PMID:25996047

  4. Persistence of side population cells with high drug efflux capacity in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the persistence of side population (SP) cells in pancreatic cancer and their role and mechanism in the drug resistance.METHODS:The presentation of side population cells in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its proportion change when cultured with Gemcitabine,was detected by Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis.The expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 was detected by realtime PCR in either SP cells or non-SP cells.RESULTS:SP cells do exist in PANC-1,with a median of 3.3% and a range of 2.1-8.7%.After cultured with Gemcitabine for 3 d,the proportion of SP cells increased significantly(3.8% ± 1.9%,10.7% ± 3.7%, t = 4.616,P = 0.001 < 0.05).ABCB1 and ABCG2 expressed at higher concentrations in SP as compared with non-SP cells (ABCBI: 1.15 ± 0.72, 5.82 ± 1.16, t = 10.839,P = 0.000 < 0.05; ABCG2:1.16 ± 0.75,5.48 ± 0.94,t = 11.305,P = 0.000 < 0.05),which may contribute to the efflux of fluorescent staining and drug resistance.CONCLUSION:SP cells with inherently high resistance to chemotherapeutic agents do exist in pancreatic cancers,which may be candidate cancer stem cells contributing to the relapse of the tumor.

  5. Variable NF-κB pathway responses in colon cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Temesgen; Fadlalla, Khalda; Gales, Dominique N; Putcha, Balananda DK; Manne, Upender

    2014-01-01

    Background The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling pathway is activated in cells exposed to various stimuli, including those originating on the cell surface or in the nucleus. Activated NF-κB signaling is thought to enhance cell survival in response to these stimuli, which include chemotherapy and radiation. In the present effort, we determined which anticancer drugs preferentially activate NF-κB in colon cancer cells. Methods NF-κB reporter cells ...

  6. Can the clinical course of cancer be influenced by non-antineoplastic drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    Brandes, L. J.; Friesen, L A

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory and anecdotal clinical evidence suggests that some common non-antineoplastic drugs may affect the course of cancer. The authors present two cases that appear to be consistent with such a possibility: that of a 63-year-old woman in whom a high-grade angiosarcoma of the forehead improved after discontinuation of lithium therapy and then progressed rapidly when treatment with carbamazepine was started, and that of a 74-year-old woman with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon that re...

  7. Low concentration of quercetin antagonizes the cytotoxic effects of anti-neoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The role of Quercetin in ovarian cancer treatment remains controversial, and the mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of Quercetin in combination with Cisplatin and other anti-neoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, along with the molecular mechanism of action. METHODS: Quercetin treatment at various concentrations was examined in combination with Cisplatin, taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fu in human epithelial ovarian cancer C13* and SKOV3 cells. CCK8 assay and Annexin V assay were for cell viability and apoptosis analysis, immunofluorescence assay, DCFDA staining and realtime PCR were used for reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced injury detection and endogenous antioxidant enzymes expression. Athymic BALB/c-nu nude mice were injected with C13*cells to obtain a xenograft model for in vivo studies. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to evaluate the ROS-induced injury and SOD1 activity of xenograft tumors. RESULTS: Contrary to the pro-apoptotic effect of high concentration (40 µM-100 µM of Quercetin, low concentrations (5 µM-30 µM of Quercetin resulted in varying degrees of attenuation of cytotoxicity of Cisplatin treatment when combined with Cisplatin. Similar anti-apoptotic effects were observed when Quercetin was combined with other anti-neoplastic agents: Taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu. Low concentrations of Quercetin were observed to suppress ROS-induced injury, reduce intracellular ROS level and increase the expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suggesting a ROS-mediated mechanism of attenuating anti-neoplastic drugs. In xenogeneic model, Quercetin led to a substantial reduction of therapeutic efficacy of Cisplatin along with enhancing the endogenous antioxidant enzyme expression and reducing ROS-induced damage in xenograft tumor tissue. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these data suggest that Quercetin at low concentrations

  8. A multifunctional drug combination shows highly potent therapeutic efficacy against human cancer xenografts in athymic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Jun Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role during tumor development. Integrated combination of drugs that target tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to anticancer therapy. Here, we report a multifunctional combination of low-cytotoxic drugs composed of dipyridamole, bestatin and dexamethasone (DBDx which mainly acts on the tumor microenvironment shows highly potent antitumor efficacy in vivo. In mouse hepatoma H22 model, the triple drug combination showed synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy. The combination indices of various combinations of the triple drugs were between 0.2 and 0.5. DBDx inhibited the growth of a panel of human tumor xenografts and showed no obvious systemic toxicity. At tolerated doses, DBDx suppressed the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402, HepG2, and lung adenocarcinoma A549 xenografts by 94.5%, 93.7% and 96.9%, respectively. Clonogenic assay demonstrated that DBDx showed weak cytotoxicity. Western blot showed that Flk1 and Nos3 were down-regulated in the DBDx-treated group. Proteomic analysis showed that DBDx mainly affected the metabolic process and immune system process; in addition, the angiogenesis and VEGF signaling pathway were also affected. Conclusively, DBDx, a multifunctional drug combination of three low-cytotoxic drugs, shows synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy evidently mediated by the modulation of tumor microenvironment. Based on its low-cytotoxic attributes and its broad-spectrum antitumor therapeutic efficacy, this multifunctional combination might be useful in the treatment of cancers, especially those refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics.

  9. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and other childhood kidney cancers. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. In vitro development of chemotherapy and targeted therapy drug-resistant cancer cell lines: A practical guide with case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eMcDermott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3-18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval and optimising the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between 2-8 fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299, H460 and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144 cell lines. Continuous selection produced lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954. Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical drug

  11. Polydopamine-based surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Danfeng; Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Gan; Chen, Yuhan; Wang, Teng; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    A novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which were modified by polydopamine (PDA) for controlled release of cationic amphiphilic drug desipramine (DES) was prepared. MSNs-DES-PDA were characterized in terms of size, size distribution, surface morphology, BET surface area, mesoporous size and pore volume, drug loading content and in vitro drug release profile. MSNs-DES-PDA had high drug loading content and pH sensitivity. The DES release profiles of MSNs-DES and MSNs-DES-PDA were totally different, and the drug release of MSNs-DES-PDA accelerated with increasing acidity. MSNs-DES-PDA can be internalized into cells. In vitro experiments demonstrated that MSNs-DES-PDA had higher cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects on acid sphingomyelinase than those of free DES. This drug delivery system was beneficial for controlled release and cancer therapy.

  12. The Metaboloepigenetic Dimension of Cancer Stem Cells: Evaluating the Market Potential for New Metabostemness-Targeting Oncology Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The current global portfolio of oncology drugs is unlikely to produce durable disease remission for millions of cancer patients worldwide. This is due, in part, to the existence of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), a particularly aggressive type of malignant cell that is capable of indefinite self-replication, is refractory to conventional treatments, and is skilled at spreading and colonizing distant organs. To date, no drugs from big-league Pharma companies are capable of killing CSCs. Why? Quite simply, a classic drug development approach based on mutated genes and pathological protein products cannot efficiently target the plastic, epigenetic proclivity of cancer tissues to generate CSCs. Recent studies have proposed that certain elite metabolites (oncometabolites) and other common metabolites can significantly influence the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures of stemness and cancer. Consequently, cellular metabolism and the core epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, can be better viewed as an integrated metaboloepigenetic dimension of CSCs, which we have recently termed cancer metabostemness. By targeting weaknesses in the bridge connecting metabolism and epigenetics, a new generation of metabostemnessspecific drugs can be generated for potent and long-lasting elimination of life-threatening CSCs. Here I evaluate the market potential of re-modeling the oncology drug pipeline by discovering and developing new metabolic approaches able to target the apparently undruggable epigenetic programs that dynamically regulate the plasticity of non-CSC and CSC cellular states.

  13. Roscovitine synergizes with conventional chemo-therapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Salah I Abaza; Abdul-Majeed A Bahman; Rajaa J Al-Attiyah

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine the ability of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor(CDKI)roscovitine(Rosco)to enhance the antitumor effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents acting by different mechanisms against human colorectal cancer.METHODS:Human colorectal cancer cells were treated,individually and in combination,with Rosco,taxol,5-Fluorouracil(S-FU),doxorubicine or vinblastine.The antiproliferative effects and the type of interaction of Rosco with tested chemotherapeutic drugs were determined.Cell cycle alterations were investigated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter FACS analysis.Apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation assay.RESULTS:Rosco inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner.The efficacies of all tested chemotherapeutic drugs were markedly enhanced 3.0-8.42×103 and 130-5.28×103 fold in combination with 5 and 10 μg/mL Rosco,re-spectively.The combinatiou of Rosco and chemotherapeutic drugs inhibited the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in an additive or synergistic fashion,and in a time and dose dependent manner.Rosco induced apoptosis and synergized with tested chemotherapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.Sequential,inverted sequential and simultaneous treatment of cancer cells with combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs and Rosco arrested the growth of human colorectal cancer cells at various phases of the cell cycle as follows:Taxol/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases),5-FU/Rosco(S-phase),Dox/Rosco(S-phase)and Vinb/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases).CONCLUSION:Since the efficacy of many anticancer drugs depends on their ability to induce apoptotic cell death,modulation of this parameter by Cell cycle inhibitors may provide a novel chemo-preventive and chemothempeutic strategy for human colorectal cancer.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  14. Fractionated irradiation induced radio-resistant esophageal cancer EC109 cells seem to be more sensitive to chemotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xingwu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo-radiotherapy, a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is the most frequent treatment for patients with esophageal cancer. In the process of radiotherapy, the radiosensitive cancer will become a radio-resistant one. Methods In order to detect the chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity in radio-resistant cancer cells and improve the therapy efficiency, we firstly established a radio-resistant esophageal cancer cell model (referred to as EC109/R from the human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line EC109 through fractionated irradiation using X-rays. The radio-sensitivity of EC109/R cells was measured by clonogenic assay. To detect the drug sensitivity for EC109/R compared to its parent cells, we employed MTT method to screen the effectiveness of five different drugs commonly used in clinical therapy. The ratio of apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. Results EC109/R cells were more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, paclitaxel and etoposide, but tolerant to cisplatin compared to its original cells. Conclusion Our study implies that fractionated irradiation induced radio-resistant esophageal cancer cell is more sensitive to certain kind of chemotherapeutic drugs. It provides evidence for choosing the sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in esophageal cancer.

  15. Optimizing anticancer drug treatment in pregnant cancer patients : pharmacokinetic analysis of gestation-induced changes for doxorubicin, epirubicin, docetaxel and paclitaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, J G C; van Calsteren, K; Heyns, L; Han, S; Mhallem Gziri, M; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Huitema, A D R; Amant, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with cancer are increasingly treated with anticancer drugs, although the specific impact of pregnancy-induced physiological changes on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anticancer drugs and associated implications for optimal dose regimens remains unclear. Our objectives wer

  16. Cancer stem-like cells can be isolated with drug selection in human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ma; Dongmei Lai; Te Liu; Weiwei Cheng; Lihe Guo

    2010-01-01

     One emerging model for the development of drugresistant tumors utilizes a pool of self-renewing malignant progenitors known as cancer stem cells(CSCs)or cancerinitiating cells(CICs).The purpose of this study was to propagate such CICs from the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3.The SKOV3 sphere cells were selected using 40.0 μmol/l cisplatin and 10.0 μmol/l paclitaxel in serumfree culture system supplemented with epidermal growth factor,basic fibroblast growth factor,leukemia inhibitory factor,and insufin or standard serum-containing system.These cells formed non-adherent spheres under drug selection(cisplatin and paclitaxel)and serum-free culture system.The selected sphere cells are more resistant to cisplatin,paclitaxel,adriamycin,and methotrexate.Importantly,the sphere cells have the properties of se lfrenewal,with high expression of the stem cell genes Nanog,Oct4,sox2,nestin,ABCG2,CD133,and the stem cell factor receptor CD117(c-kit).Consistently,flow cytometric analysis revealed that the sphere cells have a much higher percentage of CD133+/CD117+-positive cells (71%)than differentiated cells(33%).Moreover,the SKOV3 sphere cells are more tumorigenic.Furthermore,cDNA microarray and subsequent ontological analyses revealed that a large proportion of the classified genes were related to angiogenesis,extracellular matrix,integrin-mediated signaling pathway,cell adhesion,and cell proliferation.The subpopulation isolation from the SKOV3 cell line under this culture system offers a suitable in vitro model for studying ovarian CSCs in terms of their survival,self-renewal,and chemoresistance,and for developing therapeutic drugs that specifically interfere with ovarian CSCs.

  17. Quercetin and doxorubicin co-encapsulated biotin receptor-targeting nanoparticles for minimizing drug resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Li; Liu, Chunxia; Chen, Chuxiong; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Guanghui; Shi, Yonghui; Qin, Fengchao; Ou, Jiebin; Qiu, Kaifeng; Li, Guocheng

    2016-05-31

    The combination of a chemotherapeutic drug with a chemosensitizer has emerged as a promising strategy for cancers showing multidrug resistance (MDR). Herein we describe the simultaneous targeted delivery of two drugs to tumor cells by using biotin-decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles encapsulating the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin and the chemosensitizer quercetin (BNDQ). Next, the potential ability of BNDQ to reverse MDR in vitro and in vivo was investigated. Studies demonstrated that BNDQ was more effectively taken up with less efflux by doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) than by the cells treated with the free drugs, single-drug-loaded nanoparticles, or non-biotin-decorated nanoparticles. BNDQ exhibited clear inhibition of both the activity and expression of P-glycoprotein in MCF-7/ADR cells. More importantly, it caused a significant reduction in doxorubicin resistance in MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, among all the groups. Overall, this study suggests that BNDQ has a potential role in the treatment of drug-resistant breast cancer. PMID:27058756

  18. Chaperone-Targeting Cytotoxin and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Inducing Drug Synergize to Kill Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Backer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA of a novel bacterial AB5 toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  19. Optimal Sequencing of New Drugs in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio; Lunardi, Andrea; Trentin, Chiara; Maines, Francesca; Veccia, Antonello; Galligioni, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of new drugs capable of improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has led to the possibility of using them sequentially in the hope of obtaining a cumulative survival benefit. The new agents have already been administered as third-line treatments in patients who have previously received them as second line in everyday clinical practice, but the efficacy of this practice is not yet supported by clinical trial data, and evidence of possible cross-resistance has reinforced the debate concerning the best sequence to use in order to maximise the benefit. Furthermore, the situation is further complicated by the possibility of administering new hormonal agents to chemotherapy-naïve patients, and novel chemotherapeutic agents to hormone-sensitive patients. This article critically reviews the available data concerning the sequential use of new drugs, and discusses the real evidence concerning their optimal positioning in the therapeutic strategy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26721408

  20. Direct observation of key photoinduced dynamics in a potential nano-delivery vehicle of cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Samim; Chaudhuri, Siddhi; Kar, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Soumik; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, significant achievements in the use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) as delivery vehicles of cancer drugs have been made. The present study is an attempt to explore the key photoinduced dynamics in ZnO NPs upon complexation with a model cancer drug protoporphyrin IX (PP). The nanohybrid has been characterized by FTIR, Raman scattering and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Picosecond-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the defect mediated emission of ZnO NPs to PP has been used to study the formation of the nanohybrid at the molecular level. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence studies of PP-ZnO nanohybrids reveal efficient electron migration from photoexcited PP to ZnO, eventually enhancing the ROS activity. The dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) oxidation and no oxidation of luminol in PP/PP-ZnO nanohybrids upon green light illumination unravel that the nature of ROS is essentially singlet oxygen rather than superoxide anions. Surface mediated photocatalysis of methylene blue (MB) in an aqueous solution of the nanohybrid has also been investigated. Direct evidence of the role of electron transfer as a key player in enhanced ROS generation from the nanohybrid is also clear from the photocurrent measurement studies. We have also used the nanohybrid in a model photodynamic therapy application in a light sensitized bacteriological culture experiment.

  1. Decrease of anxio-depressive disorders in cancer with non drug psychotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Frédérique Bacqué

    2015-12-01

    his environment. The second step is the restoration of the continuous identity of the patient despite the illness. The narration of his story is necessary to integrate the breach of the diagnosis. Listening to this story is often the task of the psychologist. Sometimes doctors or nurses try to consolidate the patient personality but it takes special skills and a lot of time. For example some specific questions like « What is difficult for you at this moment ? » or « what are your life priorities ? » can build a clinical approach, deeply in trapsychic more than humanistic. It’s an ethic matter.  Some psychopathological symptoms may impair patients global state. The clinician may wonder about present symptoms as well as previous crisis disruptions. He will take into account the transference upon him, the caregivers and all the institution. Transferanceisa freudian concept thatincludesun conscious feelings usually reserved to parents but shifted on doctors or caregivers. The positive part of the transference will help patients to trust and accept to be cured by the oncology team.Results: Announcing cancer is the doctor’s work. In psychotraumatic conditions, a psychological accompanying is useful to help the patient to bind the traumatic disclosure to his emotional life. The psychodynamic therapy (PT is a deep in trapsychic work while the cognitivo-behavioral therapy (CBT is a way to adapt patient to illness and treatment. In PT patient is deeply committed to change his way of mentalizing (connecting affects to behaviors. Both are helpful without additional drugs.Conclusion: Psycho-oncological approach of cancer recognizes multi-factoriality of cancer aetiology and cure. Beyond simple understanding of psychological states it offers an integrative approach of the patient as a unique person in his culture and interpersonal environment.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Bacqué M. Decrease of anxio-depressive disorders in cancer with

  2. Drug concentrations in axillary lymph nodes after lymphatic chemotherapy on patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymph node status is one of the decisive prognostic factors in breast cancer. Chemotherapy targeting regional lymphatic tissues has emerged as a promising therapy for the treatment of malignancies with a high tendency to disseminate lymphatically. The present study determined the drug concentrations in axillary lymph nodes after lymphatic chemotherapy (LC) in patients with breast cancer and compared the results with those receiving intravenous chemotherapy (VC) to investigate whether LC could improve the accumulation of anticancer drug in regional lymph nodes. Sixty patients with breast carcinoma confirmed by preoperative puncture-biopsy were divided into two groups at random. The LC group (n = 30) received a subcutaneous injection of 4 ml of carboplatin-activated carbon suspension, containing 20 mg of carboplatin, adjacent to the primary tumour. The VC group (n = 30) received an intravenous administration of an equal dose of aqueous carboplatin. At 1, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after administration, modified radical mammectomies were performed on 12 patients at each time point, with 6 from each group. Axillary lymph nodes were removed for pathological examination. The platinum concentrations in nodes were determined by Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 275 axillary lymph nodes were resected, with 154 in the LC group and 121 in the VC group. Of the 275 lymph nodes, 136 (49.5%) from 23 patients (38.3%) had histopathologically detected metastases. At 1, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after injection, the carboplatin concentrations in the LC group were 11.82 ± 3.50, 23.58 ± 7.34, 18.22 ± 4.93, 16.70 ± 5.15 and 14.62 ± 4.29 μg/g (means ± SD), respectively, whereas those in the VC group were 0.06 ± 0.02, 0.11 ± 0.05, 0.10 ± 0.02, 0.05 ± 0.02 and 0 μg/g, respectively. Significant differences were found in each corresponding comparison (P < 0.001). Lymph node metastasis was uncorrelated with drug concentration (P > 0.05). LC can effectively and

  3. pH-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles employed in controlled drug deliver y systems for cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Ni Yang; Chun-Qiu Zhang; Wei Wang; Paul C.Wang; Jian-Ping Zhou; Xing-Jie Liang

    2014-01-01

    In the ifght against cancer, controlled drug delivery systems have emerged to enhance the therapeutic effcacy and safety of anti-cancer drugs. Among these systems, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with a functional surface possess obvious advantages and were thus rapidly developed for cancer treatment. Many stimuli-responsive materials, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and inorganic materials, have been applied as caps and gatekeepers to control drug release from MSNs. This review presents an overview of the recent progress in the production of pH-responsive MSNs based on the pH gradient between normal tissues and the tumor microenvironment. Four main categories of gatekeepers can respond to acidic conditions. hTese categories will be described in detail.

  4. Doxorubicin in TAT peptide-modified multifunctional immunoliposomes demonstrates increased activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant ovarian cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Anjali; Koren, Erez; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a hallmark of cancer cells and a crucial factor in chemotherapy failure, cancer reappearance, and patient deterioration. We have previously described the physicochemical characteristics and the in vitro anticancer properties of a multifunctional doxorubicin-loaded liposomal formulation. Lipodox(®), a commercially available PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin, was made multifunctional by surface-decorating with a cell-penetrating peptide, TATp, conjugated to PEG 1000-PE, to enhance liposomal cell uptake. A pH-sensitive polymer, PEG 2000-Hz-PE, with a pH-sensitive hydrazone (Hz) bond to shield the peptide in the body and expose it only at the acidic tumor cell surface, was used as well. In addition, an anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 attached to a long-chain polymer to target nucleosomes overexpressed on the tumor cell surface was also present. Here, we report the in vitro cell uptake and cytotoxicity of the modified multifunctional immunoliposomes as well as the in vivo studies on tumor xenografts developed subcutaneously in nude mice with MDR and drug-sensitive human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3). Our results show the ability of multifunctional immunoliposomes to overcome MDR by enhancing cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cells, compared with non-modified liposomes. Furthermore, in comparison with the non-modified liposomes, upon intravenous injection of these multifunctional immunoliposomes into mice with tumor xenografts, a significant reduction in tumor growth and enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug in both drug-resistant and drug-sensitive mice was obtained. The use of "smart" multifunctional delivery systems may provide the basis for an effective strategy to develop, improve, and overcome MDR cancers in the future. PMID:24145298

  5. Old-School Chemotherapy in Immunotherapeutic Combination in Cancer, A Low-cost Drug Repurposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Razavi, Ghazaleh Shoja E; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Janik, John; Khleif, Samir N

    2016-05-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has proven to be a potent treatment modality. Although often successful in generating antitumor immune responses, cancer immunotherapy is frequently hindered by tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Among immunosuppressive strategies within the tumor microenvironment, suppressive immune regulatory cells play a key role in promoting tumor progression through inhibiting the effector arm of the immune response. Targeting these suppressive cells can greatly enhance antitumor immune therapies, hence augmenting a highly effective therapeutic antitumor response. Several approaches are being tested to enhance the effector arm of the immune system while simultaneously inhibiting the suppressor arm. Some of these approaches are none other than traditional drugs repurposed as immune modulators. Cyclophosphamide, an old-school chemotherapeutic agent used across a wide range of malignancies, was found to be a potent immune modulator that targets suppressive regulatory immune cells within the tumor microenvironment while enhancing effector cells. Preclinical and clinical findings have confirmed the ability of low doses of cyclophosphamide to selectively deplete regulatory T cells while enhancing effector and memory cytotoxic T cells within the tumor microenvironment. These immune effects translate to suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival, evidence of antitumor therapeutic efficacy. This article discusses the reincarnation of cyclophosphamide as an immune modulator that augments novel immunotherapeutic approaches. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 377-82. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Current status and evolution of preclinical drug development models of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis A Konstantinopoulos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and the fifth most common cause of female cancer death in the United States. Although important advances in surgical and chemotherapeutic strategies over the last three decades have significantly improved the median survival of EOC patients, the plateau of the survival curve has not changed appreciably. Given that EOC is a genetically and biologically heterogeneous disease, identification of specific molecular abnormalities that can be targeted in each individual ovarian cancer on the basis of predictive biomarkers promises to be an effective strategy to improve outcome in this disease. However, for this promise to materialize, appropriate preclinical experimental platforms that recapitulate the complexity of these neoplasms and reliably predict antitumor activity in the clinic are critically important. In this review, we will present the current status and evolution of preclinical models of EOC, including cell lines, immortalized normal cells, xenograft models, patient-derived xenografts and animal models, and will discuss their potential for oncology drug development.

  7. Anticancer activity of drug conjugates in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted oral cancer/head and neck cancer is increasing rapidly. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is playing a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). Paclitaxel is a widely used anticancer drug for breast, ovarian, testicular, cervical, non-small cell lung, head and neck cancer. However, it is water insoluble and orally inactive. We report the synthesis of water soluble nanosize conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide by employing native chemical ligation. We performed a native chemical ligation between the N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester of paclitaxel succinate and cysteine at pH 6.5 to give the cysteine-conjugated paclitaxel derivative. The thiol functionality of cysteine was activated and subsequently conjugated to multiarm thiol-PEG to obtain the paclitaxel branched PEG conjugate. Finally, we conjugated an EGFR-targeting peptide to obtain conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide. These conjugates show anticancer activity against squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck cells (SCCHN, Tu212). PMID:27100344

  8. Ligand-based receptor tyrosine kinase partial agonists: New paradigm for cancer drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are validated targets for oncology drug discovery and several RTK antagonists have been approved for the treatment of human malignancies. Nonetheless, the discovery and development of RTK antagonists has lagged behind the discovery and development of agents that target G-protein coupled receptors. In part, this is because it has been difficult to discover analogs of naturally-occurring RTK agonists that function as antagonists. Areas covered Here we describe ligands of ErbB receptors that function as partial agonists for these receptors, thereby enabling these ligands to antagonize the activity of full agonists for these receptors. We provide insights into the mechanisms by which these ligands function as antagonists. We discuss how information concerning these mechanisms can be translated into screens for novel small molecule- and antibody-based antagonists of ErbB receptors and how such antagonists hold great potential as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics. Expert opinion While there have been a number of important key findings into this field, the identification of the structural basis of ligand functional specificity is still of the greatest importance. While it is true that, with some notable exceptions, peptide hormones and growth factors have not proven to be good platforms for oncology drug discovery; addressing the fundamental issues of antagonistic partial agonists for receptor tyrosine kinases has the potential to steer oncology drug discovery in new directions. Mechanism based approaches are now emerging to enable the discovery of RTK partial agonists that may antagonize both agonist-dependent and –independent RTK signaling and may hold tremendous promise as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:21532939

  9. FAT10 is associated with the malignancy and drug resistance of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue F

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Feng Xue,1,2,* Lin Zhu,3,* Qing-wei Meng,1 Liyan Wang,2 Xue-song Chen,1 Yan-bin Zhao,1 Ying Xing,1 Xiao-yun Wang,1 Li Cai1 1The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, 3Department of Radiotherapy, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer cases. Currently, platinum-based chemotherapy drugs, including cisplatin and carboplatin, are the most effective treatment for NSCLC. However, the clinical efficacy of chemotherapy is markedly reduced later in the treatment because drug resistance develops during the treatment. Recently, a series of studies has suggested the involvement of FAT10 in the development and malignancy of multiple cancer types. In this study, we focused our research on the function of FAT10 in NSCLC, which has not been previously reported in the literature. We found that the expression levels of FAT10 were elevated in quick chemoresistance NSCLC tissues, and we demonstrated that FAT10 promotes NSCLC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, the protein levels of FAT10 were elevated in cisplatin- and carboplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, and knockdown of FAT10 reduced the drug resistance of NSCLC cells. In addition, we gained evidence that FAT10 regulates NSCLC malignancy and drug resistance by modulating the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Keywords: FAT10, NSCLC, malignancy, drug resistance, NFκB

  10. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper.

  11. Synergistic Nanomedicine: Passive, Active, and Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhodiry, Mohamed A; Momah, Christian C; Suwaidi, Shaima R; Gadalla, Dina; Martins, Ana M; Vitor, Rute F; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 µm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site. PMID:27398430

  12. Inulin-based polymer coated SPIONs as potential drug delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialabba, C; Licciardi, M; Mauro, N; Rocco, F; Ceruti, M; Giammona, G

    2014-11-01

    This paper deal with the synthesis and characterization of PEGylated squalene-grafted-inulin amphiphile capable of self-assembling and self-organizing into nanocarriers once placed in aqueous media. It was exploited as coating agent for obtaining doxorubicin loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) endowed with stealth like behavior and excellent physicochemical stability. Inulin was firstly modified in the side chain with primary amine groups, followed in turn by conjugation with squalenoyl derivatives through common amidic coupling agents and PEGylation by imine linkage. Polymer coated SPIONs were so obtained by spontaneous self-assembling of inulin copolymer onto magnetite surface involving hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions between the metallic core and the squalene moieties. The system was characterized in terms of hydrodynamic radius, zeta potential, shape and drug loading capacity. On the whole, the stealth-like shell stabilized the suspension in aqueous media, though allowing the release of the doxorubicin loaded in therapeutic range. The cytotoxicity profile on cancer (HCT116) cell line and in vitro drug uptake were evaluated both with and without an external magnetic field used as targeting agent and uptake promoter, displaying that magnetic targeting implies advantageous therapeutic effects, that is amplified drug uptake and increased anticancer activity throughout the tumor mass.

  13. Design and Validation of PEG-Derivatized Vitamin E Copolymer for Drug Delivery into Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; Liu, Qinhui; Li, Wenyao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Hanmei; Li, Rui; Chen, Lei; Pu, Shiyun; Kuang, Jiangying; Su, Zhiguang; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Jinhan

    2016-08-17

    This study examined the ability of amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives to assemble into micelles for drug delivery. Linear PEG chains were modified on one end with hydrophobic vitamin E succinate (VES), and PEG and VES were mixed in different molar ratios to make amphiphiles, which were characterized in terms of critical micelle concentration (CMC), drug loading capacity (DLC), serum stability, tumor spheroid penetration and tumor targeting in vitro and in vivo. The amphiphile PEG5K-VES6 (PAMV6), which has a wheat-like structure, showed a CMC of 3.03 × 10(-6) M, good serum stability, and tumor accumulation. The model drug, pirarubicin (THP), could be efficiently loaded into PAMV6 micelles at a DLC of 24.81%. PAMV6/THP micelles were more effective than THP solution at inducing cell apoptosis and G2/M arrest in 4T1 cells. THP-loaded PAMV6 micelles also inhibited tumor growth much more than free THP in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. PAMV6-based micellar systems show promise as nanocarriers for improved anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27418000

  14. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  15. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  16. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Yinghong; Zhou, Ninglin

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. PMID:26838897

  17. Efficient pH Dependent Drug Delivery to Target Cancer Cells by Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    OpenAIRE

    Alle Madhusudhan; Gangapuram Bhagavanth Reddy; Maragoni Venkatesham; Guttena Veerabhadram; Dudde Anil Kumar; Sumathi Natarajan; Ming-Yeh Yang; Anren Hu; Singh, Surya S.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) was immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) for effective delivery to cancer cells. The carboxylic group of carboxymethyl chitosan interacts with the amino group of the doxorubicin (DOX) forming stable, non-covalent interactions on the surface of AuNPs. The carboxylic group ionizes at acidic pH, thereby releasing the drug effectively at acidic pH suitable to target cancer cells. The DOX loaded gold nanoparticles were effectively abs...

  18. Novel polysaccharide anti-tumour drug delivery system for active targeting and controlled release to breast cancer bone metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Bonzi, Gwénaëlle A.M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the late stage of the disease, breast cancer patients often develop bone metastases, a major cause of cancer-related death among women worldwide. The common treatment currently used clinically includes the anti-neoplastic agent paclitaxel combined with the bisphosphonate alendronate. Paclitaxel is an anti-neoplastic drug which cytotoxic effect is mainly attributed to its ability to promote the assembly of microtubules as well as prevent the depolymerisation of these micro...

  19. Drug Efflux Transporters Are Overexpressed in Short-Term Tamoxifen-Induced MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisnamurti, Desak Gede Budi; Louisa, Melva; Anggraeni, Erlia; Wanandi, Septelia Inawati

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the first line drug used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to tamoxifen remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. One of the mechanisms related to MDR is decrease of drug influx via overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1), multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), or BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein). We aimed to investigate whether the sensitivity of tamoxifen to the cells is maintained through the short period and whether the expressions of several drug efflux transporters have been upregulated. We exposed MCF7 breast cancer cells with tamoxifen 1 μM for 10 passages (MCF7 (T)). The result showed that MCF7 began to lose their sensitivity to tamoxifen from the second passage. MCF7 (T) also showed a significant increase in all transporters examined compared with MCF7 parent cells. The result also showed a significant increase of CC50 in MCF7 (T) compared to that in MCF7 (97.54 μM and 3.04 μM, resp.). In conclusion, we suggest that the expression of several drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP2, and BCRP might be used and further studied as a marker in the development of tamoxifen resistance. PMID:26981116

  20. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang, E-mail: mcfzeng@scut.edu.cn; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu, E-mail: shzhwu@scut.edu.cn [South China University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (China)

    2013-09-15

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of {approx}100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  1. The association between glucose-lowering drug use and mortality among breast cancer patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Pauline A J; Cardwell, Chris R; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Young, Ian S; Pouwer, Frans; Murray, Liam J

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the association between glucose-lowering drug (GLD) use, including metformin, sulphonylurea derivatives and insulin, after breast cancer diagnosis and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 1763 breast cancer patients, diagnosed between 1998 and 2010, with type 2 diabetes were included. Cancer information was retrieved from English cancer registries, prescription data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and mortality data from the Office of National Statistics (up to January 2012). Time-varying Cox regression models were used to calculate HRs and 95 % CIs for the association between GLD use and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. In 1057 patients with diabetes before breast cancer, there was some evidence that breast cancer-specific mortality decreased with each year of metformin use (adjusted HR 0.88; 95 % CI 0.75-1.04), with a strong association seen with over 2 years of use (adjusted HR 0.47; 95 % CI 0.26-0.82). Sulphonylurea derivative use for less than 2 years was associated with increased breast cancer-specific mortality (adjusted HR 1.70; 95 % CI 1.18-2.46), but longer use was not (adjusted HR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.54-1.66). In 706 patients who developed diabetes after breast cancer, similar patterns were seen for metformin, but sulphonylurea derivative use was strongly associated with cancer-specific mortality (adjusted HR 3.64; 95 % CI 2.16-6.16), with similar estimates for short- and long-term users. This study provides some support for an inverse association between, mainly long-term, metformin use and (breast cancer-specific) mortality. In addition, sulphonylurea derivative use was associated with increased breast cancer-specific mortality, but this should be interpreted cautiously, as it could reflect selective prescribing in advanced cancer patients. PMID:25762476

  2. Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-04-01

    The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy.

  3. A preliminary analysis of the reduction of chemotherapy waste in the treatment of cancer with centralization of drug preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Hyeda; Elide Sbardellotto Mariano da Costa

    2015-01-01

    SummaryIntroduction:chemotherapy is essential to treat most types of cancer. Often, there is chemotherapy waste in the preparation of drugs prescribed to the patient. Leftover doses result in toxic waste production.Objective:the aim of the study was to analyze chemotherapy waste reduction at a centralized drug preparation unit.Methods:the study was cross-sectional, observational and descriptive, conducted between 2010 and 2012. The data were obtained from chemotherapy prescriptions made by on...

  4. High mobility group A1 protein expression reduces the sensitivity of colon and thyroid cancer cells to antineoplastic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    D’Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; De Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of resistance to conventional drugs and novel biological agents often impair long-term chemotherapy. HMGA gene overexpression is often associated with antineoplastic drug resistance and reduced survival. Inhibition of HMGA expression in thyroid cancer cells reduces levels of ATM protein, the main cellular sensor of DNA damage, and enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. HMGA1 overexpression promotes chemoresistance to gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcino...

  5. A Cell-Targeted, Size-Photocontrollable, Nuclear-Uptake Nanodrug Delivery System for Drug-Resistant Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Liping; Chen, Tao; Öçsoy, Ismail; Yasun, Emir; Wu, Cuichen; Zhu, Guizhi; You, Mingxu; Han, Da; Jiang, Jianhui; Yu, Ruqin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) has become an increasingly serious problem in cancer therapy. The cell-membrane overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which can actively efflux various anticancer drugs from the cell, is a major mechanism of MDR. Nuclear-uptake nanodrug delivery systems, which enable intranuclear release of anticancer drugs, are expected to address this challenge by bypassing P-gp. However, before entering the nucleus, the nanocarrier must pass through the cell...

  6. Are Cancer Drugs Less Likely to be Recommended for Listing by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee in Australia?

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Chim; Kelly, Patrick J; Glenn Salkeld; Stockler, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The hurdle of cost effectiveness for the selection and reimbursement of drugs in Australia limits access to new medicines based on an assessment of cost relative to clinical benefit. Those drugs that are expensive and provide modest benefits will be less likely to receive a government price subsidy. There is concern that the cost-effectiveness hurdle will limit access to new cancer treatments because of their high costs and modest benefits. Objective: To test the hypothesis that C...

  7. PAN-811 Blocks Chemotherapy Drug-Induced In Vitro Neurotoxicity, While Not Affecting Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Gang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy often results in cognitive impairment, and no neuroprotective drug is now available. This study aimed to understand underlying neurotoxicological mechanisms of anticancer drugs and to evaluate neuroprotective effects of PAN-811. Primary neurons in different concentrations of antioxidants (AOs were insulted for 3 days with methotrexate (MTX, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, or cisplatin (CDDP in the absence or presence of PAN-811·Cl·H2O. The effect of PAN-811 on the anticancer activity of tested drugs was also examined using mouse and human cancer cells (BNLT3 and H460 to assess any negative interference. Cell membrane integrity, survival, and death and intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured. All tested anticancer drugs elicited neurotoxicity only under low levels of AO and elicited a ROS increase. These results suggested that ROS mediates neurotoxicity of tested anticancer drugs. PAN-811 dose-dependently suppressed increased ROS and blocked the neurotoxicity when neurons were insulted with a tested anticancer drug. PAN-811 did not interfere with anticancer activity of anticancer drugs against BNLT3 cells. PAN-811 did not inhibit MTX-induced death of H460 cells but, interestingly, demonstrated a synergistic effect with 5-FU or CDDP in reducing cancer cell viability. Thus, PAN-811 can be a potent drug candidate for chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment.

  8. Inhalable self-assembled albumin nanoparticles for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ho; Byeon, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Ji Su; Thao, Lequang; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Eun Seong; Shin, Beom Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2015-01-10

    Direct pulmonary delivery of anti-cancer agents is viewed as an effective way of treating lung cancer. Here, we fabricated inhalable nanoparticles made of human serum albumin (HSA) conjugated with doxorubicin and octyl aldehyde and adsorbed with apoptotic TRAIL protein (TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP). The octyl aldehyde and doxorubicin endowed HSA with significant hydrophobicity that facilitated self-assembly. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was found to have excellent particle size (~340nm), morphology, dispersability, and aerosolization properties. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP displayed synergistic cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity in H226 lung cancer cells vs. HSA-NP containing TRAIL or Dox alone. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was well deposited in the mouse lungs using an aerosolizer, and TRAIL and Dox-HSA were found to be gradually released over 3days. The anti-tumor efficacy of pulmonary administered TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was evaluated in BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing H226 cell-induced metastatic tumors. It was found that the tumors of H226-implanted mice treated with TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP were remarkably smaller and lighter than those of mice treated with TRAIL or Dox HSA-NP alone (337.5±7.5; 678.2±51.5; and 598.9±24.8mg, respectively). Importantly, this improved anti-tumor efficacy was found to be due to the synergistic apoptotic effects of Dox and TRAIL. In the authors' opinion, TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP offers a potential inhalable anti-lung cancer drug delivery system. Furthermore, the synergism displayed by combined use of Dox and TRAIL could be used to markedly reduce doxorubicin doses and minimize its side effects. PMID:25445703

  9. Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC in vitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  10. Comparative evaluation of novel biodegradable nanoparticles for the drug targeting to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattu, C; Pabari, R M; Boffito, M; Sartori, S; Ciardelli, G; Ramtoola, Z

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine formulations such as biodegradable nanoparticles (nps) and liposomes offer several advantages over traditional routes of administration: due to their small size, nanocarriers are able to selectively accumulate inside tumours or inflammatory tissues, resulting in improved drug efficacy and reduced side effects. To further augment targeting ability of nanoparticles towards tumour cells, specific ligands or antibodies that selectively recognise biomarkers over-expressed on cancer cells, can be attached to the surface either by chemical bond or by hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. In the present work, Herceptin (HER), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) able to selectively recognise HER-2 over-expressing tumour cells (such as breast and ovarian cancer cells), was absorbed on the surface of nanoparticles through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. Nps were prepared by a modified single emulsion solvent evaporation method with five different polymers: three commercial polyesters (poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly (D,L-lactide) (PLA) and poly (D,L-lactide-co-.glycolide) (PLGA)) and two novel biodegradable polyesterurethanes (PURs) based on Poly(ε-caprolactone) blocks, synthesised with different chain extenders (1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) and N-Boc-serinol). Polyurethanes were introduced as matrix-forming materials for nanoparticles due to their high chemical versatility, which allows tailoring of the materials final properties by properly selecting the reagents. All nps exhibited a small size and negative surface charge, suitable for surface functionalisation with mAb through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. The extent of cellular internalisation was tested on two different cell lines: MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells showing a normal and a high expression of the HER-2 receptor, respectively. Paclitaxel, a model anti-neoplastic drug, was encapsulated inside all nps, and release profiles and cytotoxicity on SK-BR-3 cells were also assessed

  11. Assessing cancer drugs for reimbursement: methodology, relationship between effect size and medical need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sahb-Berkovitch, Rima; Woronoff-Lemsi, Marie-Christine; Molimard, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Reimbursement is assessed by the Transparency Commission from the Health Authority (HAS) using a medical benefit (SMR) score that gives access to reimbursement, an "improvement of medical service rendered" (ASMR) that determines the added therapeutic value, and the target population. Assessing cancer drugs for reimbursement raises the same issues as other therapeutic classes, with some key differences. Overall survival (OS) is considered by the Transparency Commission as the endpoint for assessing clinical benefit, and yet it is not an applicable primary endpoint in all types of cancer. Later lines of treatment, particularly during the development process, may make it difficult to interpret OS as the primary endpoint. Therefore, progression-free survival (PFS) for metastatic situations and disease-free survival (DFS) in adjuvant situations are wholly relevant endpoints for decisions on the reimbursement of a new cancer drug. Effect size is assessed using actuarial survival curves of the product versus the comparator, and it is difficult to summarise them into one single parameter. Results are generally interpreted based on median survival, which is fragmented because it only measures one point of the curve. The hazard ratio measures the effect of treatment throughout the duration of survival and is therefore more comprehensive in quantifying clinical benefit. Determining an effect size threshold for granting reimbursement is difficult given the diversity of cancer settings and the level of medical need, which influences assessment of the clinical relevance of the observed difference. Rapid progress in comparators (700 molecules in development) and the identification of predictive factors of efficacy (biomarkers, histology, etc.) during development may lead to different ASMR scores per population, or to the restriction of the target population to a subgroup of the marketing authorisation (MA) population in which the expected effect size is greater. To address these

  12. Potential of antibody–drug conjugates and novel therapeutics in breast cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianos GD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Georgios D Lianos,1 Konstantinos Vlachos,2 Odysseas Zoras,3 Christos Katsios,1 William C Cho,4 Dimitrios H Roukos11Centre for Biosystems and Genomic Network Medicine, Ioannina University, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Surgery, Ioannina University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Surgical Oncology, Heraklion University Hospital, Crete, Greece; 4Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong KongAbstract: Progress in the treatment of cancer over the past decade has been slow. Targeting a mutated gene of an individual patient tumor, tumor-guided agents, and the first draft of the human genome sequence have created an overenthusiasm to achieve personalized medicine. However, we now know that this effort is misleading. Extreme interpatient and intratumor heterogeneity, scarce knowledge in how genome-wide mutational landscape and epigenetic changes affect transcriptional processes, gene expression, signaling transduction networks and cell regulation, and clinical assessment of temporary efficacy of targeted drugs explain the limitations of these currently available agents. Trastuzumab and a few other monoclonal antibodies or small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs represent an exception to this rule. By blocking ligand-binding receptor in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 amplification and overexpression, trastuzumab added to chemotherapy in HER2-positive patients has been proven to provide significant overall survival benefit in both metastatic and adjuvant settings. Lapatinib, a small-molecule dual inhibitor (TKI of both HER2 and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, has an antitumor activity translated into progression-free survival benefit in HER2-positive metastatic patients previously treated with a taxane, an anthracycline, and trastuzumab. Despite these advances, ~25% of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer experience recurrence in the adjuvant setting, while in

  13. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Covell

    Full Text Available Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP. The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA, b examine measures of gene expression (GE, copy number (CN and mutation status (MUT biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA, for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  14. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, David G

    2015-01-01

    Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP). The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a) evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA), b) examine measures of gene expression (GE), copy number (CN) and mutation status (MUT) biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c) conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d) assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  15. Identification of new candidate drugs for lung cancer using chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions and a K-means clustering algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yin, Jun; Huang, Tao; Bi, Yi; Kong, Xiangyin; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in the lung tissue, is the leading cause of global cancer deaths. Until now, effective treatment of this disease is limited. Many synthetic compounds have emerged with the advancement of combinatorial chemistry. Identification of effective lung cancer candidate drug compounds among them is a great challenge. Thus, it is necessary to build effective computational methods that can assist us in selecting for potential lung cancer drug compounds. In this study, a computational method was proposed to tackle this problem. The chemical-chemical interactions and chemical-protein interactions were utilized to select candidate drug compounds that have close associations with approved lung cancer drugs and lung cancer-related genes. A permutation test and K-means clustering algorithm were employed to exclude candidate drugs with low possibilities to treat lung cancer. The final analysis suggests that the remaining drug compounds have potential anti-lung cancer activities and most of them have structural dissimilarity with approved drugs for lung cancer.

  16. Three-dimensional Cell Culture Devices for Cancer Migration and Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang

    Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as 3D cell culturing and tissue engineering. A series of comparative experiments on 3D cell cultures both in PLA porous scaffolds and alginate gels were conducted to create an in vitro tumor model. A novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material was developed to study cancer migration. Significant cell migration was observed through the porous channel within 1--2 weeks induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). A three-dimensional micro-scale perfusion-based two-chamber (3D-muPTC) tissue model system was developed to test the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs by emulating liver metabolism effects in vitro. Hepatoma cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells were cultured in porous polymeric scaffolds in two separate chambers, representing the liver and tumor, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) was first tested using this system. It was found that the GBM cells showed a much higher viability under the TMZ treatment with liver cells in the system, suggesting that the drug metabolism in liver is affecting the efficacy of the drug. The favorable metabolism effect of cytochrome P450 (CYP) was tested using a prodrug ifosfamide (IFO). Without the liver cells, IFO showed only slight toxicity to GBM cells. Moreover, it was shown that different expression levels of CYP 3A4, a major drug metabolizing enzyme, in liver cells caused significantly different levels of GBM cell viability. Simulation of the flow characteristics in the 3D-muPTC system was conducted using the finite-element analysis approach. The shear stress was predicted in the porous scaffolds under different flow rate conditions. The predicted shear stress effects agreed well with an experimental cell viability study. A low cost organic solvent free approach to fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds was developed by combining the twin-screw extrusion

  17. Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD): Methodological Aspects and Practical Applications in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianti, Eleonora

    Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD) has deservedly gained increasing popularity in modern drug discovery (Schneider, G.; Fechner, U. 2005), whether applied to academic basic research or the pharmaceutical industry pipeline. In this work, after reviewing theoretical advancements in CADD, we integrated novel and stateof- the-art methods to assist in the design of small-molecule inhibitors of current cancer drug targets, specifically: Androgen Receptor (AR), a nuclear hormone receptor required for carcinogenesis of Prostate Cancer (PCa); Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5), implicated in PCa progression; and Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1), essential to the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) during latent infections. Androgen Receptor. With the aim of generating binding mode hypotheses for a class (Handratta, V.D. et al. 2005) of dual AR/CYP17 inhibitors (CYP17 is a key enzyme for androgens biosynthesis and therefore implicated in PCa development), we successfully implemented a receptor-based computational strategy based on flexible receptor docking (Gianti, E.; Zauhar, R.J. 2012). Then, with the ultimate goal of identifying novel AR binders, we performed Virtual Screening (VS) by Fragment-Based Shape Signatures, an improved version of the original method developed in our Laboratory (Zauhar, R.J. et al. 2003), and we used the results to fully assess the high-level performance of this innovative tool in computational chemistry. STAT5. The SRC Homology 2 (SH2) domain of STAT5 is responsible for phospho-peptide recognition and activation. As a keystone of Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD), we characterized key residues responsible for binding. We also generated a model of STAT5 receptor bound to a phospho-peptide ligand, which was validated by docking publicly known STAT5 inhibitors. Then, we performed Shape Signatures- and docking-based VS of the ZINC database (zinc.docking.org), followed by Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MMGBSA

  18. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused EGFR single-domain antibody enhances cancer drug penetration into 3D multicellular spheroids and facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Huizi; Zou, Zhengyun; Xin, Kai; Bian, Xinyu; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Chen, Jiao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Leaf; Blair, Andrew M.; Cao, Peng; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors, including gastric cancer, frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), which are associated with a poor prognosis. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancerous tissues shows potential in sparing unaffected tissues. However, it has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues due to the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have constructed a recombinant protein named anti-EGFR-iRGD consisting of an anti-EGFR VHH (the variable domain from the heavy chain of the antibody) fused to iRGD, a tumor-specific binding peptide with high permeability. Anti-EGFR-iRGD, which targets EGFR and αvβ3, spreads extensively throughout both the multicellular spheroids and the tumor mass. The recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD also exhibited antitumor activity in tumor cell lines, multicellular spheroids, and mice. Moreover, anti-EGFR-iRGD could improve anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), bevacizumab, nanoparticle permeability and efficacy in multicellular spheroids. This study draws attention to the importance of iRGD peptide in the therapeutic approach of anti-EGFR-iRGD. As a consequence, anti-EGFR-iRGD could be a drug candidate for cancer treatment and a useful adjunct of other anticancer drugs. PMID:25553823

  19. A Synthetic Aptamer-Drug Adduct for Targeted Liver Cancer Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu Le Trinh

    Full Text Available AS1411 (previously known as AGRO100 is a 26 nucleotide guanine-rich DNA aptamer which forms a guanine quadruplex structure. AS1411 has shown promising utility as a treatment for cancers in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials without causing major side-effects. AS1411 inhibits tumor cell growth by binding to nucleolin which is aberrantly expressed on the cell membrane of many tumors. In this study, we utilized a simple technique to conjugate a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (Dox, to AS1411 to form a synthetic Drug-DNA Adduct (DDA, termed as AS1411-Dox. We demonstrate the utility of AS1411-Dox in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by evaluating the targeted delivery of Dox to Huh7 cells in vitro and in a murine xenograft model of HCC.

  20. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  1. Drugs, cancer and end-of-life care: a case study of pharmaceuticalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Courtney

    2015-04-01

    There is evidence from some countries of a trend towards increasingly aggressive pharmacological treatment of patients with advanced, incurable cancer. To what extent should this be understood as a progressive development in which technological innovations address previously unmet needs, or is a significant amount of this expansion explained by futile or even harmful treatment? In this article it is argued that while some of this growth may be consistent with a progressive account of medicines consumption, part of the expansion is constituted by the inappropriate and overly aggressive use of drugs. Such use is often explained in terms of individual patient consumerism and/or factors to do with physician behaviour. Whilst acknowledging the role of physicians and patients' expectations, this paper, drawing on empirical research conducted in the US, the EU and the UK, examines the extent to which upstream factors shape expectations and drive pharmaceuticalisation, and explores the value of this concept as an analytical tool. PMID:25533871

  2. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Potent Copper(II)-Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodram, Janine N; Mcgregor, Iain J; Bruno, Peter M; Cressey, Paul B; Hemann, Michael T; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2016-02-18

    The breast cancer stem cell (CSC) potency of a series of copper(II)-phenanthroline complexes containing the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), indomethacin, is reported. The most effective copper(II) complex in this series, 4, selectivity kills breast CSC-enriched HMLER-shEcad cells over breast CSC-depleted HMLER cells. Furthermore, 4 reduces the formation, size, and viability of mammospheres, to a greater extent than salinomycin, a potassium ionophore known to selectively inhibit CSCs. Mechanistic studies revealed that the CSC-specificity observed for 4 arises from its ability to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that is overexpressed in breast CSCs. The former induces DNA damage, activates JNK and p38 pathways, and leads to apoptosis.

  3. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Doan Do, Hai; Thong Phan, Quoc; Nguyet Tran Thi, Minh; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan; Nhung Hoang Thi, My; Huong Le, Mai; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Quang Bui, Thuc; Hieu Phan, Van

    2016-03-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50-100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment.

  4. Half-Antibody Functionalized Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Presenting Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Aryal, Santosh; Sartor, Marta; Esener, Sadik; Bouvet, Michael; Zhang, Liangfang

    2010-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens against pancreatic cancer are met with little success as poor tumor vascularization significantly limits the delivery of oncological drugs. High-dose targeted drug delivery, through which a drug delivery vehicle releases a large payload upon tumor localization, is thus a promising alternative strategy against this lethal disease. Herein, we synthesize anti-CEA half-antibody conjugated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and characterize their ligand conjugation yields, physicochemical properties, and targeting ability against pancreatic cancer cells. Under the same drug loading, the half-antibody targeted nanoparticles show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted nanoparticles. PMID:20394436

  5. Chitosan-functionalised single-walled carbon nanotube-mediated drug delivery of SNX-2112 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lixia; Wu, Shao; Tan, Li; Tan, Huo; Yu, Baodan

    2016-09-01

    Delivery of amphiphobic drugs (insoluble in both water and oil) has been a great challenge in drug delivery. SNX-2112, a novel inhibitor of Hsp90, is a promising drug candidate for treating various types of cancers; however, the insolubility greatly limits its clinical application. This study aimed to build a new type of drug delivery system using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable release of SNX-2112; chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently added to SWNTs to improve their biocompatibility. SWNTs-CHI demonstrated high drug-loading capability; the release of SNX-2112 was pH triggered and time related. The intracellular reactive oxygen species of SWNTs-CHI increased, compared with that of SWNTs, leading to higher mitogen-activated protein kinase and cell apoptosis. The results of western-blotting, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, and cell viability assay analyses indicated that apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in K562 cells and that the drug delivery system significantly inhibited K562 cells. Thus, SWNT-CHI/SNX-2112 shows great potential as a drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:27231263

  6. Establishment of a human colorectal cancer cell line P6C with stem cell properties and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-hua RAO; Hong-min LIU; Bao-wei LI; Jia-jie HAO; Yan-lei YANG; Ming-rong WANG; Xiao-hui WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Cancer stem cells have the capacity to initiate and sustain tumor growth.In this study,we established a CD44+ colorectal cancer stem cell line with particular emphasis on its self-renewal capacity,enhanced tumor initiation and drug resistance.Methods:Fresh colon cancer and paired normal colon tissues were collected from 13 patients who had not received chemotherapy or radiotherapy prior to surgery.Among the 6 single-cell derived clones,only the P6C cell line was cultured for more than 20 passages in serial culture and formed holoclones with high efficiency,and then the stemness gene expression,colony formation,tumorigenicity and drug sensitivities of the P6C cell line were examined.Results:Stemness proteins,including c-Myc,0ct3/4,Nanog,Lgr5,and SOX2,were highly expressed in the P6C cell line.Oct3/4-positive P6C cells mostly generated holoclones through symmetric division,while a small number of P6C cells generated meroclones through asymmetric division.P6C cells stably expressed CD44 and possessed a high capacity to form tumor spheres.A single cellderived sphere was capable of generating xenograft tumors in nude mice.Compared to SW480 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells,P6C cells were highly resistant to Camptothecin and 5-fluorouracil,the commonly used chemotherapeutic agents to treat colorectal cancers.Conclusion:We established a colorectal cancer stem cell line P6C with a high tumorigenic capacity and the characteristics of normal stem cells.It will benefit the mechanistic studies on cancer stem cells and the development of drugs that specifically target the cancer stem cells.

  7. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  8. Enhancement effect of nano Fe3O4 to the drug accumulation of doxorubicin in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetraheptylammonium capped magnetic nano Fe3O4 was synthesized and used in the study of in vitro drug accumulation inside leukemia K562 cell lines. Confocal fluorescence microscopy methods were used to detect the fluorescent signal strength of doxorubicin in the absence and presence of nano Fe3O4. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface structure of the leukemia cells. In addition, MTT assay was used to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the presence of nano Fe3O4. Our results demonstrate the synergistic enhancement effect of the nano Fe3O4 on respective drug uptake of doxorubicin for drug sensitive and drug resistant leukemia K562 cells. These observations indicate that the tetraheptylammonium-capped nano Fe3O4 could efficiently enhance the relevant drug permeation into cancer cells through internalization/endocytosis processes and result in significantly enhanced doxorubicin uptake in respective leukemia K562 cells.

  9. Loss of Scribble Promotes Snail Translation through Translocation of HuR and Enhances Cancer Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Chang, Renxu; Ji, Weiwei; Wang, Na; Qi, Meiyan; Xu, Yi; Guo, Jingyu; Zhan, Lixing

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of cancer cells to various therapeutic agents and molecular targets is a major problem facing current cancer research. The tumor suppressor gene Scribble encodes a polarity protein that is conserved between Drosophila and mammals; loss of the locus disrupts cell polarity, inhibits apoptosis, and mediates cancer process. However, the role of Scribble in drug resistance remains unknown. We show here that knockdown of Scribble enhances drug resistance by permitting accumulation of Snail, which functions as a transcription factor during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Then, loss of Scribble activates the mRNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) by facilitating translocation of HuR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrate HuR can recognize AU-rich elements of the Snail-encoding mRNA, thereby regulating Snail translation. Moreover, loss of Scribble-induced HuR translocation mediates the accumulation of Snail via activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Thus, this work clarifies the role of polarity protein Scribble, which is directly implicated in the regulation of developmental transcription factor Snail, and suggesting a mechanism for Scribble mediating cancer drug resistance. PMID:26527679

  10. The evolving role of cancer cell line-based screens to define the impact of cancer genomes on drug response ?

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, Mathew J.; McDermott, Ultan

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade we have witnessed the convergence of two powerful experimental designs toward a common goal of defining the molecular subtypes that underpin the likelihood of a cancer patient responding to treatment in the clinic. The first of these ‘experiments’ has been the systematic sequencing of large numbers of cancer genomes through the International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas. This endeavour is beginning to yield a complete catalogue of the cancer genes ...

  11. Antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil is enhanced by rosemary extract in both drug sensitive and resistant colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Molina, Susana; Vicente, Gonzalo; de la Cueva, Ana; Vargas, Teodoro; Santoyo, Susana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Fornari, Tiziana; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2013-06-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most used chemotherapeutic agent in colorectal cancer. However, resistance to this drug is relatively frequent, and new strategies to overcome it are urgently needed. The aim of this work was to determine the antitumor properties of a supercritical fluid rosemary extract (SFRE), alone and in combination with 5-FU, as a potential adjuvant therapy useful for colon cancer patients. This extract has been recognized as a healthy component by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The effects of SFRE both alone and in combination with 5-FU were evaluated in different human colon cancer cells in terms of cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation. Additionally, colon cancer cells resistant to 5-FU were used to assay the effects of SFRE on drug resistance. Finally, qRT-PCR was performed to ascertain the mechanism by which SFRE potentiates the effect of 5-FU. Our results show that SFRE displays dose-dependent antitumor activities and exerts a synergistic effect in combination with 5-FU on colon cancer cells. Furthermore, SFRE sensitizes 5-FU-resistant cells to the therapeutic activity of this drug, constituting a beneficial agent against both 5-FU sensitive and resistant tumor cells. Gene expression analysis indicates that the enhancement of the effect of 5-FU by SFRE might be explained by the downregulation of TYMS and TK1, enzymes related to 5-FU resistance. PMID:23557932

  12. First ayurvedic approach towards green drugs: anti cervical cancer-cell properties of Clerodendrum viscosum root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Nirmalananda, Swami; Jenkins, Charles E; Debnath, Shawon; Balambika, Rema; Fata, Jimmie E; Raja, Krishnaswami S

    2013-12-01

    The concept of Ayurvedic expert guided drug discovery and development is defined and put to test systematically for the first time in literature. Western Science has explored only ~5% of the approximately 25,000 species of higher plants for drug leads. The ancient medical science of Ayurveda has however employed a much larger spectrum of plants for clinical treatment. Clerodendrum viscosum (CV), a commonly growing weed in the Indian subcontinent has been employed by S. Nirmalananda (Ayurvedic expert) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Here we isolate and characterize a water extract fraction (Cv-AP) from the root of CV and evaluate its anticervical cancer cell bioactivity. Our results indicate that Cv-AP possesses pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and anti-migratory activity in a dose-dependent fashion against cervical cancer cell lines. In contrast, primary fibroblasts (control healthy cells), when exposed to similar concentrations of this extract, fail to undergo apoptosis and remain relatively unaffected. These findings suggest that Clerodendrum viscosum (CV) is a readily available source of components with potent anti-cancer activity and selective bioactivity against cervical cancer cells. The major component in CV-AP was identified as a glycoprotein via SDS Page and Concanavalin-A binding studies. This study serves to illustrate that systematic collaboration with Ayurveda is a practical and powerful strategy in drug discovery and development. PMID:23387970

  13. Metformin-loaded BSA nanoparticles in cancer therapy: a new perspective for an old antidiabetic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Pinkybel; Sundar, K; Anjali, C H; Ravindran, Aswathy

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and experimental data suggest that there is a strong association between type II diabetic mellitus and pancreatic cancer. The present study focuses on exploring the anticancer and antidiabetic properties of metformin-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (BSA NPs) on (MiaPaCa-2) pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Albumin nanoparticles were synthesized using coacervation method and the average size of the particles was found to be 97 nm. The particles were stable and showed a spherical morphology with narrow size distribution. We investigated the impact of two stages characterized in type II diabetes mellitus (hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia) on the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 cells and compared the inhibitory effects of bare metformin to that of MET-BSA NPs. Further, different concentrations of insulin and glucose were added along with bare metformin, bare BSA, and metformin encapsulated BSA carrier on MiaPaCa-2 cells to check the strong association between type II diabetes and pancreatic cancer. The results revealed that MET-BSA NPs showed more toxicity when compared with drug and carrier individually.

  14. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-03-18

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets.

  15. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  16. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  17. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  18. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics’ mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  19. Cationic Albumin Nanoparticles for Enhanced Drug Delivery to Treat Breast Cancer: Preparation and In Vitro Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anticancer drugs are greatly limited by the serious side effects that they cause. Doxorubicin (DOX is an antineoplastic agent, commonly used against breast cancer. However, it may lead to irreversible cardiotoxicity, which could even result in congestive heart failure. In order to avoid these harmful side effects to the patients and to improve the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin, we developed DOX-loaded polyethylenimine- (PEI- enhanced human serum albumin (HSA nanoparticles. The formed nanoparticles were ~137 nm in size with a surface zeta potential of ~+15 mV, prepared using 20 μg of PEI added per mg of HSA. Cytotoxicity was not observed with empty PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles, formed with low-molecular weight (25 kDa PEI, indicating biocompatibility and safety of the nanoparticle formulation. Under optimized transfection conditions, approximately 80% of cells were transfected with HSA nanoparticles containing tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated bovine serum albumin. Conclusively, PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles show potential for developing into an effective carrier for anticancer drugs.

  20. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area - nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.