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Sample records for biology vibrational spectroscopy

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on biological molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Peica, Niculina

    2006-01-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are among the most widely used techniques in the physical and natural sciences today. Vibrational spectroscopy, including IR and Raman spectroscopy, has both a long and interesting history and an illustrious record of contributions to science. Spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry is dominated by techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) for the elucidation of chemical structures. Despite this, the versatility of ...

  2. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an `aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  3. In situ investigations of biological molecules using vibrational sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Caitlin

    2011-01-01

    The molecular-level understanding of biological molecules on solid surfaces is critical in areas including medicine, biologically-based industry, and the development of biotechnologies. In order to gain further knowledge of the orientation and organization of biological molecules adsorbed on surfaces, we used the label-free, interface-specific technique of sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. This technique has the distinct advantage of being able to be operated in situ as well as ex ...

  4. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  5. Application of multivariate analysis and vibrational spectroscopy in classification of biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A.; Shufan, E.; Lapidot, I.; Tsror, L.; Zeiri, L.; Sahu, R. K.; Moreh, R.; Mordechai, S.; Huleihel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies have emerged as powerful tools for chemical analysis. This is due to their ability to provide detailed information about the spatial distribution of chemical composition at the molecular level. A biological sample, i.e. bacteria or fungi, has a typical spectrum. This spectral fingerprint, characterizes the sample and can therefore be used for differentiating between biology samples which belong to different groups, i.e., several different isolates of a given fungi. When the spectral differences between the groups are minute, multivariate analysis should be used to provide a good differentiation. We hereby review several results which demonstrate the differentiation success obtained by combining spectroscopy measurements and multivariate analysis.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author)

  7. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  8. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wieckowski, Andrzej; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Reviews the latest theory, techniques, and applications Surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques probe the structure and composition of interfaces at the molecular level. Their versatility, coupled with their non-destructive nature, enables in-situ measurements of operating devices and the monitoring of interface-controlled processes under reactive conditions. Vibrational Spectroscopy at Electrified Interfaces explores new and emerging applications of Raman, infrared, and non-linear optical spectroscopy for the study of charged interfaces. The book draws from hu

  10. Bandshapes in vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account is given of the development of modern bandshape theories since 1965. An investigation into the relative contributions of statistical irreversible relaxation processes is described, for a series of molecules in which gradually the length of one molecular axis is increased. An investigation into the theoretical and experimental investigation of the broadening brought about by the effect of fluctuating intermolecular potentials on the vibrational frequency is also described. The effect of an intermolecular perturbative potential on anharmonic and Morse oscillators is discussed and the results are presented of a computation on the broadening of the vibrational band of some diatomic molecules in a rigid lattice type solvent. The broadening of the OH-stretching vibration in a number of aliphatic alcohols, the vibrational bandshapes of the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration and of the symmetric methyl stretching vibration are investigated. (Auth./ C.F.)

  11. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira, E-mail: mkhalil@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  12. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3− dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]− dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems

  13. Vibrations, Quanta and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Huelga, S F

    2013-01-01

    Quantum biology is an emerging field of research that concerns itself with the experimental and theoretical exploration of non-trivial quantum phenomena in biological systems. In this tutorial overview we aim to bring out fundamental assumptions and questions in the field, identify basic design principles and develop a key underlying theme -- the dynamics of quantum dynamical networks in the presence of an environment and the fruitful interplay that the two may enter. At the hand of three biological phenomena whose understanding is held to require quantum mechanical processes, namely excitation and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes, magneto-reception in birds and the olfactory sense, we demonstrate that this underlying theme encompasses them all, thus suggesting its wider relevance as an archetypical framework for quantum biology.

  14. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Methyl benzoate

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Kiran Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Methyl benzoate (MB) is studied as a model compound for the development of new IR pulse schemes with possible applicability to biomolecules. Anharmonic vibrational modes of MB are calculated on different level (MP2, SCS, CCSD(T) with varying basis sets) ab-initio PESs using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and its correlation corrected extensions. Dual level schemes, combining different quantum chemical methods for diagonal and coupling potentials, are systematically studied and applied successfully to reduce the computational cost. Isotopic substitution of {\\beta}-hydrogen by deuterium is studied to obtain a better understanding of the molecular vibrational coupling topology.

  17. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Notre Dame); (Northeastern Univ.)

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  19. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  20. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana

    2005-03-01

    The recently emergence of submillimeter-wave or terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of biological molecules has demonstrated the capability to detect low-frequency internal molecular vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds of the DNA base pairs and/or non-bonded interactions. These multiple bonds, although having only ˜ 5% of the strength of covalent bonds, stabilize the structure of bio-polymers, by holding the two strands of the DNA double helix together, or polypeptides together in different secondary structure conformations. There will be a review of THz-frequency transmission (absorption) results for biological materials obtained from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy during the last few years^1,2. Multiple resonances, due to low frequency vibrational modes within biological macromolecules, have been unambiguously demonstrated in qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction, thereby confirming the fundamental physical nature of observed resonance features. The discovery of resonance character of interaction between THz radiation and biological materials opens many possible applications for THz spectroscopy technique in biological sensing and biomedicine using multiple resonances as distinctive spectral fingerprints. However, many issues still require investigation. Kinetics of interactions with radiation at THz has not been studied and vibrational lifetimes have not been measured directly as a function of frequency. The strength of resonant modes of bio-molecules in aqueous environment and strong dependence of spectra on molecular orientation need explanation. Vibrational modes have not been assigned to specific motions within molecules. THz spectroscopy of bio-polymers makes it only in first steps. 1. T. Globus, D. Woolard, M. Bykhovskaia, B. Gelmont, L. Werbos, A. Samuels. International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems (IJHSES), 13, No. 4, 903-936 (2003). 2. T. Globus, T. Khromova, D. Woolard and B. Gelmont. Proceedings of

  1. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Guin-Dar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy when a high optical-depth (OD) sample is studied. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to the speed-up of decay process. We compare our calculation to recent work [Deiglmayr et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 65, 99 (2011)] and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be included in a wide variety of ultracold molecule setups including vibrational and rotational states.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy when a high optical-depth (OD) sample is studied. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to the speed-up of decay process. We compare our calculation to recent work [Deiglmayr et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 65, 99 (2011)] and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be included in a...

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  5. Spectroscopy of biological nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Ortac, Inanc; Severcan, Feride

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystals have gained much interest in recent years, due to their unusual properties allowing interesting applications in physical and biological science. In this literature review, biological nanocrystals are discussed from the spectroscopic point of view. Firstly, the theory behind the outstanding abilities of the nanocrystals is described. Secondly, the spectroscopic properties of biological nanocrystals are mentioned. Lastly, the use of nanocrystals with various spectroscopic applicati...

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy in diagnosis and screening

    CERN Document Server

    Severcan, F

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the use of vibrational spectroscopic methods for diagnosis and screening. These applications range from diagnosis of disease states in humans, such as cancer, to rapid identification and screening of microorganisms. The growth in such types of studies has been possible thanks to advances in instrumentation and associated computational and mathematical tools for data processing and analysis. This volume of Advances in Biomedical Spectroscopy contains chapters from leading experts who discuss the latest advances in the application of Fourier

  7. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear

  8. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  9. Structural characterization of chiral molecules using vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Peter Rygaard

    2006-01-01

    Chiral molecules, i.e., molecules with handedness, are essential to biology, because most amino acids and sugars are chiral. A pair of molecules which are mirror images of each other have identical physical properties, but they differ in their interaction with other chiral molecules. This is the...... cornerstone of biological specificity. Chiral molecules also interact differently with different polarization states of electromagnetic radiation, because the absorption coefficient depends on the state of polarization. This is called dichroism and gives rise to several spectroscopic techniques targeting...... compounds of pharmaceutical interest. Others are transition metal complexes relevant for the search for parity-violation effects in vibrational spectroscopy (rhenium complexes), for asymmetric catalysis (Schiff-base complexes), or as model systems for metal centres in biology (Schiff-bases and heme...

  10. Surface-Bulk Vibrational Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sandra; Covert, Paul A; Jarisz, Tasha A; Chan, Chantelle; Hore, Dennis K

    2016-05-01

    Homo- and heterospectral correlation analysis are powerful methods for investigating the effects of external influences on the spectra acquired using distinct and complementary techniques. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy is a selective and sensitive probe of surface structure changes, as bulk molecules are excluded on the basis of symmetry. However, as a result of this exquisite specificity, it is blind to changes that may be occurring in the solution. We demonstrate that correlation analysis between surface-specific techniques and bulk probes such as infrared absorption or Raman scattering may be used to reveal additional details of the adsorption process. Using the adsorption of water and ethanol binary mixtures as an example, we illustrate that this provides support for a competitive binding model and adds new insight into a dimer-to-bilayer transition proposed from previous experiments and simulations. PMID:27058265

  11. Vibrational Dynamics of Biological Molecules: Multi-quantum Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan M. Leu; Timothy Sage, J.; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Wyllie, Graeme R. A.; Ellison, Mary K.; Robert Scheidt, W.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Ercan Alp, E.; Durbin, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray measurements near a nuclear resonance reveal the complete vibrational spectrum of the probe nucleus. Because of this, nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is a uniquely quantitative probe of the vibrational dynamics of reactive iron sites in proteins and other complex molecules. Our measurements of vibrational fundamentals have revealed both frequencies and amplitudes of 57Fe vibrations in proteins and model compounds. Information on the direction of Fe moti...

  12. Multireflection sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-18

    We developed a multireflection data collection method in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, which we refer to as multireflection SFG, or MRSFG for short. To achieve MRSFG, a collinear laser beam propagation geometry was adopted and trapezoidal Dove prisms were used as sample substrates. An in-depth discussion on the signal and SNR in MRSFG was performed. We showed experimentally, with "m" total internal reflections in a Dove prism, MRSFG signal is ∼m times that of conventional SFG; SNR of the SFG signal-to-background is improved by a factor of >m(1/2) and vibrational signals. Surface molecular structures of adsorbed ethanol molecules, polymer films, and a lipid monolayer were characterized using both MRSFG and conventional SFG. Molecular orientation information on lipid molecules with a 9% composition in a mixed monolayer was measured using MRSFG, which showed a good agreement with that derived from 100% lipid surface coverage using conventional SFG. MRSFG can both improve the spectral quality and detection limit of SFG spectroscopy and is expected to have important applications in surface science for studying structures of molecules with a low surface coverage or less ordered molecular moieties. PMID:26176565

  13. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy in biomedical science: bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamsjäger, Sonja; Zoehrer, R.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Mendelsohn, R.; Paschalis, E. P.

    2009-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIR) and Raman Microspectroscopy are powerful tools for characterizing the distribution of different chemical moieties in heterogeneous materials. FTIR and Raman measurements have been adapted to assess the maturity of the mineral and the quality of the organic component (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) of the mineralized tissue in bone. Unique to the FTIRI analysis is the capability to provide the spatial distribution of two of the major collagen cross-links (pyridinoline, and dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine) and through the study of normal and diseased bone, relate them to bone strength. These FTIR parameters have been validated based on analysis of model compounds. It is widely accepted that bone strength is determined by bone mass and bone quality. The latter is a multifactorial term encompassing the material and structural properties of bone, and one important aspect of the bone material properties is the organic matrix. The bone material properties can be defined by parameters of mineral and collagen, as determined by FTIR and Raman analysis. Considerably less attention has been directed at collagen, although there are several publications in the literature reporting altered collagen properties associated with fragile bone, in both animals and humans. Since bone is a heterogeneous tissue due to the remodeling process, microscopic areas may be carefully selected based on quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging or histological staining, thus ensuring comparison of areas with similar metabolic activity and mineral content. In conclusion, FTIRI and Raman vibrational spectroscopy are proving to be powerful tools in bone-related medical research.

  15. Transient Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy in a Vibrational Ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemlin, Vincent; Bonvalet, Adeline; Daniault, Louis; Joffre, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    We report on transient 2D Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) after vibrational ladder climbing induced in the CO-moiety longitudinal stretch of carboxyhemoglobin. The population distribution, spreading up to seven vibrational levels, results in a nonequilibrium 2DIR spectrum evidencing a large number of peaks that can be easily attributed to individual transitions thanks to the anharmonicity of the vibrational potential. We discuss the physical origin of the observed peaks as well as the qualitative behavior of the subsequent dynamics governed by population relaxation in the vibrational ladder. PMID:27508408

  16. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  17. Translating vibrational spectroscopy into clinical applications - vision or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrich, Wolfgang

    2016-06-23

    The Faraday Discussion meeting "Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy for Biomedical Applications" provided an excellent opportunity to share and discuss recent research and applications on a highly interdisciplinary level. Spectral pathology, single cell analysis, data handling, clinical spectroscopy, and the spectral analysis of biofluids were among the topics covered during the meeting. The focus on discussion rather than "merely" presentation was highly appreciated and fruitful discussions evolved around the interpretation of the amide-bands, optical resolution, the role of diffraction and data analysis procedure, to name a few. The meeting made clear that the spectroscopy of molecular vibrations in biomolecules has evolved from a purely academic research tool to a technology used in clinical practice in some cases. In this sense, biomedical vibrational spectroscopy has reached a pivotal point at which questions like diagnostic value, therapeutic consequence and financial viability are gaining more and more importance. PMID:27250100

  18. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  19. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  20. Proceedings of the national conference on exploring the frontiers of vibrational spectroscopy: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopy has played and is playing a very important role as it is one of the most efficient methods of molecular structure studies with the help of which direct information about the chemical compounds can be obtained. Spectroscopy has its contribution in a number of branches in areas such as medicine, industry, environment, agriculture, power, construction, forensic analysis (both criminal and civil cases), etc., where it has revolutionized the very face of these sectors. Vibrational spectroscopic (Infrared and Raman) techniques have demonstrated potential to provide non-destructive, rapid clinically relevant diagnostic information. Raman and infrared spectroscopy enable the biochemical signatures from biological tissues to be extracted and analyzed there by advancing the treatment of cancer. Advancement in instrumentation has allowed the development of numerous infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods. Infrared spectroscopy is tremendously used in the fields of pharmaceuticals. medical diagnostics food and agrochemical quality control, and combustion research. Raman spectroscopy is used in condensed matter physics, biomedicinal fields for tissue analysis and chemistry to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system. Keeping in mind the fast development: in the Spectroscopy, we have planned to organize a national level conference for 2 days on 'Exploring the Frontiers of Vibrational Spectroscopy' to bring out the tremendous potential of various Spectroscopic techniques available at the global level. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  2. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  3. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Californial 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  4. Ultrafast spectroscopy of model biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Avishek

    2009-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, I have described the novel time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopic technique that I developed during the course of my PhD research and used it study the ultrafast vibrational, structural and orientational dynamics of water molecules at model biological membr

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy at high external pressures the diamond anvil cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1984-01-01

    Vibrational Spectroscopy at High External Pressures: The Diamond Anvil Cell presents the effects of high pressure on the vibrational properties of materials as accomplished in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The DAC serves the dual purpose of generating the pressures and being transparent to infrared radiation, allowing the observation of changes caused by pressure. The optical probes highlighted will deal principally with infrared and Raman scattering, although some observations in the visible region will also be presented. The book begins with a discussion of the effects of pressure and pres

  6. Investigating buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the studies of buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Both buried solid/liquid and solid/solid interfaces involving polymeric materials are discussed. SFG studies of polymer/water interfaces show that different polymers exhibit varied surface restructuring behavior in water, indicating the importance of probing polymer/water interfaces in situ. SFG has also been applied to the investigation of interfaces b...

  7. Drug-excipient interactions in ketoprofen: A vibrational spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, L. A. E. Batista de; Marques, M. Paula M.; Tomkinson, John

    2006-01-01

    Ketoprofen (3-benzoyl-alpha-methylbenzeneacetic acid) is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), always administered in the form of drug-excipient physical mixtures (PMs). The occurrence of possible interactions between ketoprofen and two commonly used excipients - lactose (LAC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - was evaluated, through vibrational spectroscopy techniques [both Raman and Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS)]. Spectral evidence of drug:excipient close contacts, w...

  8. Application of vibrational microspectroscopy to biology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhawana; Gautam, Rekha; Kumar, Srividya; Kumar, Vinay BN; Nongthomba, Upendra; Nandi, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Geetashree; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Umapathy, Siva

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational microspectroscopic (Raman and infrared (IR)) techniques are rapidly emerging as effective tools to probe the basic processes of life. This review mainly focuses on the applications of Raman and IR microspectroscopy to biology and biomedicine, ranging from studies on cellular components in single cells to advancement in techniques for in vitro to in vivo applications. These techniques have proved to be instrumental in studying the biological specimen with minimum perturbation, i.e....

  9. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhir Boujday

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR, (phase-modulated InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS, and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS. Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes.

  10. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  11. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species. PMID:22033540

  12. Transient grating spectroscopy of SF6 molecular vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Ferré, Amélie; Burgy, Frédéric; Dagan, Michal; Descamps, Dominique; Dudovich, Nirit; Petit, Stéphane; Soifer, Hadas; Blanchet, Valérie; Mairesse, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Strong field transient grating spectroscopy has shown to be a very versatile tool in time-resolved molecular spectroscopy. Here we use this technique to investigate the high-order harmonic generation from SF6 molecules vibrationally excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Transient grating spectroscopy enables us to reveal clear modulations of the harmonic emission. This heterodyne detection shows that the harmonic emission generated between 14 to 26 eV is mainly sensitive to two among the three active Raman modes in SF6, i.e. the strongest and fully symmetric nu 1-A1g mode (774 cm-1, 43 fs) and the slowest mode nu5-T2g (524 cm-1, 63 fs). A time-frequency analysis of the harmonic emission reveals additional dynamics: the strength and central frequency of the nu 1 mode oscillate with a frequency of 52 cm-1 (640 fs). This could be a signature of the vibration of dimers in the generating medium. Harmonic 11 shows a remarkable behavior, oscillating in opposite phase, both on the fast (774 cm-1) and slow...

  13. Computational Vibrational Spectroscopy of HDO in Osmolyte-Water Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hochan; Choi, Jun-Ho; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-07-28

    The IR absorption and time-resolved IR spectroscopy of the OD stretch mode of HDO in water was successfully used to study osmolyte effects on water H-bonding network. Protecting osmolytes such as sorbitol and trimethylglycine (TMG) make the vibrational OD stretch band red-shifted, whereas urea affects the OD band marginally. Furthermore, we recently showed that, even though sorbitol and TMG cause a slow-down of HDO rotation in their aqueous solutions, urea does not induce any change in the rotational relaxation of HDO in aqueous urea solutions even at high concentrations. To clarify the underlying osmolyte effects on water H-bonding structure and dynamics, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a variety of aqueous osmolyte solutions. Using the vibrational solvatochromism model for the OD stretch mode and taking into account the vibrational non-Condon and polarization effects on the OD transition dipole moment, we then calculated the IR absorption spectra and rotational anisotropy decay of the OD stretch mode of HDO for the sake of direct comparisons with our experimental results. The simulation results on the OD stretch IR absorption spectra and the rotational relaxation rate of HDO in osmolyte solutions are found to be in quantitative agreement with experimental data, which confirms the validity of the MD simulation and vibrational solvatochromism approaches. As a result, it becomes clear that the protecting osmolytes like sorbitol and TMG significantly modulate water H-bonding network structure, while urea perturbs water structure little. We anticipate that the computational approach discussed here will serve as an interpretive method with atomic-level chemical accuracy of current linear and nonlinear time-resolved IR spectroscopy of structure and dynamics of water near the surfaces of membranes and proteins under crowded environments. PMID:27341918

  14. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  15. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  16. Unveiling Microscopic Structures of Charged Water Interfaces by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Chieh; Zha, Shuai; Liu, Xing; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Pan; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping; Shen, Y Ron; Tian, Chuanshan

    2016-01-01

    A sum-frequency spectroscopy scheme is developed that allows the measurement of vibrational spectra of the interfacial molecular structure of charged water interfaces. The application of this scheme to a prototype lipid-aqueous interface as a demonstration reveals an interfacial hydrogen-bonding water layer structure that responds sensitively to the charge state of the lipid headgroup and its interaction with specific ions. This novel technique provides unique opportunities to search for better understanding of electrochemistry and biological aqueous interfaces at a deeper molecular level. PMID:26799031

  17. Vibrational Assignments of Six-Coordinate Ferrous Heme Nitrosyls: New Insight From Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulat, F.; Berto, T.C.; George, S.DeBeer; Goodrich, L.; Praneeth, V.K.K.; Sulok, C.D.; Lehnert, N.

    2009-05-21

    This Communication addresses a long-standing problem: the exact vibrational assignments of the low-energy modes of the Fe-N-O subunit in six-coordinate ferrous heme nitrosyl model complexes. This problem is addressed using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) coupled to {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope labeling and detailed simulations of the obtained data. Two isotope-sensitive features are identified at 437 and 563 cm{sup -1}. Normal coordinate analysis shows that the 437 cm{sup -1} mode corresponds to the Fe-NO stretch, whereas the 563 cm{sup -1} band is identified with the Fe-N-O bend. The relative NRVS intensities of these features determine the degree of vibrational mixing between the stretch and the bend. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the trans effect of imidazole on the bound NO. In addition, a comparison to myoglobin-NO (Mb-NO) is made to determine the effect of the Mb active site pocket on the bound NO.

  18. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD...

  19. Cross-Propagation Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Li; Chen, Shunli; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the theory formulation and the experiment realization of sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the cross-propagation (XP) geometry or configuration. In the XP geometry, the visible and the infrared (IR) beams in the SFG experiment are delivered to the same location on the surface from visible and IR incident planes perpendicular to each other, avoiding the requirement to have windows or optics to be transparent to both the visible and IR frequencies. Therefore, the XP geometry is applicable to study surfaces in the enclosed vacuum or high pressure chambers with far infrared (FIR) frequencies that can directly access the metal oxide and other lower frequency surface modes, with much broader selection of visible and IR transparent window materials.

  20. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  1. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  2. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  3. High-Pressure Effects in Benzoic Acid Dimers: Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuchuan; Dreger, Zbigniew; Gupta, Yogendra

    2013-06-01

    To understand pressure effects on dimer structure stability, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy were used to examine changes in hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid crystals up to 31 GPa. Raman measurements indicated a phase transition around 7-8 GPa. It is proposed that this transition is caused by a rearrangement of molecules within the dimer leading to a symmetry change from C2h to likely C2 or Cs. This change was reversible upon pressure release from 15 GPa. Pressures above 15 GPa, induced gradual changes in luminescence and a color change in the crystal from white to brownish. FTIR measurements at 31 GPa revealed the formation of a new broad band centered around 3250 cm-1, which was attributed to the stretching vibrations of the O -H bond. It is proposed that hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid transform partially to a covalently bonded compound composed of benzoic anhydride-like molecules and H2O. This study demonstrates that application of high pressure can lead to significant changes in the H-bonded dimer structure, including formation of chemical bonding. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and ONR/MURI.

  4. Temperature Dependent Studies of Conformational Vibrational Modes of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelz, A. G.; Pawar, A.

    2001-03-01

    Low frequency vibrational modes of proteins are correlated to conformation and conformational change critical to biochemical activity, however direct measurements of these modes has been impeded by limitations in spectroscopic techniques. We are presently exploring the use of the high sensitivity FIR spectroscopic technique of pulsed terahertz spectroscopy to measure these modes as a function of conformational state. Initial measurements have been preformed using bovine heart cytochrome c and the chromophore of photoactive yellow protein, p-coumaric acid (PCA). We have measured the temperature dependence (77 K - 300 K) of the far infrared absorption (2-100 cm-1) using both solid state and solution samples. Sample preparation techniques to eliminate etalon in the spectra will be discussed. For cytochrome c, a distinct absorption at 10 cm-1 is seen at room temperature that narrows and slightly red shifts as the temperature decreases. For PCA, the FIR absorption remains broad at lower temperatures, with an overall increase in FIR absorption at lower temperatures. We will discuss the implications of these measurements for future studies of conformational dynamics in these proteins.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of –/ – stretching vibrations of copper tetramesityl porphyrin: An algebraic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivasa Rao Karumuri; Joydeep Choudhury; Nirmal Kumar Sarkar; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2010-01-01

    Using Lie algebraic techniques and simpler expressions of the matrix elements of Majorana and Casimir operators given by us, we obtain an effective Hamiltonian operator which conveniently describes stretching vibrations of biomolecules. For a copper tetramesityl porphyrin molecule, the higher excited vibrational levels are calculated by applying the (2) algebraic approach.

  6. Structural determination of some uranyl compounds by vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds has been studied and of it spectral information has been used the fundamental asymmetric vibrational frequency, to determine the length and constant bond force U=O by means of the combination of the concept of absorbed energy and the mathematical expression of Badger modified by Jones. It is intended a factor that simplifies the mathematical treatment and the results are compared with the values obtained for other methods. (Author)

  7. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm−1. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions

  8. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Aritra [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tokmakoff, Andrei, E-mail: tokmakoff@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm{sup −1}. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  9. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state.

  10. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicholas H C; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state. PMID:25956093

  11. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Photoreactive Molecules in Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Veronica

    2010-06-01

    Vibrational overtone spectra of oxidized atmospheric chromophores are presented and analyzed to energies where chemistry through vibrational overtone pumping is possible. Experimental near infrared and visible spectra complemented by dynamical theory are presented to elucidate the light initiated reaction dynamics of pyruvic and of glyoxilic acid photo-decarboxylation. The role of water is investigated by making use of vibrational spectra of hydrates of the title compounds. Consequences of water and sunlight mediated chemistry to formation of secondary organic aerosol in the atmosphere will be discussed. K. L. Plath, J. L. Axson, G. C. Nelson, K. Takahashi, R. T. Skodje and V. Vaida -- React. Kineti. Catal. Lett. 96, 209 (2009) V. Vaida J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5 (2009) K. Takahashi, K. L. Plath, R. T. Skodje and V. Vaida J. Phys. Chem A 112 7321 (2008)

  12. Action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Ueba, H.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Calculations of the inelastic tunneling current for excitation of the C-O stretch mode of the CO molecule on metal surfaces are combined with a theory which describes how the energy in the vibrational mode is transferred to a reaction coordinate mode to overcome the activation barrier. The calculated rate for CO hopping on Pd (110) as a function of the bia...

  13. Mechanism for vibrational relaxation in water investigated by femtosecond infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Woutersen, Sander; van Santen, Rutger A.; Bakker, Huib J.

    1999-07-01

    We present a study on the relaxation of the O-H stretch vibration in a dilute HDO:D2O solution using femtosecond mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. We performed one-color experiments in which the 0→1 vibrational transition is probed at different frequencies, and two-color experiments in which the 1→2 transition is probed. In the one-color experiments, it is observed that the relaxation is faster at the blue side than at the center of the absorption band. Furthermore, it is observed that the vibrational relaxation time T1 shows an anomalous temperature dependence and increases from 0.74±0.01 ps at 298 K to 0.90±0.02 ps at 363 K. These results indicate that the O-H⋯O hydrogen bond forms the dominant accepting mode in the vibrational relaxation of the O-H stretch vibration.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy of purified C[sub 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R.H. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Schreiber, H. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Gierden, R. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Hennrich, F. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Rockenberger, J. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Beck, R.D. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Kappes, M.M. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie); Lehner, C. (Bruker Analytische Messtechnik GmbH, Rheinstetten (Germany)); Adelmann, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik); Armbruster, J.F. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik)

    1994-07-01

    C[sub 76] was generated by graphite contact arc discharge in helium and purified by high performance liquid chromatography (>98%). We report an infrared and first Raman spectroscopic study of the microcrystalline solid and compare the observed vibrational structure to existing calculations. (orig.)

  15. Vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy study of paroxetine and femoxetine precursors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, M.; Setnička, V.; Bouř, Petr; Navrátilová, H.; Volka, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2002), s. 298-301. ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : vibrational circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  16. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  17. Microwave spectroscopy of furfural in vibrationally excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2007-07-01

    The results of microwave spectrum investigation of the excited vibrational states of furfural in the frequency range between 49 and 149 GHz are reported. In total 15 excited vibrational states (9 for trans-furfural and 6 for cis-furfural) were assigned and analyzed. Six of the 15 investigated states were assigned for the first time. Accurate values of rigid rotor and quartic centrifugal distortion constants of asymmetric top Hamiltonian have been determined for 13 excited states. Also for some states several sextic and octic level constants were needed in order to fit the data within experimental accuracy. The vt = 3 and vs = 1, va = 1 states of trans-furfural were found to be strongly perturbed and only rotational transitions with low Ka values can be reliably identified in this study.

  18. Ultrafast reaction dynamics and vibrational spectroscopy at surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Christian

    2001-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the surface femtochemistry leading to the formation of hydrogen and the desorption and oxidation of CO from a Ru(001) single crystal surface is obtained by application of a variety of experimental methods. Among these are measurements of the translational energy distributions, two-pulse-correlations, isotope effects, and vibrational spectra of the reaction products after excitation with near-infrared (800 nm) femtosecond laser pulses. It is demonstrated t...

  19. Measurement of Mechatronic Property of Biological Gel with Micro-Vibrating Electrode at Ultrasonic Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A measurement system has been designed with a micro-vibrating electrode at ultrasonic frequency to measure local impedance of biological gel in vitro. The designed system consists of two electrodes, where one of the electrodes vibrates with a piezoelectric actuator. The component of variation at impedance between two electrodes with vibration of one electrode is analyzed at the corresponding spectrum. The manufactured system was applied to measure impedance of a physiological saline solution, a potassium chloride solution, a dextran aqueous solution, and an egg. The experimental results show that the designed system is effective to measure local mechatronic property of biological gel.

  20. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence

  1. Far-infra-red molecular vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic electron tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the far infrared vibrational spectrum of polyvinyl-formate is reported as can be obtained by an inelastic electron tunneling experiment. The results here described as compared with those previously known from the current literature show that the afore mentioned technique can improve molecular spectroscopy data both as the covered energy range and resolution

  2. Study of cancer cell lines with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)/vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uceda Otero, E. P.; Eliel, G. S. N.; Fonseca, E. J. S.;

    2013-01-01

    In this work we have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) / vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy to study two cancer cell lines: the Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) human cervix carcinoma and 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. Our goal is to experimentally investigate biochemical changes and d...

  3. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  4. Methanol Perturbing Modeling Cell Membranes Investigated using Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangzhen Tian; Hongchun Li; Shuji Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cell membranes play a crucial role in many biological functions of cells.A small change in the composition of cell membranes can strongly influence the functions of membrane-associated proteins,such as ion and water channels,and thus mediate the chemical and physical balance in cells.Such composition change could originate from the introduction of short-chain alcohols,or other anesthetics into membranes.In this work,we have applied sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS),supplemented by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR),to investigate interaction between methanol and 1,2-dimyristoyl-d54-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d54-DMPC) lipid bilayers.Lipid's hydrocarbon interior is deuterated while its head group is hydrogenated.At the same time,CH3 symmetric stretch from methanol and lipid head amine group has different frequency,thus we can distinguish the behaviors of methanol,lipid head amine group,and lipid hydrocarbon interior.Based on the spectral feature of the bending mode of the water molecules replaced by methanol,we determined that the methanol molecules are intercalated into the region between amine and phosphate groups at the lipid hydrophilic head.The dipole of CH3 groups of methanol and lipid head,and the water O-H all adopt the same orientation directions.The introduction of methanol into the lipid hydrophilic head group can strongly perturb the entire length of the alkyl chains,resulting that the signals of CD2 and CD3 groups from both leaflets can not cancel each other.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy for online monitoring of extraction solvent degradation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our research, we are exploring the potential of online monitoring of the organic solvents for the flowsheets relevant to the used nuclear fuel reprocessing and tributyl phosphate (TBP)- based extraction processes in particular. Utilization of vibrational spectroscopic techniques permits the discrimination of the degradation products from the primary constituents of the loaded extraction solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitates development of the regression models for their quantification in real time and potentially enables online implementation of a monitoring system. Raman and FTIR spectral databases were created and used to develop the regression partial least squares (PLS) chemometric models for the quantitative prediction of HDBP (dibutyl phosphoric acid) degradation product, TBP, and UO22+ extraction organic product phase. It was demonstrated that both these spectroscopic techniques are suitable for the quantification of the Purex solvent components in the presence of UO2(NO3)2. Developed PLS models successfully predicted HDBP and TBP organic concentrations in simulated Purex solutions

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    C, the OH-stretch cannot be observed due to thermal broadening, but the peak reappears upon cooling; the OH and OD absorption bands in BaCe1-chiNdchiO3 are very broad and, in addition, an electronic transition of Nd-3 is observed at 1900-1930 cm(-1);finally, IR reflectance spectroscopy on BaZr0.9Y0.1O3, La0...

  7. Monte Carlo wave packet propagators for multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Samsonyuk, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    A direct Monte Carlo wave packet sampling method for Liouville space pathways, based on the solution of the quantum stochastic differential equation in a doubled Hilbert space, was developed to widen the scope of nonlinear spectroscopy simulations. Using this method we can: compute third order infrared response functions for systems with thousands of states, which was not possible before; simulate a very broad range of experiments with any number of pulse interactions; reduce the computationa...

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nonlinear two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Hamm, Peter

    2002-10-01

    In this overview, we discuss theoretical and experimental aspects of nonlinear two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. With this technique both peptide conformation and conformational flexibility can be probed. The quantitative relation between the experimental 2D-IR spectrum and the peptide conformation is discussed, and examples of how the conformation of a peptide and the timescale of its fluctuations are derived from its (time-resolved) 2D spectrum are presented.

  9. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy characterization of magnetron sputtered silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SiOxNy and SiOx films prepared by magnetron sputtering on steel and silicon substrates. Interference bands in the infrared reflectivity measurements provided the film thickness and the dielectric function of the films. Vibrational modes bands were obtained both from infrared and Raman spectra providing useful information on the bonding structure and the microstructure (formation of nano-voids in some coatings) for these amorphous (or nanocrystalline) coatings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis have also been carried out to determine the composition and texture of the films, and to correlate these data with the vibrational spectroscopy studies. The angular dependence of the reflectivity spectra provides the dispersion of vibrational and interference polaritons modes, what allows to separate these two types of bands especially in the frequency regions where overlaps/resonances occurred. Finally the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared measurements have been also carried out demonstrating the feasibility and high sensitivity of the technique. Comparison of the spectra of the SiOxNy films prepared in various conditions demonstrates how films can be prepared from pure silicon oxide to silicon oxynitride with reduced oxygen content.

  11. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  12. Computational Laser Spectroscopy in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ben Salah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical spectroscopic study of visible and infrared laser radiation in a biological tissue. We derive a solution of a general two-dimensional time dependent radiative transfer equation in a tissue-like medium. The used model is suitable for many situations especially when the external source is time-dependent or continuous. We use a control volume-discrete ordinate method associated with an implicit three-level second-order time differencing scheme. We consider a very thin rectangular biological-tissue-like medium submitted to a visible or a near infrared light sources. The RTE is solved for a set of different wavelength source. All sources are assumed to be monochromatic and collimated. The energetic fluence rate is computed at a set of detector points on the boundaries. According to the source type, we investigate either the steady-state or transient response of the medium. The used model is validated in the case of a heterogeneous tissue-like medium using referencing experimental results from the literature. Also, the developed model is used to study changes on transmitted light in a rat-liver tissue-like medium. Optical properties depend on the source wavelength and they are taken from the literature. In particular, light-transmission in the medium is studied for continuous wave and for short pulse.

  13. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    CERN Document Server

    Rüger, Robert; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the harmonic approximation. The theory of vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy is first summarized from the viewpoint of TD-DFTB. The method is benchmarked against time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations for strongly dipole allowed excitations in various aromatic and polar molecules. Using the recent 3ob:freq parameter set of Elstner's group, excellent agreement with TD-DFT calculations using local functionals was achieved.

  14. Vibrational ladder-climbing in surface-enhanced, ultrafast infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Hamm, Peter

    2016-06-28

    In a recent work (J. Phys. Chem. C 2016, 120, 3350-3359), we have introduced the concept of surface-enhanced, two-dimensional attenuated total reflectance (2D ATR IR) spectroscopy with modest enhancement factors (450), which allows for multi-quantum IR excitation of adsorbed molecules, a process known as "vibrational ladder-climbing", even for weakly absorbing (ε ultrafast dynamics of highly excited vibrational states or surface-sensitive coherent control experiments of ground-state reactions at solid-liquid interfaces. PMID:27265518

  15. Thermochromism in polyalkylthiophenes: Molecular aspects from vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbi, G.; Chierichetti, B.; Ingänas, O.

    1991-03-01

    It is known that polyalkylthiophenes show reversible thermochromism within a well-defined temperature range. The vibrational infrared and Raman spectra are used as structural probes for understanding the structures of polyhexyl and polyoctyl thiophenes at room temperature and their evolution with temperature during the thermochromic process. The seemingly sample IR and Raman spectra of these materials are explained in terms of the theory of the effective conjugation coordinate which also accounts for the observed ``dispersion'' of the Raman spectrum with exciting wavelength or from solid to solution states in terms of changes of effective conjugation length. A detailed description of the structure of the system is reached. At room T the sample consists mainly of two phases: (i) an ordered phase with the alkyl side chains in the transplanar structure and the main chain in a quasicoplanar or coplanar conformation and (ii) a disordered phase with the alkyl residue fully conformationally coiled and the main chain conformationally twisted with the torsional angle of ˜ 30°. Upon heating, the relative concentration of the disordered phase increases. The temperature dependence of the side chain and the main chain conformations are similar, thus showing that the coiling of the side chain drives the twisting of the main chain. The thermochromism is thus accounted for.

  16. Role of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ceren; Severcan, Feride

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches have mainly displayed the significant role of stem cells in tissue renewal and homeostasis with their unique capacity to develop different cell types. These findings have clarified the importance of stem cells to improve the effectiveness of any cell therapy for regenerative medicine. Identification of purity and differentiation stages of stem cells are the greatest challenges of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The existing methods to carefully monitor and chara...

  17. FT-IR spectra and vibrational spectroscopy of Andrographolide

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, P.K.; Hasan, Tanveer; Prasad, Onkar; Sinha, Leena; Raj, Kanwal; Misra, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    A complete normal coordinate analysis was performed for andrographolide in terms of the calculation by using Wilson's G-F matrix method and Urey Bradley force field. Normal coordinate analysis has been carried out to understand the dynamical behaviour of the bioactive labdane diterpenoid of the medicinally useful terrestrial plant Andrographis paniculata. The structural elucidation of a novel, biologically active natural product followed by its total synthesis lays the groundwork for investig...

  18. Electron-Induced Vibrational Spectroscopy. A New and Unique Tool To Unravel the Molecular Structure of Polymer Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Pireaux, J. J.; Gregoire, Ch.; Caudano, R.; Rei Vilar, M.; Brinkhuis, R; Schouten, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Among the surface-sensitive spectroscopies used to characterize clean and surface-modified polymers, one technique has rather recently emerged as a very promising complementary tool. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, or electron-induced vibrational spectroscopy, has potentially all the attributes of the well-known optical (infrared and Raman) spectroscopies; it clearly adds to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the possibility to go beyond surface elemental and chemical analysi...

  19. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holinga IV, George Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  20. Vibrational relaxation dynamics in transient grating spectroscopy studied by rate equations based on time-dependent correlation function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Guo-Yang; Song Yun-Fei; He Xing; Zheng Xian-Xu; Tan Duo-Wang; Chen Jun; Yang Yan-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A modified model,a set of rate equations based on time-dependent correlation function,is used to study vibrational relaxation dynamics in transient grating spectroscopy.The dephasing,the population dynamics,and the vibrational coherence concerning two vibrational states are observed respectively in organic dye IR780 perchlorate molecules doped polyvinyl alcohol matrix.The result shows that in addition to the information concerning system-environment interaction and vibrational coherence,the vibrational energy transfer can be described by this modified model.

  1. Far-infrared vibrational modes of DNA components studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The far-infrared dielectric function of a wide range of organic molecules is dominated by vibrations involving a substantial fraction of the atoms forming the molecule and motion associated with intermolecular hydrogen bond vibrations. Due to their collective nature such modes are highly sensitive to the intra- and intermolecular structure and thus provide a unique fingerprint of the conformational state of the molecule and effects of its environment. We demonstrate the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) for recording the far-infrared (0.5-4.0 THz) dielectric function of the four nucleobases and corresponding nucleosides forming the building blocks of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). We observe numerous distinct spectral features with large differences between the molecules in both frequency-dependent absorption coefficient and index of refraction. Assisted by results from density-functional calculations we interpret the origin of the observed resonances as vibrations of hydrogen bonds between the molecules

  2. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion

  3. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker [Universität Würzburg, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Emil-Fischer-Str. 42, Campus Nord, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  4. Vibrational Circular Dichroism Studies of Biological Macromolecules and their Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polyanichko, A. M.; Andrushchenko, Valery; Bouř, Petr; Wieser, H.

    Hauppauge, NY : Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 2012 - (Rodgers, D.), s. 67-126 ISBN 978-1-61122-522-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0559; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) * proteins * nucleic acids * peptides * spectra simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/ product _info.php? product s_id=32793

  5. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of rotaxane-based molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Panman, Matthijs R; Bakker, Bert H; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-15

    It has recently become possible to synthesize mechanical devices the size of a single molecule. Although it is tempting to regard such molecular machines as nanoscale versions of their macroscopic analogs, many notions from macroscopic mechanics no longer apply at a molecular level. For instance, the concept of viscous friction is meaningless for a molecular machine because the size of the solvent molecules that cause the friction is comparable to that of the machine itself. Furthermore, in many cases, the interactions between a molecular machine and its surroundings are comparable to the force driving the machine. As a result, a certain amount of intrinsic randomness exists in the motion of molecular machines, and the details of their mechanics are largely unknown. For a detailed understanding of the mechanical behavior of molecular machines, experiments that probe their motion on an ultrafast time scale, such as two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy, are essential. This method uses coupling between vibrational modes in a molecule to investigate the molecular conformation. The coupling shows up as off-diagonal peaks in a 2D graph of the vibrational response of the molecule, analogous to the spin coupling observed in multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Both spin coupling and vibrational coupling are sensitive probes of the molecular conformation, but 2D vibrational spectroscopy shows orders of magnitude better time resolution than NMR. In this Account, we use 2D vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular machines based on rotaxanes. These devices consist of a linear thread and a macrocycle that is noncovalently locked onto the thread. In the rotaxanes we study, the macrocycle and the thread both contain CO and NH groups. By determining the coupling between the stretching modes of these goups from the cross peaks in the 2D spectrum, we directly and quantitatively probe the relative position and orientation of the macrocycle and the thread for both a small

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of the borate mineral kotoite Mg₃(BO₃)₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-02-15

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to assess the structure of kotoite a borate mineral of magnesium which is isostructural with jimboite. The mineral is orthorhombic with point group: 2/m 2/m 2/m. The mineral has the potential as a new memory insulator material. The mineral has been characterised by a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a very intense band at 835 cm(-1), assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of tetrahedral boron. Raman bands at 919, 985 and 1015 cm(-1) are attributed to the antisymmetric stretching modes of tetrahedral boron. Kotoite is strictly an hydrous borate mineral. An intense Raman band observed at 3559 cm(-1) is attributed to the stretching vibration of hydroxyl units, more likely to be associated with the borate mineral hydroxyborate. The lack of observation of water bending modes proves the absence of water in the kotoite structure. PMID:23257343

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yisong [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); Brecht, Eric [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Aznavour, Kristen [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); George, Simon J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Bau, Robert [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W. [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States); Jenney, Francis E. Jr. [Georgia Campus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (United States); Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Yoda, Yoshitaka [JASRI (Japan); Cramer, Stephen P., E-mail: spcramer@lbl.gov [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We have applied {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  8. Structure and vibrational spectroscopy of salt water/air interfaces: Predictions from classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brown, E. C.; Mucha, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Tobias, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, - (2005), s. 7934-7940. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 644; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE 0431512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vibrational spectroscopy * salt water * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.033, year: 2005

  9. Vibrational spectra of CO on Ni (100) studied by infrared emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed the technique of infrared emission spectroscopy in order to observe vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on clean, single crystal metal surfaces. A novel apparatus has been constructed which measures the emission from a single crystal sample in thermal equilibrium at room temperature. The apparatus consists of a liquid helium cooled infrared grating spectrometer coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum system equipped with surface preparation and characterization facilities. 3 references, 3 figures

  10. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  11. Exciton–vibrational coupling in the dynamics and spectroscopy of Frenkel excitons in molecular aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of exciton–vibrational coupling on the optical and transport properties of molecular aggregates is an old problem that gained renewed interest in recent years. On the experimental side, various nonlinear spectroscopic techniques gave insight into the dynamics of systems as complex as photosynthetic antennae. Striking evidence was gathered that in these protein–pigment complexes quantum coherence is operative even at room temperature conditions. Investigations were triggered to understand the role of vibrational degrees of freedom, beyond that of a heat bath characterized by thermal fluctuations. This development was paralleled by theory, where efficient methods emerged, which could provide the proper frame to perform non-Markovian and non-perturbative simulations of exciton–vibrational dynamics and spectroscopy. This review summarizes the state of affairs of the theory of exciton–vibrational interaction in molecular aggregates and photosynthetic antenna complexes. The focus is put on the discussion of basic effects of exciton–vibrational interaction from the stationary and dynamics points of view. Here, the molecular dimer plays a prominent role as it permits a systematic investigation of absorption and emission spectra by numerical diagonalization of the exciton–vibrational Hamiltonian in a truncated Hilbert space. An extension to larger aggregates, having many coupled nuclear degrees of freedom, becomes possible with the Multi-Layer Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method for wave packet propagation. In fact it will be shown that this method allows one to approach the limit of almost continuous spectral densities, which is usually the realm of density matrix theory. Real system–bath situations are introduced for two models, which differ in the way strongly coupled nuclear coordinates are treated, as a part of the relevant system or the bath. A rather detailed exposition of the Hierarchy Equations Of Motion (HEOM

  12. Exciton–vibrational coupling in the dynamics and spectroscopy of Frenkel excitons in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröter, M.; Ivanov, S.D.; Schulze, J. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Polyutov, S.P. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Laboratory for Nonlinear Optics and Spectroscopy, Siberian Federal University, Svobodniy, 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Yan, Y. [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guizhou 550018 (China); Pullerits, T. [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Kühn, O., E-mail: oliver.kuehn@uni-rostock.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-03-18

    The influence of exciton–vibrational coupling on the optical and transport properties of molecular aggregates is an old problem that gained renewed interest in recent years. On the experimental side, various nonlinear spectroscopic techniques gave insight into the dynamics of systems as complex as photosynthetic antennae. Striking evidence was gathered that in these protein–pigment complexes quantum coherence is operative even at room temperature conditions. Investigations were triggered to understand the role of vibrational degrees of freedom, beyond that of a heat bath characterized by thermal fluctuations. This development was paralleled by theory, where efficient methods emerged, which could provide the proper frame to perform non-Markovian and non-perturbative simulations of exciton–vibrational dynamics and spectroscopy. This review summarizes the state of affairs of the theory of exciton–vibrational interaction in molecular aggregates and photosynthetic antenna complexes. The focus is put on the discussion of basic effects of exciton–vibrational interaction from the stationary and dynamics points of view. Here, the molecular dimer plays a prominent role as it permits a systematic investigation of absorption and emission spectra by numerical diagonalization of the exciton–vibrational Hamiltonian in a truncated Hilbert space. An extension to larger aggregates, having many coupled nuclear degrees of freedom, becomes possible with the Multi-Layer Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method for wave packet propagation. In fact it will be shown that this method allows one to approach the limit of almost continuous spectral densities, which is usually the realm of density matrix theory. Real system–bath situations are introduced for two models, which differ in the way strongly coupled nuclear coordinates are treated, as a part of the relevant system or the bath. A rather detailed exposition of the Hierarchy Equations Of Motion (HEOM

  13. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications. PMID:27145861

  14. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  15. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis

    2008-12-16

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and CpFe(CO){sub 2} have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO){sub 5}[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO){sub 5} have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  16. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C2 Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B2Σ–X2Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN molecules in the

  17. Coherent vibrational dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful investigation tool for a wide class of materials covering diverse areas in physics, chemistry and biology. The continuous development in the laser field regarding ultrashort pulse generation has led to the possibility of producing light pulses that can follow vibrational motion coupled to the electronic transitions in molecules and solids in real time. Aimed at researchers and graduate students using vibrational spectroscopy, this book provides both introductory chapters as well as more advanced contents reporting on recent progress. It also provides a good starting point for scientists seeking a sound introduction to ultrafast optics and spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Detection of vibrational-overtone excitation in water via laser-induced grating spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe a method, based on the laser-induced grating technique, for studying the spectroscopy of vibrational overtone-excited gas-phase water. Two phase-coherent visible laser beams whose frequencies are in the range of the third overtone of the OH stretch in water are crossed in the gas-phase sample. As the wavelength of these excitation beams is scanned through individual rovibrational OH overtone transitions, vibrational energy is deposited into the water in a spatially sinusoidal pattern. A fixed-frequency 266 nm probe laser beam is diffracted from the resultant transmission diffraction grating in water. We show that under collision-free conditions, probe laser diffraction is observed from the initially excited grating, which is a necessary condition for using this technique to study the absorption spectroscopy of the vibrationally excited molecules. Under multiple collision conditions, a probe laser wavelength-independent refractive index grating is formed within the bulk sample. In addition, we observe temporal oscillations in the grating diffraction efficiency arising from excitation of standing acoustic waves

  19. Vibration-rotational overtones absorption of solid hydrogens using optoacoustic spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational-rotational overtones absorption solid hydrogens (H2, D2, HD) is studied using pulsed laser piezoeletric transducer (PULPIT) optoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. A general downward shift in energy from isolated molecular energies is observed. Studying normal-hydrogen it was observed that the phonon excitations associated with double-molecular transitions are predominantly transverse-optical phonons, whereas the excitations associated with single-molecular transitions are predominantly longitudinal - optical phonons. Multiplet structures were observed for certain double transitions in parahydrogen and orthodeuterium. The HD spectrum, besides presenting the sharp zero-phonon lines and the associated phonon side bands, like H2 and D2, showed also two different features. This observation was common to all the transitions involving pure rotational excitation in H2 and D2, which showed broad linewidths. This, together with some other facts (fluorescence lifetime *approx*105 sec; weak internal vibration and lattice coupling), led to the proposition of a mechanism for the fast nonradiative relaxation in solid hydrogens, implied from some observed experimental evidences. This relaxation, due to strong coupling, would happen in two steps: the internal vibration modes would relax to the rotational modes of the molecules, and then this rotational modes would relax to the lattice vibration modes. (Author)

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic imaging of living systems: An emerging platform for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Xin; Xie, X Sunney

    2015-11-27

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been extensively applied to the study of molecules in gas phase, in condensed phase, and at interfaces. The transition from spectroscopy to spectroscopic imaging of living systems, which allows the spectrum of biomolecules to act as natural contrast, is opening new opportunities to reveal cellular machinery and to enable molecule-based diagnosis. Such a transition, however, involves more than a simple combination of spectrometry and microscopy. We review recent efforts that have pushed the boundary of the vibrational spectroscopic imaging field in terms of spectral acquisition speed, detection sensitivity, spatial resolution, and imaging depth. We further highlight recent applications in functional analysis of single cells and in label-free detection of diseases. PMID:26612955

  1. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  2. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Hai; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1500 cm-1, is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light-matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here, we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon-phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire infrared fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly-confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectrosc...

  3. Structural information on ball milled magnesium hydride from vibrational spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmel, H.G. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kearley, G.J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Ramirez-Cuesta, A.J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Huot, J. [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 des Forges, PO Box 500, Trois-Rivieres, Que., G9A 5H7 (Canada); Mulder, F.M. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: f.m.mulder@iri.tudelft.nl

    2005-05-03

    Ball milled magnesium hydride with an average size of about 40 nm and bulk magnesium hydride have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy together with density functional computer calculations. Using this combination of techniques structural information can now be obtained on a nanometer scale, which is especially important for nanosized samples. Such samples exhibit very broad diffraction lines, from which limited information about the structure can be extracted. It was found that ball milling distorts the vibrational spectra due to distribution in stresses over the sample. Cycling of the hydrogen content of ball milled samples results in the spectrum of unmilled samples, while the particle size remains small and hydrogen storage characteristics continue to be better for ball milled samples. We conclude that improved performance for hydrogen storage applications of ball milled magnesium hydride has to be attributed to the reduction of the particle size, while defect densities inside the particles play less of a role.

  4. Structural information on ball milled magnesium hydride from vibrational spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball milled magnesium hydride with an average size of about 40 nm and bulk magnesium hydride have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy together with density functional computer calculations. Using this combination of techniques structural information can now be obtained on a nanometer scale, which is especially important for nanosized samples. Such samples exhibit very broad diffraction lines, from which limited information about the structure can be extracted. It was found that ball milling distorts the vibrational spectra due to distribution in stresses over the sample. Cycling of the hydrogen content of ball milled samples results in the spectrum of unmilled samples, while the particle size remains small and hydrogen storage characteristics continue to be better for ball milled samples. We conclude that improved performance for hydrogen storage applications of ball milled magnesium hydride has to be attributed to the reduction of the particle size, while defect densities inside the particles play less of a role

  5. Time-resolved two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of a short α-helix in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Hamm, Peter

    2001-10-01

    Nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the amide I band of an alanine-based 21-residue α-helical peptide in aqueous solution. Whereas the linear absorption spectrum consists of a single, broad amide I band, the 2D vibrational spectrum clearly reveals that this band is composed of two amide I transitions, which are assigned to the A and E1 modes. The A-E1 frequency splitting is found to be approximately 10 cm-1. We find that the amide I band is inhomogeneously broadened due to conformational disorder of the helix. The 2D line shapes can be well described using distributions of the dihedral angles (φ,ψ) around their average values with a width of 20°, confirming previous molecular-dynamics studies. Time-resolved 2D measurements show that the conformation fluctuates on a time scale of picoseconds.

  6. Hydrogen bonding to carbonyl oxygen of nitrogen-pyramidalized amide - detection of pyramidalization direction preference by vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Taniguchi, Tohru; Monde, Kenji; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen-pyramidalization of amide increases electron density on nitrogen and decreases that on carbonyl oxygen. We identified hydrogen-bonding to carbonyl of nitrogen-pyramidalized bicyclic β-proline derivatives by crystallography, and by NMR and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy in solution. Such hydrogen-bonding can switch the preferred nitrogen-pyramidalization direction, as detected by VCD spectroscopy. PMID:26889607

  7. Laser deposition, vibrational spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy and STM imaging of C60 and C70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors of this paper demonstrated that C60 and C70, as well as other fullerenes, can be deposited and accumulated on surfaces using laser ablation of graphite in an inert gas atmosphere. Indicating the presence of C60 in carbon soot, the authors showed that samples consisting exclusively of C60 and C70 can be sublimed from such soot. Vibrational Raman spectra of C60 and C70 were obtained from these samples. The C60 spectrum is consistent with the calculated spectrum of Buckminsterfullerene, and the strongest three lines can be assigned on the basis of frequency and polarization. The NMR spectrum of dissolved C60 was then obtained, and found to consist of a single resonance, establishing the Icosahedral symmetry of this molecule. STM images of the C60 molecules on a Au(111) crystal face show that these clusters form hexagonal arrays with an intercluster spacing of 11.0 Angstrom and are mobile at ambient temperature. Distinctly taller species evident in the arrays are believed to be C70 clusters. Vibrational Raman and infrared spectra have also been obtained for separated C60 and C70

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  9. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  10. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  11. Communication: Atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ(3)) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ(2))

  12. Isotope-edited two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of trialanine in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, S.; Hamm, P.

    2001-02-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy is applied to the amide I mode of trialanine and two of its isotopomers dissolved in heavy water. We use site-directed 13C isotope substitution to change the individual frequencies of the coupled oscillators, and hence to modify specific matrix elements of the molecular Hamiltonian. It is found that all of the results can be well described by an excitonic model for the amide I band, using the same coupling strength and dipole-dipole angle for all three isotopomers. This demonstrates that these two spectral parameters are determined by the secondary structure of the peptide, which remains unchanged upon isotope substitution.

  13. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labeled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging’ mode involving H− motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density fu...

  14. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sen...

  15. Nanophotonic waveguide enhanced Raman spectroscopy of biological submonolayers

    CERN Document Server

    Dhakal, Ashim; Peyskens, Frédéric; Jans, Karolien; Thomas, Nicolas Le; Baets, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing a monolayer of biological molecules has been a major challenge. We demonstrate nanophotonic wave-guide enhanced Raman spectroscopy (NWERS) of monolayers in the near-infrared region, enabling real-time measurements of the hybridization of DNA strands and the density of sub-monolayers of biotin-streptavidin complex immobilized on top of a photonics chip. NWERS is based on enhanced evanescent excitation and collection of spontaneous Raman scattering near nanophotonic waveguides, which for a one centimeter silicon nitride waveguide delivers a signal that is more than four orders of magnitude higher in comparison to a confocal Raman microscope. The reduced acquisition time and specificity of the signal allows for a quantitative and real-time characterization of surface species, hitherto not possible using Raman spectroscopy. NWERS provides a direct analytic tool for monolayer research and also opens a route to compact microscope-less lab-on-a-chip devices with integrated sources, spectrometers and d...

  16. Excited-State Vibrational Coherence in Perylene Bisimide Probed by Femtosecond Broadband Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Minjung; Park, Kyu Hyung; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Pyosang; Kim, Dongho

    2015-06-18

    Broadband laser pulses with ultrashort duration are capable of triggering impulsive excitation of the superposition of vibrational eigenstates, giving rise to quantum beating signals originating from coherent wave packet motions along the potential energy surface. In this work, coherent vibrational wave packet dynamics of an N,N'-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)perylene bisimide (DMP-PBI) were investigated by femtosecond broadband pump-probe spectroscopy which features fast and balanced data acquisition with a wide spectral coverage of >200 nm. Clear modulations were observed in the envelope of the stimulated emission decay profiles of DMP-PBI with the oscillation frequencies of 140 and 275 cm(-1). Fast Fourier transform analysis of each oscillatory mode revealed characteristic phase jumps near the maxima of the steady-state fluorescence, indicating that the observed vibrational coherence originates from an excited-state wave packet motion. Quantum calculations of the normal modes at the low-frequency region suggest that low-frequency C-C (C═C) stretching motions accompanied by deformation of the dimethylphenyl substituents are responsible for the manifestation of such coherent wave packet dynamics. PMID:25992707

  17. Vibrational self-trapping in beta-sheet structures observed with femtosecond nonlinear infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Schwartz, Erik; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-28

    Self-trapping of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in synthetic beta-sheet helices is observed using femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. In a dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, the transient-absorption change upon exciting the NH-stretch mode exhibits a negative absorption change at the fundamental frequency and two positive peaks at lower frequencies. These two induced-absorption peaks are characteristic for a state in which the vibrational excitation is self-trapped on essentially a single NH-group in the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, forming a small (Holstein) vibrational polaron. By engineering the structure of the polymer we can disrupt the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, allowing us to eliminate the self-trapping, as is confirmed from the NH-stretch pump-probe response. We also investigate a trialanine-based beta-sheet helix, where each side chain participates in two NH...OC chains with different hydrogen-bond lengths. The chain with short hydrogen bonds shows the same self-trapping behavior as the dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, whereas in the chain with long hydrogen bonds the self-trapping is too weak to be observable. PMID:19791890

  18. Vibrational self-trapping in beta-sheet structures observed with femtosecond nonlinear infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Schwartz, Erik; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-01

    Self-trapping of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in synthetic β-sheet helices is observed using femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. In a dialanine-based β-sheet helix, the transient-absorption change upon exciting the NH-stretch mode exhibits a negative absorption change at the fundamental frequency and two positive peaks at lower frequencies. These two induced-absorption peaks are characteristic for a state in which the vibrational excitation is self-trapped on essentially a single NH-group in the hydrogen-bonded NH⋯OC chain, forming a small (Holstein) vibrational polaron. By engineering the structure of the polymer we can disrupt the hydrogen-bonded NH⋯OC chain, allowing us to eliminate the self-trapping, as is confirmed from the NH-stretch pump-probe response. We also investigate a trialanine-based β-sheet helix, where each side chain participates in two NH⋯OC chains with different hydrogen-bond lengths. The chain with short hydrogen bonds shows the same self-trapping behavior as the dialanine-based β-sheet helix, whereas in the chain with long hydrogen bonds the self-trapping is too weak to be observable.

  19. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1,500 cm−1, is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light–matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon–phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire molecular fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectroscopies. Our results provide a platform, fulfilling the long-awaited expectation of high sensitivity and selectivity far-field fingerprint detection of nano-scale molecules for numerous applications. PMID:27460765

  1. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1,500 cm-1, is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light-matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon-phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire molecular fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectroscopies. Our results provide a platform, fulfilling the long-awaited expectation of high sensitivity and selectivity far-field fingerprint detection of nano-scale molecules for numerous applications.

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  3. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  4. The Molecular Surface Structure of Ammonium and Potassium Dinitramide : A Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rahm, Martin; Tyrode, Eric; Brinck, Tore; Johnson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and quantum chemical modeling have been employed to investigate the molecular surface structure of ammonium and potassium dinitramide (ADN and KDN) crystals. Identification of key vibrational modes was made possible by performing density functional theory calculations of molecular clusters. The surface of KDN was found to be partly covered with a thin layer of the decomposition product KNO3, which due to its low thickness was not detectable by inf...

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of functional group chemistry and arsenate coordination in ettringite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Satish C. B.; Traina, Samuel J.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Logan, Terry J.

    1998-11-01

    The functional group chemistry and coordination of AsO 43--sorption complexes in ettringite [Ca 6Al 2(SO 4) 3(OH) 12·26H 2O] were evaluated as a function of sorption type (adsorption, coprecipitation) and pH using Raman and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. The reactive functional groups of ettringite, ≡Al-OH, ≡Ca-OH 2, and ≡Ca 2-OH exhibit broad overlapping OH bands in the range 3600-3200 cm -1, prohibiting separation of component vibrational bands. The SO 42- polyhedra of the channels are present in three crystallographically different sites and exhibit weakly split S-O asymmetric stretch at 1136 cm -1 (with several components) and symmetric stretch at 1016, 1008, and 989 cm -1. During AsO 43- adsorption, the vibrational spectra of SO 42- were least affected, and the OH stretching intensities around 3600 cm -1 decreased with an increase in AsO 43- sorption. In contrast, the S-O symmetric stretch at 1016 and 1008 cm -1 were almost completely removed, and the OH vibrations were relatively unaffected during AsO 43--coprecipitation. The As-O asymmetric stretch of sorbed AsO 43- are split and occur as overlapping peaks around 870 cm -1. The As-O complexed stretching vibrations are at ˜800 cm -1. The low pH samples (pH = 10.3-11.0) exhibit distinct As-OH stretching vibrations at 748 cm -1, indicating that some of the sorbed AsO 43- ions are protonated. These spectral features demonstrate that AsO 43- directly interacts with ettringite surface sites during adsorption and substitute inside the channels during coprecipitation (preferentially for two of the three sites). The energy position of the As-O symmetric stretch vibrations suggest that the AsO 43- polyhedra interacts predominantly with ≡Ca-OH 2 and ≡Ca 2-OH sites rather than with ≡Al-OH sites. Sorption of more than one type of As species was evident in low pH (<11.0) samples.

  6. Spatially resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy of siderophores in biological matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, J.; Kilcoyne, D.; Tyliszczak, T.; Haselwandter, K.

    2013-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all forms of life. In the presence of oxygen iron is present in its ferric form which precipitates under formation of rather insoluble oxide-hydroxide polymers. Hence the bioavailability of iron is extremely low (< 10-17 M at pH 7 for Fe3+). Under such conditions almost all microorganisms synthesize siderophores as iron chelating agents, thus solubilizing ferric iron from rather insoluble iron sources. Siderophores form soluble complexes with Fe3+. The present study aims at developing a methodology that would allow for the specific detection and localization of such iron chelators in their natural environment. The applicability of spatially resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy in the soft X-ray energy (E < 1 keV) range was evaluated for localization of typical fungal hydroxamate siderophores like ferrichrome or coprogen, which can be present in various biological materials. Results obtained with the scanning transmission X-ray microscopes at beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2 of the ALS have shown characteristic signatures for siderophores. Thus NEXAFS spectroscopy at the carbon K-edge, nitrogen K-edge and iron L-edge with high spatial resolution has proven to be extremely useful for their identification in their natural environment. Spectra of different siderophores as well as spectra and images of biological material containing siderophores are presented.

  7. Sulfur K-edge absorption spectroscopy on selected biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur is an essential element in organisms. In this thesis investigations of sulfur compounds in selected biological systems by XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy are reported. XANES spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge provides an excellent tool to gain information about the local environments of sulfur atoms in intact biological samples - no extraction processes are required. Spatially resolved measurements using a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror focusing system were carried out to investigate the infection of wheat leaves by rust fungi. The results give information about changes in the sulfur metabolism of the host induced by the parasite and about the extension of the infection into visibly uninfected plant tissue. Furthermore, XANES spectra of microbial mats from sulfidic caves were measured. These mats are dominated by microbial groups involved in cycling sulfur. Additionally, the influence of sulfate deprivation and H2S exposure on sulfur compounds in onion was investigated. To gain an insight into the thermal degradation of organic material the influence of roasting of sulfur compounds in coffee beans was studied. (orig.)

  8. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  9. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Hendrik

    2001-05-16

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  10. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxleene Sandasi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The name “ginseng” is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng, P. quinquefolius (American ginseng, P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng, each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spectroscopy-based techniques are here proposed as fast, non-destructive methods for the distinction of four ginseng species and the identification of raw materials in commercial ginseng products. Certified ginseng reference material and commercial products were analysed using hyperspectral imaging (HSI, mid-infrared (MIR and near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA and (orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis models (OPLS-DA were developed using multivariate analysis software. UHPLC-MS was used to analyse methanol extracts of the reference raw materials and commercial products. The holistic analysis of ginseng raw materials revealed distinct chemical differences using HSI, MIR and NIR. For all methods, Eleutherococcus senticosus displayed the greatest variation from the three Panax species that displayed closer chemical similarity. Good discrimination models with high R2X and Q2 cum vales were developed. These models predicted that the majority of products contained either /P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius. Vibrational spectroscopy and HSI techniques in tandem with multivariate data analysis tools provide useful alternative methods in the authentication of ginseng raw materials and commercial products in a fast, easy, cost-effective and non-destructive manner.

  11. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandasi, Maxleene; Vermaak, Ilze; Chen, Weiyang; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The name "ginseng" is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng), P. quinquefolius (American ginseng), P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng) and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng), each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spectroscopy-based techniques are here proposed as fast, non-destructive methods for the distinction of four ginseng species and the identification of raw materials in commercial ginseng products. Certified ginseng reference material and commercial products were analysed using hyperspectral imaging (HSI), mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA) and (orthogonal) partial least squares discriminant analysis models (OPLS-DA) were developed using multivariate analysis software. UHPLC-MS was used to analyse methanol extracts of the reference raw materials and commercial products. The holistic analysis of ginseng raw materials revealed distinct chemical differences using HSI, MIR and NIR. For all methods, Eleutherococcus senticosus displayed the greatest variation from the three Panax species that displayed closer chemical similarity. Good discrimination models with high R²X and Q² cum vales were developed. These models predicted that the majority of products contained either /P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius. Vibrational spectroscopy and HSI techniques in tandem with multivariate data analysis tools provide useful alternative methods in the authentication of ginseng raw materials and commercial products in a fast, easy, cost-effective and non-destructive manner. PMID:27077839

  12. Geometry determination of complexes in a molecular liquid mixture using Electron-Vibration-Vibration two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy with a vibrational transition density cube method

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Rui; Mukamel, Shaul; Klug, David R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a new vibrational transition density cube (VTDC) method for determining the geometry of complexes in a molecular liquid mixture from electron-vibration-vibration two-dimensional infrared (EVV 2DIR) spectra. The VTDC method was used to calculate the electrically-mediated intermolecular vibrational coupling and thereby the EVV 2DIR spectra. Using the 1:1 benzonitrile-phenylacetylene liquid mixture as a test case, the new method leads to a distance of 3.60 Å between the...

  13. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films

  14. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  15. Exchanging conformations of a hydroformylation catalyst structurally characterized using two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Vos, Jannie; Bocokić, Vladica; Bellini, Rosalba; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost H N; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-12-16

    Catalytic transition-metal complexes often occur in several conformations that exchange rapidly (vibrational spectroscopy, a method that can be applied to any catalyst provided that the exchange between its conformers occurs on a time scale of a few picoseconds or slower. We find that, in one of the conformations, the OC-Rh-CO angle deviates significantly from the canonical value in a trigonal-bipyramidal structure. On the basis of complementary density functional calculations, we ascribe this effect to attractive van der Waals interaction between the CO and the xantphos ligand. PMID:24256078

  16. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui, E-mail: zrh@iccas.ac.cn; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Wen-Mei [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-03-14

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  17. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed

  18. Description of cross peaks induced by intermolecular vibrational energy transfer in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Villaeys, Albert A

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, the analytical description of an intermolecular vibrational energy transfer, analyzed by two dimensional infrared spectroscopy, is established. The energy transfer process takes place between the dark combination states of low frequency modes pertaining to different molecules. The appearance of the cross peaks results from coherent transfer between these combination states and an optically active state of the acceptor molecule. Such a process has recently been observed experimentally between the nitrile groups of acetonitrile-d3 and benzonitrile molecules. This molecular system will be used as a model for the simulations of their two-dimensional infrared spectra. The dependence of the cross-peak growth, which is a signature of the intermolecular energy transfer, will be discussed in detail as a function of the molecular dynamical constants.

  19. Hydrogen Bonding in Ionic Liquids Probed by Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, C; Kerlé, D; Friedriszik, F; Lütgens, M; Lochbrunner, S; Kühn, O; Ludwig, R

    2012-01-01

    Three imidazolium-based ionic liquids of the type [Cnmim][NTf2] with varying alkyl chain lengths (n = 1, 2 and 8) at the 1 position of the imidazolium ring were studied applying IR, linear Raman, and multiplex CARS spectroscopy. The focus has been on the CH-stretching region of the imidazolium ring, which is supposed to carry information about a possible hydrogen bonding network in the ionic liquid. The measurements are compared to calculations of the corresponding anharmonic vibrational spectra for a cluster of [C2mim][NTf2] consisting of four ion pairs. The results support the hypothesis of moderate hydrogen bonding involving the C(4)-H and C(5)-H groups and somewhat stronger hydrogen bonds of the C(2)-H groups.

  20. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-bo; Liu, Zi-zhong; Liu, Hong-xia; Zhang, Feng-ying; Yin, Jun-qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1‧) of the LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1‧) Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules.

  1. Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reaction of Single Molecules Directly Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Han-Kyu; Park, Won-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyu; Shin, Hyun-Hang; Lee, Kang Sup; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2016-04-01

    The study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions remains a major challenge because it involves a complex network of reaction steps with various intermediates. If the vibrational spectra of individual molecules could be monitored in real time, one could characterize the structures of the intermediates and the time scales of reaction steps without ensemble averaging. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy does provide vibrational spectra with single-molecule sensitivity, but typical single-molecule SERS signals exhibit spatial heterogeneities and temporal fluctuations, making them difficult to be used in single-molecule kinetics studies. Here we show that SERS can monitor the single-molecule catalytic reactions in real time. The surface-immobilized reactants placed at the junctions of well-defined nanoparticle-thin film structures produce time-resolved SERS spectra with discrete, step-transitions of photoproducts. We interpret that such SERS-steps correspond to the reaction events of individual molecules occurring at the SERS hotspot. The analyses of the yield, dynamics, and the magnitude of such SERS steps, along with the associated spectral characteristics, fully support our claim. In addition, a model that is based on plasmonic field enhancement and surface photochemistry reproduces the key features of experimental observation. Overall, the result demonstrates that it is possible, under well-controlled conditions, to differentiate the chemical and physical processes contributing to the single-molecule SERS signals, and thus shows the use of single-molecule SERS as a tool for studying the metal-catalyzed organic reactions. PMID:26964567

  2. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Bo; Liu, Zi-Zhong; Liu, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Feng-Ying; Yin, Jun-Qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1') of the LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1') Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules. PMID:27085169

  3. Spectroscopy of isolated PTCDA molecules on the KCl(100) surface: Vibrational spectra and azimuthal orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mathias; Paulheim, Alexander; Marquardt, Christian; Sokolowski, Moritz

    2013-02-01

    Small amounts of the model molecule perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) were vacuum deposited on epitaxial KCl films on Ag(100). The use of a low substrate temperature (20 K) during deposition hampered molecular diffusion resulting in isolated monomers on the surface. Fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectroscopy performed on these monomers yielded highly resolved spectra with narrow lines corresponding to individual vibronic modes. This high resolution in our spectra is caused by a very small inhomogeneous broadening due to well-defined adsorption sites of the molecule on the substrate. Indeed, by polarization dependent fluorescence spectroscopy we show that the flat-lying molecules exhibit a preferred azimuthal orientation on the surface, the long molecular axis being oriented along the [011] or the equivalent [0bar{1}1] direction of the substrate. Furthermore, the high resolution in the spectra allowed a detailed analysis of the vibronic modes. The vibrational modes of the adsorbed molecule are very similar to those of the free PTCDA molecule, but due to the presence of the substrate additional low energy modes which are relevant for the full understanding of the spectra couple to the transition.

  4. Interfacial Water Structure in Langmuir Monolayer and Gibbs Layer Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贞; 郭源

    2012-01-01

    Langmuir monolayer and Gibbs layer exhibit surface-active properties and it can be used as simple model systems to investigate the physicochemical properties of biological membranes. In this report, we presented the OH stretching vibration of H2O in the 4"-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT), nonadecanenitrile (C18CN) Langmuir monolayer and compared them with CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface with polarization SFG-VS. This study demonstrated that the hydrogen bond network is different in the Langmuir monolayer of 5CT, C18CN from CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface which showed two different water structures on the different surface layer. The results provided a deeper insight into understanding the hydrogen bond on the interfaces.

  5. Characterizing interstate vibrational coherent dynamics of surface adsorbed catalysts by fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingmin; Wang, Jiaxi; Clark, Melissa L.; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Xiong, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We report the first fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy of a monolayer of the catalyst Re(diCN-bpy)(CO)3Cl on a gold surface. Besides measuring the vibrational coherences of single vibrational modes, the fourth-order 3D SFG spectrum also measures the dynamics of interstate coherences and vibrational coherences states between two vibrational modes. By comparing the 3D SFG to the corresponding 2D and third-order 3D IR spectroscopy of the same molecules in solution, we found that the interstate coherences exist in both liquid and surface systems, suggesting that the interstate coherence is not disrupted by surface interactions. However, by analyzing the 3D spectral lineshape, we found that the interstate coherences also experience non-negligible homogenous dephasing dynamics that originate from surface interactions. This unique ability of determining interstate vibrational coherence dynamics of the molecular monolayer can help in understanding of how energy flows within surface catalysts and other molecular monolayers.

  6. Ultrafast dynamics in iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Newton, Arthur C; Vos, Jannie; van den Bosch, Bart; Bocokić, Vladica; Reek, Joost N H; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-01-28

    The dynamics of iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes has been investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Cross peaks between all CO-stretching bands show that the CO-stretch modes are coupled, and from the cross-peak anisotropies we can confirm previous assignments of the absorption bands. From the pump-probe delay dependence of the diagonal peaks in the 2D-IR spectrum we obtain a correlation time of ∼3 ps for the spectral fluctuations of the CO-stretch modes. We observe a multi-exponential pump-probe delay dependence of the cross-peak intensities, with rate constants ranging from 0.1 ps(-1) to 0.6 ps(-1). To determine whether this delay dependence originates from fluxionality of the complex or from intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR), we modulate the free-energy barrier of fluxional rearrangement by varying the pi-backbonding capacities of the olefin ligand in two iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes: Fe(CO)(4)(cinnamic acid) and Fe(CO)(4)(dimethyl fumarate). Since the pi-backbonding strongly influences the rate of fluxionality, comparing the dynamics in the two complexes allows us to determine to what extent the observed dynamics is caused by fluxionality. We conclude that on the time scale of our experiments (up to 100 ps) the cross-peak dynamics in the iron complexes is determined by intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation. Hence, in contrast to previously investigated irontricarbonyl and ironpentacarbonyl complexes, iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes exhibit no fluxionality on the picosecond time scale. PMID:23223560

  7. Nature of Asymmetry in the Vibrational Line Shape of Single-Molecule Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy with the STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Chiang, Chi-lun; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W.

    2016-04-01

    Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy and microscopy was demonstrated in 1998 by inelastic electron tunneling with the scanning tunneling microscope. To date, the discussion of its application has mainly focused on the spatial resolution and the spectral energy and intensity. Here we report on the vibrational line shape for a single carbon monoxide molecule that qualitatively exhibits inversion symmetry when it is transferred from the surface to the tip. The dependence of the line shape on the molecule's asymmetric couplings in the tunnel junction can be understood from theoretical simulation and further validates the mechanisms of inelastic electron tunneling.

  8. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  9. A spider's biological vibration filter: micromechanical characteristics of a biomaterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Seth L; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Erko, Maxim; Barth, Friedrich G; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor; Politi, Yael; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-11-01

    A strain-sensing lyriform organ (HS-10) found on all of the legs of a Central American wandering spider (Cupiennius salei) detects courtship, prey and predator vibrations transmitted by the plant on which it sits. It has been suggested that the viscoelastic properties of a cuticular pad directly adjacent to the sensory organ contribute to the organ's pronounced high-pass characteristics. Here, we investigate the micromechanical properties of the cuticular pad biomaterial in search of a deeper understanding of its impact on the function of the vibration sensor. These properties are considered to be an effective adaptation for the selective detection of signals for frequencies >40 Hz. Using surface force spectroscopy mapping we determine the elastic modulus of the pad surface over a temperature range of 15-40 °C at various loading frequencies. In the glassy state, the elastic modulus was ~100 MPa, while in the rubbery state the elastic modulus decreased to 20 MPa. These data are analyzed according to the principle of time-temperature superposition to construct a master curve that relates mechanical properties, temperature and stimulus frequencies. By estimating the loss and storage moduli vs. temperature and frequency it was possible to make a direct comparison with electrophysiology experiments, and it was found that the dissipation of energy occurs within a frequency window whose position is controlled by environmental temperatures. PMID:25065547

  10. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  11. Surface vibrational relaxation of N2 studied by CO2 titration with time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for determination of the wall de-excitation probability γN2 of vibrationally excited N2 on different surfaces exposed to low-pressure plasmas has been developed. A short dc discharge pulse of only a few milliseconds was applied to a mixture containing 0.05-1% of CO2 in N2 at a pressure of 133 Pa. Due to a nearly resonant fast vibrational transfer between N2(v) and the asymmetric ν3 mode of CO2 the vibrational excitation of these titrating molecules is an image of the degree of vibrational excitation of N2. In the afterglow, the vibrational relaxation of CO2 was monitored in situ using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of a numerical model of non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics in CO2-N2 mixtures. Heterogeneous relaxation was the main quenching process of N2(v) under the conditions of this study, which allowed determination of the value of γN2 from the best agreement between the experiment and the model. The new method is suitable for γN2 determination in a single plasma pulse with the discharge tube surface pretreated by a low-pressure plasma. The relaxation probability of the first vibrational level of nitrogen γ1 = (1.1 ± 0.15) × 10-3 found for Pyrex and silica is in reasonable agreement with the literature data. Using the new technique the N2(v = 1) quenching probability was measured on TiO2 surface, γ1 = (9 ± 1) × 10-3. A linear enhancement of the N2(v) wall deactivation probability with an increase in the admixture of CO2 was observed for all studied materials. In order to explain this effect, a vibrational energy transfer mechanism between N2(v) and adsorbed CO2 is proposed. (paper)

  12. Spatially resolved localized vibrational mode spectroscopy of carbon in liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown gallium arsenide wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substitutional carbon on an arsenic lattice site is the shallowest and one of the most dominant acceptors in semi-insulating Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs. However, the role of this acceptor in determining the well known ''W'' shape spatial variation of neutral EL2 concentration along the diameter of a LEC wafer is not known. In this thesis, we attempt to clarify the issue of the carbon acceptor's effect on this ''W'' shaped variation by measuring spatial profiles of this acceptor along the radius of three different as-grown LEC GaAs wafers. With localized vibrational mode absorption spectroscopy, we find that the profile of the carbon acceptor is relatively constant along the radius of each wafer. Average values of concentration are 8 x 10E15 cm-3, 1.1 x 10E15 cm-3, and 2.2 x 10E15 cm-3, respectively. In addition, these carbon acceptor LVM measurements indicate that a residual donor with concentration comparable to carbon exists in these wafers and it is a good candidate for the observed neutral EL2 concentration variation. 22 refs., 39 figs

  13. Peptide conformational heterogeneity revealed from nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Pfister, Rolf; Hamm, Peter; Mu, Yuguang; Kosov, Daniel S.; Stock, Gerhard

    2002-10-01

    Nonlinear time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to compare spectral broadening of the amide I band of the small peptide trialanine with that of N-methylacetamide, a commonly used model system for the peptide bond. In contrast to N-methylacetamide, the amide I band of trialanine is significantly inhomogeneously broadened. Employing classical molecular-dynamics simulations combined with density-functional-theory calculations, the origin of the spectral inhomogeneity is investigated. While both systems exhibit similar hydrogen-bonding dynamics, it is found that the conformational dynamics of trialanine causes a significant additional spectral broadening. In particular, transitions between the poly(Gly)II and the αR conformations are identified as the main source of the additional spectral inhomogeneity of trialanine. The experimental and computational results suggest that trialanine adopts essentially two conformations: poly(Gly)II (80%) and αR (20%). The potential of the joint experimental and computational approach to explore conformational dynamics of peptides is discussed.

  14. Probing QED and fundamental constants through laser spectroscopy of vibrational transitions in HD(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesheuvel, J; Karr, J-Ph; Hilico, L; Eikema, K S E; Ubachs, W; Koelemeij, J C J

    2016-01-01

    The simplest molecules in nature, molecular hydrogen ions in the form of H2(+) and HD(+), provide an important benchmark system for tests of quantum electrodynamics in complex forms of matter. Here, we report on such a test based on a frequency measurement of a vibrational overtone transition in HD(+) by laser spectroscopy. We find that the theoretical and experimental frequencies are equal to within 0.6(1.1) parts per billion, which represents the most stringent test of molecular theory so far. Our measurement not only confirms the validity of high-order quantum electrodynamics in molecules, but also enables the long predicted determination of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from a molecular system, as well as improved constraints on hypothetical fifth forces and compactified higher dimensions at the molecular scale. With the perspective of comparisons between theory and experiment at the 0.01 part-per-billion level, our work demonstrates the potential of molecular hydrogen ions as a probe of fundamental physical constants and laws. PMID:26815886

  15. Localised vibrational mode spectroscopy studies of self-interstitial clusters in neutron irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Chroneos, A. [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-28

    The evolution of self-interstitial clusters in silicon (Si), produced by fast neutron irradiation of silicon crystals followed by anneals up to 750 °C, is investigated using localised vibrational mode spectroscopy. A band at 582 cm{sup −1} appears after irradiation and is stable up to 550 °C was attributed to small self-interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 4} structure. Two bands at 713 and 758 cm{sup −1} arising in the spectra upon annealing of the 582 cm{sup −1} band and surviving up to ∼750 °C were correlated with larger interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 8} structure or/and with chainlike defects which are precursors of the (311) extended defects. The results illustrate the presence of different interstitial clusters I{sub n}, at the various temperature intervals of the material, in the course of an isochronal anneal sequence. As the annealing temperature increases, they evolve from first-order structures with a small number of self-interstitials (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4) for the temperatures 50 < T < 550 °C, to second order structures (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8) with a larger number of interstitials, for the temperatures 550 < T < 750 °C.

  16. Chemometrics and vibrational spectroscopy as green tools for mine phytoremediation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, N. S.; Regnier, T.; Combrinck, S.; Kouekam, C. R.; Weiersbye, I. M.

    This study describes the use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to characterise Combretum erythrophyllum plant material to determine differences in the chemical profiles of samples harvested from mine contaminated areas and those of natural populations. The chemometric computation of near infrared vibrational spectra was used to generate principal component analysis and partial least squares models. These models were used to determine seasonal differences in the chemical matrices of samples harvested from the mine sites with different levels of contamination. Principal component analysis scatter plots illustrated clustering of phenolic profiles of samples depending on whether they originated from contaminated or uncontaminated soils. A partial least squares model was developed to link the variations in the chemical composition and levels of contamination in all samples collected in the same season (autumn). The levels of total soluble phenolic compounds in leaf extracts of C. erythrophyllum were measured using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Data analysis of the samples revealed that plants harvested from mine sites, particularly in summer, produced a higher level of phenolic compounds than those of the natural population, thereby displaying a good correlation with the chemometric models.

  17. Rebinding dynamics of NO to microperoxidase-8 probed by time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taegon; Kim, Jooyoung; Park, Jaeheung; Pak, Youngshang; Kim, Hyojoon; Lim, Manho

    2016-02-21

    Femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy was used to probe the rebinding kinetics of NO to microperoxidase-8 (Mp), an ideal model system for the active site of ligand-binding heme proteins, including myoglobin and hemoglobin, after the photodeligation of MpNO in glycerol/water (G/W) solutions at 294 K. The geminate rebinding (GR) of NO to Mp in viscous solutions was highly efficient and ultrafast and negligibly dependent on the solution viscosity, which was adjusted by changing the glycerol content from 65% to 90% by volume in G/W mixtures. The kinetics of the GR of NO to Mp in viscous solutions was well represented by an exponential function with a time constant of ca. 11 ps. Although the kinetic traces of the GR of NO to Mp in solutions with three different viscosities (18, 81, and 252 cP) almost overlap, they show a slight difference early in the decay process. The kinetic traces were also described by the diffusion-controlled reaction theory with a Coulomb potential. Since the ligand is deligated in a neutral form, an ionic pair of NO(-) and Mp(+) may be produced before forming the Mp-NO bond by an electron transfer from Mp to NO as the deligated NO is sufficiently near to the Fe atom of Mp. The strong reactivity between NO and ferrous heme may arise from the Coulomb interaction between the reacting pair, which is consistent with the harpooning mechanism for NO binding to heme. PMID:26813691

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Infrared and Near-Infrared Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Sidsel Dahl

    This PhD thesis describes the gas phase studies of four intramolecular hydrogen bonds: O-H···O (in methyl lactate), O-H···π (in methallyl carbinol and allyl carbinol), O-H···N (in methylated and triuoromethylated 2-aminoethanol) and N-H···N (in the diamines 1,2-diaminoethane, 1,3-diaminopropane and...... 1,4-diaminobutane). Experimentally, the hydrogen bonds have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared and near-infrared regions. The focus is primarily on spectra recorded in the near-infrared regions, which in these studies are dominated by O-H and N-H stretching overtones...... spectra. The experimental characterization of hydrogen bonds have been complemented by theoretical analyzes. These analyzes are based on the electron density topology, natural bond orbital theory and visualization of the distribution of electrostatic potential energy in the molecules. In these studies...

  19. Probing QED and fundamental constants through laser spectroscopy of vibrational transitions in HD+

    CERN Document Server

    Biesheuvel, J; Hilico, L; Eikema, K S E; Ubachs, W; Koelemeij, J C J

    2016-01-01

    The simplest molecules in nature, molecular hydrogen ions in the form of H2+ and HD+, provide an important benchmark system for tests of quantum electrodynamics in complex forms of matter. Here, we report on such a test based on a frequency measurement of a vibrational overtone transition in HD+ by laser spectroscopy. We find that the theoretical and experimental frequencies are equal to within 0.6(1.1) parts per billion, which represents the most stringent test of molecular theory so far. Our measurement not only confirms the validity of high-order quantum electrodynamics in molecules, but also enables the long predicted determination of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from a molecular system, as well as improved constraints on hypothetical fifth forces and compactified higher dimensions at the molecular scale. With the perspective of comparisons between theory and experiment at the 0.01 part-per-billion level, our work demonstrates the potential of molecular hydrogen ions as a probe of fundamental physica...

  20. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-08-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique `wagging' mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe-CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate a low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. The present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe-H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.

  1. Infrared and Raman Vibrational Spectroscopies Reveal the Palette of Frescos Found in the Medieval Monastery of Karaach Teke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational spectroscopy is applied on samples obtained from the excavation area of the medieval Monastery (10th century) of Karaach-Teke in Bulgaria. The results of the corresponding study, reveal the type of materials used for the creation of the wall-paintings and give evidence of Byzantine influence, a fact that further supports the well known impact of Byzantium on the technology and thematic-aesthetic features of iconography in Bulgaria during this era. In addition, the complementarity of FTIR and -Raman spectroscopies in the identification of pigments is indicated

  2. Real-Time Structural Investigation of a Lipid Bilayer during Its Interaction with Melittin Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jie; Kristalyn, Cornelius B.; Chen, Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between membrane bilayers and peptides/proteins are ubiquitous throughout a cell. To determine the structure of membrane bilayers and the associated peptides/proteins, model systems such as supported lipid bilayers are often used. It has been difficult to directly investigate the interactions between a single membrane bilayer and peptides/proteins without exogenous labeling. In this work we demonstrate that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can be employed to stud...

  3. An Interim Investigation of the Potential of Vibrational Spectroscopy for the Dating of Cultural Objects in Ivory

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Sonia; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Ali , Esam

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of ivory requires destructive sampling on a scale not always compatible with the requirements of the preservation and curation of cultural objects. The development of a minimally-destructive dating technique is urgently needed. Raman spectroscopy can detect the changes in the organic and inorganic molecular components of ivory that occur with time. It has been suggested that these vibrational spectroscopic changes could be used to assess the relative date of mammoth ivories...

  4. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ− anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ− to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm−1), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ− at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor

  5. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  6. Two-dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy of vibrational polaritons of molecules in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Saurabh, Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of molecular vibrations to an infrared cavity mode affects their nature by creating dressed polariton states. We show how the single and double vibrational polariton manifolds may be controlled by varying the cavity coupling strength, and probed by a time domain 2DIR technique, Double Quantum Coherence (DQC). Applications are made to the amide-I ($CO$) and amide-II ($CN$) bond vibrations of $N-methylacetamide$ (NMA).

  7. Final Technical Report Structural Dynamics in Complex Liquids Studied with Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Fiechtner, Gregory J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    This grant supported work in the Tokmakoff lab at the University of Chicago aimed at understanding the fundamental properties of water at a molecular level, and how water participates in proton transport in aqueous media. The physical properties of water and aqueous solutions are inextricably linked with efforts to develop new sustainable energy sources. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology and soft matter, make use of water for the purpose of storing and moving charge. Water’s unique physical and chemical properties depend on the ability of water molecules to participate in up to four hydrogen bonds, and the rapid fluctuations and ultrafast energy dissipation of its hydrogenbonded networks. Our work during the grant period led to advances in four areas: (1) the generation of short pulses of broadband infrared light (BBIR) for use in time-resolved twodimensional spectroscopy (2D IR), (2) the investigation of the spectroscopy and transport of excess protons in water, (3) the study of aqueous hydroxide to describe the interaction of the ion and water and the dynamics of proton transfer, and (4) the coupled motion of water and its hydrogen-bonding solutes.

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  9. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  10. Surface structure of protonated R-plane-sapphire (1-102) studied by sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, J.; Zhang, L.; Tian, C.; Waychunas, G. A.; Shen, Y. R.

    2011-04-01

    Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study the protonated R-plane (1{bar 1}02 ) sapphire surface. The OH stretch vibrational spectra show that the surface is terminated with three hydroxyl moieties, two from AlOH{sub 2} and one from Al{sub 2}OH functional groups. The observed polarization dependence allows determination of the orientations of the three OH species. The results suggest that the protonated sapphire (1{bar 1}02 ) surface differs from an ideal stoichimetric termination in a manner consistent with previous X-ray surface diffraction (crystal truncation rod) studies. However, in order to best explain the observed hydrogenbonding arrangement, surface oxygen spacing determined from the X-ray diffraction study requires modification.

  11. Application of vibrational spectroscopy in the in vitro studies of carbon fiber-polylactic acid composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, Marta; Gajewska, Maria Chomyszyn; Paluszkiewicz, Czeslawa

    1999-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy was used for assessment of new material for stomatology, for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) techniqe.Implants applied in the healing of periodontal defects using GTR technique have to meet stringent requirements concerning their chemical as well physical properties.At present the implants prepared from two layers membranes differing in porosity in their outer and inner layers are studied clinically. Composite plates prepared by us consist of three layers: polylactic acid film, carbon fibres coated with polylactic acid and carbon fabric.Vibrational spectroscopic studies of the material; polylactic acid- carbon fiber have made it possible to analyse chemical reactions occurring between the polymer and carbon surface. Analysis of the IR spectra of samples treated in Ringer solution allowed to describe the phenomena resulting from the composite degradation. It was shown that material biostability is related to the presence of carbon fibers.

  12. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy of SnBr4 and CCl4 using Lie algebraic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joydeep Choudhury; Srinivasa Rao Karmuri; Nirmal Kumar Sarkar; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2008-09-01

    The stretching and bending vibrational energies of SnBr4 and CCl4 are calculated in the one-dimensional framework. The dynamical symmetry group of tetrahedral molecule was taken into consideration to construct the model Hamiltonian in this frame-work. Casimir and Majorana invariant operators were also determined accordingly. Using the model Hamiltonian so constructed, we reported the vibrational energy levels of SnBr4 and CCl4 molecules accurately.

  14. Surface deactivation of vibrationally excited N2 studied using infrared titration combined with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wall de-excitation probability γN2 of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules was determined using infrared (IR) titration with CO, CO2 and N2O. Gas mixtures of N2 with 0.05–0.5% of CO (CO2 or N2O) were excited by a pulsed dc discharge at p = 133 Pa in a cylindrical discharge tube. During the afterglow, the vibrational relaxation of titrating molecules was monitored in situ with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. The value of γN2 was deduced from measured vibrational relaxation times using a model of vibrational kinetics in N2. It was found that adsorption of IR tracers on the surface may increase the value of γN2 by a factor up to two, depending on the molecule and the surface material. It was demonstrated that N2O is the most inert and reliable tracer and it was used for the determination of γN2 on silica, Pyrex, TiO2, Al2O3 and anodized aluminum. Pretreatment of the silica surface by low-pressure plasma was found to have a strong effect on the vibrational de-excitation. Values of γN2 measured after O2, Ar and N2 plasma pretreatment of the same silica discharge tube were 5.7 × 10−4, 8.2 × 10−4 and 11 × 10−4, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the presence of adsorbed atoms and molecules on the surface may significantly alter the value of γN2. (paper)

  15. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy applied to [Fe(OEP)(NO)] : the vibrational assignments of five-coordinate ferrous heme-nitrosyls and implications for electronic structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, N.; Galinato, M. I.; Paulat, F.; Richter-Addo, G. B.; Sturhahn, W.; Xu, N.; Zhao, J. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Michigan); (Univ. of Oklahoma)

    2010-01-01

    This study presents Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data on the five-coordinate (5C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl complex [Fe(OEP)(NO)] (1, OEP{sup 2-} = octaethylporphyrinato dianion) and the corresponding {sup 15}N{sup 18}O labeled complex. The obtained spectra identify two isotope sensitive features at 522 and 388 cm{sup -1}, which shift to 508 and 381 cm{sup -1}, respectively, upon isotope labeling. These features are assigned to the Fe-NO stretch v(Fe-NO) and the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O), the latter has been unambiguously assigned for the first time for 1. The obtained NRVS data were simulated using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Since complex 1 can potentially exist in 12 different conformations involving the FeNO and peripheral ethyl orientations, extended density functional theory (DFT) calculations and QCC-NCA simulations were performed to determine how these conformations affect the NRVS properties of [Fe(OEP)NO]. These results show that the properties and force constants of the FeNO unit are hardly affected by the conformational changes involving the ethyl substituents. On the other hand, the NRVS-active porphyrin-based vibrations around 340-360, 300-320, and 250-270 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to the conformational changes. The spectroscopic changes observed in these regions are due to selective mechanical couplings of one component of Eu-type (in ideal D4h symmetry) porphyrin-based vibrations with the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode. This leads to the observed variations in Fe(OEP) core mode energies and NRVS intensities without affecting the properties of the FeNO unit. The QCC-NCA simulated NRVS spectra of 1 show excellent agreement with experiment, and indicate that conformer F is likely present in the samples of this complex investigated here. The observed porphyrin-based vibrations in the NRVS spectra of 1 are also assigned based on the QCC-NCA results. The obtained force

  16. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Rao, B. Jayachander

    2016-05-01

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  17. Unexpected red shift of C-H vibrational band of Methyl benzoate

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Kiran Sankar; Scheurer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The C-H vibrational bands become more and more important in the structural determination of biological molecules with the development of CARS microscopy and 2DIR spectroscopy. Due to the congested pattern, near degeneracy, and strong anharmonicity of the C-H stretch vibrations, assignment of the C-H vibrational bands are often misleading. Anharmonic vibrational spectra calculation with multidimensional potential energy surface interprets the C-H vibrational spectra more accurately. In this article we have presented the importance of multidimensional potential energy surface in anharmonic vibrational spectra calculation and discuss the unexpected red shift of C-H vibrational band of Methyl benzoate.

  18. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Vibration-Rotation Bands of Hbo and Hbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Ram, R. S.; Hargreaves, R. J.; Bernath, P. F.; Li, H.

    2012-06-01

    The vibration-rotation spectra of HBO and HBS have been investigated at high resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The HBO molecules were produced in a high temperature furnace from the reaction of H2O vapor with boron by heating a mixture of crystalline boron and boron oxide (B2O3) at a temperature ˜1350°C. The spectra were recorded in the 1100-2200 cm-1 and 1700-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 fundamentals, respectively. In total 24 vibrational bands involving 30 vibrational levels of H11BO and 12 bands involving 18 levels of H10BO have been rotationally analyzed. After combining the existing microwave and infrared measurements, the absolute term values have been determined for a number of vibrationally-excited states of H11BO and H10BO. The HBS molecules were formed by the reaction of CS2 and water vapor with crystalline boron at a temperature ˜1300°C. The spectra were recorded in the 850-1500 cm-1 and 1750-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 frequency regions. In total 29 vibrational bands involving 33 vibrationally-excited levels of H11BS and 9 bands involving 12 vibrational levels of H10BS have been analyzed. The fitted spectroscopic parameters agree very well with the results of our {ab initio} calculations. {L}-resonance interactions observed between the 0200 (Σ) and 0220 (Δ) levels of HBO and HBS were analyzed using a 2×2 matrix to yield deperturbed constants.

  19. Vibrational structure of C 84 and Sc 2@C 84 analyzed by IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulman, M.; Pichler, T.; Kuzmany, H.; Zerbetto, F.; Yamamoto, E.; Shinohara, H. N.

    1997-06-01

    The isomer III of Sc 2@C 84 was separated by multi-cycle HPLC purification. We present temperature dependent IR absorption measurements of Sc 2@C 84 which have been performed between 50 and 300 K and between 400 and 5000 cm -1, respectively. The vibrational structure of the endohedral compound is compared to the structure of unfilled C 84. We find a strong overall broadening of the vibrational modes in Sc 2@C 84. Also some of the vibrational absorption lines are strongly enhanced if compared to the spectrum for the empty cage. With decreasing temperature, a dramatic narrowing of the lines in the spectral range between 700 and 800 cm -1 is observed.

  20. Vibrational autodetachment spectroscopy of Au-6 : Image-charge-bound states of a gold ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral experiments on mass-selected negative cluster ions of gold and silver were performed in the wavelength range near the threshold for one-photon photodetachment of the extra electron. The Au-6 cluster ion displayed a uniquely well resolved spectrum consisting of a progression in a single vibrational mode. Details of this threshold photodetachment spectrum and the associated photoelectron energy distribution suggest an explanation based on autodetachment from totally symmetric vibrational levels of very weakly bound excited electronic state (bound by image charge forces) of the Au-6 cluster in the form of a planar, six-fold symmetric, gold ring

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed fluid N2 and O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid N2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 41 GPa and 5200 K and liquid O2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 10 GPa and 1000 K. For N2, the experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman line widths. The question of excited state populations in the shock-compressed state is addressed

  2. Spectroscopy of electronic and vibrational excitations in semiconductors and oxide insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Jayprakash

    A temperature tuned light emitting diode (LED) has several advantages over conventional sources for optical spectroscopy. The large radiation density of LEDs, concentrated in a small spectral region, is ideal for Spectroscopic techniques where a high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is desired. A simple, inexpensive LED source leads to a superior performance at high resolutions exceeding that of a tungsten halogen lamp, from near infrared to ultraviolet spectral region. A theoretical investigation with ab initio techniques of the electron-phonon interaction of semiconductors with chalcopyrite structure and its comparison with modulated reflectivity experiments yield a striking difference between those with (AgGaS2) and without (ZnSnAs 2) d electrons in their valence bands. The former exhibit a non-monotonic temperature dependence of the band gaps whose origin is not yet fully understood. The analysis of this temperature dependence with the Bose-Einstein oscillator model involving two oscillator terms having weights of opposite signs, provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data and correlates well with the characteristic peaks in the phonon density of states associated with the acoustical phonon modes. This work underscores the need for theoretical understanding of the electron-phonon interaction involving d electrons, particularly in ab initio investigations. Spectroscopic signatures of point defects serve as insightful characterizations in basic studies on semiconductors and their applications. In this context, localized vibrational modes (LVMs) revealed in their infrared absorption spectra the appearance of vacancies and interstitials originating from the lack of exact stoichiometry is a special feature of compound semiconductors. A striking manifestation of the LVMs of oxygen impurities substitutionally incorporated into CdSe is observed in which cation vacancies are either generated or suppressed deliberately by adopting specific crystal growth

  3. Applications and Developments on the Use of Vibrational Spectroscopy Imaging for the Analysis, Monitoring and Characterisation of Crops and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Daniel; Roberts, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The adaptation and use of advanced technologies is an effective and encouraging way to efficiently and reliably characterise crops and plants. Additionally advances in these technologies will improve the information available for agronomists, breeders and plant physiologists in order to develop best management practices in the process and commercialization of agricultural products and commodities. Methods based on vibrational spectroscopy such as near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy using either single spot or hyperspectral measurements are now more available and ready to use than ever before. The main characteristics of these methodologies (high-throughput, non-destructive) have determined a growth in basic and applied research using NIR spectroscopy in many disciplines related with crop and plant sciences. A wide range of studies have demonstrated the ability of NIR spectroscopy to analyse different parameters in crops. Recently the use of hyperspectral imaging techniques have expanded the range of applications in crop and plant sciences. This article provides an overview of applications and developments of NIR hyperspectral image for the analysis, monitoring and characterisation of crops and plants. PMID:27294902

  4. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with a backward-forward trajectories sampling for multidimensional infrared spectroscopy of molecular vibrational modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Taisuke; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2008-02-01

    A full molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach to calculate multidimensional third-order infrared (IR) signals of molecular vibrational modes is proposed. Third-order IR spectroscopy involves three-time intervals between three excitation and one probe pulses. The nonequilibrium MD (NEMD) simulation allows us to calculate molecular dipoles from nonequilibrium MD trajectories for different pulse configurations and sequences. While the conventional NEMD approach utilizes MD trajectories started from the initial equilibrium state, our approach does from the intermediate state of the third-order optical process, which leads to the doorway-window decomposition of nonlinear response functions. The decomposition is made before the second pump excitation for a two-dimensional case of IR photon echo measurement, while it is made after the second pump excitation for a three-dimensional case of three-pulse IR photon echo measurement. We show that the three-dimensional IR signals are efficiently calculated by using the MD trajectories backward and forward in time for the doorway and window functions, respectively. We examined the capability of the present approach by evaluating the signals of two- and three-dimensional IR vibrational spectroscopies for liquid hydrogen fluoride. The calculated signals might be explained by anharmonic Brownian model with the linear-linear and square-linear system-bath couplings which was used to discuss the inhomogeneous broadening and dephasing mechanism of vibrational motions. The predicted intermolecular librational spectra clearly reveal the unusually narrow inhomogeneous linewidth due to the one-dimensional character of HF molecule and the strong hydrogen bond network.

  5. Identification of biological microparticles using ultrafast depletion spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Courvoisier, François; Bonacina, Luigi; Boutou, Véronique; Guyon, Laurent; Bonnet, Christophe; Thuillier, Benoit; Extermann, Jérôme; Roth, Matthias; Rabitz, Herschel; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    We show how an ultrafast pump–pump excitation induces strong fluorescence depletion in biological samples, such as bacteria-containing droplets, in contrast with fluorescent interferents, such as polycyclic aromatic compounds, despite similar spectroscopic properties. Application to the optical remote discrimination of biotic versus non-biotic particles is proposed. Further improvement is required to allow the discrimination of one pathogenic among other non-pathogenic micro-organisms. This i...

  6. Evidences of rare-earth nanophases embedded in silica using vibrational spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vedda, A.; Chiodini, N.; Fasoli, M.; Lauria, A.; Moretti, F.; Di Martino, D.; Baraldi, A.; Buffagni, E.; Capelletti, R.; Mazzera, M.; Boháček, Pavel; Mihóková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2010), s. 1361-1369. ISSN 0018-9499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nano-phases * rare-earths * scintillators * vibrational properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2010

  7. Evidence for cooperative vibrational relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids using infrared pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D J; Panman, M R; Woutersen, S

    2009-11-27

    Vibrational energy relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids has been investigated by means of infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates have been determined both in neat liquids and in isotopic mixtures with systematically varied isotope fractions. In all liquids, the vibrational relaxation rate increases as the isotope fraction is increased and reaches a maximum in the neat liquid. The dependence of the relaxation rate on the isotope fraction suggests a relaxation channel in which the vibrational energy is partitioned between accepting modes of two neighboring molecules. PMID:20366125

  8. Evidence for Cooperative Vibrational Relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-Stretching Modes in Hydrogen-Bonded Liquids Using Infrared Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D. J.; Panman, M. R.; Woutersen, S.

    2009-11-01

    Vibrational energy relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids has been investigated by means of infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates have been determined both in neat liquids and in isotopic mixtures with systematically varied isotope fractions. In all liquids, the vibrational relaxation rate increases as the isotope fraction is increased and reaches a maximum in the neat liquid. The dependence of the relaxation rate on the isotope fraction suggests a relaxation channel in which the vibrational energy is partitioned between accepting modes of two neighboring molecules.

  9. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  10. Spectroscopy of Multilayered Biological Tissues for Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry

    Neurological and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus are known to cause foot ulceration in diabetic patients. Present clinical screening techniques enable the diabetes care provider to triage treatment by identifying diabetic patients at risk of foot ulceration. However, these techniques cannot effectively identify specific areas of the foot at risk of ulceration. This study aims to develop non-invasive optical techniques for accurate assessment of tissue health and viability with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm². The thesis can be divided into three parts: (1) the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry to detect microcirculatory changes prior to ulcer formation, (2) development of a two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm and its application to detection of callus formation or epidermal degradation prior to ulceration, and (3) multi-layered tissue fluorescence modeling for identification of bacterial growth in existing diabetic foot wounds. The first part of the dissertation describes a clinical study in which hyperspectral tissue oximetry was performed on multiple diabetic subjects at risk of ulceration. Tissue oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were estimated using the Modified Beer-Lambert law. Then, an ulcer prediction algorithm was developed based on retrospective analysis of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in sites that were known to ulcerate. The ulcer prediction algorithm exhibited a large sensitivity but low specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively. The second part of the dissertation revisited the hyperspectral data presented in part one with a new and novel two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm. This algorithm was able to detect not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, but also the thickness of the epidermis, and the tissue's scattering coefficient. Specifically, change in epidermal thickness provided insight into the formation of diabetic foot ulcers over time. Indeed, callus formation or

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy investigation and density functional theory calculations on (E)-N‧-(4-methoxybenzylidene) benzohydrazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, H.; Subashchandrabose, S.; Ramesh Babu, N.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.

    2015-05-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the Schiff base compound (E)-N‧-(4-methoxybenzylidene) benzohydrazide (MBBH) have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized geometrical parameters were calculated. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of TED of the vibrational modes, calculated with the help of SQM method. NBO analysis has been carried out to explore the hyperconjugative interactions and their second order stabilization energy within the molecule. The molecular orbitals (MO's) and its energy gap were studied. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) and related properties (β, α0, Δα) of MBBH are also calculated. All theoretical calculations were performed on the basis of B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  12. Structure and vibrational spectroscopy investigation of 2-(4-chlorophenyliminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yang-yang; Zhang, Yu-hua; Dai, Li; Zhou, Zheng-yu

    2011-10-01

    2-(4-Chlorophenyliminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline was synthesized and crystal data was obtained in the orthorhombic space group P-1, with Z = 4. Unit cell parameters a = 4.744(7) Å, b = 9.981(15) Å, c = 27.27(4) Å and V = 12915(3) Å 3. In this paper the structural properties and vibrational frequencies of 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative, 2CP8HQ, are studied with the B3LYP and HF methods. Two stable conformers are obtained. The calculated frequencies are in good agreement with the experiment results. It is indicated that both of theoretical calculations were suitable for molecular vibrational frequencies study and the scaled B3LYP method was superior to the scaled HF methods.

  13. Vibrationally highly excited molecules and intramolecular mode coupling through high-overtone spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.S.; Moore, C.B.

    1981-08-01

    High overtone spectra of organic molecules can be interpreted using the local mode model for absorptions by the inequivalent C-H bonds. The spectra can be assigned using either observed C-H bond lengths or isolated fundamental frequencies. The spectra of trihalomethanes indicate that the dominant intramolecular mode coupling for the C-H stretching overtones is Fermi resonance with combination states with one less C-H stretching quantum plus two quanta of the C-H bending vibrations.

  14. Two-Dimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy of a Dissipative System with the Optimized Mean-Trajectory Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Alemi, Mallory; Loring, Roger F

    2014-01-01

    The optimized mean-trajectory (OMT) approximation is a semiclassical method for computing vibrational response functions from action-quantized classical trajectories connected by discrete transitions representing radiation–matter interactions. Here we apply this method to an anharmonic chromophore coupled to a harmonic bath. A forward–backward trajectory implementation of the OMT method is described that addresses the numerical challenges of applying the OMT to large systems with disparate fr...

  15. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng

    OpenAIRE

    Maxleene Sandasi; Ilze Vermaak; Weiyang Chen; Alvaro Viljoen

    2016-01-01

    The name “ginseng” is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng), P. quinquefolius (American ginseng), P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng) and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng), each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spec...

  16. Obtaining Sulfur from Sulfur Hexafluoride and Studying the Sulfur Isotopes Properties by Using Vibrational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Nikolai Borisovich; Akimov, Dmitry Vasilievich; Zhuravlev, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Scheme of isotopically enriched SF[6] to elemental sulfur with orthorhombic modification conversion is offered. This scheme includes SF[6] reduction to Li2S by using lithium. The yield of isotopically enriched sulfur is not less than 97% with chemical purity not less than 99.9%. The results which show the dependence of the experimental frequencies in the vibrational spectra on the molecular weight of the sulfur isotope have been obtained.

  17. Modeling peptide vibrations with dynamic change in structure. Local and extended contributions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kiederling, T.; Kubelka, J.; Bouř, Petr; Wei, Y.; Vazquez, F.

    Bochum : Ruhr-University Bochum, 2015. s. 46. [European Conference on the Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules /16./. 06.09.2015-10.09.2015, Bochum] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * peptide vibrations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Direct observation of the fundamental vibration-rotation transitions within the NiD X2Δ ground state by CO-Faraday-L.M.R. spectroscopy and zero field transitions in NiH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipus, K.; Simon, U.; Bachem, E.; Nelis, Th.; Urban, W.

    We report the first direct observation of the vibration-rotation spectrum of nickel-deuteride in its X2Δ ground state by CO-Faraday-L.M.R. spectroscopy. A set of effective molecular parameters is given. We present first results on the vibration-rotation spectroscopy of NiH, employing a tunable diode laser spectrometer.

  19. Ultrafast Spectroscopy in Conjugated Organic and Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming

    The dynamics of two kinds of conjugated materials, the visual pigment rhodopsin and the organic polymer poly(p -phenylene vinylene), have been studied utilizing femtosecond spectroscopy. The 11-cis to all-trans torsional isomerization of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin for both protonated and deuterated aqueous environments have been studied by time-resolved absorption measurements at room temperature. The kinetic results are well modeled by rate equations based on the scheme which involves the isomerization along the torsional coordinate of the 11-cis bond of the retinal chromophore. A metastable intermediate 90 degree twisted state is formed within 200 fs on the excited state surface by rotation around the C_{11} -C_{12} double bond, and it takes 3 ps to form the fully isomerized all -trans photoproduct known as bathorhodopsin and to repopulate the ground state rhodopsin. These results agree well with the semiempirical energy level and molecular dynamics calculations. The observed dynamics are insensitive to deuteration of the exchangeable protons which suggest that proton translocation is unimportant at physiological temperatures. The conjugated polymer, Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) in a stretch oriented film, has been studied using polarized time-resolved absorption with subpicosecond resolution and transient luminescence measurements. Excitations are generated by photoexcitation near the band edge (500nm -540nm) with a 200 fs pulse and the resulting spectral changes are probed with a white light pulse. Lattice stabilized (singlet) self-trapped excitons are formed within 200 fs which are observed by measuring the stimulated gain in their emission band which decay at 10 ps. The agreement of the photoinduced exciton gain spectrum (luminescence spectrum (10 ps) and the steady state luminescence spectrum suggest that the singlet excitons are not further trapped after 200fs of their formation time. Excitation wavelength dependence measurements suggest that

  20. Magnetic resonance microscopy and spectroscopy reveal kinetics of cryoprotectant permeation in a multicompartmental biological system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn, M; Hsu, E. W.; Pilatus, U; Wildt, D E; Rall, W R; Blackband, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of most multicompartmental biological systems has not been achieved. One prerequisite for success is quantitative information on cryoprotectant permeation into and amongst the compartments. This report describes direct measurements of cryoprotectant permeation into a multicompartmental system using chemical shift selective magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy and MR spectroscopy. We used the developing zebrafish embryo as a model for studying these complex systems be...

  1. Salt Effects on Surface Structures of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers (PEMs) Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Aimin; Matsusaki, Michiya; Qiao, Lin; Akashi, Mitsuru; Ye, Shen

    2016-04-26

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was employed to investigate the surface structures of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) constructed by sequentially alternating adsorption of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). It was found that the surface structures and surface charge density of the as-deposited PEMs of PDDA/PSS significantly depend on the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) present in the polyelectrolyte solutions. Furthermore, it was found that the surface structure of the as-deposited PEMs is in a metastable state and will reach the equilibrium state by diffusion of the polyelectrolyte chain after an aging process, resulting in a polyelectrolyte mixture on the PEM surfaces. PMID:27045932

  2. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang; Rao, B Jayachander

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach. PMID:27179484

  3. Detection of biological analytes using nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy with a nanoporous microcantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The highly sensitive nanoporous cantilever beam without immobilized receptors was combined with highly selective mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy for molecular recognition of analytes using characteristic molecular vibrations. Unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, in addition, the detection sensitivity and resolution are drastically enhanced by combining high power tunable quantum cascade laser with a nanoporous cantilever having large surface area, low modulus, and nanowell structures. Further, analytes can be easily loaded on the porous microcantilever without receptor due to nanowells. In addition, orthogonal signals, variations in the mass and IR spectrum, provide more reliable and quantitative results including physical as well as chemical information of samples. We have used this technique to rapidly identify single and double stranded DNA.

  4. Vibrational dynamics of single-crystal YVO4 studied by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Andrea; Giarola, Marco; Rossi, Barbara; Mariotto, Gino; Cazzanelli, Enzo; Speghini, Adolfo

    2012-12-01

    The vibrational properties of yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4) single crystals, with tetragonal zircon structure, have been investigated by means of polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Raman spectra were taken at different polarizations and orientations carefully set by the use of a micromanipulator, so that all of the twelve Raman-active modes, expected on the basis of the group theory, were selected in turn and definitively assigned in wave number and symmetry. In particular the Eg(4) mode, assigned incorrectly in previous literature, has been observed at 387 cm-1. Moreover, the very weak Eg(1) mode, peaked at about 137 cm-1, was clearly observed only under some excitation wavelengths, and its peculiar Raman excitation profile was measured within a wide region of the visible. Finally, ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory have been performed in order to determine both Raman and infrared vibrational modes and to corroborate the experimental results. The rather good agreement between computational and experimental frequencies is slightly better than in previous computational works and supports our experimental symmetry assignments.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy at interfaces by IR-VIS sum-frequency generation using CLIO FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IR-vis sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a versatile technique for probing the vibrational structure of interfaces. To overcome the limited spectral range accessible by benchtop IR lasers, we have developed an SFG spectrometer that makes use of the broad band tuneable infrared beam provided by the CLIO-FEL. We will evaluate the gain in sensitivity of the FEL-SFG spectrometer in comparison to that of benchtop lasers, taking account of the surface damage by laser heating. Thereafter, we review the different research projects undertaken using this facility: (1) The interface selectivity of SFG makes it particularly suitable for probing buried liquid/solid interface. We took advantage of the spectrometer sensitivity to monitor the electrochemical deposition of hydrogen on platinum single crystals at under- and overpotential (2) Because of its sensitivity to the molecular symmetry, SFG allows probing the conformation of self assembled monolayers deposited on metals. We discuss SFG spectra of ω(4-nitroanilino)-dodecane adsorbed on polycrystalline gold and silver films; in the 1550 - 900 cm-1 spectral range. (3) We have undertaken a spectroscopic approach for the investigation of polymer films adhesion on glass. Polyurethane/glass interface is investigated in the 2200 - 1600 cin-1 spectral region. (4) The use of the CLIO FEL allows probing of the vibrational dynamics of the prominent IR active vibrations between 1500 and 500 cm-1 of fullerene epitaxial films. These modes are modified upon charge transfer from the substrate to the C60 molecules. Preliminary SFG spectra of C60/Ag interface are presented. (5) Site specific detection of CO adsorption and CO + O coadsorption on Pd(111) are studied

  6. Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study of corroded Magnox sludge from a legacy spent nuclear fuel storage pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Spent Magnox fuel corroding in-situ in storage ponds forms sludges comprised of brucite and other Mg based phases with uranium oxide particles. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Caracterization study of highly radioactive corroded Magnox sludges. → Unique data from samples of actual corroded nuclear fuel. → Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study. → Analysis of particles from legacy spent fuel storage pond at Sellafield. → Supports major UK decommissioning and nuclear clean up challenge. - Abstract: Samples of filtered particulates and sludges, formed from corroding magnesium alloy clad uranium metal ('Magnox') fuel elements, collected from one of the legacy nuclear fuel storage ponds located at Sellafield (UK) were investigated by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). ESEM imaging confirmed the dominant morphology to be clusters of interlocking platelets typical of brucite (Mg(OH)2). EDX analysis was suggestive of some conversion to the related phase, hydrotalcite (Mg6Al2(CO3)(OH)16.4H2O), due to elevated levels of Al associated with Mg. Other apparent morphologies were less commonly observed including flaky sheets, consistent with earlier stages of Magnox alloy corrosion. In a few specific cases, rods were also observed suggestive of some conversion to Mg-hydroxycarbonate phases. Discrete phases rich in U were also identified. Fluorescence in the Raman spectroscopy also indicated surface coatings of organic macromolecules and iron sulphide on hematite containing particles, attributed to microbial activity within the open air pond. Some specific differences in the solid phases between pond areas with differing conditions were apparent.

  7. Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study of corroded Magnox sludge from a legacy spent nuclear fuel storage pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Colin R., E-mail: colin.r.gregson@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Goddard, David T., E-mail: dave.t.goddard@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Sarsfield, Mark J., E-mail: mark.j.sarsfield@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Spent Magnox fuel corroding in-situ in storage ponds forms sludges comprised of brucite and other Mg based phases with uranium oxide particles. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Caracterization study of highly radioactive corroded Magnox sludges. > Unique data from samples of actual corroded nuclear fuel. > Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study. > Analysis of particles from legacy spent fuel storage pond at Sellafield. > Supports major UK decommissioning and nuclear clean up challenge. - Abstract: Samples of filtered particulates and sludges, formed from corroding magnesium alloy clad uranium metal ('Magnox') fuel elements, collected from one of the legacy nuclear fuel storage ponds located at Sellafield (UK) were investigated by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). ESEM imaging confirmed the dominant morphology to be clusters of interlocking platelets typical of brucite (Mg(OH){sub 2}). EDX analysis was suggestive of some conversion to the related phase, hydrotalcite (Mg{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 16}.4H{sub 2}O), due to elevated levels of Al associated with Mg. Other apparent morphologies were less commonly observed including flaky sheets, consistent with earlier stages of Magnox alloy corrosion. In a few specific cases, rods were also observed suggestive of some conversion to Mg-hydroxycarbonate phases. Discrete phases rich in U were also identified. Fluorescence in the Raman spectroscopy also indicated surface coatings of organic macromolecules and iron sulphide on hematite containing particles, attributed to microbial activity within the open air pond. Some specific differences in the solid phases between pond areas with differing conditions were apparent.

  8. Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Laubereau, Alfred; Mantel, Karl-Heinz; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The thirteenth meeting in a long-standing series of “Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy” (TRVS) conferences was held May 19th to 25th at the Kardinal Döpfner Haus in Freising, Germany, organized by the two Munich Universities - Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Technische Universität München. This international conference continues the illustrious tradition of the original in 1982, which took place in Lake Placid, NY. The series of meetings was initiated by leading, world-renowned exp...

  9. Vibrational characterization of female gametes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, E; Gioacchini, G; Sabbatini, S; Conti, C; Vaccari, L; Borini, A; Carnevali, O; Tosi, G

    2014-10-21

    In the last few years, vibrational spectroscopies have been widely applied in biology and medicine, as a synergic support to commonly used analytical and diagnostic techniques. This review summarizes the relevant researches carried out by using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on oviparous and mammalian gametes, including human ones. PMID:25181749

  10. Electronic Excited State and Vibrational Dynamics of Water Solution of Cytosine Observed by Time-resolved Transient Absorption Spectroscopy with Sub-10fs Deep Ultraviolet Laser Pules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Takayoshi.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy for water solution of cytosine with sub-10fs deep ultraviolet laser pulse is reported. Ultrafast electronic excited state dynamics and coherent molecular vibrational dynamics are simultaneously observed and their relaxation mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid, quantitative analysis of bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Daniel P; Andersen, David H; Beatson, Ron A; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2014-12-31

    Hops, Humulus lupulus, are grown worldwide for use in the brewing industry to impart characteristic flavor and aroma to finished beer. Breeders produce many varietal crosses with the aim of improving and diversifying commercial hops varieties. The large number of crosses critical to a successful breeding program imposes high demands on the supporting chemical analytical laboratories. With the aim of reducing the analysis time associated with hops breeding, quantitative partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models have been produced, relating reference data acquired by the industrial standard HPLC and UV methods, to vibrational spectra of the same, chemically diverse hops sample set. These models, produced from rapidly acquired infrared (IR), near-infrared (NIR), and Raman spectra, were appraised using standard statistical metrics. Results demonstrated that all three spectroscopic methods could be used for screening hops for α-acid, total bitter acids, and cohumulone concentrations in powdered hops. Models generated from Raman and IR spectra also showed potential for use in screening hops varieties for xanthohumol concentrations. NIR analysis was performed using both a standard benchtop spectrometer and a portable NIR spectrometer, with comparable results obtained by both instruments. Finally, some important vibrational features of cohumulone, colupulone, and xanthohumol were assigned using DFT calculations, which allow more insightful interpretation of PLS-R latent variable plots. PMID:25485767

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of water at the water-air interface studied by femtosecond surface vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Huib J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of water molecules at the water-air interface, using surfacespecific two-dimensional infrared sum-frequency generation (2D-SFG spectroscopy. The data reveal the occurrence of surprisingly fast energy transfer and reorientational dynamics at aqueous interfaces.

  13. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  14. Enhanced formation of thermal donors in irradiated germanium: local vibrational mode spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen-rich Ge samples were irradiated with fast electrons (E = 4 MeV) at 80 deg C and subjected to isochronal (100-340 deg C) and isothermal (350 deg C) annealings. Infra-red absorption spectra were measured at room temperature. Preliminary irradiation is found to enhance strongly the development of the absorption bands in the range 600 and 780 cm-1 upon heating the Ge crystals at 350 deg C. The bands are assigned to local vibrational modes (LVM) of thermal donors (TD). It is inferred from the annealing studies that a radiation-induced complex with the LVM at about 770-780 cm-1 is likely responsible for the enhanced growth of TD. The oxygen dimer is suggested to be such a complex

  15. Identification and characterization of phyllosilicate minerals from Republic of Macedonia by vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification and characterization of several phyllosilicate minerals collected from the Republic of Macedonia: Mg3Si2O5(OH)4; antigorite, (Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4; talc, Mg3Si4O10(OH)2; clinochlore, (Mg,Fe2+)5Al(Si3Al)O10(OH)8; cymrite, BaAl2Si2O8·H2O; muscovite, KAl2(Si3Al)O10(OH,F)2; phlogopite, KMg3(Si3Al)O10(F, OH)2; montmorillonite, (Na,Ca)0..33(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2·nH2O; sherindanite, (Mg,Al)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8 and biotite, K(Mg,Fe2+)3AlSiO10(OH,F)2 is performed using their infrared and Raman vibrational spectra. In contrast to Raman spectra, the above-mentioned minerals showed IR spectral similarities in the region bellow 1200 cm-1 mainly due to their common structural characteristics. The bands appearing in the 1100-900 cm-1 spectral region were prescribed to ν(Si-O-Si)modes, whereas most of the lower-frequency bands were interpreted as either δ(OH) or δ(Si-O-Si) vibrations. The presence of sharp peak at 1630 cm-1, registered only in the infrared spectra of cymrite and montmorillonite, enables to discriminate between hydroxide and water-containing minerals. Various types of ion substitutions, which appear in this group of minerals, sometimes could led to wrong identification. Therefore, the authenticity of the three samples, muscovite (Nezhlevo), biotite (Chanishte) and sherindanite (Sivets), was checked with results obtained from chemical composition analysis. (Author)

  16. Ultrafast Strong-Field Vibrational Dynamics Studied by Femtosecond Extreme-Ultraviolet Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hosler, Erik Robert

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved extreme-ultraviolet core-level absorption spectroscopy has developed into a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics due to its sensitivity for detecting changes in electronic structure. By probing the core-levels of atoms and molecules, dynamics may be monitored with elemental specificity, as well as localized sensitivity to the oxidation state around the atomic absorber. Previous experiments with this technique demonstrated the capability to quantitatively...

  17. LASER BIOLOGY: Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabova, A. V.; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A.; Loshchenov, V. B.

    2006-06-01

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching).

  18. Oxygen chemistry in biology: Vibrational spectroscopy, stable isotopes, and future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, G.T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Dioxygen is an ideally suited substrate for enzymatic manipulation in oxidation-reduction chemistry and in substrate transformation. It is a powerful oxidant with a midpoint potential of 0.815 at neutral pH; at the same time, however, it exists in a triplet state in its most stable electronic configuration. This latter property confers kinetic inertness as a result of spin-conservation restrictions on reaction chemistry. If these restrictions can be overcome and controlled, dioxygen`s high redox potential can be used to maximize efficiency in free-energy conversion processes and to effect activation of relatively inert substrates.

  19. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  20. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Angelo S; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  1. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy at solid gas interfaces: CO adsorption on Pd model catalysts at ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprechter, Günther; Unterhalt, Holger; Morkel, Matthias; Galletto, Paolo; Hu, Linjie; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2002-04-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorption on Pd(1 1 1) and Pd nanoparticles supported by Al 2O 3/NiAl(1 1 0) was examined by vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy from 10 -8 to 1000 mbar, and from 100 to 400 K. Identical CO saturation structures were observed on Pd(1 1 1) under ultrahigh vacuum (˜10 -7 mbar, 95 K) and at high pressure (e.g. ⩾1 mbar, 190 K) with no indications of pressure-induced surface rearrangements. Special attention was paid to experimental artifacts that may occur under elevated pressure and may be misinterpreted as "high pressure effects". Vibrational spectra of CO on defect-rich Pd(1 1 1) exhibited an additional peak that originated from CO bound to defect (step or edge) sites. The CO adsorbate structure on supported Pd nanoparticles was different from Pd(1 1 1) but more similar to stepped Pd(1 1 1). At low pressure (10 -7 mbar CO) the adsorbate structure depended strongly on the Pd morphology revealing specific differences in the adsorption properties of supported nanoparticles and single crystal surfaces. At high pressure (e.g. 200 mbar CO) these differences were even more pronounced. Prominent high coverage CO structures on Pd(1 1 1) could not be established on Pd particles. However, in spite of structural differences between well faceted and rough Pd nanoparticles nearly identical adsorption site occupancies were observed in both cases at 200 mbar CO. Initial tests of the catalytic activity of Pd/Al 2O 3/NiAl(1 1 0) for ethylene hydrogenation at 1 bar revealed a remarkable activity and stability of the model system with catalytic properties similar to impregnated catalysts.

  2. 3D Motions of Iron in Six-Coordinate {FeNO}(7) Hemes by Nuclear Resonance Vibration Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qian; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Silvernail, Nathan J; Alp, E Ercan; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Sage, J Timothy; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-04-25

    The vibrational spectrum of a six-coordinate nitrosyl iron porphyrinate, monoclinic [Fe(TpFPP)(1-MeIm)(NO)] (TpFPP=tetra-para-fluorophenylporphyrin; 1-MeIm=1-methylimidazole), has been studied by oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The crystal was oriented to give spectra perpendicular to the porphyrin plane and two in-plane spectra perpendicular or parallel to the projection of the FeNO plane. These enable assignment of the FeNO bending and stretching modes. The measurements reveal that the two in-plane spectra have substantial differences that result from the strongly bonded axial NO ligand. The direction of the in-plane iron motion is found to be largely parallel and perpendicular to the projection of the bent FeNO on the porphyrin plane. The out-of-plane Fe-N-O stretching and bending modes are strongly mixed with each other, as well as with porphyrin ligand modes. The stretch is mixed with v50 as was also observed for dioxygen complexes. The frequency of the assigned stretching mode of eight Fe-X-O (X=N, C, and O) complexes is correlated with the Fe-XO bond lengths. The nature of highest frequency band at ≈560 cm(-1) has also been examined in two additional new derivatives. Previously assigned as the Fe-NO stretch (by resonance Raman), it is better described as the bend, as the motion of the central nitrogen atom of the FeNO group is very large. There is significant mixing of this mode. The results emphasize the importance of mode mixing; the extent of mixing must be related to the peripheral phenyl substituents. PMID:26999733

  3. High-pressure vibrational and polymorphic response of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene single crystals: Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Zbigniew A; Tao, Yuchuan; Gupta, Yogendra M

    2014-07-10

    Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the vibrational and polymorphic behavior of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7) to elucidate its structural and chemical stability under high pressure. Measurements were performed on single crystals compressed in a diamond anvil cell, and data were obtained over the entire frequency range of FOX-7 Raman activity. Several new features were observed with increase of pressure: (i) new vibrational peaks and discontinuity in the shifts of the peaks at 2 and 4.5 GPa, (ii) apparent coupling or mixing of several modes, and (iii) changes in the NH2 stretching spectral shape and modes shift. The spectral changes at 2 GPa, in contrast to previous reports, involved only a few peaks and likely resulted from a small molecular transformation. In contrast, changes at 4.5 GPa involved most of the modes, and the pressure for the onset and completion of the changes depended on the pressure medium. A large pressure hysteresis regarding the changes at 4.5 GPa implies a reconstructive transformation. We suggest that this transformation reflects a change in the balance between interlayer (van der Waals) and in-layer (H-bonding) interactions. Despite these transformations, further compression to 40 GPa and subsequent release of pressure did not cause any irreversible changes. This finding implies that FOX-7 has remarkable chemical stability under high pressures. The observed coupling between the various modes with increasing pressure was analyzed within the Fermi resonance model. The potential implication of the coupling of modes for shock insensitivity of FOX-7 is briefly discussed. PMID:24941445

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy and analytical electron microscopy studies of Fe-V-O and In-V-O thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orthovanadate (M3+VO4; M= Fe, In) and vanadate (Fe2V4O13) thin films were prepared using sol-gel synthesis and dip coating deposition. Using analytical electron microscopy (AEM), the chemical composition and the degree of crystallization of the phases present in the thin Fe-V-O films were investigated. TEM samples were prepared in both orientations: parallel (plan view) and perpendicular (cross section) to the substrate. In the first stages of crystallization, when the particle sizes were in the nanometer range, the classical identification of phases using electron diffraction was not possible. Instead of measuring d values, experimentally selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns were compared to calculated (simulated) patterns in order to determine the phase composition. The problems of evaluating the ratio of amorphous and crystalline phases in thin films are reported. Results of TEM and XRD as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the films made at lower temperatures (300 oC) consisted of nanograins embedded in the dominating amorphous phase. Characteristic vibrational spectra allowed to distinguish between the different crystalline phases, since the IR and Raman bands showed broadening due to the decreasing particle size of the films thermally treated at lower temperatures. Vibrational analysis also showed that the electrochemical cycling of crystalline films led to spectra that were in close agreement with the spectra of the nanocrystalline films prepared at lower temperatures. The formation of a nanocrystalline structure is therefore a prerequisite for obtaining a higher charging/discharging stability of Fe-V-O and In-V-O films. (author)

  5. Far-infrared VRT spectroscopy of the water dimer: Characterization of the 20 μm out-of-plane librational vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first high-resolution spectra for the out-of-plane librational vibration in the water dimer. Three vibrational subbands comprising a total of 188 transitions have been measured by diode laser spectroscopy near 500 cm−1 and assigned to (H2O)2 libration-rotation-tunneling eigenstates. The band origin for the Ka = 1 subband is ~524 cm−1. Librational excitation increases the interchange and bifurcation hydrogen bond rearrangement tunneling splittings by factors of 3-5 and 4-40, respectively. Analysis of the rotational constants obtained from a nonlinear least squares fit indicates that additional external perturbations to the energy levels are likely

  6. Towards the Limits of Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: VCD Spectra of Some Alkyl Vinylethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinna, Francesco; Pescitelli, Gennaro

    2016-02-01

    Three alkyl vinylethers from our collection of chiral samples were investigated through VCD spectroscopy, in combination with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Despite the simplicity of the compounds, reproducing all the spectral features is an involved task, since the many significantly populated conformers contribute to the total VCD spectrum with bands which often have opposite signatures. Nevertheless, we show that certain bands can be satisfactorily reproduced by calculation and therefore they may be employed for the determination of absolute configuration in these and similar compounds, for which no simple alternative method is available. Chirality 28:143-146, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26634887

  7. Communication: Quantitative multi-site frequency maps for amide I vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate method for predicting the amide I vibrational spectrum of a given protein structure has been sought for many years. Significant progress has been made recently by sampling structures from molecular dynamics simulations and mapping local electrostatic variables onto the frequencies of individual amide bonds. Agreement with experiment, however, has remained largely qualitative. Previously, we used dipeptide fragments and isotope-labeled constructs of the protein G mimic NuG2b as experimental standards for developing and testing amide I frequency maps. Here, we combine these datasets to test different frequency-map models and develop a novel method to produce an optimized four-site potential (4P) map based on the CHARMM27 force field. Together with a charge correction for glycine residues, the optimized map accurately describes both experimental datasets, with average frequency errors of 2–3 cm−1. This 4P map is shown to be convertible to a three-site field map which provides equivalent performance, highlighting the viability of both field- and potential-based maps for amide I spectral modeling. The use of multiple sampling points for local electrostatics is found to be essential for accurate map performance

  8. Communication: Quantitative multi-site frequency maps for amide I vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-08-01

    An accurate method for predicting the amide I vibrational spectrum of a given protein structure has been sought for many years. Significant progress has been made recently by sampling structures from molecular dynamics simulations and mapping local electrostatic variables onto the frequencies of individual amide bonds. Agreement with experiment, however, has remained largely qualitative. Previously, we used dipeptide fragments and isotope-labeled constructs of the protein G mimic NuG2b as experimental standards for developing and testing amide I frequency maps. Here, we combine these datasets to test different frequency-map models and develop a novel method to produce an optimized four-site potential (4P) map based on the CHARMM27 force field. Together with a charge correction for glycine residues, the optimized map accurately describes both experimental datasets, with average frequency errors of 2-3 cm-1. This 4P map is shown to be convertible to a three-site field map which provides equivalent performance, highlighting the viability of both field- and potential-based maps for amide I spectral modeling. The use of multiple sampling points for local electrostatics is found to be essential for accurate map performance.

  9. Distinguishing gramicidin D conformers through two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin D is a short peptide which dimerizes to form helical pores, adopting one of two conformations in the process. These conformations differ primarily in number of residues per turn and the hydrogen-bond registry between rungs of the helix. Using amide I 2D infrared (IR) and FTIR, we have demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish between the different conformers of gramicidin D in solution. We show that the spectra observed for this helical peptide bear no resemblance to the spectra of α- or 310-helices and that while the FTIR spectra appear similar to spectra of β-sheets, 2D IR reveals that the observed resonances arise from vibrational modes unlike those observed in β-sheets. We also present an idealized model which reproduces the experimental data with high fidelity. This model is able to explain the polarization-dependence of the experimental 2D IR data. Using this model, we show the coupling between the rungs of the helix dominates the spectra, and as a consequence of this, the number of residues per turn can greatly influence the amide I spectra of gramicidin D.

  10. Communication: Quantitative multi-site frequency maps for amide I vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Tokmakoff, Andrei, E-mail: tokmakoff@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    An accurate method for predicting the amide I vibrational spectrum of a given protein structure has been sought for many years. Significant progress has been made recently by sampling structures from molecular dynamics simulations and mapping local electrostatic variables onto the frequencies of individual amide bonds. Agreement with experiment, however, has remained largely qualitative. Previously, we used dipeptide fragments and isotope-labeled constructs of the protein G mimic NuG2b as experimental standards for developing and testing amide I frequency maps. Here, we combine these datasets to test different frequency-map models and develop a novel method to produce an optimized four-site potential (4P) map based on the CHARMM27 force field. Together with a charge correction for glycine residues, the optimized map accurately describes both experimental datasets, with average frequency errors of 2–3 cm{sup −1}. This 4P map is shown to be convertible to a three-site field map which provides equivalent performance, highlighting the viability of both field- and potential-based maps for amide I spectral modeling. The use of multiple sampling points for local electrostatics is found to be essential for accurate map performance.

  11. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15 000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as

  13. A variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is presented. The microscope operates from 8 to 350 K in ultrahigh vacuum. The thermally compensated STM is suspended by springs from the cold tip of a continuous flow cryostat and is completely surrounded by two radiation shields. The design allows for in situ dosing and irradiation of the sample as well as for the exchange of samples and STM tips. With the STM feedback loop off, the drift of the tip-sample spacing is approximately 0.001 Angstrom/min at 8 K. It is demonstrated that the STM is well-suited for the study of atomic-scale chemistry over a wide temperature range, for atomic-scale manipulation, and for single-molecule inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy study of doped-CaZrO3 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doped-CaZrO3 materials were prepared by solid-state reaction. The substitution was either on the A site of the perovskite (Mg, Ca, Ba) or on the B site (Ti, Hf). The samples were pre-calcined and sintered at 1673 K for 6 h. They were analysed using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. The microwave dielectric function was determined by a Kramers-Kronig analysis. The reflectance spectra were then adjusted using the classical dispersion equations taking into account the longitudinal/transverse optic (LO/TO) modes splitting. The calculated values of the Q factor match very well with the measured ones and follow a linear tendency depending on the reduced mass of the oscillator composed of Ca- and Zr-like virtual-ions. The first phonon mode is (as in many perovskite) the most incident mode on the dielectric losses. Numerous modes' parameters are dependent on both the mass of the dopant and its concentration

  15. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweskin, S.J.

    2006-05-19

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  16. A Multiscale Vibrational Spectroscopic Approach for Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Pollen

    OpenAIRE

    Bagcioglu, Murat; Zimmermann, Boris; Kohler, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Background Analysis of pollen grains reveals valuable information on biology, ecology, forensics, climate change, insect migration, food sources and aeroallergens. Vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopies offer chemical characterization of pollen via identifiable spectral features without any sample pretreatment. We have compared the level of chemical information that can be obtained by different multiscale vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Methodology Pollen from 15 different spec...

  17. Theory of sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of adsorbed molecules using the density matrix method-broadband vibrational sum-frequency generation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generalized theory of frequency- and time-resolved vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy of adsorbates at surfaces is presented using the density matrix formalism. Our theoretical treatment is specifically aimed at addressing issues that accompany the relatively novel SFG approach using broadband infrared pulses. The ultrashort duration of these pulses makes them ideally suited for time-resolved investigations, for which we present a complete theoretical treatment. A second key characteristic of these pulses is their large bandwidth and high intensity, which allow for highly non-linear effects, including vibrational ladder climbing of surface vibrations. We derive general expressions relating the density matrix to SFG spectra, and apply these expressions to specific experimental results by solving the coupled optical Bloch equations of the density matrix elements. Thus, we can theoretically reproduce recent experimentally demonstrated hot band SFG spectra using femtosecond broadband infrared excitation of carbon monoxide (CO) on a Ru(001) surface

  18. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO2 + CO2 collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO2 lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 7000K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ΔJ up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 → 101) and hot-band (011 → 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu3-transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments

  19. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomason, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO/sub 2/ lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 700/sup 0/K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ..delta..J up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 ..-->.. 101) and hot-band (011 ..-->.. 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu/sub 3/-transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments.

  20. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Yuxin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se; Gong, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Shumin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3}, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films.

  1. Chiral recognition between lactic acid derivatives and an aromatic alcohol in a supersonic expansion: electronic and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seurre, N; Le Barbu-Debus, K; Lahmani, F; Zehnacker, A; Borho, N; Suhm, M A

    2006-02-28

    Jet-cooled diastereoisomeric complexes formed between a chiral probe, (+/-)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol, and chiral lactic acid derivatives have been characterised by laser-induced fluorescence and IR fluorescence-dip spectroscopy. Complexes with non chiral alpha-hydroxyesters and chiral beta-hydroxyesters have also been studied for the sake of comparison. DFT calculations have been performed to assist in the analysis of the vibrational spectra and the determination of the structures. The observed 1 : 1 complexes correspond to the addition of the hydroxy group of the chromophore on the oxygen atom of the hydroxy in alpha-position relative to the ester function. Moreover, (+/-)-methyl lactate and (+/-)-ethyl lactate complexes with (+/-)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol show an enantioselectivity in the size of the formed adducts: while fluorescent 1 : 1 complexes are the most abundant species observed when mixing (S)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol with (R)-methyl or ethyl lactate, they are absent in the case of the SS mixture, which only shows 1 : 2 adducts. This property has been related to steric hindrance brought by the methyl group on the hydroxy-bearing carbon atom. PMID:16482344

  2. In Situ Potentiodynamic Analysis of the Electrolyte/Silicon Electrodes Interface Reactions--A Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Han, Hui-Ling; Ross, Philip N; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-01-27

    The key factor in long-term use of batteries is the formation of an electrically insulating solid layer that allows lithium ion transport but stops further electrolyte redox reactions on the electrode surface, hence solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). We have studied a common electrolyte, 1.0 M LiPF6/ethylene carbonate (EC)/diethyl carbonate (DEC), reduction products on crystalline silicon (Si) electrodes in a lithium (Li) half-cell system under reaction conditions. We employed in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) with interface sensitivity in order to probe the molecular composition of the SEI surface species under various applied potentials where electrolyte reduction is expected. We found that, with a Si(100)-hydrogen terminated wafer, a Si-ethoxy (Si-OC2H5) surface intermediate forms due to DEC decomposition. Our results suggest that the SEI surface composition varies depending on the termination of Si surface, i.e., the acidity of the Si surface. We provide the evidence of specific chemical composition of the SEI on the anode surface under reaction conditions. This supports an electrochemical electrolyte reduction mechanism in which the reduction of the DEC molecule to an ethoxy moiety plays a key role. These findings shed new light on the formation mechanism of SEI on Si anodes in particular and on SEI formation in general. PMID:26651259

  3. pH dependence of the conformation of small peptides investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Shaw, Daniel J; Woutersen, Sander

    2010-11-25

    We investigate how the conformation of small peptides is influenced by the presence or absence of charge on the C-terminus and on the side groups. To this purpose, the conformations of two tripeptides, with acidic and basic side groups, is determined at several pD values using two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The investigated pD values are chosen relative to the C-terminal and side-chain pK(a) values in such a way that the C-terminus and side groups are in well-defined protonation states. The measurements are analyzed quantitatively using an excitonic model for the Amide I' mode. From the vibrational coupling and the angle between the Amide I' transition dipoles obtained in this way, the dihedral angles (φ,ψ) of the central C(α) atom are determined. Interestingly, our measurements show that the backbone structure of the peptides is remarkably stable against changing the charges of both the side groups and the C-terminal carboxylate groups. This is probably a consequence of effective screening of the Coulomb interactions between the charged groups by the water molecules between them. We also find that the (φ,ψ) confidence regions obtained from 2DIR measurements can have highly irregular shapes as a consequence of the nonlinear relation between the dihedral angles and the experimentally determined Amide I' coupling and transition-dipole angle. PMID:20977228

  4. Hydrogenated graphene on Ir(111): A high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy study of the vibrational spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyhl, Line; Balog, Richard; Angot, Thierry; Hornekær, Liv; Bisson, Régis

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen atom adsorption on high-quality graphene on Ir(111) [gr/Ir(111)] is investigated using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the vibrational spectrum, up to 400 meV, of gr/Ir(111) upon increasing hydrogen atom exposures is measured. The two dominant binding configurations of atomic hydrogen are identified as (1) graphanelike hydrogen clusters on the parts of the graphene more strongly interacting with the Ir(111) surface and (2) dimers bound more weakly to the freestanding parts of the graphene. The graphanelike surface structures lead to increased corrugation of the graphene sheet, yielding graphane-related phonon components. Additionally, a recent theoretical prediction of the existence of a bending character for a LO/TO graphane chair phonon mode is experimentally verified. No clear evidence was found for hydrogen bound on both sides of a high-quality graphene sheet and phonon features strongly suggest interactions between graphanelike hydrogen clusters and Ir atoms in the substrate.

  5. New Insights from Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy into the Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptides with Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of amyloid polypeptides on membrane surfaces have gained increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have revealed that membranes can catalyze protein aggregation and that the early products of amyloid aggregation can disrupt membrane integrity, increasing water permeability and inducing ion cytotoxicity. Nonetheless, probing aggregation of amyloid proteins on membrane surfaces is challenging. Surface-specific methods are required to discriminate contributions of aggregates at the membrane interface from those in the bulk phase and to characterize protein secondary structures in situ and in real time without the use of perturbing spectroscopic labels. Here, we review the most recent applications of sum frequency generation (SFG vibrational spectroscopy applied in conjunction with computational modeling techniques, a joint experimental and computational methodology that has provided valuable insights into the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP on membrane surfaces. These applications show that SFG can provide detailed information about structures, kinetics, and orientation of IAPP during interfacial aggregation, relevant to the molecular mechanisms of type II diabetes. These recent advances demonstrate the promise of SFG as a new approach for studying amyloid diseases at the molecular level and for the rational drug design targeting early aggregation products on membrane surfaces.

  6. IR and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy of Matrine- and Artemisinin-Type Herbal Products: Stereochemical Characterization and Solvent Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuefei; Poopari, M Reza; Cai, Xiaoli; Savin, Aliaksandr; Dezhahang, Zahra; Cheramy, Joseph; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-04-22

    Five Chinese herbal medicines--matrine, oxymatrine, sophoridine, artemisinin, and dihydroartemisinin--were investigated using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) experiments and density functional theory calculations to extract their stereochemical information. The three matrine-type alkaloids are available from the dry roots of Sophora flavescens and have long been used in various traditional Chinese herbal medicines to combat diseases such as cancer and cardiac arrhythmia. Artemisinin and the related dihydroartemisinin, discovered in 1979 by Professor Youyou Tu, a 2015 Nobel laureate in medicine, are effective drugs for the treatment of malaria. The VCD measurements were carried out in CDCl3 and DMSO-d6, two solvents with different dielectric constants and hydrogen-bonding characteristics. A "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach was used to model both explicit and implicit solvent effects. The studies show that effectively accounting for solvent effects is critical to using IR and VCD spectroscopy to provide unique spectroscopic features to differentiate the potential stereoisomers of these Chinese herbal medicines. PMID:27070079

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy via the Caldeira-Leggett model with anharmonic system potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The Caldeira-Leggett (CL) model, which describes a system bi-linearly coupled to a harmonic bath, has enjoyed popularity in condensed phase spectroscopy owing to its utmost simplicity. However, the applicability of the model to cases with anharmonic system potentials, as it is required for the description of realistic systems in solution, is questionable due to the presence of the invertibility problem [J. Phys. Chem. Lett., \\textbf{6}, 2722 (2015)] unless the system itself resembles the CL model form. This might well be the case at surfaces or in the solid regime, which we here confirm for a particular example of an iodine molecule in the atomic argon environment under high pressure. For this purpose we extend the recently proposed Fourier method for parameterizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics[J. Chem. Phys., \\textbf{142}, 244110 (2015)] to the non-linear case based on the CL model and perform an extensive error analysis. In order to judge on the applicability of this model in advance, we give handy ...

  8. Evidence for Tautomerisation of Glutamine in BLUF Blue Light Receptors by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domratcheva, Tatiana; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ilme; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-03-01

    BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) domains regulate the activity of various enzymatic effector domains in bacteria and euglenids. BLUF features a unique photoactivation through restructuring of the hydrogen-bonding network as opposed to a redox reaction or an isomerization of the chromophore. A conserved glutamine residue close to the flavin chromophore plays a central role in the light response, but the underlying modification is still unclear. We labelled this glutamine with 15N in two representative BLUF domains and performed time-resolved infrared double difference spectroscopy. The assignment of the signals was conducted by extensive quantum chemical calculations on large models with 187 atoms reproducing the UV-vis and infrared signatures of BLUF photoactivation. In the dark state, the comparatively low frequency of 1,667 cm‑1 is assigned to the glutamine C=O accepting a hydrogen bond from tyrosine. In the light state, the signature of a tautomerised glutamine was extracted with the C=N stretch at ~1,691 cm‑1 exhibiting the characteristic strong downshift by 15N labelling. Moreover, an indirect isotope effect on the flavin C4=O stretch was found. We conclude that photoactivation of the BLUF receptor does not only involve a rearrangement of hydrogen bonds but includes a change in covalent bonds of the protein.

  9. In situ vibrational spectroscopy of thin organic films confined at the solid-solid interface

    CERN Document Server

    Haydock, S A

    2002-01-01

    Raman scattering was used to study thin films, of hexadecane, octamethyltetrasiloxane (OMCTS), 1-undecanol and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers consisting of zinc stearate, zinc arachidate and zinc behenate, all at the solid-solid interface. This thesis contains the first unenhanced Raman spectrum of an organic monolayer confined in the contact between two solid surfaces. The LB monolayers were also investigated with sum-frequency spectroscopy in order that comparisons could be made between results from the two techniques. Thin films were confined between an optical prism and an optical lens at pressures ranging from 30 MPa to 200 MPa. I have shown that the deposited LB monolayers were conformationally ordered and that this high degree of order was retained at applied pressures of up to 200 MPa. However, the application of pressure caused the hydrocarbon chains to tilt from the surface normal. The changes observed in the overall intensity of the Raman spectra on formation of the solid-solid contact can be ex...

  10. Evidence for Tautomerisation of Glutamine in BLUF Blue Light Receptors by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domratcheva, Tatiana; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ilme; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) domains regulate the activity of various enzymatic effector domains in bacteria and euglenids. BLUF features a unique photoactivation through restructuring of the hydrogen-bonding network as opposed to a redox reaction or an isomerization of the chromophore. A conserved glutamine residue close to the flavin chromophore plays a central role in the light response, but the underlying modification is still unclear. We labelled this glutamine with 15N in two representative BLUF domains and performed time-resolved infrared double difference spectroscopy. The assignment of the signals was conducted by extensive quantum chemical calculations on large models with 187 atoms reproducing the UV-vis and infrared signatures of BLUF photoactivation. In the dark state, the comparatively low frequency of 1,667 cm−1 is assigned to the glutamine C=O accepting a hydrogen bond from tyrosine. In the light state, the signature of a tautomerised glutamine was extracted with the C=N stretch at ~1,691 cm−1 exhibiting the characteristic strong downshift by 15N labelling. Moreover, an indirect isotope effect on the flavin C4=O stretch was found. We conclude that photoactivation of the BLUF receptor does not only involve a rearrangement of hydrogen bonds but includes a change in covalent bonds of the protein. PMID:26947391

  11. Copper/oxide interface formation: a vibrational and electronic investigation by electron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, T.; Ghijsen, J.; Vohs, J. M.; Thiry, P. A.; Caudano, R.; Johnson, R. L.

    1992-04-01

    In this study, we deposited copper on a MgO(100) surface at room temperature (using a Knudsen cell) and studied the interface formation using electron spectroscopy. The evolution of the AES peak intensities showed that copper grows on MgO(100) in the Stranski-Krastanov mode. In HREELS experiments, the intensity and the position of the energy loss corresponding to the MgO surface optical phonon at 80.7 meV, both decrease with increasing Cu coverage. These results agree with theoretical spectra simulated from the dielectric theory by considering a Cu 2O overlayer on a semi-infinite MgO crystal substrate at the beginning of the growth. From the HREELS data, both the formation of a homogeneous Cu metallic overlayer or a CuO overlayer on MgO can be ruled out. The synchrotron-radiation (SR) photoemission measurements were performed in the vicinity of the Cu3p3d resonance. The positions of the Cu resonance peaks as a function of Cu coverage on MgO show that at low coverage the difference in energy between the main Cu 3d peak and the resonance peak is close to that found in Cu 2O and at higher coverage close to metallic copper indicating the formation of an interacting phase at the beginning followed by the growth of metallic copper.

  12. From Vibrational Spectroscopy to Force Fields and Structures of Saccharides: New Computational Algorithms and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincu, Madeleine [UCI; Gerber, Robert Benny [Professor, UCI, Chemistry Dept.

    2013-07-17

    This work was undertaken with the main objective to investigate basic reactions that take place in relatively simple saccharides (mono-saccharides and cellobiose - the building block of cellulose) , in isolation and in cluster with few water molecules or with (gas-phase) clusters of few waters and ionic compounds (salt, isolated ions like H{sup +} or OH{sup -}). Within the context of this work, different potentials were investigated; among them, were the PM3 semi empirical potential, DFT/BLYP and a new hybrid potential constructed from MP2 for the harmonic part and from adjusted Hartree-Fock anharmonic interactions (VSCF-PT2). These potentials were evaluated by comparison with experimental data from published sources and from several collaborating groups. The findings show excellent agreement between experiments and predictions with the hybrid VSCF-PT2 potential and very good agreement with predictions obtained from dynamics with dispersion corrected DFT/BLYP potential. Investigation of hydration of cellobiose, was another topic of interest. Guided by a hydration motif demonstrated by our experimental collaborators (team of Prof J.P. Simons), we demonstrated large energetic and structural differences between the two species of cellobiose: cis and trans. The later, which is dominant in solid and liquid phases, is higher in energy in the gas-phase and compared to pure water, it does not disturb as much the network of H bonds. In contrast, the cis species exhibits asymmetric hydration in cluster with up to 25 waters, indicating that it has surfactant properties. Another highlight of this research effort was the successful first time spectrometric and spectroscopic study of a gas-phase protonated sugar derivative (alpha-D-Galactopyranoside) and its interpretation by Ab Initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The findings demonstrate the formation of a motif in which a proton bridges between two Oxygen atoms (belonging to OH groups) at the sugar; The vibrational

  13. The vibrational structure of (E,E’)-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene. Linear dichroism FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Møller, Søren; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The title compound (DPB) was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in liquid solutions and by FTIR linear dichroism (LD) measurements on samples aligned in stretched polyethylene. The LD data provided experimental assignments of molecular transition moment directions and vibrational symmetries for mo...... of a nearly complete assignment of the IR active fundamentals of DPB, involving reassignment of a number of transitions. In addition, previously published Raman spectra of DPB were well predicted by the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations....

  14. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy studies at solid/liquid interfaces : Influence of the experimental geometry in the spectral shape and enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F.D.; Tyrode, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the experimental geometry, specifically the angles of incidence (AOI) of the exciting beams, on the enhancement of the vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) spectra has been systematically investigated, particularly when approaching total internal reflection (TIR) conditions. Theoretical simulations of the spectral intensity as a function of the AOI and infrared wavelength at three different polarization combinations were critically compared to experimental data obtai...

  15. In situ vibrational spectroscopy of thin organic films confined at the solid-solid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman scattering was used to study thin films, of hexadecane, octamethyltetrasiloxane (OMCTS), 1-undecanol and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers consisting of zinc stearate, zinc arachidate and zinc behenate, all at the solid-solid interface. This thesis contains the first unenhanced Raman spectrum of an organic monolayer confined in the contact between two solid surfaces. The LB monolayers were also investigated with sum-frequency spectroscopy in order that comparisons could be made between results from the two techniques. Thin films were confined between an optical prism and an optical lens at pressures ranging from 30 MPa to 200 MPa. I have shown that the deposited LB monolayers were conformationally ordered and that this high degree of order was retained at applied pressures of up to 200 MPa. However, the application of pressure caused the hydrocarbon chains to tilt from the surface normal. The changes observed in the overall intensity of the Raman spectra on formation of the solid-solid contact can be explained by changes in electric field strengths, but this interpretation cannot be made in the case of the SF spectra. The SF signal arising from the monolayer confined between the two solid surfaces was often much lower than predicted, and this is discussed in terms of structural changes and transfer of monolayer material from one surface to the other. Liquid lubricants were squeezed almost completely out of the solid-solid contact at pressures of 40 MPa. However, the use of a total internal reflection (TIR) excitation geometry in the Raman experiments increased the sensitivity of this technique sufficiently for spectra to be obtained from sub-monolayer amounts of material that had collected in small surface defects, with acquisition times of minutes. (author)

  16. Spectral pre and post processing for infrared and Raman spectroscopy of biological tissues and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Hugh J; Knief, Peter; Keating, Mark E; Bonnier, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, both infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications, from in vivo and ex vivo disease diagnostics and screening, to in vitro screening of therapeutics. There remain, however, many challenges related to the accuracy of analysis of physically and chemically inhomogeneous samples, across heterogeneous sample sets. Data preprocessing is required to deal with variations in instrumental responses and intrinsic spectral backgrounds and distortions in order to extract reliable spectral data. Data postprocessing is required to extract the most reliable information from the sample sets, based on often very subtle changes in spectra associated with the targeted pathology or biochemical process. This review presents the current understanding of the factors influencing the quality of spectra recorded and the pre-processing steps commonly employed to improve on spectral quality. It further explores some of the most common techniques which have emerged for classification and analysis of the spectral data for biomedical applications. The importance of sample presentation and measurement conditions to yield the highest quality spectra in the first place is emphasised, as is the potential of model simulated datasets to validate both pre- and post-processing protocols. PMID:26463830

  17. Study on vibrational relaxation dynamics of phenol–water complex by picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump–probe spectroscopy in a supersonic molecular beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Picosecond IR-UV pump–probe study revealed a detailed energy dissipation route and its time scale from the energy put into the OH(OD) stretching vibration for the phenol–water hydrogen-bonded complex. - Abstract: A comparative study of vibrational energy relaxation (VER) between the monohydrated complexes of phenol-d0 and phenol-d1 is investigated in a supersonic molecular beam. The direct time-resolved measurement of energy redistribution from the phenolic OH/OD stretching mode of the phenol-d0-H2O/phenol-d1-D2O is performed by picosecond IR-UV pump–probe spectroscopy. Two complexes follow the same relaxation process that begins with the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and the intermolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR), which is followed by the vibrational predissociation (VP). The difference in the relaxation lifetimes between them is discussed by anharmonic force field and RRKM calculations. Anharmonic analysis implies that intra- (IVR) and intermolecular (IVR) relaxations occur in parallel in the complexes. The RRKM-predicted dissociation (VP) lifetimes show qualitative agreement with the observed results, suggesting that VP takes place after the statistical energy distribution in the complexes

  18. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  19. Quantitative determination of molecular structure in multilayered thin films of biaxial and lower symmetry from photon spectroscopies. I. Reflection infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Atul N.; Allara, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A semitheoretical formalism based on classical electromagnetic wave theory has been developed for application to the quantitative treatment of reflection spectra from multilayered anisotropic films on both metallic and nonmetallic substrates. Both internal and external reflection experiments as well as transmission can be handled. The theory is valid for all wavelengths and is appropriate, therefore, for such experiments as x-ray reflectivity, uv-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Further, the theory is applicable to multilayered film structures of variable number of layers, each with any degree of anisotropy up to and including full biaxial symmetry. The reflectivities (and transmissivities) are obtained at each frequency by solving the wave propagation equations using a rigorous 4×4 transfer matrix method developed by Yeh in which the optical functions of each medium are described in the form of second rank (3×3) tensors. In order to obtain optical tensors for materials not readily available in single crystal form, a method has been developed to evaluate tensor elements from the complex scalar optical functions (n̂) obtained from the isotropic material with the limitations that the molecular excitations are well characterized and obey photon-dipole selection rules. This method is intended primarily for infrared vibrational spectroscopy and involves quantitative decomposition of the isotropic imaginary optical function (k) spectrum into a sum of contributions from fundamental modes, the assignment of a direction in molecular coordinates to the transition dipole matrix elements for each mode, the appropriate scaling of each k vector component in surface coordinates according to a selected surface orientation of the molecule to give a diagonal im(n̂) tensor, and the calculation of the real(n̂) spectrum tensor elements by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Tensors for other surface orientations are generated by an

  20. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  1. Decongestion of methylene spectra in biological and non-biological systems using picosecond 2DIR spectroscopy measuring electron-vibration-vibration coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylene is found in the repeat units of many polymers including proteins. In some cases it appears to be a useful reporter of variation in local environment whilst in other contexts average behaviour seems to dominate. In this paper we apply a particular 2DIR technique to a range of systems containing methylene groups, showing that mode frequencies, linewidths and splittings can be easily extracted even when the infrared absorption bands are too congested to allow reliable analysis. 2DIR spectra of polyethylene and several liquid alkanes are compared and it is shown for the case of L-arginine that the methylene scissor modes are split and that this can be resolved by tracking the 2DIR spectrum as a function of time. Calculations from first principles reveal that for most of the methylene modes studied, electrical anharmonicity is the dominant contributor to the 2DIR cross-peak intensity, with the mechanical anharmonicity making only a small contribution

  2. In situ speciation of the functional groups at mineral/electrolyte interfaces by sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In order to describe surface reactivity and adsorption/desorption processes on the molecular level, a large number of functional groups has been postulated. In most cases, however, a direct proof for the existence of these species in real aquatic environment is lacking because it is difficult to obtain chemical analytical information in situ under electrolyte with interface selectivity. Here we apply interface selective sum frequency (SF) vibrational spectroscopy to study the (001) and (110) surfaces of sapphire (α-Al2O3) under water between pH 4 and 12. This work is part of an ongoing fundamental study of the sorption mechanism of actinides on single crystals faces of sapphire by various experimental and theoretical techniques. Sapphire is used as a simple model for natural clay minerals and related iron phases. In the O-H stretch region of the infrared spectrum between 2800 and 4000 cm-1, we observe a surprisingly large number of 8 SF bands in total. Two of them are due to the polar ordered water film near the mineral surface which is well known from various aquatic interfaces. The other bands originate from up to 6 different aluminol species or from specifically [1] bound water molecules. The prominent peak of the (001) surface (SF intensity maximum at 3690 cm-1), we attribute to an OH species bridging two [1-4] aluminium atoms. At the (110) surface, the concentration of this species is considerably smaller. Another aluminol species that can be detected at the (001) and the (110) surface (signal maximum near 3450 cm-1) exhibits O-H bonds which are almost parallel to the interface plane. This species is probably the in-plane aluminol group predicted in recent molecular dynamics calculations [4]. SF spectroscopy allows us also to measure the absolute polar orientation of the water molecules adjacent to the mineral surface. The inversion of the molecules polar orientation upon alteration of the pH indicates the point of zero

  3. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  4. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of adsorption and vibrational features of folic acid, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A gold-capped silicon nanopillar (Au NP) with a height of 600 nm and a width of 120 nm was utilized to study the vibrational features of FA molecules adsorbed on the n...

  5. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair Elfick; Andrew Downes

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (bio)chemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We dis...

  6. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  7. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and related techniques in studies of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas; Sebesta, Aleksandar; Stadler, Johannes; Opilik, Lothar; Balabin, Roman M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    Biological materials can be highly heterogeneous at the nanometer scale. The investigation of nanostructures is often hampered by the low spatial resolution (e.g. spectroscopic techniques) or very little chemical information (e.g. atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)) provided by analytical techniques. Our research focuses on combined instruments, which allow the analysis of the exactly same area of a sample by complementary techniques, such as AFM and Raman spectroscopy. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) combines the high spatial resolution of AFM or STM with the chemical information provided by Raman spectroscopy. The technique is based on enhancement effects known from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In TERS the enhancing metallic nanostructure is brought to the sample by an AFM or STM tip. With a TERS-active tip, enhanced Raman signals can be generated from a sample area as small as 10-50 nm in diameter. AFM analysis of bacterial biofilms has demonstrated their heterogeneity at the nanometer scale, revealing a variety of nanostructures such as pili, flagella, and extracelullar polymers. TERS measurements of the biopolymers alginate and cytochrome c have yielded spectroscopic fingerprints even of such weak Raman scatterers, which in future can allow their localization in complex matrices. Furthermore, biofilms of the bacterium Halomonas meridiana were studied, which was found to be involved in the generation of the mineral dolomite. Only combined AFM-Raman analysis was able to identify the nanoglobules found in laboratory cultures of H. meridiana as dolomite nanoparticles. Our combined setups are and will be applied to the investigation of biofilms, fish spermatozoa as well as biological membranes.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy and electrophoresis as a "golden means" in monitoring of polysaccharides in medical plant and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, A.

    In recent years, some bioactive polysaccharides isolated from natural sources have attracted much attention in the field of biochemistry and pharmacology. Of them, polysaccharides or their glycoconjugates were shown to exhibit multiple biological activities including anticarcinogenic, anticoagulant, immunostimulating, antioxidant, etc. Pharmacotherapy using plant-derived substances can be currently regarded as a very promising future alternative to conventional therapy. The advanced biotechnologies available today enable chemical investigation of well-defined bioactive plant components as sources of novel drugs. The need for safer drugs without side effects has led to the use of natural ingredients with proven safety. Special interest is focused on plant polysaccharides. This article attempts to review the current structural and conformational characterization of some importantly bioactive monosaccharides isolated from following plant cell-wall: Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Thymus pulegioides (thyme), Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (fenugreek), Tussilago farfara L. (coltsfoot), Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop), Althaea officinalis L. (marshmallow) and Equisetum arvense L. (horsetail). The chemical structures of monosaccharides were analysed using FTIR and Raman spectroscopies as well as cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAE). The dried plant samples were gently hydrolysed with sulphuric acid. The presence of glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, alginic acid, glucose, mannose and xylose in the hydrolysates of reference substances and non-defatted plant films was proved. The possibility of a taxonomic classification of plant cell walls based on infrared and Raman spectroscopies and the use of spectral fingerprinting for authentication and detection of adulteration of products rich in cell-wall materials are discussed. Individual bands were selected to monitor the sugar content in medical plant cell walls and to confirm the identity of the analysed plants.

  9. Systematic Vibration Studies on a Cryogen-Free ^3He/^4He Dilution Refrigerator for X-ray Spectroscopy at Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, P. A.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.

    2016-08-01

    High-precision X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions at storage rings provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in strong Coulomb fields. To increase the precision of such experiments, silicon microcalorimeters have already been applied successfully. To minimize the interruption of beam times due to maintenance, a new cryogen-free ^3He/^4He dilution refrigerator has been designed and is under commissioning. However, in cryogen-free systems microphonic noise due to vibrations contributes considerably to the overall noise and may limit the detector energy resolution. Therefore, we report on systematic vibration studies on a cryogen-free ^3He/^4He dilution refrigerator which is specially adapted for experiments at storage rings.

  10. Investigation of polarized infrared spectra of the hydrogen bond in molecular crystals. New spectral effects in the vibrational spectroscopy of hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the experimental as well as of the theoretical studies, performed on the area of the infrared spectroscopy of hydrogen bonded molecular crystals, is given. Discussion of some physical phenomena is presented, responsible for basic spectral effects registered in the infrared spectra, as breaking of vibrational dipole selection rules in the IR spectra, linear dichroic as well as temperature effects, observed in the frequency range of the proton stretching vibrations. Also some newly recognized H/D isotopic effects for hydrogen bonded systems are presented, deduced from a quantitative analysis of the polarized spectra in the IR, namely the so called 'self-organization' effects and the 'long-range' H/D isotope effects. (author)

  11. Systematic Vibration Studies on a Cryogen-Free ^3 He/^4 He Dilution Refrigerator for X-ray Spectroscopy at Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, P. A.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.

    2016-01-01

    High-precision X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions at storage rings provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in strong Coulomb fields. To increase the precision of such experiments, silicon microcalorimeters have already been applied successfully. To minimize the interruption of beam times due to maintenance, a new cryogen-free ^3 He/^4 He dilution refrigerator has been designed and is under commissioning. However, in cryogen-free systems microphonic noise due to vibrations contributes considerably to the overall noise and may limit the detector energy resolution. Therefore, we report on systematic vibration studies on a cryogen-free ^3 He/^4 He dilution refrigerator which is specially adapted for experiments at storage rings.

  12. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicholas H C; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale. PMID:26429003

  13. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale

  14. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  15. High-resolution synchrotron infrared spectroscopy of acrolein: The vibrational levels between 850 and 1020 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.; Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using spectra obtained at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron radiation facility, a previously unobserved out-of-plane vibration of trans-acrolein (propenal) is reliably assigned for the first time. Its origin is at 1002.01 cm-1, which is about 20 cm-1 higher than usually quoted in the past. This mode is thus labelled as v14, leaving the label v15 for the known vibration at 992.66 cm-1. Weak combination bands 171182 ← 182, 171131 ← 131, 121182 ← 181, and 171182 ← 181 are studied for the first time, and assignments in the known v11, v16, and v15 fundamental bands are also extended. The seven excited vibrations involved in these bands are analyzed, together with five more unobserved vibrations in the same region (850-1020 cm-1), in a large 12-state simultaneous fit which accounts for most of the many observed perturbations in the spectra.

  16. Detailed structural study of β-artemether: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of Infrared, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jianchao; Li, Linwei; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical studies on the structure of β-artemether are presented. The optimized molecular structure, Mulliken atomic charges, vibrational spectra (IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism), and molecular electrostatic potential have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (2d, p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments for Artemether have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) has been explored by ab initio calculations, and then was used to compare with the experimental VCD. The consistence between them confirmed the absolute configuration of Artemether. In addition, HOMO-LUMO of the title compound as well as thermo-dynamical parameters has illustrated the stability of β-artemether.

  17. Determination of populations of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide molecules in gas dynamic lasers by ir spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhir, L.P.; Overchenko, Yu.V.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption and emission spectra of some vibrational and rotational transitions of the carbon dioxide molecule in the range of 4.3, 10, and 15 ..mu.. m are analyzed under non-equilibrium conditions at the outlet of a gas-dynamic laser; and an examination is made of the possibility of their use to determine the populations of lower vibrational levels of carbon dioxide at different degrees of expansion. In view of the sharp distinction of relaxation rates for various degrees of freedom in a gas-dynamic laser, the vibrational temperatures of various levels of CO/sub 2/ may differ significantly from each other, as well as from rotational and translational temperatures. In describing populations in terms of the length of a jet, vibrational and rotational energies are separated and population temperatures equal to mode temperatures are assumed for purely symmetric deformation and asymmetric vibrations. A method for determining the absolute populations of low vibrational levels of the carbon dioxide molecule is developed according to measurements of absorption and brightness of a non-equilibrium jet near given frequencies.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in biological systems. Opportunities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has become more important for applications in the material sciences, geology, environmental science and biology, specifically in the field of molecular biology. The scope of this thesis is to add more experimental evidence in order to show how applicable X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is to biology. Two biological systems were investigated, at the molecular level, lead uptake in plants and the effect of silver on bacteria. This investigation also included an analysis of the sensitivity of Pb L3- and Ag L3-XANES spectra with regard to their chemical environment. It was shown that Pb L3- and Ag L3-XANES spectra are sensitive to an environment with at least differences in the second coordination shell. The non-destructive and element specific properties of XANES are the key advantages that were very important for this investigation. However, in both projects the adequate selection of reference compounds, which required in some cases a chemical synthesis, was the critical factor to determine the chemical speciation and, finally, possible uptake and storage mechanisms for plants and antibacterial mechanisms of silver. The chemical environment of Pb in roots and leaves of plants from four different plant families and a lichen from a former lead mining site in the Eifel mountains in Germany was determined using both solid compounds and aqueous solutions of different ionic strength, which simulate the plant environment. The results can be interpreted in such a way that lead is sorbed on the surface of cell walls. Silver bonding as reaction with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli bacteria was determined using inorganic silver compounds and synthesized silver amino acids. Silver binds to sulfur, amine and carboxyl groups in amino acids.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in biological systems. Opportunities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovenkamp, Gudrun Lisa

    2013-05-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has become more important for applications in the material sciences, geology, environmental science and biology, specifically in the field of molecular biology. The scope of this thesis is to add more experimental evidence in order to show how applicable X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is to biology. Two biological systems were investigated, at the molecular level, lead uptake in plants and the effect of silver on bacteria. This investigation also included an analysis of the sensitivity of Pb L{sub 3}- and Ag L{sub 3}-XANES spectra with regard to their chemical environment. It was shown that Pb L{sub 3}- and Ag L{sub 3}-XANES spectra are sensitive to an environment with at least differences in the second coordination shell. The non-destructive and element specific properties of XANES are the key advantages that were very important for this investigation. However, in both projects the adequate selection of reference compounds, which required in some cases a chemical synthesis, was the critical factor to determine the chemical speciation and, finally, possible uptake and storage mechanisms for plants and antibacterial mechanisms of silver. The chemical environment of Pb in roots and leaves of plants from four different plant families and a lichen from a former lead mining site in the Eifel mountains in Germany was determined using both solid compounds and aqueous solutions of different ionic strength, which simulate the plant environment. The results can be interpreted in such a way that lead is sorbed on the surface of cell walls. Silver bonding as reaction with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli bacteria was determined using inorganic silver compounds and synthesized silver amino acids. Silver binds to sulfur, amine and carboxyl groups in amino acids.

  20. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray-induced photo-chemistry of metal sites within biological molecules is a concern for X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and other techniques in which samples are illuminated with X-rays. The effects of X-ray-induced photo-chemistry are reviewed and the methods used to mitigate these in X-ray absorption spectroscopy are outlined.

  1. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  2. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  3. Analysis of biological and chemical compounds by remote spectroscopy using IR TeX glass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Foulgoc, Karine; Le Neindre, Lydia; Guimond, Yann; Ma, Hong Li; Zhang, Xhang H.; Lucas, Jacques

    1995-09-01

    The TeX glasses are attracting much attention as materials for low loss mid-IR optical fibers and are consequently good candidates for thermal imaging, laser power delivery, and more recently remote sensing. The TeX glass fiber, transmitting in a wide optical window, has a minimum attenuation in the 9-10 micrometers region. Fibers with an attenuation of less than 0.5 dB/m have been repeatly obtained. These fibers are coated with a UV curable or thermal plastic, in order to improve their mechanical properites. The IR remote spectroscopy using TeX fibers is one of the most promising applications. This technology allows to perform in situ, real-time, and on-line analysis of chemical and biological compounds. The study of industrial processes such as fermentations has been performed by this method, based on the use of these IR TeX fibers.

  4. Parallel analysis of individual biological cells using multifocal laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Taylor, Douglas S; Matthews, Dennis L; Chan, James W

    2010-11-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a multifocal laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (M-LTRS) technique for parallel Raman spectral acquisition of individual biological cells. Using a 785-nm diode laser and a time-sharing laser trapping scheme, multiple laser foci are generated to optically trap single polystyrene beads and suspension cells in a linear pattern. Raman signals from the trapped objects are simultaneously projected through the slit of a spectrometer and spatially resolved on a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector with minimal signal crosstalk between neighboring cells. By improving the rate of single-cell analysis, M-LTRS is expected to be a valuable method for studying single-cell dynamics of cell populations and for the development of high-throughput Raman based cytometers. PMID:21073802

  5. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode–sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50–400 g l−1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m−1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m−1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality. (paper)

  6. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  7. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav

    2004-12-15

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180{sup o} between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180{sup o}. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  8. Composite vibrational spectroscopy of the group 12 difluorides: ZnF2, CdF2, and HgF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonik, Victor G.; Smirnov, Alexander N.; Navarkin, Ilya S.

    2016-04-01

    The vibrational spectra of group 12 difluorides, MF2 (M = Zn, Cd, Hg), were investigated via coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples, CCSD(T), including core correlation, with a series of correlation consistent basis sets ranging in size from triple-zeta through quintuple-zeta quality, which were then extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using a variety of extrapolation procedures. The explicitly correlated coupled cluster method, CCSD(T)-F12b, was employed as well. Although exhibiting quite different convergence behavior, the F12b method yielded the CBS limit estimates closely matching more computationally expensive conventional CBS extrapolations. The convergence with respect to basis set size was examined for the contributions entering into composite vibrational spectroscopy, including those from higher-order correlation accounted for through the CCSDT(Q) level of theory, second-order spin-orbit coupling effects assessed within four-component and two-component relativistic formalisms, and vibrational anharmonicity evaluated via a perturbative treatment. Overall, the composite results are in excellent agreement with available experimental values, except for the CdF2 bond-stretching frequencies compared to spectral assignments proposed in a matrix isolation infrared and Raman study of cadmium difluoride vapor species [Loewenschuss et al., J. Chem. Phys. 50, 2502 (1969); Givan and Loewenschuss, J. Chem. Phys. 72, 3809 (1980)]. These assignments are called into question in the light of the composite results.

  9. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  10. Vibrational study of the structural phase transition in bis(pyrrolidinium)-chloride-hexachloroantimonate(V) by infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska-Bolek, B.; Jakubas, R.; Bator, G.; Baran, J.

    2002-09-01

    Infrared spectra of bis(pirrolidinium)-chloride-hexachloroantimonate(V) {(C 4H 8NH 2+) 2SbCl 6-·Cl -} in the region of the internal vibrations of the pyrrolidinium cations (3500-400 cm -1) around the phase transition at T c=134 K are presented and discussed. A detailed analysis has been performed for the bands assigned to the stretching and deformation vibrations of the C 4N ring as well as the NH 2+ and CH 2 groups of the cation. It has been suggested that the mechanism of the phase transition is connected with a change in the dynamical state of the pyrrolidinium cation.

  11. Studies of Heterogeneously Catalyzed Liquid-Phase Alcohol Oxidation on Platinum bySum-frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Reaction Rate Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Compared to many branches of chemistry, the molecular level study of catalytically active surfaces is young. Only with the invention of ultrahigh vacuum technology in the past half century has it been possible to carry out experiments that yield useful molecular information about the reactive occurrences at a surface. The reason is two-fold: low pressure is necessary to keep a surface clean for an amount of time long enough to perform an experiment, and most atomic scale techniques that are surface speci c (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, etc.) cannot be used at ambient pressures, because electrons, which act as chemical probes in these techniques, are easily scattered by molecules. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one technique that can provide molecular level information from the surface without the necessity for high vacuum. Since the advent of SFG as a surface spectroscopic tool it has proved its worth in the studies of surface catalyzed reactions in the gas phase, with numerous reactions in the gas phase having been investigated on a multitude of surfaces. However, in situ SFG characterization of catalysis at the solid-liquid interface has yet to be thoroughly pursued despite the broad interest in the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the liquid phase as replacements for homogeneous counterparts. This work describes an attempt to move in that direction, applying SFG to study the solid-liquid interface under conditions of catalytic alcohol oxidation on platinum.

  12. Structure Sensitivity in Pt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene: In Situ Study of Reaction Intermediates Using SFG Vibrational Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2013-01-31

    The product selectivity during 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation on monodisperse, colloidally synthesized, Pt nanoparticles was studied under reaction conditions with kinetic measurements and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG was performed with the capping ligands intact in order to maintain nanoparticle size by reduced sintering. Four products are formed at 75 C: 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and n-butane. Ensembles of Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 0.9 and 1.8 nm exhibit a ∼30% and ∼20% increase in the full hydrogenation products, respectively, as compared to Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.6 and 6.7 nm. Methyl and methylene vibrational stretches of reaction intermediates observed under working conditions using SFG were used to correlate the stable reaction intermediates with the product distribution. Kinetic and SFG results correlate with previous DFT predictions for two parallel reaction pathways of 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene can initiate with H-addition at internal or terminal carbons leading to the formation of 1-buten-4-yl radical (metallocycle) and 2-buten-1-yl radical intermediates, respectively. Small (0.9 and 1.8 nm) nanoparticles exhibited vibrational resonances originating from both intermediates, while the large (4.6 and 6.7 nm) particles exhibited vibrational resonances originating predominately from the 2-buten-1-yl radical. This suggests each reaction pathway competes for partial and full hydrogenation and the nanoparticle size affects the kinetic preference for the two pathways. The reaction pathway through the metallocycle intermediate on the small nanoparticles is likely due to the presence of low-coordinated sites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Communication: He-tagged vibrational spectra of the SarGlyH+ and H+(H2O)2,3 ions: Quantifying tag effects in cryogenic ion vibrational predissociation (CIVP) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the degree to which more perturbative, but widely used “tag” species (Ar, H2, Ne) affect the intrinsic band patterns of the isolated ions, we describe the extension of mass-selective, cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy to the very weakly interacting helium complexes of three archetypal ions: the dipeptide SarGlyH+ and the small protonated water clusters: H+(H2O)2,3, including the H5O2+ “Zundel” ion. He adducts were generated in a 4.5 K octopole ion trap interfaced to a double-focusing, tandem time-of-flight photofragmentation mass spectrometer to record mass-selected vibrational predissociation spectra. The H2 tag-induced shift (relative to that by He) on the tag-bound NH stretch of the SarGlyH+ spectrum is quite small (12 cm−1), while the effect on the floppy H5O2+ ion is more dramatic (125 cm−1) in going from Ar (or H2) to Ne. The shifts from Ne to He, on the other hand, while quantitatively significant (maximum of 10 cm−1), display the same basic H5O2+ band structure, indicating that the He-tagged H5O2+ spectrum accurately represents the delocalized nature of the vibrational zero-point level. Interestingly, the He-tagged spectrum of H+(H2O)3 reveals the location of the non-bonded OH group on the central H3O+ ion to fall between the collective non-bonded OH stretches on the flanking water molecules in a position typically associated with a neutral OH group

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory calculation of anthracene: Effect of dispersion force on the vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Tominaga, Keisuke, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-0013 (Japan); Hayashi, Michitoshi, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp; Wang, Houng-Wei [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Kambara, Ohki; Sasaki, Tetsuo [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Jyohoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Nishizawa, Jun-ichi, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp [Jun-ichi Nishizawa Memorial Research Center, Tohoku University, 519-1176 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The phonon modes of molecular crystals in the terahertz frequency region often feature delicately coupled inter- and intra-molecular vibrations. Recent advances in density functional theory such as DFT-D{sup *} have enabled accurate frequency calculation. However, the nature of normal modes has not been quantitatively discussed against experimental criteria such as isotope shift (IS) and correlation field splitting (CFS). Here, we report an analytical mode-decoupling method that allows for the decomposition of a normal mode of interest into intermolecular translation, libration, and intramolecular vibrational motions. We show an application of this method using the crystalline anthracene system as an example. The relationship between the experimentally obtained IS and the IS obtained by PBE-D{sup *} simulation indicates that two distinctive regions exist. Region I is associated with a pure intermolecular translation, whereas region II features coupled intramolecular vibrations that are further coupled by a weak intermolecular translation. We find that the PBE-D{sup *} data show excellent agreement with the experimental data in terms of IS and CFS in region II; however, PBE-D{sup *} produces significant deviations in IS in region I where strong coupling between inter- and intra-molecular vibrations contributes to normal modes. The result of this analysis is expected to facilitate future improvement of DFT-D{sup *}.

  15. Vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy as a tool to study DNA structural changes: Experimental and computional approaches (Lecture)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrushchenko, Valery; Wieser, H.; Bouř, Petr

    Kharkiv : Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NASU, 2007, 28/145. [Kharkiv Young Scientist Conference on Radiophysics and Electronics /7./. Kharkiv (UA), 12.12.2007-14.12.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vibrational circular dichroism * DNA * RNA Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry www.ire.kharkov.ua/ysc

  16. Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] : quantitative sssessment of the trans effect of NO.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, N.; Sage, J. T.; Silvernail, N.; Scheidt, W. R.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Michigan); (Northeastern Univ.); (Univ. of Notre Dame)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [{sup 57}Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP{sup 2-} = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm{sup -1}. The 437 cm{sup -1} feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows a {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope shift of 8 cm{sup -1} and is therefore assigned to v(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520-580 cm{sup -1} region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm{sup -1}. The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520-580 cm{sup -1} region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of ?(Fe-NO) and {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at {approx}550 cm{sup -1} had usually been associated with v(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin

  17. Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)]: quantitative assessment of the trans effect of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Sage, J Timothy; Silvernail, Nathan; Scheidt, W Robert; Alp, E Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [(57)Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP(2-) = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm(-1). The 437 cm(-1) feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows a (15)N(18)O isotope shift of 8 cm(-1) and is therefore assigned to nu(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520-580 cm(-1) region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to delta(ip)(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm(-1). The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520-580 cm(-1) region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of nu(Fe-NO) and delta(ip)(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at approximately 550 cm(-1) had usually been associated with nu(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin (Mb) mutants where the distal histidine (His64

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  19. IRMPD spectroscopy of protonated S-nitrosocaptopril, a biologically active, synthetic amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Cecilia; Re, Nazzareno; Scuderi, Debora; Maître, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Fornarini, Simonetta; Lanucara, Francesco; Sinha, Rajeev K; Crestoni, Maria Elisa

    2010-11-01

    S-Nitrosocaptopril, a biologically active S-nitrosothiol, is generated as protonated species and isolated in the gas phase by electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) or ion-trap mass spectrometry. The structural and IR spectroscopic characterization of protonated S-nitrosocaptopril (SNOcapH(+)) is aided by the comparative study of the parent species lacking the NO feature, namely protonated captopril. The study is accomplished by methodologies based on tandem mass spectrometry, namely by energy resolved collision-induced dissociation and infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, backed by density functional theory calculations. IRMPD spectra have been obtained both in the 1000-1900 cm(-1) fingerprint range, using a beamline of the infrared free electron laser (IR-FEL) at the Centre Laser Infrarouge d'Orsay (CLIO), and in the O-H and N-H stretching region (2900-3700 cm(-1)) using the tunable IR radiation of a tabletop parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser source. The structural features of the ion have been ascertained by comparison of the experimental IRMPD spectra with the IR transitions calculated for the lowest energy isomers. Evidence is obtained that protonation occurs at the amide carbonyl oxygen which is found to be the thermodynamically most basic site. However, SNOcapH(+) is present as a thermally equilibrated mixture of low-energy structures, with a major contribution of the most stable isomer characterized by a trans relationship of the positively charged OH group with respect to the carboxylic acid functionality on the adjacent proline ring and by an anti conformation at the S-N (partial) double bond, though the energy difference with the analogous trans-syn isomer is less than 1 kJ mol(-1). The highly diagnostic N-O stretching mode has been unambiguously identified, which may be regarded as an informative probe for S-nitrosation features in more complex, biologically active

  20. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselman, Brian J; Amberger, Brent K; Shutter, Joshua D; Daane, Mitchell A; Stanton, John F; Woods, R Claude; McMahon, Robert J

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-(13)C]-C4H4N2, [4-(13)C]-C4H4N2, and [1-(15)N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key

  1. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy of bromobenzene and its perdeuterated isotopologue: Assignment of the vibrations of the S(0), S(1), and D(0)(+) states of bromobenzene and the S(0) and D(0)(+) states of iodobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D; Harris, Joe P; Wright, Timothy G

    2015-12-28

    We report vibrationally resolved spectra of the S1←S0 transition of bromobenzene using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. We study bromobenzene-h5 as well as its perdeuterated isotopologue, bromobenzene-d5. The form of the vibrational modes between the isotopologues and also between the S0 and S1 electronic states is discussed for each species, allowing assignment of the bands to be achieved and the activity between states and isotopologues to be established. Vibrational bands are assigned utilizing quantum chemical calculations, previous experimental results, and isotopic shifts. Previous work and assignments of the S1 spectra are discussed. Additionally, the vibrations in the ground state cation, D0 (+), are considered, since these have also been used by previous workers in assigning the excited neutral state spectra. We also examine the vibrations of iodobenzene in the S0 and D0 (+) states and comment on the previous assignments of these. In summary, we have been able to assign the corresponding vibrations across the whole monohalobenzene series of molecules, in the S0, S1, and D0 (+) states, gaining insight into vibrational activity and vibrational couplings. PMID:26723684

  2. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy of bromobenzene and its perdeuterated isotopologue: Assignment of the vibrations of the S0, S1, and D0+ states of bromobenzene and the S0 and D0+ states of iodobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report vibrationally resolved spectra of the S1←S0 transition of bromobenzene using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. We study bromobenzene-h5 as well as its perdeuterated isotopologue, bromobenzene-d5. The form of the vibrational modes between the isotopologues and also between the S0 and S1 electronic states is discussed for each species, allowing assignment of the bands to be achieved and the activity between states and isotopologues to be established. Vibrational bands are assigned utilizing quantum chemical calculations, previous experimental results, and isotopic shifts. Previous work and assignments of the S1 spectra are discussed. Additionally, the vibrations in the ground state cation, D0+, are considered, since these have also been used by previous workers in assigning the excited neutral state spectra. We also examine the vibrations of iodobenzene in the S0 and D0+ states and comment on the previous assignments of these. In summary, we have been able to assign the corresponding vibrations across the whole monohalobenzene series of molecules, in the S0, S1, and D0+ states, gaining insight into vibrational activity and vibrational couplings

  3. Next generation techniques in the high resolution spectroscopy of biologically relevant molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Justin L; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2011-04-28

    Recent advances in the technology of test and measurement equipment driven by the computer and telecommunications industries have made possible the development of a new broadband, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer that operates on principles similar to FTNMR. This technique uses a high sample-rate arbitrary waveform generator to construct a phase-locked chirped microwave pulse that gives a linear frequency sweep over a wide frequency range in 1 μs. The chirped pulse efficiently polarizes the molecular sample at all frequencies lying within this band. The subsequent free induction decay of this polarization is measured with a high-speed digitizer and then fast Fourier-transformed to yield a broadband, frequency-resolved rotational spectrum, spanning up to 11.5 GHz and containing lines that are as narrow as 100 kHz. This new technique is called chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The technique offers the potential to determine the structural and dynamical properties of very large molecules solely from fully resolved pure rotational spectra. FTMW double resonance techniques employing a low-resolution UV laser facilitate an easy assignment of overlapping spectra produced by different conformers in the sample. Of particular interest are the energy landscapes of conformationally flexible molecules of biological importance, including studies of their interaction with solvent and/or other weakly bound molecules. An example is provided from the authors' work on p-methoxyphenethylamine, a neurotransmitter, and its complexes with water. PMID:21394332

  4. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Proton transport in biological systems can be probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chungwen; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine the proton transfer (PT) rate in channel proteins by two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. Proton transport processes in biological systems, such as proton channels, trigger numerous fundamental biochemical reactions. Due to the limitation in both spatial and time resolution of the traditional experimental approaches, describing the whole proton transport process and identifying the rate limiting steps at the molecular level is challenging. In the present paper, we focus on proton transport through the Gramicidin A channel. Using a kinetic PT model derived from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we model the amide I region of the 2DIR spectrum of the channel protein to examine its sensitivity to the proton transport process. We demonstrate that the 2DIR spectrum of the isotope-labeled channel contain information on the PT rate, which may be extracted by analyzing the antidiagonal linewidth of the spectral feature related to the labeled site. Such experiments in combination with detailed numerical simulations should allow the extraction of site dependent PT rates, providing a method for identifying possible rate limiting steps for proton channel transfer.

  6. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  7. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Electrical pulse induced biological effects using dielectric spectroscopy and mathematical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Allen Lawrence

    This dissertation studies the effects of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on biological cells by measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the pulsed cells and mathematically modeling avascular tumor growth, cell population dynamics, and Ohmic heating. These issues are critical because of the recent use of intense ultrashort PEFs for various biological and medical applications. Recent research using PEFs for tumor treatment motivated an investigation of a simple model for the growth of an avascular tumor. We modeled tumor growth before and after necrotic core formation by incorporating spatial dependence into a one dimensional scaling law. This model emphasized the importance of cell metabolic rate in determining the final steady state size of the tumor. Experimental results showing changes in cell survival and cell cycle due to PEFs led to an investigation of a simple mathematical model for cell population dynamics that considered the cells to be proliferating (dividing) or quiescent (resting). Although some cell populations apparently reached steady state quickly, the proliferating cell population fell below one, meaning that the overall cell population would eventually decay away. This result, which was unaltered by including a transition from the quiescent to proliferating state, emphasized the importance of targeting proliferating cells for successful cancer treatments. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy was used to measure the electrical properties of a biological cell suspension over a wide frequency range with a single pulse following multiple PEFs. Fitting the dielectric properties of a cancer cell (Jurkat) suspension to a double shell model yielded the dielectric parameters of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, nuclear envelope, and nucleoplasm. Decreased cytoplasm and nucleoplasm conductivity and increased suspension conductivity suggestion transport from the cell interior to the exterior consistent with electroporation. Reduced cell membrane

  9. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible, and NMR spectroscopy and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando E.; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Fortuna, Mario; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the structural and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol using the hybrid B3LYP method together with the 6-31G∗ basis set. Three stable structures with minimum energy found on the potential energy curves (PES) were optimized, and the corresponding molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies and topological properties were computed at the same approximation level. The complete assignment of the bands observed in the vibrational spectrum of 13-epi-sclareol was performed taking into account the internal symmetry coordinates for the three structures using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology at the same level of theory. In addition, the force constants were calculated and compared with those reported in the literature for similar compounds. The predicted vibrational spectrum and the calculated 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical UV-Vis spectra for the most stable structure of 13-epi-sclareol demonstrate a better correlation with the corresponding experimental spectrum. The study of the three conformers by means of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) revealed different H bond interactions and a strong dependence of the interactions on the distance between the involved atoms. Furthermore, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations showed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization for the two six-membered rings with chair conformations.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite--(Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-15

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm(-1) assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO4(2-) units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm(-1) are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm(-1) are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood. PMID:23434550

  11. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Interpenetrating polymer network membranes for fuel cells: infrared vibrational spectroscopy; Membranes baseadas dm redes polimericas interpenetrantes para celulas a combustivel: estudo por espectroscopia vibracional no infravermelho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Felipe A.M.; Rocco, Ana Maria [Grupo de Materiais Condutores e Energia, Escola de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: amrocco@eq.ufrj.br; Pereira, Robson Pacheco [Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, proton conductive membranes based on IPN matrices doped with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were developed. The characterization by infrared vibrational spectroscopy evidenced the polymerization of DGEBA and the immobilization of PEI chains, originating a structure containing basic sites suitable for proton coordination and conduction. The FTIR characterization evidenced the polymerization of DGEBA in the presence of PEI thus forming Semi-IPN membranes which, after doped with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, exhibited conductivity values of 10{sup -4} W{sup -1}cm{sup -1} at room temperature and 10{sup -3} {omega}{sup -1}cm{sup -1} at 80 degree C, as well as a dependency of conductivity with temperature following the Arrhenius model. The activation energy values (14,33 and 12,96 kJ.mol{sup -1}) indicated a proton conduction mechanism predominantly vehicular in the matrices studied under 100% relative humidity. (author)

  13. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar

    2011-04-28

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm average size, synthesized by colloidal methods and cleaned by ultraviolet light and ozone treatment. Reactions carried out at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 20-120 °C produced dihydro and tetrahydro species, as well as ring-opening products (alcohols) and ring-cracking products, showing high selectivity toward ring opening throughout the entire temperature range. The aromatic rings (MF and DMF) adsorbed parallel to the nanoparticle surface. Results yield insight into various surface reaction intermediates and the reason for the significantly lower selectivity for ring cracking in DMF hydrogenation compared to MF hydrogenation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Claussen, Anetta;

    2006-01-01

    We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretical...... and experimental approach. The systems we have studied systematically are the amino acids (L-alanine, L-tryptophan, and L-histidine), peptides (N-acetyl L-alanine N'-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-tryptophan N'-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-histidine N'-methyl amide, L-alanyl L-alanine, tri-L-serine, N-acetyl L......-alanine L-ploline L-tyrosine N'-methyl amide, Leu-enkephalin, cyclo-(gly-L-pro), N-acetyl (L-alanine)(n) N'-methyl amide), 3-methyl indole, and a variety of small molecules (dichlobenil and 2,6-dochlorobenzamide) of relevance to the protein systems under study. We have used molecular mechanics, the SCC...

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting β-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control

  16. Structural characterization of electron-induced proton transfer in the formic acid dimer anion, (HCOOH)2-, with vibrational and photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Helen K.; DeBlase, Andrew F.; Leavitt, Christopher M.; Su, Xiaoge; Jordan, Kenneth D.; McCoy, Anne B.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2012-04-01

    The (HCOOH)2 anion, formed by electron attachment to the formic acid dimer (FA2), is an archetypal system for exploring the mechanics of the electron-induced proton transfer motif that is purported to occur when neutral nucleic acid base-pairs accommodate an excess electron [K. Aflatooni, G. A. Gallup, and P. D. Burrow, J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 6205 (1998), 10.1021/jp980865n; J. H. Hendricks, S. A. Lyapustina, H. L. de Clercq, J. T. Snodgrass, and K. H. Bowen, J. Chem Phys. 104, 7788 (1996), 10.1063/1.471484; C. Desfrancois, H. Abdoul-Carime, and J. P. Schermann, J. Chem Phys. 104, 7792 (1996)]. The FA2 anion and several of its H/D isotopologues were isolated in the gas phase and characterized using Ar-tagged vibrational predissociation and electron autodetachment spectroscopies. The photoelectron spectrum of the FA2 anion was also recorded using velocity-map imaging. The resulting spectroscopic information verifies the equilibrium FA2- geometry predicted by theory which features a symmetrical, double H-bonded bridge effectively linking together constituents that most closely resemble the formate ion and a dihydroxymethyl radical. The spectroscopic signatures of this ion were analyzed with the aid of calculated anharmonic vibrational band patterns.

  17. Structural, Potential Surface and Vibrational Spectroscopy Studies of Hypophosphorous Acid in the Gas Phase and Chain Conformation. A Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential energy surfaces (PES), molecular and vibrational structure of hypophosphours acid (HPA) were investigated by HF, MP2 and DFT-B3LYP level of theory using 6-31G** basis set. In order to approach solid state spectra we optimized mono-, di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-mer structures and computed frequencies and intensities of the vibrational modes of VCD and IR. It is found that by increasing the number of HPA molecules in the chain, some of calculated vibrational frequencies approach to the experimental solid state values. The potential energy surfaces of HPA are calculated in a wide range on the plane perpendicular to the P-O bond where the hydrogen can rotate 360 degree through O=P-O-H dihedral angle. A circular valley is found going up and down on the plane, the valley is centered to the continuation of P-O bond. There are two minima at angles ±42.5.deg. to the O=P-O plane giving two mirror conformers and one saddle point in between with a height of 284.87 cm-1 at the angles 0.deg. and a complex barrier with a height of 2089.40 cm-1 at the angle 180.deg. to the same plane. On top of the complex barrier, there is a small well with depth of 15.65 cm-1. To study the tunneling effect and pathway between the two conformers, the molecule is considered to have CS symmetry and a symmetric double minimum potential energy well with a barrier of 284.87 cm-1 height in the middle. With the constructed potential, the torsional motion of P-O-H (Hindered Rotation) of the monomer, using variation method and harmonic oscillator wave functions is studied and IR frequencies and relative intensities of vibrational modes are calculated. Due to the width of the well and the trigonometric shape of the barrier, tunneling can occur at the ground state and the next excited state does not feel the barrier at all

  18. Determining Enzyme Kinetics for Systems Biology with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann J. Eicher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme kinetics for systems biology should ideally yield information about the enzyme’s activity under in vivo conditions, including such reaction features as substrate cooperativity, reversibility and allostery, and be applicable to enzymatic reactions with multiple substrates. A large body of enzyme-kinetic data in the literature is based on the uni-substrate Michaelis–Menten equation, which makes unnatural assumptions about enzymatic reactions (e.g., irreversibility, and its application in systems biology models is therefore limited. To overcome this limitation, we have utilised NMR time-course data in a combined theoretical and experimental approach to parameterize the generic reversible Hill equation, which is capable of describing enzymatic reactions in terms of all the properties mentioned above and has fewer parameters than detailed mechanistic kinetic equations; these parameters are moreover defined operationally. Traditionally, enzyme kinetic data have been obtained from initial-rate studies, often using assays coupled to NAD(PH-producing or NAD(PH-consuming reactions. However, these assays are very labour-intensive, especially for detailed characterisation of multi-substrate reactions. We here present a cost-effective and relatively rapid method for obtaining enzyme-kinetic parameters from metabolite time-course data generated using NMR spectroscopy. The method requires fewer runs than traditional initial-rate studies and yields more information per experiment, as whole time-courses are analyzed and used for parameter fitting. Additionally, this approach allows real-time simultaneous quantification of all metabolites present in the assay system (including products and allosteric modifiers, which demonstrates the superiority of NMR over traditional spectrophotometric coupled enzyme assays. The methodology presented is applied to the elucidation of kinetic parameters for two coupled glycolytic enzymes from Escherichia coli

  19. Ion-molecule interactions of biological importance. A vibrational spectroscopic study of magnesium complexes with hydroxylated quinones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luteoskyrin and rugulosin are two naturally occurring yellow pigments with hydroxylated bis-anthraquinonic structures. They cause serious liver disorders in man due to the formation of complexes of the type pigment-Mg2+-DNA. In order to elucidate the structure of these complexes we have studied the vibrational spectra of some model systems, namely 1-hydroxy- and 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone, their magnesium chelate complexes, and a series of simpler complexes as the acetylacetonates of some divalent metals. Complete vibrational assignment are proposed for anthraquinone-9,10, the two hydroxylated and deureroxylated derivatives and their magnesium complexes. The substitution of 26Mg in place of 24Mg in these complexes enabled us to assign the Mg-O vibrations; their number corresponds to a hexa-coordinated metal in the acetylacetonate case and to a tetra-coordinated structure in the anthraquinone-olates complexes. The position of the ν C=0 and ν C-0 vibrations bands in the complexes shows that the bonds in the chelated ring of Mg(1-O-AQ)2 retains their single and double bond characteristic whereas in the CMg(1,4-O2,-AQ)n a resonating structure appears in the ring. The study of the IR and R spectra of the complexes enabled a tetrahedral structure to be proposed for the oxygens around the magnesium. Finally it was noted that the Mg-O bonds possessed a high degree of covalent character. (author)

  20. Spatially-resolved probing of biological phantoms by point-radiance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Palmer, Tyler J.; Whelan, William M.

    2011-03-01

    Interstitial fiber-optic based strategies for therapy monitoring and assessment rely on detecting treatment-induced changes in the light distribution in biological tissues. We present an optical technique to identify spectrally and spatially specific tissue chromophores in highly scattering turbid media. Typical optical sensors measure non-directional light intensity (i.e. fluence) and require fiber translation (i.e. 3-5 positions), which is difficult to implement clinically. Point radiance spectroscopy is based on directional light collection (i.e. radiance) at a single point with a side-firing fiber that can be rotated up to 360°. A side firing fiber accepts light within a well-defined solid angle thus potentially providing an improved spatial resolution. Experimental measurements were performed using an 800-μm diameter isotropic spherical diffuser coupled to a halogen light source and a 600 μm, ~43° cleaved fiber (i.e. radiance detector). The background liquid-based scattering phantom was fabricated using 1% Intralipid (i.e. scattering medium). Light was collected at 1-5° increments through 360°-segment. Gold nanoparticles, placed into a 3.5 mm diameter capillary tube were used as localized scatterers and absorbers introduced into the liquid phantom both on- and off-axis between source and detector. The localized optical inhomogeneity was detectable as an angular-resolved variation in the radiance polar plots. This technique is being investigated as a non-invasive optical modality for prostate cancer monitoring.

  1. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of organic and biological transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 1 - Introduction. A short introduction to TRIR spectroscopy is given, including a description of different experimental approaches to nanosecond TRIR. Previous applications of TRIR to the study of organic photochemistry and biological systems are outlined. The experimental methods used within this thesis are briefly described, particularly with reference being made to previous, more detailed accounts of the techniques. Chapter 2 - Photopolymerisation Initiators. A description of previous spectroscopic studies on the photochemistry of photopolymerisation initiators is given, focusing on phosphine oxides, and α-hydroxy and (α-amino ketones. A combination of time-resolved s2-FTIR, diode laser based TRIR and ultrafast TRIR have been used in order to provide insight into the photochemistry of (2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)diphenylphosphine oxide. The reactivity of its daughter 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl radical towards a range of radical quenchers (n-butyl acrylate, thiophenol, bromotrichloromethane and oxygen) has been determined. Other commercial photoinitiators have been investigated and the reactivities of their daughter benzoyl radicals have also been measured. Chapter 3 - Protein Folding. This chapter starts by outlining some of the unanswered questions concerning the folding of proteins. A description of different experimental approaches for obtaining structural and conformational information on proteins is given. The focus is then directed to methodologies and previous experiments that have been used for obtaining time-resolved information on conformational changes that occur when a protein folds or unfolds. A variable temperature steady-state FTIR study of a small β-hairpin model peptide has revealed that hydrogen bonding plays a rather insignificant role in the stabilisation of the β-hairpin. (author)

  2. Introduction: Andrew Thomson and the Centre for Metalloprotein Spectroscopy and Biology at the University of East Anglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael T

    2008-12-01

    The present article briefly relates the early history and growth of the Centre for Metalloprotein Spectroscopy and Biology at UEA (University of East Anglia) under the joint directorship of A.J. Thomson and C. Greenwood, and charts the exceptional success that this centre has had in fostering bioinorganic chemistry in the U.K. and the impact that it has had internationally. PMID:19021505

  3. Microelemental and mineral compositions of pathogenic biomineral concrements: SRXFA, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, T.N. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: moroz@uiggm.nsc.ru; Palchik, N.A.; Dar' in, A.V. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-11

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF), X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy had been applied for determination of microelemental and mineral composition of the kidney stones, gallstones and salivalities from natives of Novosibirsk and Novosibirsk region, Russia. The relationship between mineral, organic and microelemental composition of pathogenic calcilus was shown.

  4. Resonant intermolecular transfer of vibrational energy in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    1999-12-01

    Many biological, chemical and physical processes involve the transfer of energy. In the case of electronic excitations, transfer between molecules is rapid, whereas for vibrations in the condensed phase, resonant energy transfer is an unlikely process because the typical timescale of vibrational relaxation (a few picoseconds) is much shorter than that of resonant intermolecular vibrational energy transfer. For the OH-stretch vibration in liquid water, which is of particular importance due to its coupling to the hydrogen bond, extensive investigations have shown that vibrational relaxation takes place with a time constant of 740 +/- 25 femtoseconds (ref. 7). So for resonant intermolecular energy transfer to occur in liquid water, the interaction between the OH-stretch modes of different water molecules needs to be extremely strong. Here we report time-resolved pump-probe laser spectroscopy measurements that reveal the occurrence of fast resonant intermolecular transfer of OH-stretch excitations over many water molecules before the excitation energy is dissipated. We find that the transfer process is mediated by dipole-dipole interactions (the Förster transfer mechanism) and additional mechanisms that are possibly based on intermolecular anharmonic interactions involving hydrogen bonds. Our findings suggest that liquid water may play an important role in transporting vibrational energy between OH groups located on either different biomolecules or along extended biological structures. OH groups in a hydrophobic environment should accordingly be able to remain in a vibrationally excited state longer than OH groups in a hydrophilic environment.

  5. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-08-19

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  6. Quantitative terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and analysis in chemistry and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2005-01-01

    I will describe how Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) can be used for quantitative, broadband spectroscopy in the far-infrared spectral region. Thz-TDS is sensitive to long-range, non-covalent interactions in the condensed phase, for instance intermolecular hydrogen bonding in molecular...

  7. Quantitative terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and analysis in chemistry and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2005-01-01

    I will describe how Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) can be used for quantitative, broadband spectroscopy in the far-infrared spectral region. Thz-TDS is sensitive to long-range, non-covalent interactions in the condensed phase, for instance intermolecular hydrogen bonding in molecula...

  8. Vibrational mid-infrared photothermal spectroscopy using a fiber laser probe: asymptotic limit in signal-to-baseline contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totachawattana, Atcha; Liu, Hui; Mertiri, Alket; Hong, Mi K; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Sander, Michelle Y

    2016-01-01

    We report on a mid-infrared photothermal spectroscopy system with a near-infrared fiber probe laser and a tunable quantum cascade pump laser. Photothermal spectra of a 6 μm-thick 4-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal sample are measured with a signal-to-baseline contrast above 103. As both the peak photothermal signal and the corresponding baseline increase linearly with probe power, the signal-to-baseline contrast converges to an asymptotic limit for a given pump power. This limit is independent of the probe power and characterizes the best contrast achievable for the system. This enables sensitive quantitative spectral characterization of linear infrared absorption features directly from photothermal spectroscopy measurements. PMID:26696188

  9. Anharmonic force field and vibrational dynamics of CH2F2 up to 5000 cm(-1) studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and state-of-the-art ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Regini, Giorgia; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Gambi, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Difluoromethane (CH(2)F(2), HFC-32) is a molecule used in refrigerant mixtures as a replacement of the more environmentally hazardous, ozone depleting, chlorofluorocarbons. On the other hand, presenting strong vibration-rotation bands in the 9 μm atmospheric window, it is a greenhouse gas which contributes to global warming. In the present work, the vibrational and ro-vibrational properties of CH(2)F(2), providing basic data for its atmospheric modeling, are studied in detail by coupling medium resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to high-level electronic structure ab initio calculations. Experimentally a full quantum assignment and accurate integrated absorption cross sections are obtained up to 5000 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations are carried out by using CCSD(T) theory and large basis sets of either the correlation consistent or atomic natural orbital hierarchies. By using vibrational perturbation theory to second order a complete set of vibrational and ro-vibrational parameters is derived from the ab initio quartic anharmonic force fields, which well compares with the spectroscopic constants retrieved experimentally. An excellent agreement between theory and experiment is achieved for vibrational energy levels and integrated absorption cross sections: transition frequencies up to four quanta of vibrational excitation are reproduced with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 7 cm(-1) while intensities are predicted within few km mol(-1) from the experiment. Basis set performances and core correlation effects are discussed throughout the paper. Particular attention is focused in the understanding of the anharmonic couplings which rule the vibrational dynamics of the |ν(1)>, |2ν(8)>, |2ν(2)> three levels interacting system. The reliability of the potential energy and dipole moment surfaces in reproducing the vibrational eigenvalues and intensities as well as in modeling the vibrational and ro-vibrational mixings over the whole 400-5000 cm(-1

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S0 and T1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C50)-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S0 and T1, regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S0 and T1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T1 states of carotenoids and in the S1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S1 lifetime (of the 1B/sub u/ and/or the 1A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-12-16

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/ states of the carotenoids ..beta..-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C/sub 50/)-..beta..-carotene, ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/, regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/ reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T/sub 1/ states of carotenoids and in the S/sub 1/ states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S/sub 1/ lifetime (of the /sup 1/B/sub u/ and/or the /sup 1/A/sub g/* states) of ..beta..-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps.

  12. Infrared micro-spectroscopy of human tissue: principles and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Max; Ergin, Ayşegül; Remiszewski, Stan; Mu, Xinying; Akalin, Ali; Raz, Dan

    2016-06-23

    This article summarizes the methods employed, and the progress achieved over the past two decades in applying vibrational (Raman and IR) micro-spectroscopy to problems of medical diagnostics and cellular biology. During this time, several research groups have verified the enormous information contained in vibrational spectra; in fact, information on protein, lipid and metabolic composition of cells and tissues can be deduced by decoding the observed vibrational spectra. This decoding process is aided by the availability of computer workstations and advanced algorithms for data analysis. Furthermore, commercial instrumentation for the fast collection of both Raman and infrared micro-spectral data has enabled the collection of images of cells and tissues based solely on vibrational spectroscopic data. The progress in the field has been manifested by a steady increase in the number and quality of publications submitted by established and new research groups in vibrational spectroscopy in the biological and biomedical arenas. PMID:27075634

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction of Cd(OH)2 to 28 GPa at 300 K

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Rekhi, Sandeep; Martin, Michael C.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    We report Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy along with X-ray diffraction for brucite-type beta-Cd(OH)2 to 28 GPa at 300 K. The OH-stretching modes soften with pressure and disappear at 21 GPa with their widths increasing rapidly above 5 GPa, consistent with a gradual disordering of the H sublattice at 5 20 GPa similar to that previously observed for Co(OH)2. Asymmetry in the peak shapes of the OH-stretching modes suggests the existence of diverse disordered sitesfor H atoms in C...

  14. Evaluation of non-radioactive lutetium- and yttrium-labeled immunoconjugates of rituximab - a vibrational spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Gjorgieva Ackova, Darinka; Smilkov, Katarina; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Stafilov, Trajče; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Makreski, Petre

    2015-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Raman Spectroscopy were used to study the molecular structure of the recombinant monoclonal antibody and anti-CD20-conjugates which are intended to be used as anti-cancer therapeutic agents. We characterized the secondary structure of a therapeutic immunoconjugates of rituximab, formulated with three different bifunctional chelating agents (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-DTPA, 1B4M-DTPA) and labeled with non-radioactive lutetium and yttrium. The secondary struc...

  15. Infrared differential-absorption Mueller matrix spectroscopy and neural network-based data fusion for biological aerosol standoff detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Copper, Jack; Owens, David J; Roese, Erik S; Bottiger, Jerold R; Everly, Robert D; Hung, Kevin C

    2010-01-20

    An active spectrophotopolarimeter sensor and support system were developed for a military/civilian defense feasibility study concerning the identification and standoff detection of biological aerosols. Plumes of warfare agent surrogates gamma-irradiated Bacillus subtilis and chicken egg white albumen (analytes), Arizona road dust (terrestrial interferent), water mist (atmospheric interferent), and talcum powders (experiment controls) were dispersed inside windowless chambers and interrogated by multiple CO(2) laser beams spanning 9.1-12.0 microm wavelengths (lambda). Molecular vibration and vibration-rotation activities by the subject analyte are fundamentally strong within this "fingerprint" middle infrared spectral region. Distinct polarization-modulations of incident irradiance and backscatter radiance of tuned beams generate the Mueller matrix (M) of subject aerosol. Strings of all 15 normalized elements {M(ij)(lambda)/M(11)(lambda)}, which completely describe physical and geometric attributes of the aerosol particles, are input fields for training hybrid Kohonen self-organizing map feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). The properly trained and validated ANN model performs pattern recognition and type-classification tasks via internal mappings. A typical ANN that mathematically clusters analyte, interferent, and control aerosols with nil overlap of species is illustrated, including sensitivity analysis of performance. PMID:20090802

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of hydrated potassium hexauranate for the phase study of the UO3-KCl-H2O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of the UO3-KCl-H2O system, a phase, called C phase, was isolated; it has a radiocrystallogram very close to the hexauranate K2U6O19,11H2O, but K+ and Cl- are found in its composition. Links between these two phases are studied and especially structure relationships. Hydrated potassium hexauranate structure was determined previously with a natural crystal. Position of potassium and uranium atoms only are known. As monocrystal preparation is impossible a direct structural study is impossible too. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis was selected for this study. Hexauranate structure is determined and results are extended for the study of the C phase. The hydrate UO3.0.8 H2O a stable and well defined compound is chosen for the hydrothermal synthesis of the different phases. Four main phases are evidenced: the chloro-uranate Ksub(x)UO3Clsub(x) (already known), a hydrated potassium uranate and two phases (one is the C phase) containing chloride ions are intermediaries between the chloro-uranate and the uranate

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy characterization of low level laser therapy on mammary culture cells: a micro-FTIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Taciana D.; Villa dos Santos, Nathalia; Pecora Milazzotto, Marcella; Cerchiaro, Giselle; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2011-03-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably go from the photobiostimulation/photobioinibition at cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect is still obscure. This work is dedicated to quantify some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. This goal was attached by exposing malignant breast cells (MCF7) to spatially filtered light of a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with 28.8 mJ/cm2 of fluency. The cell viability was evaluated by microscopic observation using Trypan Blue viability test. The vibrational spectra of each experimental group (micro- FTIR technique) were used to identify the relevant biochemical alterations occurred due the process. The red light had influence over RNA, phosphate and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. Light effects on cell number or viability were not detected. However, the irradiation had direct influence on metabolic activity of cells.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of methoxyphenols involved as atmospheric secondary organic aerosol precursors: Gas-phase vibrational cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, A.; Coeur, C.; Mouret, G.; Ahmad, W.; Tomas, A.; Pirali, O.

    2016-08-01

    Methoxyphenols are emitted in the atmosphere from biomass burning and recent works have shown the potential role of these oxygenated aromatic species in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. IR spectroscopic data that would enable their remote measurement in the atmosphere remain scarce in the literature. Room temperature Far-IR cross-sections of 4 methoxyphenols (2-methoxyphenol or guaiacol, 3-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol or syringol) have been determined using the THz synchrotron radiation available at SOLEIL. Mid- and near-IR regions have also been investigated with a conventional Fourier transform IR setup and allowed to provide a set of vibrational cross-sections of the studied methoxyphenols. Finally, gas-phase cross sections of two nitroguaiacol isomers (4-nitroguaiacol and 5-nitroguaiacol), two intermediate products involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols have been measured in the mid- and near-IR with a heated multi-pass cell. Harmonic and anharmonic density functional theory calculations were carried out for all the studied compounds and allowed a full assignment of the recorded rovibrational bands.

  19. The Biological Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Vibrations on Barley Seed Hydration and Germination

    OpenAIRE

    Armine Amyan; Sinerik Ayrapetyan

    2004-01-01

    The changes of wet and dry weights and germination of barley seed in different periods of its swelling in nontreated (control), extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) )–treated, and extremely low frequency vibrations (ELFV)–treated cold (4°C) and warm (20°C) distilled water (DW) were studied. The metabolic-dependent seed hydration, dry weight dissolving, germination, and water binding in seed were modulated by preliminary EMF- and ELFV-treated DW. Frequency “windows” for the...

  20. 2D IR Spectroscopy of Histidine: Probing Side-Chain Structure and Dynamics via Backbone Amide Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J.; Gai, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that histidine is involved in many biological functions due to the structural versatility of its side chain. However, probing the conformational transitions of histidine in proteins, especially those occurring on an ultrafast time scale, is difficult. Herein we show, using a histidine dipeptide as a model, that it is possible to probe the tautomer and protonation status of a histidine residue by measuring the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of its amide I vibrationa...

  1. Two-dimensional-vibrational spectroscopy: Development and testing of a two-dimensional ultrafast Raman spectrometer with Time-Frequency Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Diana Camila

    The major emphasis of this dissertation will be given toward the theoretical tools necessary to acquire high resolution femtosecond Raman spectra from broadband femtosecond pulses. The theory of simultaneous Time-Frequency Detection (TFD) will be discussed and demonstrated to be a robust technique to acquire the vibrational coherence information. Finally, two experimental cases that demonstrate the feasibility of femtosecond TFD-CARS for acetonitrile and nitrobenzene will be presented. In the introductory first chapter, the motivation and fundamentals for developing 2D-vibrational spectroscopy using femtosecond Raman detection is presented. For coherent Raman spectroscopies, common femtosecond pulses often lie in an intermediate regime: their bandwidth is too wide for measurements in the frequency domain, but their temporal width is too broad for homodyne measurements in the time domain. A recent paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 , 267401 (2006)] showed that complete Raman spectra can be recovered from intermediate length pulses by using simultaneous time and frequency detection (TFD). Heterodyne detection and a phase-stable local oscillator at the anti-Stokes frequency are not needed with TFD. Phase-control, pulse shaping or pulses of widely differing duration are not required. To demonstrate the TFD method, a high resolution Raman spectrum of nitrobenzene obtained from 60 fs pulses is discussed theoretically and experimentally in the second chapter. In the third chapter model calculations illustrate how information on the Raman spectrum is smoothly transferred from the frequency domain to the time domain as the pulse width shortens. When data is collected in both dimensions, the Raman spectrum is completely determined to high resolution, regardless of the probe pulse width. The TFD method is tested on experimental CARS data from acetonitrile in the fourth chapter. Compared to theoretical models, experimental data are complicated by noise and incomplete knowledge of the

  2. Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of the DNA backbone at different hydration levels mapped by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Liu, Yingliang; Siebert, Torsten; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    DNA oligomers are studied at 0% and 92% relative humidity, corresponding to N  20 water molecules per base pair. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared spectroscopy of DNA backbone modes between 920 and 1120 cm(-1) maps fluctuating interactions at the DNA surface. At both hydration levels, a frequency fluctuation correlation function with a 300 fs decay and a slow decay beyond 10 ps is derived from the 2D lineshapes. The fast component reflects motions of DNA helix, counterions, and water shell. Its higher amplitude at high hydration level reveals a significant contribution of water to the fluctuating forces. The slow component reflects disorder-induced inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:26798841

  3. Multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT for wide-field measurement of interior surface vibrations in thick biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samuel; Watanabe, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Hibino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Osami

    2015-08-10

    Microvibrations that occur in bio-tissues are considered to play pivotal roles in organ function; however techniques for their measurement have remained underdeveloped. To address this issue, in the present study we have developed a novel optical coherence tomography (OCT) method that utilizes multifrequency swept interferometry. The OCT volume data can be acquired by sweeping the multifrequency modes produced by combining a tunable Fabry-Perot filter and an 840 nm super-luminescent diode with a bandwidth of 160 nm. The system employing the wide-field heterodyne method does not require mechanical scanning probes, which are usually incorporated in conventional Doppler OCTs and heterodyne-type interferometers. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. Indeed, our OCT achieved the axial resolution of ~2.5 μm when scanning the surface of a glass plate. Moreover, when examining a mechanically resonant multilayered bio-tissue in full-field configuration, we captured 22 nm vibrations of its internal surfaces at 1 kHz by reconstructing temporal phase variations. This so-called "multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT" can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research. PMID:26367958

  4. Prediction for steatosis in type-2 diabetes: clinico-biological markers versus {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiu, Boris; Krause, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); CHU (University Hospital), Department of Radiology, 2 boulevard Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, BP 77908, Dijon (France); Crevisy-Girod, Elodie [CHU (University Hospital), Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology, and Metabolic Diseases, BP 77908, Dijon (France); Binquet, Christine [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); CHU (University Hospital), Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, BP 77908, Dijon (France); Duvillard, Laurence [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); Masson, David [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); CHU (University Hospital), Department of Biochemistry, BP 77908, Dijon (France); Lepage, Come; Hamza, Samia; Minello, Anne; Hillon, Patrick [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); CHU (University Hospital), Department of Hepatology, BP 77908, Dijon (France); Verges, Bruno; Petit, Jean-Michel [University of Burgundy, INSERM U866, BP 87900, Dijon (France); CHU (University Hospital), Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology, and Metabolic Diseases, BP 77908, Dijon (France)

    2012-04-15

    The SteatoTest, fatty liver index (FLI) and hepatic steatosis index (HSI) are clinico-biological scores of steatosis validated in general or selected populations. Serum adiponectin (s-adiponectin) and retinol binding protein 4 (s-RBP4) are adipokines that could predict liver steatosis. We investigated whether the Steatotest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin and s-RBP4 could be valid predictors of liver steatosis in type-2 diabetic (T2D) patients. We enrolled 220 consecutive T2D patients. Reference standard was 3.0 T {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy (corrected for T1 and T2 decays). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Kappa statistic measures of agreement, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed. Median liver fat content was 91 mg triglyceride/g liver tissue (range: 0-392). ICCs among the Steatotest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin, s-RBP4 and spectroscopy were low: 0.384, 0.281, 0.087, -0.297 and 0.048. Agreement between scores and spectroscopy was poor (Kappa range: 0.042-0.281). The areas under the ROC curves were low: 0.674, 0.647, 0.637, 0.616 and 0.540. S-adiponectin and s-RBP4 levels were strongly related to the presence of diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.0037 and P = 0.004; Mann-Whitney). The SteatoTest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin, s-RBP4 are not valid predictors of steatosis in T2D patients. Clino-biological markers cannot replace {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy for the assessment of liver fat in this population. (orig.)

  5. Prediction for steatosis in type-2 diabetes: clinico-biological markers versus 1H-MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SteatoTest, fatty liver index (FLI) and hepatic steatosis index (HSI) are clinico-biological scores of steatosis validated in general or selected populations. Serum adiponectin (s-adiponectin) and retinol binding protein 4 (s-RBP4) are adipokines that could predict liver steatosis. We investigated whether the Steatotest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin and s-RBP4 could be valid predictors of liver steatosis in type-2 diabetic (T2D) patients. We enrolled 220 consecutive T2D patients. Reference standard was 3.0 T 1H-MR spectroscopy (corrected for T1 and T2 decays). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Kappa statistic measures of agreement, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed. Median liver fat content was 91 mg triglyceride/g liver tissue (range: 0-392). ICCs among the Steatotest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin, s-RBP4 and spectroscopy were low: 0.384, 0.281, 0.087, -0.297 and 0.048. Agreement between scores and spectroscopy was poor (Kappa range: 0.042-0.281). The areas under the ROC curves were low: 0.674, 0.647, 0.637, 0.616 and 0.540. S-adiponectin and s-RBP4 levels were strongly related to the presence of diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.0037 and P = 0.004; Mann-Whitney). The SteatoTest, FLI, HSI, s-adiponectin, s-RBP4 are not valid predictors of steatosis in T2D patients. Clino-biological markers cannot replace 1H-MR spectroscopy for the assessment of liver fat in this population. (orig.)

  6. Multi-level modeling of vibrational spectra of the phosphate group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrushchenko, Valery; Bouř, Petr

    Bochum: Ruhr-University Bochum, 2015. s. 86. [European Conference on the Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules /16./. 06.09.2015-10.09.2015, Bochum] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA phosphate group * vibrational spectroscopy * multi- level spectra simulations * MD/DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  7. AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy of the extended green object G318.05+0.09: Detection of CO fundamental ro-vibrational emission

    CERN Document Server

    Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ardaseva, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of near-infrared (2.5--5.4um) long-slit spectroscopy of the extended green object (EGO) G318.05+0.09 with AKARI. Two distinct sources are found in the slit. The brighter source has strong red continuum emission with H2O ice, CO2 ice, and CO gas and ice absorption features at 3.0, 4.25um, 4.67um, respectively, while the other greenish object shows peculiar emission that has double peaks at around 4.5 and 4.7um. The former source is located close to the ultra compact HII region IRAS 14498-5856 and is identified as an embedded massive young stellar object. The spectrum of the latter source can be interpreted by blue-shifted (-3000 ~ -6000km/s) optically-thin emission of the fundamental ro-vibrational transitions (v=1-0) of CO molecules with temperatures of 12000--3700K without noticeable H2 and HI emission. We discuss the nature of this source in terms of outflow associated with the young stellar object and supernova ejecta associated with a supernova remnant.

  8. Structural and vibrational investigation on species derived from the cyclamic acid in aqueous solution by using HATR and Raman spectroscopies and SCRF calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, Alicia B.; Raschi, Ana B.; Castillo, María V.; Davies, Lilian; Romano, Elida; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, aqueous solutions at different molar concentrations of sodium cyclamate in water were completely characterized by HATR (Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance) and Raman spectroscopies. The theoretical structures of cyclamate ion, the zwitterionic and neutral forms of the cyclamic acid and its dimer were optimized in gas and aqueous solution phases by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. The solvent effects for the four species in aqueous solutions were simulated by using self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations employing the integral equation formalism variant (IEFPCM) model. The complete assignments of the vibrational spectra of all the forms of cyclamic acid were performed taking into account the factor group analysis with the Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology. The existence of the zwitterionic and neutral forms of the cyclamic acid and its dimer in a solution of cyclamate in water is evidenced by characteristic bands in the HATR and Raman spectra. The dimerization of cyclamate in aqueous solution was previously reported by conductimetric method. The natural population analysis (NPA) and Merz-Kollman (MK) charges, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations predict for all the species the principal donor and acceptor sites for the H bonds formation in aqueous solution. The SQM force fields for the cyclamate ion, the zwitterionic and neutral species of the cyclamic acid were obtained and their corresponding force constants in both phases were reported. Additionally, the solvation energies for those species were reported.

  9. IR and SFG vibrational spectroscopy of the water bend in the bulk liquid and at the liquid-vapor interface, respectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational spectroscopy of the water bending mode has been investigated experimentally to study the structure of water in condensed phases. In the present work, we calculate the theoretical infrared (IR) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectra of the HOH bend in liquid water and at the water liquid/vapor interface using a mixed quantum/classical approach. Classical molecular dynamics simulation is performed by using a recently developed water model that explicitly includes three-body interactions and yields a better description of the water surface. Ab-initio-based transition frequency, dipole, polarizability, and intermolecular coupling maps are developed for the spectral calculations. The calculated IR and SFG spectra show good agreement with the experimental measurements. In the theoretical imaginary part of the SFG susceptibility for the water liquid/vapor interface, we find two features: a negative band centered at 1615 cm−1 and a positive band centered at 1670 cm−1. We analyze this spectrum in terms of the contributions from molecules in different hydrogen-bond classes to the SFG spectral density and also compare to SFG results for the OH stretch. SFG of the water bending mode provides a complementary picture of the heterogeneous hydrogen-bond configurations at the water surface

  10. The study of secondary effects in vibrational and hydrogen bonding properties of 2- and 3-ethynylpyridine and ethynylbenzene by IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Danijela; Matanović, Ivana; Kovačević, Goran; Baranović, Goran

    2014-11-11

    Weak hydrogen bonds formed by 2- and 3-ethynylpyridine and ethynylbenzene with trimethylphosphate and phenol were characterized by IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p)). The structure and stability of ethynylpyridines and ethynylbenzene in the gas phase and in the complexes with trimethylphosphate and phenol are discussed in terms of geometry and electronic charge redistribution. Anharmonic effects are taken into account when calculating vibrational wavenumbers of these systems what lead to partial improvement of agreement with experiment. The changes in the electronic charge distribution are behind the frequency shifts of the CC stretching in opposite direction depending on the role the ethyne molecule has in a hydrogen bonded complex (Δν̃=+9 cm(-1) in trimethylphosphate complexes, Δν̃=-3 cm(-1) in phenol complexes). The association constants were determined by keeping the concentrations of proton donors approximately constant and low enough to avoid self-association and the proton acceptors were present in excess. The values obtained for the association constants and enthalpy changes in C2Cl4 (for trimethylphosphate complexes K≈0.5-1.0 mol(-1)dm(3) and -ΔrH≈6-8 kJ mol(-1), for phenol complexes K≈20-40 mol(-1) dm3-ΔrH≈17-22 kJ mol(-1)) are in good agreement with literature data. PMID:24866088

  11. Adsorption of F2Cdbnd CFCl on TiO2 nano-powder: Structures, energetics and vibrational properties from DRIFT spectroscopy and periodic quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Moro, Daniele; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Toninello, Piero; Giorgianni, Santi

    2015-10-01

    Photodegradation over titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a very appealing technology for removing environmental pollutants from the air, the adsorption interaction being the first step of the whole reaction pathway. In the present work the adsorption of F2Cdbnd CFCl (chlorotrifluoroethene, halon 1113), a compound used by industry and detected in the atmosphere, on a commercial TiO2 nano-powder is investigated experimentally by in situ DRIFT spectroscopy and theoretically through periodic ab initio calculations rooted in DFT. The spectra of the adsorbed molecule suggest that the anchoring to the surface mainly takes place through F atoms. Theoretically, five adsorption configurations for the molecule interacting with the anatase (1 0 1) surface are simulated at B3LYP level and for each of them, structures, binding energies and vibrational frequencies are derived. The interplay between theory and experiments shows the coexistence of different adsorption configurations, the foremost ones featuring the interaction of one F atom with a fivefold coordinated Ti4+ of the surface. These two adsorption models, which mostly differ for the orientation of the adsorbate with respect to the surface, feature a binding energy of -45.6 and -41.0 kJ mol-1 according to dispersion corrected DFT calculations. The favorable adsorption interaction appears as an important requirement toward the application of titanium dioxide technologies for the photocatalytic degradation of halon 1113.

  12. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  13. Antifouling and antimicrobial mechanism of tethered quaternary ammonium salts in a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) matrix studied using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Majumdar, Partha; Chisholm, Bret; Stafslien, Shane; Chen, Zhan

    2010-11-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) materials containing chemically bound (''tethered'') quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) moieties are being developed as new contact-active antimicrobial coatings. Such coatings are designed to inhibit the growth of microorganisms on surfaces for a variety of applications which include ship hulls and biomedical devices. The antimicrobial activity of these coatings is a function of the molecular surface structure generated during film formation. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study polymer surface structures at the molecular level in different chemical environments. SFG was successfully used to characterize the surface structures of PDMS coatings containing tethered QAS moieties that possess systematic variations in QAS chemical composition in air, in water, and in a nutrient growth medium. The results indicated that the surface structure was largely dependent on the length of the alkyl chain attached to the nitrogen atom of the QAS moiety as well as the length of alkyl chain spanning between the nitrogen atom and silicon atom of the QAS moiety. The SFG results correlated well with the antimicrobial activity, providing a molecular interpretation of the activity. This research showed that SFG can be effectively used to aid in the development of new antimicrobial coating technologies by correlating the chemical structure of a coating surface to its antimicrobial activity. PMID:20345165

  14. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-05-15

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to

  15. Vibrational optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent vibrational activity (VOA) research is discussed. The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) experiments were carried out with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. One of the major anticipations from VOA spectroscopy is to be able to derive new pathways for determining the molecular structure. Shown is Fourier transform infrared absorption and VCD spectra of lyxopyranose in pyradine-d5 solvent. Raman optical activity measurements are discussed, and depolarized Raman and Raman optical activity spectra for (+)-alpha-pinene are presented. It was concluded that at present Raman optical activity can be measured in the entire vibrational spectral region, where as VCD has not been measured below 600 cm-1

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction of Cd(OH)2 to 28 GPa at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy along with x-ray diffraction for brucite-typeβ-Cd(OH)2 to 28 GPa at 300 K. The OH-stretching modes soften with pressure and disappear at 21 GPa with their widths increasing rapidly above 5 GPa, consistent with a gradual disordering of the H sublattice at 5-20 GPa similar to that previously observed for Co(OH)2. Asymmetry in the peak shapes of the OH-stretching modes suggests the existence of diverse disordered sites for H atoms in Cd(OH)2 under pressure. Above 15 GPa, the A1g(T) lattice mode shows nonlinear behavior and softens to 21 GPa, at which pressure significant changes are observed: some Raman modes appear, two Raman-active lattice modes and the OH-stretching modes of the low-pressure phase disappear, and the positions of some x-ray diffraction lines change abruptly with the appearance of weak diffraction features. These observations suggest that amorphization of the H sublattice is accompanied by a crystalline-to-crystalline transition at 21 GPa in Cd(OH)2, which has not been previously observed in the brucite-type hydroxides. The Raman spectra of the high-pressure phase of Cd(OH)2 is similar to those of the high-pressure phase of single-crystal Ca(OH)2 of which structure has been tentatively assigned to the Sr(OH)2 type

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy and analytical electron microscopy studies of Fe-V-O and In-V-O thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Vuk, A S; Drazic, G; Colomban, P

    2002-01-01

    Orthovanadate (M sup 3 sup + VO sub 4; M= Fe, In) and vanadate (Fe sub 2 V sub 4 O sub 1 sub 3) thin films were prepared using sol-gel synthesis and dip coating deposition. Using analytical electron microscopy (AEM), the chemical composition and the degree of crystallization of the phases present in the thin Fe-V-O films were investigated. TEM samples were prepared in both orientations: parallel (plan view) and perpendicular (cross section) to the substrate. In the first stages of crystallization, when the particle sizes were in the nanometer range, the classical identification of phases using electron diffraction was not possible. Instead of measuring d values, experimentally selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns were compared to calculated (simulated) patterns in order to determine the phase composition. The problems of evaluating the ratio of amorphous and crystalline phases in thin films are reported. Results of TEM and XRD as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the films made at lo...

  18. Social inclusion enhances biological motion processing: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolling, Danielle Z.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Kaiser, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are especially tuned to the movements of other people. Neural correlates of this social attunement have been proposed to lie in and around the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) region, which robustly responds to biological motion in contrast to a variety of non-biological motions. This response persists even when no form information is provided, as in point-light displays (PLDs). The aim of the current study was to assess the ability of functional near-infrared spectroscop...

  19. Features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy to find the size distribution of biological polymers and their fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work deals with the determination of various biopolymer fragments' distribution (DNA and proteins) by their size on the basis of thermal adsorption technique. New features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy with the determination of the length of the DNA fragments and proteins, also analysis of the role of buffer solution in the thermal desorption of biopolymer fragments have been found. (authors)

  20. Direct probing of photoinduced electron transfer in a self-assembled biomimetic [2Fe2S]-hydrogenase complex using ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Hartl, František; Lutz, Martin; de Bruin, Bas; Becker, René; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-05-19

    A pyridyl-functionalized diiron dithiolate complex, [μ-(4-pyCH2-NMI-S2)Fe2(CO)6] (3, py = pyridine (ligand), NMI = naphthalene monoimide) was synthesized and fully characterized. In the presence of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP), a self-assembled 3·ZnTPP complex was readily formed in CH2Cl2 by the coordination of the pyridyl nitrogen to the porphyrin zinc center. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from excited ZnTPP to complex 3 in the supramolecular assembly was observed in real time by monitoring the ν(C≡O) and ν(C═O)NMI spectral changes with femtosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. We have confirmed that photoinduced charge separation produced the monoreduced species by comparing the time-resolved IR spectra with the conventional IR spectra of 3(•-) generated by reversible electrochemical reduction. The lifetimes for the charge separation and charge recombination processes were found to be τCS = 40 ± 3 ps and τCR = 205 ± 14 ps, respectively. The charge recombination is much slower than that in an analogous covalent complex, demonstrating the potential of a supramolecular approach to extend the lifetime of the charge-separated state in photocatalytic complexes. The observed vibrational frequency shifts provide a very sensitive probe of the delocalization of the electron-spin density over the different parts of the Fe2S2 complex. The TR and spectro-electrochemical IR spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, and density functional theory calculations all show that the spin density in 3(•-) is delocalized over the diiron core and the NMI bridge. This delocalization explains why the complex exhibits low catalytic dihydrogen production even though it features a very efficient photoinduced electron transfer. The ultrafast porphyrin-to-NMI-S2-Fe2(CO)6 photoinduced electron transfer is the first reported example of a supramolecular Fe2S2-hydrogenase model studied by femtosecond TRIR spectroscopy. Our results show that TRIR

  1. Sulfur K-edge absorption spectroscopy on selected biological systems; Schwefel-K-Kanten-Absorptionsspektroskopie an ausgewaehlten biologischen Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberg, Henning

    2008-07-15

    Sulfur is an essential element in organisms. In this thesis investigations of sulfur compounds in selected biological systems by XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy are reported. XANES spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge provides an excellent tool to gain information about the local environments of sulfur atoms in intact biological samples - no extraction processes are required. Spatially resolved measurements using a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror focusing system were carried out to investigate the infection of wheat leaves by rust fungi. The results give information about changes in the sulfur metabolism of the host induced by the parasite and about the extension of the infection into visibly uninfected plant tissue. Furthermore, XANES spectra of microbial mats from sulfidic caves were measured. These mats are dominated by microbial groups involved in cycling sulfur. Additionally, the influence of sulfate deprivation and H{sub 2}S exposure on sulfur compounds in onion was investigated. To gain an insight into the thermal degradation of organic material the influence of roasting of sulfur compounds in coffee beans was studied. (orig.)

  2. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and Fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of ∼ 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm-1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach

  3. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, John Andrew

    2004-11-24

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of {approx} 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm{sup -1} occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach.

  4. Gelatin embedding: a novel way to preserve biological samples for terahertz imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-04-01

    Sample dehydration has traditionally been a challenging problem in ex vivo terahertz biomedical experiments as water content changes significantly affect the terahertz properties and can diminish important contrast features. In this paper, we propose a novel method to prevent sample dehydration using gelatin embedding. By looking at terahertz image data and calculating the optical properties of the gelatin-embedded sample, we find that our method successfully preserves the sample for at least 35 h, both for imaging and spectroscopy. Our novel preservation method demonstrates for the first time the capability to simultaneously maintain sample structural integrity and prevent dehydration at room temperature. This is particularly relevant for terahertz studies of freshly excised tissues but could be beneficial for other imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

  5. Vibrations of the S1 state of fluorobenzene-h5 and fluorobenzene-d5 via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Joe P.; Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D.; Pugliesi, Igor; Schriever, Christian; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    We report resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of the isotopologues fluorobenzeneh5 and fluorobenzene-d5. By making use of quantum chemical calculations, the changes in the wavenumber of the vibrational modes upon deuteration are examined. Additionally, the mixing of vibrational modes both between isotopologues and also between the two electronic states is discussed. The isotopic shifts lead to dramatic changes in the appearance of the spectrum as vibrations shift in and out of F...

  6. Rotationally resolved vibrational spectra of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) : Tunneling splittings studied by zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Zuyang; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    The rotationally resolved vibrational spectra of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) have been measured for the first time with vibrational energies up to 6000 cm-1 above the ground state using the zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron method. The symmetric inversion vibrational energy levels ( v2 +) and the corresponding rotational constants for v2 + = 0 -15 have been determined. The tunneling splittings of the inversion vibration energy levels have been observed and are 0.8 and 37.7 (±0.5) cm-1 for the ground and the first excited vibrational states, respectively. The first adiabatic ionization energy for AsH3 was determined as 79 243.3 ± 1 cm-1. The geometric parameters of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) as a function of inversion vibrational numbers have been determined, indicating that the geometric structure of the cation changes from near-planar to pyramidal with increasing inversion vibrational excitation. In addition to the experimental measurements, a two-dimensional theoretical calculation considering the two symmetric vibrational modes was performed to determine the energy levels of the symmetric inversion, which are in good agreement with the experimental results. The inversion vibrational energy levels of SbH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) have also been calculated and are found to have much smaller energy splittings than those of AsH3 + (" separators=" X ˜ 2 A2 ″) .

  7. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  8. Simulations of Vibrational Spectra of Macromolecular Aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Dračínský, Martin; Kiederling, T. A.; Bouř, Petr

    Kobe : -, 2013. P231-P231. [International Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy /7./. 25.08.2013-30.08.2013, Kobe] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : VCD * molecular spectroscopy * quantum chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Thermal expansion of mullite-type Bi2Al4O9: A study by X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline Bi2Al4O9 powder samples were synthesized using the glycerine method. Single crystals were produced from the powder product in a Bi2O3 melt. The lattice thermal expansion of the mullite-type compound was studied using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation for the zero pressure equation of state, where the temperature-dependent vibrational internal energy was calculated from the Debye characteristic frequency. Both the first-order and second-order Grüneisen approximations were applied for modeling the volumetric expansion, and the second-order approach provided physically meaningful axial parameters. The phonon density of states as well as phonon dispersion guided to set the characteristic frequency for simulation. The experimental infrared and Raman phonon bands were compared with those calculate from the DFT calculations. Selective Raman modes were analyzed for the thermal anharmonic behaviors using simplified Klemens model. The respective mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of mullite-type Bi2Al4O9 showing the edge-sharing AlO6 octahedra running parallel to the c-axis. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Bi2Al4O9 was studied using XRD, FTIR, Raman and DFT. • Metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation. • Phonon DOS and phonon dispersion helped to set the Debye frequency. • Mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. • Anharmonicity was analyzed for some selective Raman modes

  10. Validation of Spectra and Phase in Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy through Internal Heterodyne Phase-Resolved Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Li; Chen, Shunli; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-03-03

    Reliably determination of the spectral features and their phases in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for surfaces with closely overlapping peaks has been a standing issue. Here we present two approaches towards resolving such issue. The first utilizes the high resolution and accurate lineshape from the recently developed sub-wavenumber high resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS), from which the detail spectral parameters, including relative spectral phases, of overlapping peaks can be determined through reliable spectral fitting. These results are further validated by using the second method that utilizes the azimuthal angle phase dependence of the z-cut α-quartz crystal, a common phase standard, through the spectral interference between the SFG fields of the quartz surface, as the internal phase reference, and the adsorbed molecular layer. Even though this approach is limited to molecular layers that can be transferred or deposited onto the quartz surface, it is simple and straightforward, as it requires only an internal phase standard with a single measurement that is free of phase drifts. More importantly, it provides unambiguous SFG spectral phase information of such surfaces. Using this method, the absolute phase of the molecular susceptibility tensors of the CH3, CH2 and chiral C-H groups in different Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular monolayers and drop-cast peptide films are determined. These two approaches are fully consistent with and complement to each other, making both easily applicable tools in SFG-VS studies. More importantly, as the HR-BB-SFG-VS technique can be easily applied to various surfaces and interfaces, such validation of the spectral and phase information from HR-BB-SFG-VS measurement demonstrates it as one most promising tool for interrogating the detailed structure and interactions of complex molecular interfaces.

  11. NMR spectroscopy, Hammett correlations and biological activity of some Schiff bases derived from piperonal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Itaguai, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Nascimento, Maria da Graca; Geronimo, Vanilde [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Miller, Joseph [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Giesbrecht, Astrea [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    1999-07-01

    A series of eleven Schiff Bases have been synthesized. They were obtained by condensation of piperonal (3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde) with the corresponding aromatic primary amines. Their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra have been obtained and the Hammett correlations including chemical shifts and the substituent constants ({sigma}{sub p}, {sigma}R e {sigma}I) were studied. Linear and bilinear significant correlations were observed for iminic carbon (C-{alpha}) and C-1{sup '}, showing a more significant resonance effect on chemical shifts. The chemical shifts for C-4{sup '} were highly affected by substituent effects, especially for halogens in the expected direction. Their biological activity against microorganisms has also been measured and significant activity was showed against Epidermophyton floccosum. The biological activity did not give a reasonable relationship with electronic effects. (author)

  12. NMR spectroscopy, Hammett correlations and biological activity of some Schiff bases derived from piperonal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of eleven Schiff Bases have been synthesized. They were obtained by condensation of piperonal (3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde) with the corresponding aromatic primary amines. Their 1H and 13C-NMR spectra have been obtained and the Hammett correlations including chemical shifts and the substituent constants (σp, σR e σI) were studied. Linear and bilinear significant correlations were observed for iminic carbon (C-α) and C-1', showing a more significant resonance effect on chemical shifts. The chemical shifts for C-4' were highly affected by substituent effects, especially for halogens in the expected direction. Their biological activity against microorganisms has also been measured and significant activity was showed against Epidermophyton floccosum. The biological activity did not give a reasonable relationship with electronic effects. (author)

  13. Determining Enzyme Kinetics for Systems Biology with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Eicher, Johann J.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Rohwer, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics for systems biology should ideally yield information about the enzyme’s activity under in vivo conditions, including such reaction features as substrate cooperativity, reversibility and allostery, and be applicable to enzymatic reactions with multiple substrates. A large body of enzyme-kinetic data in the literature is based on the uni-substrate Michaelis–Menten equation, which makes unnatural assumptions about enzymatic reactions (e.g., irreversibility), and its application i...

  14. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  15. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  16. Estimation of regional hemoglobin concentration in biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a novel spectral interpretation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both in medical research and clinical settings, regional hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb]) in the microcirculation of biological tissues are highly sought. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been proven to be a favorable method by which to detect regional [Hb]. This paper introduces a new algorithm to retrieve [Hb] information from diffuse reflectance spectra. The proposed algorithm utilizes the natural logarithmic operation and the differential wavelet transform to effectively quench the scattering effects, and then employs the concept of isosbestic wavelength in the transformed spectra to reduce the effects of hemoglobin oxygenation. As a result, the intensity at the defined isosbestic wavelength of the transformed spectra is a good indicator of [Hb] estimation. The algorithm was derived and validated using theoretical spectra produced by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration. Its accuracy was further evaluated using liquid tissue phantoms, and its clinical utility with an in vivo clinical study of brain tumors. The results demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm for real-time [Hb] estimations from diffuse reflectance spectra, acquired by means of a fiber-optic spectroscopy system.

  17. FTIR spectroscopy of borate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Beregi, E.; Polgar, K.; Peter, A.

    1999-03-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the vibrational modes in various borate crystals, the electronic transitions of Nd3+ ions in NYAB, and the stretching vibration of hydroxyl ions in CLBO crystals.

  18. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Peggy (University of Tulsa)

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  19. High-extinction virtually imaged phased array-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Antonio; Zhang, Jitao; Shao, Peng; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-05-01

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as a powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell, and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we combined a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer with a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 μm deep within chicken muscle tissue.

  20. High-extinction VIPA-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Antonio; Shao, Peng; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we developed a spectrometer composed of a two VIPA stages and a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 microns deep within chicken muscle tissue.

  1. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  2. Vibrations of the S1 state of fluorobenzene-h5 and fluorobenzene-d5 via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D; Pugliesi, Igor; Schriever, Christian; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-12-28

    We report resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of the isotopologues fluorobenzene-h5 and fluorobenzene-d5. By making use of quantum chemical calculations, the changes in the wavenumber of the vibrational modes upon deuteration are examined. Additionally, the mixing of vibrational modes both between isotopologues and also between the two electronic states is discussed. The isotopic shifts lead to dramatic changes in the appearance of the spectrum as vibrations shift in and out of Fermi resonance. Assignments of the majority of the fluorobenzene-d5 observed bands are provided, aided by previous results on fluorobenzene-h5. PMID:25554159

  3. Vibrational behavior of Gelucire 50/13 by Raman and IR spectroscopies: A focus on the 1800-1000 cm-1 spectral range according to temperature and degree of hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadri, M.; Achahbar, A.; El Khamkhami, J.; Khelifa, B.; Tran Le Tuyet, C.; Faivre, V.; Abbas, O.; El Marssi, M.; Bougrioua, F.; Bresson, S.

    2015-03-01

    The present paper reports on physical and thermal properties of polyoxyethylene glycol glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) used as sustained release matrix forming agent in pharmaceutical applications. Gelucire 50/13 was essentially studied by Raman and IR spectroscopies according to the temperature and the degree of hydration. The hydration behavior of this amphiphilic excipient has been investigated with increasing water contents to study the behavior during dissolution. In the spectral range 1800-1000 cm-1, Raman and IR spectroscopies of Gelucire 50/13 were performed to characterize the contribution of its each components at room temperature, with emphasis placed on the evolution of the CH2 wagging and twisting, ν(Csbnd C) and ν(Csbnd O) vibrational modes regions (1400-1000 cm-1), along with analysis of the IR and Raman-active δ(CH2) deformation region (1500-1400 cm-1). In comparison with temperature and degree of hydration, in the spectral range 1800-1000 cm-1, the vibrational changes were directly correlated with conformational changes of the Gelucire structure. Overall, IR and Raman spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the different functional groups studied could be characterized independently, allowing for the understanding of their role in Gelucire structure.

  4. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  5. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  6. Phase equilibrium in poly(rA).poly(rU) complexes with Cd2+ and Mg2+ ions, studied by ultraviolet, infrared, and vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoi, Yurii; Gladchenko, Galina; Nafie, Laurence A; Freedman, Teresa B; Sorokin, Victor; Valeev, Vladimir; He, Yanan

    2005-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) absorption and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy were used to study conformational transitions in the double-stranded poly(rA). poly(rU) and its components-single-stranded poly(rA) and poly(rU) in buffer solution (pH 6.5) with 0.1M Na+ and different Mg2+ and Cd2+ (10(-6) to 10(-2) M) concentrations. Transitions were induced by elevated temperature that changed from 10 up to 96 degrees C. IR absorption and VCD spectra in the base-stretching region were obtained for duplex, triplex, and single-stranded forms of poly(rA) . poly(rU) at [Mg2+],[Cd2+]/[P] = 0.3. For single-stranded polynucleotides, the kind of conformational transition (ordering --> disordering --> compaction, aggregation) is conditioned by the dominating type of Me2+-polymer complex that in turn depends on the ion concentration range. The phase diagram obtained for poly(rA) . poly(rU) has a triple point ([Cd2+] approximately 10(-4)M) at which the helix-coil (2 --> 1) transition is replaced with a disproportion transition 2AU --> A2U + poly(rA) (2 --> 3) and the subsequent destruction of the triple helix (3 --> 1). The 2 --> 1 transitions occur in the narrow temperature interval of 2 degrees -5 degrees . Unlike 2 --> 1 and 3 --> 1 melting, the disproportion 2 --> 3 transition is a slightly cooperative one and observed over a wide temperature range. At [Me2+] approximately 10(-3) M, the temperature interval of A2U stability is not less than 20 degrees C. In the case of Cd2+, it increases with the rise of ion concentration due to the decrease of T(m) (2-->3). The T(m) (3-->1) value is practically unchanged up to [Cd2+] approximately 10(-3)M. Differences between diagrams for Mg(2+) and Cd2+ result from the various kinds of ion binding to poly(rA).poly-(rU) and poly(rA). PMID:15892121

  7. Folding dynamics of the Trp-cage miniprotein: evidence for a native-like intermediate from combined time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Marino, Kristen A; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Panman, Matthijs R; Smeenk, Linde E J; Kettelarij, Albert J; van Maarseveen, Jan H; Timmerman, Peter; Bolhuis, Peter G; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-10-01

    Trp-cage is a synthetic 20-residue miniprotein which folds rapidly and spontaneously to a well-defined globular structure more typical of larger proteins. Due to its small size and fast folding, it is an ideal model system for experimental and theoretical investigations of protein folding mechanisms. However, Trp-cage's exact folding mechanism is still a matter of debate. Here we investigate Trp-cage's relaxation dynamics in the amide I' spectral region (1530-1700 cm(-1)) using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Residue-specific information was obtained by incorporating an isotopic label ((13)C═(18)O) into the amide carbonyl group of residue Gly11, thereby spectrally isolating an individual 310-helical residue. The folding-unfolding equilibrium is perturbed using a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump), and the subsequent re-equilibration is probed by observing the time-dependent vibrational response in the amide I' region. We observe bimodal relaxation kinetics with time constants of 100 ± 10 and 770 ± 40 ns at 322 K, suggesting that the folding involves an intermediate state, the character of which can be determined from the time- and frequency-resolved data. We find that the relaxation dynamics close to the melting temperature involve fast fluctuations in the polyproline II region, whereas the slower process can be attributed to conformational rearrangements due to the global (un)folding transition of the protein. Combined analysis of our T-jump data and molecular dynamics simulations indicates that the formation of a well-defined α-helix precedes the rapid formation of the hydrophobic cage structure, implying a native-like folding intermediate, that mainly differs from the folded conformation in the orientation of the C-terminal polyproline II helix relative to the N-terminal part of the backbone. We find that the main free-energy barrier is positioned between the folding intermediate and the unfolded state ensemble, and that it involves the formation of

  8. Vibrational relaxation in pyridine upon supersonic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Assimo; Favero, Laura B.; Danieli, Roberto; Favero, Paolo G.; Caminati, Walther

    2000-11-01

    The rotational spectra of five vibrational states of pyridine have been assigned and measured by millimeter wave absorption spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion. The intensities of the lines of the vibrational satellites with respect to the ground state after the supersonic expansion depend on the kind of carrier gas, backing pressure, pyridine concentration, and symmetry of the rotational and vibrational states. Several rotational transitions of the vibrational satellites have also been measured in a conventional cell to complete the spectral assignment.

  9. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted. PMID:27214270

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of size-assigned p-cresol/H 2O-clusters in the S 0 and S 1 state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M.; Schmitt, M.; Kleinermanns, K.

    1991-02-01

    Vibrational spectra of supersonically cooled complexes of p-cresol with H 2O and CH 3OH were analysed by mass-resolved two-photon ionisation, dispersed fluorescence and stimulated emission, detected by two-colour ionisation dip. In p-cresol·(H 2O) 1 progressions of the intermolecular cluster stretch vibration and its combination bands with intramolecular cluster vibrations were observed with similar frequencies in the S 0 and S 1 state. In p-cresol·(H 2O) 3 and p-cresol·(CH 3OH) 1, further intense intermolecular bands arise, namely the hydrogen-bridge bending and torsion vibration. This can be attributed to the lower symmetry of these clusters. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations show p-cresol·(H 2O) 3 to have a higher H-bond stretch frequency than p-cresol·(H 2O) 1 because its (unsymmetric) cyclic structure is more rigid.

  11. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  12. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  13. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Labbe, Nicole [ORNL; Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  14. The energetic of (CH2F2)2 investigated by TDL IR spectroscopy and DFT computations: From collision induced relaxation of ro-vibrational transitions to non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Turchetto, Arianna; Stoppa, Paolo; Charmet, Andrea Pietropolli; Giorgianni, Santi

    2015-04-01

    Difluoromethane (CH2F2) is an atmospheric pollutant presenting strong absorptions within the 8-12 μm atmospheric window, hence it can contribute to global warming. Its dimer, (CH2F2)2, is bound through weak hydrogen bonds (wHBs). Theoretically, wHBs are of paramount importance in biological systems, though their modeling at density functional theory (DFT) level requires dispersion correlations to be accounted for. In this work, the binding energy (3.1 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1) of (CH2F2)2 is experimentally derived from the foreign broadening coefficients of the monomer compound, collisionally perturbed by a range of damping gases. Measurements are carried out on CH2F2 ro-vibrational transitions by means of tunable diode laser spectroscopy. Six stationary points on the potential energy surface (PES) of the dimer are investigated at DFT level by using some of the last generation density functionals (DFs). The Minnesota M06 suite of functionals as well as range separated DFs and DFs augmented by the non-local (NL) van der Waals (vdW) dispersion corrections are considered. DFT results are compared to reference values at the estimated complete basis set (CBS) limit of CCSD(T) theory (coupled cluster with singles and doubles augmented by a perturbational estimate of connected triples) and to the experimental binding energy. The M06-2X, M06-HF, VV10, BLYP-NL, and B3LYP-NL DFs reproduce CCSD(T)/CBS binding energies with a mean absolute deviation <0.4 kcal mol-1 and about the same deviation from the experimental value. The present results are of twofold relevance: (i) they show that binding energy of homodimers can be conveniently obtained from the monomer's foreign broadening coefficients and that the correct simulation of hydrogen bonds involved in (CH2F2)2 needs non-covalent interactions to be included into DFT; (ii) O2- and N2-pressure broadening parameters represent fundamental data for exploiting the efficacy of remote sensing measurements employed to retrieve temperature

  15. Vibrational biospectroscopy: from plants to animals to humans. A historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R. Anthony; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1999-05-01

    Today, more than ever, vibrational spectroscopy means different things to different people. From their roots as molecular fingerprinting techniques, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy have evolved to the point where they play roles in a staggering variety of scientific endeavors. This survey focuses upon biological and medical applications. The past 40 years have witnessed enormous advances in our understanding of the building blocks of life, and vibrational spectroscopy has played an important role. That role is reviewed briefly here. In parallel with these efforts, the near-IR community developed powerful 'chemometric' methods to extract a wealth of information from spectra that appeared superficially featureless. As vibrational spectroscopy is finding new niches in the medical and clinical realms, these chemometric methods are proving to be a valuable (but not infallible!) adjunct to conventional spectral interpretation. This survey includes a brief outline of biomedical vibrational spectroscopy and imaging, including several representative examples to illustrate the strengths and pitfalls of a growing reliance upon multivariate quantitation and classification methods.

  16. Evaluation of a multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy tensor probe to detect the anisotropic conductivity spectra of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of anisotropic tissues using a 16 electrode probe and reconstruction method of estimating the anisotropic impedance spectrum in a local region just underneath the center of the probe. This may enable in-vivo surface bioimpedance measurements with similar performance to the ex-vivo gold standard that requires excising and placing the entire tissue sample in a unit measurement cell with uniform electric field. The multiple surface electrodes enable us to create a focused current pattern so that the resulting measured voltage is more sensitive to a local region and less sensitive to other areas. This is exploited in a reconstruction method to provide improved bioimpedance and anisotropy measurements. In this paper, we describe the current pattern for localized electrical energy concentration, performance with the spring loaded pin electrodes, data calibration and experimental results on anisotropic agar phantoms and different tissue types. The anisotropic conductivity spectra are able to differentiate insulating films of different thickness and detect their orientation. Bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues are in agreement with published data and reference instruments. The anisotropy expressed as the ratio of eigenvalues and the orientation of eigenfunctions were reconstructed at 45° intervals. This information is used to predict the underlying anisotropy of the region under the probe. Tissue measurements clearly demonstrate the expected higher anisotropy of muscle tissue compared to liver tissue and spectral changes. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of a multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy tensor probe to detect the anisotropic conductivity spectra of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bishal; Wi, Hun; McEwan, Alistair; Kwon, Hyeuknam; In Oh, Tong; Woo, Eung Je; Seo, Jin Keun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of anisotropic tissues using a 16 electrode probe and reconstruction method of estimating the anisotropic impedance spectrum in a local region just underneath the center of the probe. This may enable in-vivo surface bioimpedance measurements with similar performance to the ex-vivo gold standard that requires excising and placing the entire tissue sample in a unit measurement cell with uniform electric field. The multiple surface electrodes enable us to create a focused current pattern so that the resulting measured voltage is more sensitive to a local region and less sensitive to other areas. This is exploited in a reconstruction method to provide improved bioimpedance and anisotropy measurements. In this paper, we describe the current pattern for localized electrical energy concentration, performance with the spring loaded pin electrodes, data calibration and experimental results on anisotropic agar phantoms and different tissue types. The anisotropic conductivity spectra are able to differentiate insulating films of different thickness and detect their orientation. Bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues are in agreement with published data and reference instruments. The anisotropy expressed as the ratio of eigenvalues and the orientation of eigenfunctions were reconstructed at 45° intervals. This information is used to predict the underlying anisotropy of the region under the probe. Tissue measurements clearly demonstrate the expected higher anisotropy of muscle tissue compared to liver tissue and spectral changes.

  18. Structure and intermolecular vibrations of 7-azaindole-water 2:1 complex in a supersonic jet expansion: Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Montu K Hazra; Moitrayee Mukherjee; V Ramanathan; Tapas Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra of a 2:1 complex between 7-azaindole and water, known as `non-reactive dimer’ of the molecule, have been measured in a supersonic jet expansion. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of the electronic origin band of the complex shows a very large number of low-frequency vibrational features corresponding to different intermolecular modes of the complex in the ground electronic state. Geometries of several possible isomeric structures of the complex and their vibrational frequencies at harmonic approximation were calculated by electronic structure theory method at MP2/6-31G∗∗ level. An excellent agreement is observed between the measured and calculated intermolecular vibrational mode frequencies for the energetically most favoured structure of the complex, where the water molecule is inserted within one of the two N$\\cdots$H-N hydrogen bonds of the 7AI dimer.

  19. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-21

    In this report we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (HR-BB-SFG-VS) of the –CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows for the first time the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral lineshapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity SFG-VS spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt lineshape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall lineshape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ±0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the –CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt lineshape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and a inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the lineshapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  20. Theoretical Vibrational Spectroscopy of the E3B (Explicit Three-Body) Water Model and Evidence for a Liquid-Liquid Critical Point in Supercooled Water within This Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yicun

    Water, one of the most common substances on earth, is of tremendous importance for our daily life and many disciplines of science. Despite its simple molecular structure, water is very complicated and has many anomalies in condensed phases, mostly due to its vast and continuously changing hydrogen-bonding network. Experimentally, vibrational spectroscopy, especially in the OH bond stretch frequency region, is an ideal tool to investigate the microscopic structure and dynamics of this network. However, the interpretation of the experimental measurements usually needs the assistance of theoretical calculation. This thesis presents our recent work in simulating linear and non-linear vibrational spectroscopy of liquid water in diverse environments using a novel model. We believe our results provide new insights into this important and interesting field. In this thesis, we use a newly developed water model, named E3B, which explicitly includes three-body interaction terms in its Hamiltonian. We begin with the simulation of the two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectroscopy at the water/vapor interface. The result reveals the slow hydrogen-bond switching dynamics at the water liquid/vapor interface. Then we evaluate the E3B model by comparing the temperature dependence of the theoretical non-linear vibrational spectra to experimental data. The result shows that the E3B model outperforms other commonly used models in terms of the microscopic dynamics of liquid water in a wide temperature range. Next, we propose a spectroscopic map for the water bend mode, and use it to study the vibrational spectra of this mode in the bulk liquid and the surface. The result has a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. We suggest that the bend mode, although studied less often than the OH-stretch mode, provides complementary information about the microscopic structure of water. At last, we discuss another interesting topic, which is the proposed liquid-liquid critical

  1. Vibrational Microspectroscopy for Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M. Lyng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy analyses vibrations within a molecule and can be used to characterise a molecular structure. Raman spectroscopy is one of the vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in which incident radiation is used to induce vibrations in the molecules of a sample, and the scattered radiation may be used to characterise the sample in a rapid and non-destructive manner. Infrared (IR spectroscopy is a complementary vibrational spectroscopic technique based on the absorption of IR radiation by the sample. Molecules absorb specific frequencies of the incident light which are characteristic of their structure. IR and Raman spectroscopy are sensitive to subtle biochemical changes occurring at the molecular level allowing spectral variations corresponding to disease onset to be detected. Over the past 15 years, there have been numerous reports demonstrating the potential of IR and Raman spectroscopy together with multivariate statistical analysis techniques for the detection of a variety of cancers including, breast, lung, brain, colon, oral, oesophageal, prostate and cervical cancer. This paper discusses the recent advances and the future perspectives in relation to cancer screening applications, focussing on cervical and oral cancer.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy of the G...C base pair: Experiment, harmonic and anharmonic calculations, and the nature of the anharmonic couplings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brauer, B.; Gerber, R. B.; Kabeláč, Martin; Hobza, Pavel; Bakker, J. M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Vries de, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, - (2005), s. 6974-6984. ISSN 1089-5639 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE-0244341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleic acids base s * vibrational spectrum * frequencies anharmonicity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2005

  3. Ship Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Herman

    1997-01-01

    Methods for calculating natural frequencies for ship hulls and for plates and panels.Evaluation of the risk for inconvenient vibrations on board......Methods for calculating natural frequencies for ship hulls and for plates and panels.Evaluation of the risk for inconvenient vibrations on board...

  4. Analysis of poly-β-hydroxyalkonates (PHA) during the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process using FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-hua; Mao, Qin-yan; Liu, Yi-xin; Sheng, Guo-ping; Yu, Han-qing; Huang, Xian-huai; Liu, Shao-geng; Ling, Qi; Yan, Guo-bing

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is the main phosphorus removal technique for wastewater treatment. During the anaerobic-aerobic alternative process, the activated sludge experienced the anaerobic storage of polyhydroxy-β-alkonates (PHA) and aerobic degradation, corresponding the infrared peak intensity of sludge at 1 740 cm(-1) increased in the aerobic phase and declined in the anaerobic phase. Compared with PHA standard, this peak was indentified to attribute the carbonyl of PHA. The overlapping peaks of PHA, protein I and II bands were separated using Gaussian peak fitting method. The infrared peak area ratios of PHA versus protein I had a good relationship with the PHA contents measured by gas chromatography, and the correlation coefficient was 0.873. Thus, the ratio of the peak area of PHA versus protein I can be considered as the indicator of the PHA content in the sludge. The infrared spectra of 1 480-1 780 cm(-1) was selected, normalized and transferred to the absorption data. Combined with the chromatography analysis of PHA content in the sludge sample, a model between the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ETIR) spectra of the sludge and PHA content was established, which could be used for the prediction of the PHA content in the unknown sample. The PHA content in the sludge sample could be acquired by the infrared spectra of the sludge sample and the established model, and the values fitted well with the results obtained from chromatograph. The results would provide a novel analysis method for the rapid characterization and quantitative determination of the intracellular PHA content in the activated sludge. PMID:25358156

  5. Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy of a monolayer self-assembled on gold: interference between resonant and nonresonant contributions of nonlinear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lin, S.; Aono, M.; Suzuki, T.

    The spectral profiles of sum-frequency signal from CH vibrational modes of octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled on gold have been studied for several optical configurations of incident beams. The observed spectra, generally of the shape of dispersion type, have been interpreted by the interference between the resonant contribution from the CH stretching modes of adsorbed molecules and the nonresonant contribution from the gold substrate. We have shown for the first time that the contribution from the zzz component of the resonant nonlinear susceptibility χzzz(R) is dominant in the observed resonant signals, whereas all of the ijk components contribute to the nonresonant signal. The transition frequencies and the relative amplitude of resonant signals are also determined for the CH3 vibrational modes of ODT on gold.

  6. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy of bromobenzene and its perdeuterated isotopologue: Assignment of the vibrations of the S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, and D{sub 0}{sup +} states of bromobenzene and the S{sub 0} and D{sub 0}{sup +} states of iodobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D.; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    We report vibrationally resolved spectra of the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition of bromobenzene using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. We study bromobenzene-h{sub 5} as well as its perdeuterated isotopologue, bromobenzene-d{sub 5}. The form of the vibrational modes between the isotopologues and also between the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electronic states is discussed for each species, allowing assignment of the bands to be achieved and the activity between states and isotopologues to be established. Vibrational bands are assigned utilizing quantum chemical calculations, previous experimental results, and isotopic shifts. Previous work and assignments of the S{sub 1} spectra are discussed. Additionally, the vibrations in the ground state cation, D{sub 0}{sup +}, are considered, since these have also been used by previous workers in assigning the excited neutral state spectra. We also examine the vibrations of iodobenzene in the S{sub 0} and D{sub 0}{sup +} states and comment on the previous assignments of these. In summary, we have been able to assign the corresponding vibrations across the whole monohalobenzene series of molecules, in the S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, and D{sub 0}{sup +} states, gaining insight into vibrational activity and vibrational couplings.

  7. Gas-phase spectroscopy and anharmonic vibrational analysis of the 3-residue peptide Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 by the laser desorption supersonic jet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► UV, IR and hole-burning spectra of a tri-peptide Z-PLG-NH2 were measured in a jet. ► The laser desorption technique was used to evaporate the peptide. ► The conformers were detected but the population is mainly distributed to a single conformation. ► MD simulations and DFT calculations reproduced the IR spectrum except for NH stretch. ► Anharmonic vibrational analysis VQDPT reproduced the splitting of the NH stretch. - Abstract: The electronic excitation and infrared (IR) spectra of a capped tri-peptide, Z-PLG-NH2 (Z = benzyloxycarbonyl, P = Pro, L = Leu, G = Gly), were measured in the gas phase by using the laser desorption supersonic jet technique. By measuring an ultraviolet–ultraviolet hole burning spectrum, it was found that Z-PLG-NH2 has the maximum three conformers in the gas phase, but that the population is mainly distributed to a single conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations well-reproduced the observed IR spectrum, except for splitting of the NH stretching bands by a β-turn structure that corresponds to a global minimum structure. Anharmonic vibrational analysis by vibrational quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (VQDPT) successfully reproduced the anharmonic splitting, and confirmed the assignments

  8. Stereochemical analysis of glycerophospholipids by vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tohru; Manai, Daisuke; Shibata, Masataka; Itabashi, Yutaka; Monde, Kenji

    2015-09-30

    The stereochemistry of glycerophospholipids (GPLs) has been of interest for its roles in the evolution of life and in their biological activity. However, because of their structural complexity, no convenient method to determine their configuration has been reported. In this work, through the first systematic application of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy to various diacylated GPLs, we have revealed that their chirality can be assigned by the sign of a VCD exciton couplet generated by the interaction of two carbonyl groups. This paper also presents spectroscopic evidence for the stereochemistry of GPLs isolated from bacteria, eukaryotes, and mitochondria. PMID:26379046

  9. Vibration sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a sensor for detecting the vibrations of a liquid, specifically designed for detecting low frequency vibrations transmitted by a high temperature liquid, particularly the liquid metal coolant of a fast reactor. It comprises a piezoelectric transducer inside a cavity closed by a membrane in contact with the liquid and in which a vacuum is made. The membrane is connected to one of the sides of the transducer, called the first side, through a mechanical vibration transmitting part made of a thermal insulation material. The other side of the transducer, termed second side, is blocked and the cavity has at least one leak-tight passage for an electric conductor

  10. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  11. Effect of pH on the Water/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1{bar 1}02) interface structure studied by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, J.; Zhang, L.; Tian, C.; Shen, Y. R.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2011-08-01

    Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) was used to study the structure of water/{alpha}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1{bar 1}02 ) interfaces at different pH values. The OH stretch spectra are dominated by interfacial water contributions at lower frequencies, and by bonded hydroxyls on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface at higher frequencies. Protonation and deprotonation of various oxide functional groups at the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface as pH varies can be monitored quantitatively by changes of the spectrum, allowing their pK reaction values can be estimated. The point of zero charge of the interface is found to be at pH ~ 6.7.

  12. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of 1,3-Butadiene Hydrogenation on 4 nm Pt@SiO 2 , Pd@SiO 2 , and Rh@SiO 2 Core–Shell Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2015-01-14

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. 1,3-Butadiene (1,3-BD) hydrogenation was performed on 4 nm Pt, Pd, and Rh nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 shells at 20, 60, and 100 °C. The core-shells were grown around polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated NPs (Stöber encapsulation) prepared by colloidal synthesis. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was performed to correlate surface intermediates observed in situ with reaction selectivity. It is shown that calcination is effective in removing PVP, and the SFG signal can be generated from the metal surface. Using SFG, it is possible to compare the surface vibrational spectrum of Pt@SiO2 (1,3-BD is hydrogenated through multiple paths and produces butane, 1-butene, and cis/trans-2-butene) to Pd@SiO2 (1,3-BD favors one path and produces 1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). In contrast to Pt@SiO2 and Pd@SiO2, SFG and kinetic experiments of Rh@SiO2 show a permanent accumulation of organic material.

  13. Excitation energy transfer and electron-vibrational coupling in phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina investigated by site-selective spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryliuk, G; Rätsep, M; Hildebrandt, S; Irrgang, K-D; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2014-09-01

    In adaption to its specific environmental conditions, the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina developed two different types of light-harvesting complexes: chlorophyll-d-containing membrane-intrinsic complexes and phycocyanobilin (PCB) - containing phycobiliprotein (PBP) complexes. The latter complexes are believed to form a rod-shaped structure comprising three homo-hexamers of phycocyanin (PC), one hetero-hexamer of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin (APC) and probably a linker protein connecting the PBPs to the reaction centre. Excitation energy transfer and electron-vibrational coupling in PBPs have been investigated by selectively excited fluorescence spectra. The data reveal a rich spectral substructure with a total of five low-energy electronic states with fluorescence bands at 635nm, 645nm, 654nm, 659nm and a terminal emitter at about 673 nm. The electronic states at ~635 and 645 nm are tentatively attributed to PC and APC, respectively, while an apparent heterogeneity among PC subunits may also play a role. The other fluorescence bands may be associated with three different isoforms of the linker protein. Furthermore, a large number of vibrational features can be identified for each electronic state with intense phonon sidebands peaking at about 31 to 37cm⁻¹, which are among the highest phonon frequencies observed for photosynthetic antenna complexes. The corresponding Huang-Rhys factors S fall in the range between 0.98 (terminal emitter), 1.15 (APC), and 1.42 (PC). Two characteristic vibronic lines at about 1580 and 1634cm⁻¹ appear to reflect CNH⁺ and CC stretching modes of the PCB chromophore, respectively. The exact phonon and vibrational frequencies vary with electronic state implying that the respective PCB chromophores are bound to different protein environments. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24560813

  14. Thermodynamics of water dimer dissociation in the primary hydration shell of the iodide ion with temperature-dependent vibrational predissociation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Conrad T; Menges, Fabian S; Tötsch, Niklas; Gorlova, Olga; Fournier, Joseph A; Weddle, Gary H; Johnson, Mark A; Heine, Nadja; Esser, Tim K; Knorke, Harald; Asmis, Knut R; McCoy, Anne B; Arismendi-Arrieta, Daniel J; Prosmiti, Rita; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-03-12

    The strong temperature dependence of the I(-)·(H2O)2 vibrational predissociation spectrum is traced to the intracluster dissociation of the ion-bound water dimer into independent water monomers that remain tethered to the ion. The thermodynamics of this process is determined using van't Hoff analysis of key features that quantify the relative populations of H-bonded and independent water molecules. The dissociation enthalpy of the isolated water dimer is thus observed to be reduced by roughly a factor of three upon attachment to the ion. The cause of this reduction is explored with electronic structure calculations of the potential energy profile for dissociation of the dimer, which suggest that both reduction of the intrinsic binding energy and vibrational zero-point effects act to weaken the intermolecular interaction between the water molecules in the first hydration shell. Additional insights are obtained by analyzing how classical trajectories of the I(-)·(H2O)2 system sample the extended potential energy surface with increasing temperature. PMID:25647222

  15. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Ramos, Pedro M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed.

  16. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of unstable N-containing compounds: Resolution of ΔK subbands in HNCO{sup +} and vibrational resolution in NCO{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Lang, Melanie; Fischer, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.fischer@uni-wuerzburg.de [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Tang, Xiaofeng [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin BP 48, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Romanzin, Claire; Alcaraz, Christian [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS and Université Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Hemberger, Patrick [Molecular Dynamics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-05-14

    The threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of two unstable nitrogen-containing species, HNCO and NCO, were recorded utilizing vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Both are intermediates in combustion processes and play a role in the removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases. The rovibronic structure of the first band in the TPES of HNCO{sup +} was analyzed within the framework of an orbital ionization model, and the resolved structure of the origin band was assigned to ΔK subbands. An ionization energy of 11.602 ± 0.005 eV was determined and the vibrational structure of the cationic ground state was analyzed by a Franck-Condon fit. Low lying electronically excited states of HNCO{sup +} were also observed. In a second series of experiments, the NCO radical was generated by flash pyrolysis from chlorine isocyanate. The ionization energy to the X{sup +} {sup 3}Σ{sup −} ground state was determined to be 11.76 ± 0.02 eV, while for the a{sup +1}Δ state, a value of 12.93 ± 0.02 eV was obtained. Vibrational structure was observed for both states, and bands were assigned by Franck-Condon simulations.

  17. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed. (paper)

  18. Weak hydrogen-, halogen- and stacking π...π bonding in crystalline 5-chloro-1-indanone. An analysis by using X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy and theoretical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermolecular forces of C-H...O, C-H...π, C=O...Cl and π...π types are present in the stable triclinic crystal structure of 5-chloro-1-indanone. They are analysed from a geometrical point of view supported in some extent by the analysis of the vibrational spectrum of the titled compound. Moreover, the molecular structure of the isolated species is calculated by using ab initio as well as density functional theory (DFT) methods together an assortment of basis sets. In order to obtain some information about the influence of intermolecular forces on the molecular structure, the calculated geometries of a free molecule were compared with the experimental solid phase geometry determined by X-ray crystallography. An analysis and assignment of the vibrational spectrum of the 5-chloro-1-indanone is accomplished by using IR and Raman experimental data along with Pulay et al.'s scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQM) methodology starting from the theoretical B3LYP/6-31G(d) and BLYP/6-31G(d) force fields under C s symmetry

  19. A theoretical study on the equilibrium structures, vibrational frequencies and photoelectron spectroscopy of thiocarbonyl fluoride by using density functional and coupled-cluster theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The properties of F2CS were computed by DFT and CC approaches. • The photoelectron spectra were simulated by computing Franck–Condon factors. • Computed equilibrium geometries are reliable assessed from the following criteria. • The simulated spectra are in agreement with the experiment. • The computed adiabatic ionization energies are of high accuracy. - Abstract: The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies and normal modes of F2CS and F2CS+X∼2B2, A∼2B1, and B∼2A1 states were obtained by utilizing both density functional and coupled-cluster (CC2) theories. Franck–Condon factors were calculated by using the harmonic-oscillator model taking into account the Duschinsky effect, based on which photoelectron spectra were simulated. The adiabatic ionization energies were computed by the CCSD(T) method extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The computed equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies are generally in agreement with the experiment, except in few cases. The B3LYP and CC2 approaches perform equally well in the computations of F2CS. The simulated photoelectron spectra of F2CS are also in accord with the experiment, indicating that the calculated structures are reliable. The computed adiabatic ionization energies are in agreement with the experiment within 0.01, 0.02, and 0.06 eV for the three ionic states, respectively

  20. Characterizing the Biological and Geochemical Architecture of Hydrothermally Derived Sedimentary Deposits: Coupling Micro Raman Spectroscopy with Noble Gas Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, D. M.; Conrad, P. G.; Steele, A.; Fries, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical species in cherts and glass fragments were analyzed using micro Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with measurements of heavy noble gas isotopes to characterize hydrothermally derived sedimentary environments.

  1. Random Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  2. Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: A Powerful Tool for Determination of Lateral Diffusion in Biological Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefl, Martin; Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    New York : KLUWER ACADEMIC/PLENUM PUBL, 2011 - (Geddes, C.), s. 321-344 ISBN 978-1-4419-9671-8. - (Reviews in Fluorescence. Vol. 6) R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1090; GA ČR GAP208/10/0376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : image correlation spectroscopy * single particle tracking * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Systematic metabolite annotation and identification in complex biological extracts : combining robust mass spectrometry fragmentation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hooft, van, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the chemical content of organisms, organs, tissues, and cells is needed to fully characterize complex biological systems. The high chemical variety of compounds present in biological systems is illustrated by the presence of a large variety of compounds, ranging from apolar lipids, semi-polar phenolic conjugates, toward polar sugars. A molecules’ chemical structure forms the basis to understand its biological function. The chemical identification process of small m...

  4. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.;

    2003-01-01

    The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...

  5. Interactions in Symmetric Top Molecules between Vibrational Polyads: Rotational and Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Low-lying States of Propyne, H3C-C.IDENT.CH.­ ­

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pracna, Petr; Müller, H. S. P.; Klee, S.; Horneman, V. M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 102, 14/15 (2004), s. 1555-1568. ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/1274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : rotational * rovibrational * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.406, year: 2004

  6. Investigation of vibrational characteristics in BBO crystals by femtosecond CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuanqin; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Sheng; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2012-10-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is utilized to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in BBO crystals at room temperature. Time-resolved two-beam and three-beam CARS are detected. The vibrational dephasing time is analyzed and the changes of vibrational mode intensities with the polarization of pump pulses are observed.

  7. Systematic metabolite annotation and identification in complex biological extracts : combining robust mass spectrometry fragmentation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van der J.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the chemical content of organisms, organs, tissues, and cells is needed to fully characterize complex biological systems. The high chemical variety of compounds present in biological systems is illustrated by the presence of a large variety of compounds, ranging from apolar lip

  8. Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer and intramolecular vibrational relaxation of rhodamine 6G in DMSO revealed by multiplex transient grating spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer (PIET) and intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) dynamics of the excited state of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G+) in DMSO are investigated by multiplex transient grating. Two major components are resolved in the dynamics of Rh6G+. The first component, with a lifetime τPIET = 140 fs–260 fs, is attributed to PIET from the phenyl ring to the xanthene plane. The IVR process occurring in the range τIVR = 3.3 ps–5.2 ps is much slower than the first component. The PIET and IVR processes occurring in the excited state of Rh6G+ are quantitatively determined, and a better understanding of the relationship between these processes is obtained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Insight into the Local Solvent Environment of Biologically Relevant Iron-nitroysl Systems through Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Jennifer Faith

    Iron-nitrosyl systems, particularly in the form of heme proteins, with their iron metal active sites play an important role in biological systems. Heme proteins act as storage, transporters, and receptors for nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule that is important in immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems of mammals. By better understanding the local environment of the active site of NO binding heme proteins we can gain insight into disease in which the NO pathways have been implicated. This is an important step to being able to develop pharmaceuticals targeting NO pathways in humans. Sodium nitroprusside ((SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5is NO]·2H 2O) investigated as a model system for the active site of nitric oxide binding heme proteins. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) to obtain dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch (nuNO) in a series of solvents we are able to better understand the local environment of the more complicated metalloproteins. Rigorous line shape analysis is performed by using nonlinear response theory to simulate 2D IR spectra which are then fit to experimental data in an iterative process to extract frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs). The time scales obtained are then correlated to empirical solvent polarity parameters. The analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveal that the spectral diffusion timescale of the nuNO in SNP varies from 0.8 -- 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We continue to investigate NO binding of metalloproteins through 2D IR experiments on nitrophorin 4 (NP4). NP4 is a pH-sensitive NO transporter protein present in the salivary gland of the blood sucking insect Rhodius prolixus which undergoes a pH sensitive structural change between a closed and open conformation allowing for the storage and delivery of NO. The two structures are observed spectroscopically as two distinct pH-dependent nu NO frequencies at ~1904 and ~1917 cm-1. We obtain FFCFs by globally

  10. Urban vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Knudsen, L.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    In   this   paper   we   describe   a   field   study   conducted   with   a   wearable   vibration   belt   where   we   test   to   determine   the   vibration   intensity   sensitivity   ranges   on   a   large   diverse   group   of   participants   with   evenly   distributed  ages  and......   lab   studies   in   that   we   found   a   decreased   detection   rate   in   busy   environments.   Here   we   test   with   a   much   larger   sample   and   age   range,   and   contribute   with   the   first   vibration  sensitivity  testing  outside  the  lab  in  an  urban   public...

  11. Contrasting organic aerosol particles from boreal and tropical forests during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 using coherent vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Ebben

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the vibrational sum frequency generation spectra of organic particles collected in a boreal forest in Finland and a tropical forest in Brazil. These spectra are compared to those of secondary organic material produced in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. By comparing coherent vibrational spectra of a variety of terpene and olefin reference compounds, along with the secondary organic material synthesized in the environmental chamber, we show that submicron aerosol particles sampled in Southern Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 are composed to a large degree of material similar in chemical composition to synthetic α-pinene-derived material. For material collected in Brazil as part of AMAZE-08, the organic component is found to be chemically complex in the coarse mode but highly uniform in the fine mode. When combined with histogram analyses of the isoprene and monoterpene abundance recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 campaigns, the findings presented here indicate that if air is rich in monoterpenes, submicron-sized secondary aerosol particles that form under normal OH and O3 concentration levels can be described in terms of their hydrocarbon content as being similar to α-pinene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles. If the isoprene concentration dominates the chemical composition of organic compounds in forest air, then the hydrocarbon component of secondary organic material in the submicron size range is not simply well-represented by that of isoprene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles but is more complex. Throughout the climate-relevant size range of the fine mode, however, we find that the chemical composition of the secondary organic particle material from such air is invariant with size, suggesting that the particle growth does not change the chemical composition of the hydrocarbon component of the particles in a significant way.

  12. Contrasting organic aerosol particles from boreal and tropical forests during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 using coherent vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Ebben

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the vibrational sum frequency generation spectra of organic particles collected in a boreal forest in Finland and a tropical forest in Brazil. These spectra are compared to those of secondary organic material produced in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. By comparing coherent vibrational spectra of a variety of terpene and olefin reference compounds, along with the secondary organic material synthesized in the environmental chamber, we show that submicron aerosol particles sampled in Southern Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 are composed to a large degree of material similar in chemical composition to synthetic α-pinene-derived material. For material collected in Brazil as part of AMAZE-08, the organic component is found to be chemically complex in the coarse mode but highly uniform in the fine mode. When combined with histogram analyses of the isoprene and monoterpene abundance recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 campaigns, the findings presented here indicate that if air is rich in monoterpenes, submicron-sized secondary aerosol particles that form under normal OH and O3 concentration levels can be described in terms of their hydrocarbon content as being similar to α-pinene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles. If the isoprene concentration dominates the chemical composition of organic compounds in forest air, then the hydrocarbon component of secondary organic material in the submicron size range is not simply well-represented by that of isoprene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles but is more complex. Throughout the climate-relevant size range of the fine mode, however, we find that the chemical composition of the secondary organic particle material from such air is invariant with size, suggesting that the particle growth does not change the chemical composition of the hydrocarbon component of the particles in a significant way.

  13. Contrasting organic aerosol particles from boreal and tropical forests during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 using coherent vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, C. J.; Martinez, I. S.; Shrestha, M.; Buchbinder, A. M.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guenther, A.; Karl, T.; Petäjä, T.; Song, W. W.; Zorn, S. R.; Artaxo, P.; Kulmala, M.; Martin, S. T.; Russell, L. M.; Williams, J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2011-10-01

    We present the vibrational sum frequency generation spectra of organic particles collected in a boreal forest in Finland and a tropical forest in Brazil. These spectra are compared to those of secondary organic material produced in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. By comparing coherent vibrational spectra of a variety of terpene and olefin reference compounds, along with the secondary organic material synthesized in the environmental chamber, we show that submicron aerosol particles sampled in Southern Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 are composed to a large degree of material similar in chemical composition to synthetic α-pinene-derived material. For material collected in Brazil as part of AMAZE-08, the organic component is found to be chemically complex in the coarse mode but highly uniform in the fine mode. When combined with histogram analyses of the isoprene and monoterpene abundance recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 campaigns, the findings presented here indicate that if air is rich in monoterpenes, submicron-sized secondary aerosol particles that form under normal OH and O3 concentration levels can be described in terms of their hydrocarbon content as being similar to α-pinene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles. If the isoprene concentration dominates the chemical composition of organic compounds in forest air, then the hydrocarbon component of secondary organic material in the submicron size range is not simply well-represented by that of isoprene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles but is more complex. Throughout the climate-relevant size range of the fine mode, however, we find that the chemical composition of the secondary organic particle material from such air is invariant with size, suggesting that the particle growth does not change the chemical composition of the hydrocarbon component of the particles in a significant way.

  14. A Review on the Role of Vibrational Spectroscopy as An Analytical Method to Measure Starch Biochemical and Biophysical Properties in Cereals and Starchy Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cozzolino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starch is the major component of cereal grains and starchy foods, and changes in its biophysical and biochemical properties (e.g., amylose, amylopectin, pasting, gelatinization, viscosity will have a direct effect on its end use properties (e.g., bread, malt, polymers. The use of rapid and non-destructive methods to study and monitor starch properties, such as gelatinization, retrogradation, water absorption in cereals and starchy foods, is of great interest in order to improve and assess their quality. In recent years, near infrared reflectance (NIR and mid infrared (MIR spectroscopy have been explored to predict several quality parameters, such as those generated by instrumental methods commonly used in routine analysis like the rapid visco analyser (RVA or viscometers. In this review, applications of both NIR and MIR spectroscopy to measure and monitor starch biochemical (amylose, amylopectin, starch and biophysical properties (e.g., pasting properties will be presented and discussed.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene hip prostheses: influence of the sterilisation method on crystallinity and surface oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Affatato, Saverio; Fagnano, Concezio; Bordini, Barbara; Tinti, Anna; Toni, Aldo

    2002-08-01

    Due to its high strength and low creep, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used for 30 years in the replacement of damaged articulating cartilage for total joint replacement surgery. In this study, micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of the sterilisation method (gamma and ethylene oxide (EtO) treatment) on the crystallinity changes of UHMWPE acetabular cups. The crystallinity of the cups was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy coupled to the partial least square (PLS) regression as a function of the inner surface position. Unworn gamma-sterilised cups were found to be significantly more crystalline than the EtO-sterilised ones. No significant differences were observed between the crystallinity values of worn (in in vitro tests) and unworn cups for each type of sterilisation, showing that the changes in surface crystallinity were mainly caused by irradiation rather than by mechanical friction during the in vitro wear tests. These results were discussed in relation to gravimetric measurements, which revealed at the end of the in vitro tests, a higher mean weight loss for the EtO-sterilised cups than for the gamma-sterilised ones. No significant amounts of oxidative degradation products were detected by IR spectroscopy in the inner surface of the EtO-sterilised worn and unworn cups. Regarding the gamma-sterilised cups, the oxidation level appeared to be slightly higher in the centre of the worn cups than on their borders.

  16. Vibrating minds

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Ed Witten is one of the leading scientists in the field of string theory, the theory that describes elementary particles as vibrating strings. This week he leaves CERN after having spent a few months here on sabbatical. His wish is that the LHC will unveil supersymmetry.

  17. Vibrating Manipulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Guo-quan; CUI Yi-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ As a manipulation with unique therapeutic effect in TCM Tuina manipulations, Vibrating manipulation has significantly stronger effection on viscera, blood vessel, smooth muscle and gland secretion than other Tuina manipulations and it is mainly used in internal medicine, gynecology and miscellaneous diseases.

  18. Vibration sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Matěj, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper lays out a design of a system for reading the radar antenna gearbox vibrations. Firstly it names different types of sensors and defines their suitability for this usage. It describes their important electric and frequency properties. Secondly it shows a design of the data transmission system from the transducer to a computer and describes measured data changes according to the gearbox faults.

  19. Quantitative vibrational dynamics of iron in nitrosyl porphyrins

    OpenAIRE

    Leu, B. M.; Zgierski, M. Z.; Wyllie, G. R. A.; Scheidt, W. R.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Durbin, S. M.; Sage, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    We use quantitative experimental and theoretical approaches to characterize the vibrational dynamics of the Fe atom in porphyrins designed to model heme protein active sites. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) yields frequencies, amplitudes, and directions for 57Fe vibrations in a series of ferrous nitrosyl porphyrins, which provide a benchmark for evaluation of quantum chemical vibrational calculations. Detailed normal mode predictions result from DFT calculations on ferrous n...

  20. VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION ON HYDROGEN BONDING IN DINUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATE

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Giichi

    1983-01-01

    The specific interactions between bases, which depend on the dinucleoside phosphate conformations, were studied in terms of the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen-bonding. The hydrogen-bond stretching vibrations of the nucleotide complexes and dinucleoside phosphates were observed in the polycrystalline state by the Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational dynamics were investigated by measuring the line broadenings of hydrogen-bonding vibration observed in near 100cm^. The half band-widths of vibra...

  1. Rotational spectroscopy as a tool to investigate interactions between vibrational polyads in symmetric top molecules: low-lying states v8 <= 2 of methyl cyanide, CH$_3$CN

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Holger S P; Drouin, Brian J; Pearson, John C; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L; Sung, Keeyoon; Ordu, Matthias H; Lewen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of methyl cyanide were recorded to analyze interactions in low-lying vibrational states and to construct line lists for radio astronomical observations as well as for infrared spectroscopic investigations of planetary atmospheres. The rotational spectra cover large portions of the 36-1627 GHz region. In the infrared (IR), a spectrum was recorded for this study in the region of 2nu8 around 717 cm-1 with assignments covering 684-765 cm-1. Additional spectra in the nu8 region were used to validate the analysis. The large amount and the high accuracy of the rotational data extend to much higher J and K quantum numbers and allowed us to investigate for the first time in depth local interactions between these states which occur at high K values. In particular, we have detected several interactions between v8 = 1 and 2. Notably, there is a strong Delta(v8) = +- 1, Delta(K) = 0, Delta(l) = +-3 Fermi resonance between v8 = 1^-1 and v8 = 2^+2 at K = 14. Pronounced effects in the spectrum are also caused by reso...

  2. Syntheses, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Crystal Structure Determination from X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data of Alkaline Earth Dicyanamides M[N(CN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergens, Barbara; Irran, Elisabeth; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2001-03-01

    The alkaline earth dicyanamides Mg[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, and Ba[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2} were synthesized by ion exchange using Na[N(CN){sub 2}] and the respective nitrates or bromides as starting materials. The crystal structures were determined from X-ray powder diffractometry: Mg[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Pnnm, Z=2, a=617.14(3), b=716.97(3), and c=740.35(5) pm; Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2} and Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, C2/c, Z=4; Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, a=1244.55(3), b=607.97(1), and c=789.81(1) pm, {beta}=98.864(2){degree}; Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, a=1279.63(2), b=624.756(8), and c=817.56(1) pm, {beta}=99.787(1){degree}; Ba[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Pnma, Z=4, a=1368.68(7), b=429.07(7), and c=1226.26(2) pm. The dicyanamides consist of the respective alkaline earth cations and bent planar [N(CN){sub 2}]{sup -} ions. The structural features were correlated with vibrational spectroscopic data. The thermal behavior was studied by thermoanalytical experiments.

  3. New accurate measurement of 36ArH+ and 38ArH+ ro-vibrational transitions by high resolution IR absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cueto, M; Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Herrero, V J; Tanarro, I; Domenech, J L

    2014-01-01

    The protonated Argon ion, $^{36}$ArH$^{+}$, has been identified recently in the Crab Nebula (Barlow et al. 2013) from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its $J$=1-0 and $J$=2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of $^{36}$ArH$^{+}$ and $^{38}$ArH$^{+}$ rotation-vibration transitions in the $v$=1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 $\\mu$m (2450-2715 cm$^{-1}$). The wavenumbers of the $R$(0) transitions of the $v$=1-0 band are 2612.50135$\\pm$0.00033 and 2610.70177$\\pm$0.00042 cm$^{-1}$ ($\\pm3\\sigma$) for $^{36}$ArH$^{+}$ and $^{38}$ArH$^{+}$, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and a linewidth of 1 km.s$^{-1}$ of the $R$(0) line is $1.6\\times10^{-15}\\times N$($^{36}$ArH$^+$). For column densities ...

  4. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, S.; Sylvestre, S.; Jayarajan, D.; Amalanathan, M.; Oudayakumar, K.; Gnanapoongothai, T.; Jayavarthanan, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis.

  5. FT-Raman and FTIR-ATR spectroscopies and DFT calculations of triterpene acetyl aleuritolic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, I. R. S.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Sena Junior, D. M.; Santos, H. S.; Albuquerque, M. R. J. R.; Bandeira, P. N.; Rodrigues, A. S.; Braz-Filho, R.; Gusmão, G. O. M.; Silva, J. H.; Faria, J. L. B.; Bento, R. R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Triterpenoids comprise an important class of compounds presenting a wide range of biologically important properties. Acetyl aleutitolic acid (AAA) is a triterpenoid isolated from Croton zehntneri, with molecular formula C32H50O4. Its structure has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, however, there are no papers available regarding its vibrational properties. The Fourier-Transform Infrared with Attenuated Total Reflectance and Fourier-Transform Raman spectra, together with Density Functional Theory calculations of AAA are reported. Vibrational spectra were recorded at 300 K in the regions 600 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1 and 40 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1, for IR and Raman, respectively. Vibrational wavenumbers were predicted using Density Functional Theory calculations with the hybrid functional B3LYP and the basis set 6-31 G(d,p). A complete assignment of vibrational modes is given.

  6. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L. [Molecular Physics Department, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cernicharo, J. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB. INTA-CSIC. Crta Torrejón-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M., E-mail: jl.domenech@csic.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London. Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  7. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO{sub 2} in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide’s point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean, E-mail: sgr@pitt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 219 Parkman Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    The CO{sub 2}ν{sub 3} asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO{sub 2} is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C{sub 4}C{sub 1}im][X], where [X]{sup −} is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup −}), tetrafluoroborate (BF{sub 4}{sup −}), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf{sub 2}N{sup −}), triflate (TfO{sup −}), trifluoroacetate (TFA{sup −}), dicyanamide (DCA{sup −}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup −})). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν{sub 3} center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO{sub 2} and from CO{sub 2} to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO{sub 2}, which in turn changes the ν{sub 3} frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν{sub 2} and ν{sub 3} normal modes of CO{sub 2}. Thermal fluctuations in the ν{sub 2} population stochastically modulate the ν{sub 3} frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO{sub 2}. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO{sub 2} are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  8. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X]- is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF 6- ), tetrafluoroborate (BF 4- ), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N-), triflate (TfO-), trifluoroacetate (TFA-), dicyanamide (DCA-), and thiocyanate (SCN-)). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  9. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide’s point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X]− is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF6−), tetrafluoroborate (BF4−), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N−), triflate (TfO−), trifluoroacetate (TFA−), dicyanamide (DCA−), and thiocyanate (SCN−)). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations

  10. Vibration sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These sensors, which aim is the surveillance of the fast breeder reactor internal structure, were designed considering the following requirements: - long term utilization under low frequencies conditions (1 to 50 Hz) and detection of accelerations lower than 0,01 g, - operation with a temperature up to 6000C and receiving important neutron and gamma flux. Monoaxial sensors with a liquid vibrating mass (sodium) were thus developed, based on the electromagnetic flow meter principles (Faraday effect)

  11. Unusual Synthetic Pathway for an {Fe(NO)2}(9) Dinitrosyl Iron Complex (DNIC) and Insight into DNIC Electronic Structure via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Amy L; Zhang, Bo; Silakov, Alexey; Skodje, Kelsey M; Alp, E Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y; Kim, Eunsuk; Krebs, Carsten; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2016-06-01

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are among the most abundant NO-derived cellular species. Monomeric DNICs can exist in the {Fe(NO)2}(9) or {Fe(NO)2}(10) oxidation state (in the Enemark-Feltham notation). However, experimental studies of analogous DNICs in both oxidation states are rare, which prevents a thorough understanding of the differences in the electronic structures of these species. Here, the {Fe(NO)2}(9) DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2](OTf) (1; dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) is synthesized from a ferrous precursor via an unusual pathway, involving disproportionation of an {FeNO}(7) complex to yield the {Fe(NO)2}(9) DNIC and a ferric species, which is subsequently reduced by NO gas to generate a ferrous complex that re-enters the reaction cycle. In contrast to most {Fe(NO)2}(9) DNICs with neutral N-donor ligands, 1 exhibits high solution stability and can be characterized structurally and spectroscopically. Reduction of 1 yields the corresponding {Fe(NO)2}(10) DNIC [Fe(dmp)(NO)2] (2). The Mössbauer isomer shift of 2 is 0.08 mm/s smaller than that of 1, which indicates that the iron center is slightly more oxidized in the reduced complex. The nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) of 1 and 2 are distinct and provide direct experimental insight into differences in bonding in these complexes. In particular, the symmetric out-of-plane Fe-N-O bending mode is shifted to higher energy by 188 cm(-1) in 2 in comparison to 1. Using quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA), this is shown to arise from an increase in Fe-NO bond order and a stiffening of the Fe(NO)2 unit upon reduction of 1 to 2. DFT calculations demonstrate that the changes in bonding arise from an iron-centered reduction which leads to a distinct increase in Fe-NO π-back-bonding in {Fe(NO)2}(10) DNICs in comparison to the corresponding {Fe(NO)2}(9) complexes, in agreement with all experimental findings. Finally, the implications of the electronic structure of DNICs for

  12. Rotational Spectroscopy as a Tool to Investigate Interactions Between Vibrational Polyads in Symmetric Top Molecules: Low-Lying States v_8 ≤ 2 OF Methyl Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Ordu, Matthias H.; Lewen, Frank; Brown, Linda; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Sung, Keeyoon; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Rotational and rovibrational spectra of methyl cyanide were recorded to analyze interactions in low-lying vibrational states and to construct line lists for radio astronomical observations as well as for infrared spectroscopic investigations of planetary atmospheres. The rotational spectra cover large portions of the 36-1627~GHz region. In the infrared (IR), a spectrum was recorded for this study in the region of 2ν_8 around 717~cm-1 with assignments covering 684-765~cm-1. Additional spectra in the ν _8 region were used to validate the analysis. Using ν _8 data as well as spectroscopic parameters for v_4 = 1, v_7 = 1, and v_8 = 3 from previous studies, we analyzed rotational data involving v = 0, v_8 = 1, and v_8 = 2 up to high J and K quantum numbers. We analyzed a strong Δ v_8 = ± 1, Δ K = 0, Δ l = ±3 Fermi resonance between v_8 = 1-1 and v_8 = 2+2 at K = 14 and obtained preliminary results for two further Fermi resonances between v_8 = 2 and 3. We also found resonant Δ v_8 = ± 1, Δ K = ∓ 2, Δ l = ± 1 interactions between v_8 = 1 and 2 and present the first detailed analysis of such a resonance between v_8 = 0 and 1. We discuss the impact of this analysis on the v_8 = 1 and 2 as well as on the axial v = 0 parameters and compare selected CH_3CN parameters with those of CH_3CCH and CH_3NC. We evaluated transition dipole moments of ν _8, 2ν _8 - ν _8, and 2ν _8 for remote sensing in the IR. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. M. Koivusaari et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 152 (1992) 377-388. A.-M. Tolonen et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 160 (1993) 554-565.

  13. Biomedical applications of X-ray absorption and vibrational spectroscopic microscopies in obtaining structural information from complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, Jade B.; Carter, Elizabeth A. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Eastgate, Harold [Eastmac Pty Ltd, 8 Cassinia Close, Knoxfield, Vic 3180 (Australia); Hackett, Mark J.; Harris, Hugh H.; Levina, Aviva [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lee, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-I. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Centre, No. 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lay, Peter A., E-mail: p.lay@chem.usyd.edu.a [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Protein crystallography and NMR spectroscopy took decades to emerge as routine techniques in structural biology. X-ray absorption spectroscopy now has reached a similar stage of maturity for obtaining complementary local structural information around metals in metalloproteins. However, the relatively recent emergence of X-ray and vibrational spectroscopic microprobes that build on these techniques has enabled the structural information obtained from the 'mature' techniques on isolated biomolecules to be translated into in situ structural information from inhomogeneous complex systems, such as whole cells and tissues.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy accomplished with DFT calculation of new hybrid compound [2-CH3C6H4NH3]HSO4.H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hassen, C.; Boujelbene, M.; Marweni, S.; Bahri, M.; Mhiri, T.

    2015-10-01

    The present paper undertakes the study of a new organic/inorganic hybrid compound [2-CH3C6H4NH3]HSO4.H2O characterized by the X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA, IR and Raman spectroscopy accomplished with DFT calculation. It is crystallized in the monoclinic system with the centrosymmetric space group P 21/c, with a = 9.445 (5) Å, b = 10.499 Å, c = 10.073 Å, β = 90.627 (5)° and Z = 4. The atomic arrangement can be described as inorganic layers built by infinite chains, parallel to the (a c) planes between which the organic cations are inserted. In this atomic arrangement, hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the different species have an important role in the tri-dimensional network cohesion. Besides, the X-ray powder diffraction of the title compound confirms the existence of only one phase at room temperature. The thermal decomposition of precursors studied by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), the differential thermal analysis (DTA) and the temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction, show crystalline anhydrous compounds upon dehydration. DFT/BHHLYP calculations were performed, using the DZV (d,p) basis set, to determine the harmonic frequencies of the vibrational modes of an optimized cluster structure. The calculated modes were animated using the Molden graphical package to give tentative assignments of the observed IR and Raman spectra.

  15. Changing Hydrogen-Bond Structure during an Aqueous Liquid-Liquid Transition Investigated with Time-Resolved and Two-Dimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Jeroen R; van der Loop, Tibert H; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the putative liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous glycerol solution, using the OD-stretch mode in dilute OD/OH isotopic mixtures to probe the hydrogen-bond structure. The conversion exhibits Avrami kinetics with an exponent of n = 2.9 ± 0.1 (as opposed to n = 1.7 observed upon inducing ice nucleation and growth in the same sample), which indicates a transition from one liquid phase to another. Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy shows that the initial and final phases have different hydrogen-bond structures: the former has a single Gaussian distribution of hydrogen-bond lengths, whereas the latter has a bimodal distribution consisting of a broad distribution and a narrower, ice-like distribution. The 2D-IR spectrum of the final phase is identical to that of ice/glycerol at the same temperature. Combined with the kinetic data this suggests that the liquid-liquid transformation is immediately followed by a rapid formation of small (probably nanometer-sized) ice crystals. PMID:26891098

  16. Fully automated radiochemical preparation system for gamma-spectroscopy on fission products and the study of the intruder and vibrational levels in 83Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AUTOBATCH was developed to provide a usable source of short-lived neutron-rich nuclides through chemical preparation of the sample from fission products for detailed gamma-ray spectroscopy, which would complement the output of on-line isotope separators. With AUTOBATCH the gamma rays following the β- decay of 83As were studied to determine the ground state spin and parity of 83As to be 5/2-; the absolute intensity of the β- branch from 83As to 83Se/sup m/ to be 0.3%; the absolute intensity of the ground state β- branch from 83Se/sup m/ to 83Br to be 39%; the halflife of the 5/21+ level to be 3.2 ns; and the structure of 83Se49. Results are used to show that the intruder structure which had been previously observed in the odd mass 49In isotopes could be observed in the N = 49 isotones. The observed structure is discussed in terms of the unified model calculations of Heyde which has been used to describe the intruder structure in the indium nuclei. The intruder structure is most strongly developed, not at core mid-shell, 89Zr49, but rather at core mid-sub-shell 83Se. This difference is qualitatively understood to be due to the blocking of collectivity by the Z = 40 subshell closure which prevents the intruder structure from occurring in 87Sr49 and 89Zr49

  17. Probing Structural Transitions in the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of the Measles Virus Nucleoprotein by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cyanylated Cysteines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G.; Longhi, Sonia; Snead, David M.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Terrer, Elodie; Londergan, Casey H.

    2010-01-01

    Four single-cysteine variants of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) were cyanylated at cysteine and their infrared spectra in the C≡N stretching region were recorded both in the absence and in the presence of one of the physiological partners of NTAIL, namely the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Consistent with previous studies showing that XD triggers a disorder-to-order transition within NTAIL, the C≡N stretching bands of the infrared probe were found to be significantly affected by XD, with this effect being position-dependent. When the cyanylated cysteine side chain is solvent-exposed throughout the structural transition, its changing linewidth reflects a local gain of structure. When the probe becomes partially buried due to binding, its frequency reports on the mean hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding the labeled side chain of the bound form. The probe moiety is small compared to other common covalently attached spectroscopic probes, thereby minimizing possible steric hindrance/perturbation at the binding interface. These results show for the first time to our knowledge the suitability of site-specific cysteine mutagenesis followed by cyanylation and infrared spectroscopy to document structural transitions occurring within intrinsically disordered regions, with regions involved in binding and folding being identifiable at the residue level. PMID:20816082

  18. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission is one of four selected for Phase A Concept Study in NASA's current call for MIDEX class missions. ABE is a cooled space telescope equipped with spectrographs covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral range. The ABE mission is devoted to the detection and identification of organic and related molecular species in space. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace.

  19. Combining vibrational biomolecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques for the study of response and sensitivity of molecular structures/functional groups mainly related to lipid biopolymer to various processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) combine vibrational spectroscopy with chemometric multivariate techniques to determine the effect of processing applications on molecular structural changes of lipid biopolymer that mainly related to functional groups in green- and yellow-type Crop Development Centre (CDC) pea varieties [CDC strike (green-type) vs. CDC meadow (yellow-type)] that occurred during various processing applications; (2) relatively quantify the effect of processing applications on the antisymmetric CH3 ("CH3as") and CH2 ("CH2as") (ca. 2960 and 2923 cm(-1), respectively), symmetric CH3 ("CH3s") and CH2 ("CH2s") (ca. 2873 and 2954 cm(-1), respectively) functional groups and carbonyl C=O ester (ca. 1745 cm(-1)) spectral intensities as well as their ratios of antisymmetric CH3 to antisymmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3as to CH2as), ratios of symmetric CH3 to symmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3s to CH2s), and ratios of carbonyl C=O ester peak area to total CH peak area (ratio of C=O ester to CH); and (3) illustrate non-invasive techniques to detect the sensitivity of individual molecular functional group to the various processing applications in the recently developed different types of pea varieties. The hypothesis of this research was that processing applications modified the molecular structure profiles in the processed products as opposed to original unprocessed pea seeds. The results showed that the different processing methods had different impacts on lipid molecular functional groups. Different lipid functional groups had different sensitivity to various heat processing applications. These changes were detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques which may be highly related to lipid utilization and availability. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis of original spectra (without spectral parameterization) are unable to fully distinguish the structural differences in the

  20. Self-trapped vibrational states in synthetic beta-sheet helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Erik; Bodis, Pavol; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Rowan, Alan E; Woutersen, Sander; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2009-08-21

    Femtosecond vibrational pump-probe spectroscopy on beta-helical polyisocyanopeptides reveals vibrational self-trapping in the well-defined hydrogen-bonded side groups that is absent when non-hydrogen bonded monomers are mixed in. PMID:19641806

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy to support the link between rheology and continuous twin-screw melt granulation on molecular level: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteyne, Tinne; Heeze, Liza; Oldörp, Klaus; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Twin screw hot melt granulation (TSHMG) is an innovative and continuous drug formulation process allowing granulation of moisture sensitive drugs. However, due to the lack of experience and in-depth process understanding, this technique is not yet widely used. During the TSHMG process, the microstructure of the granules is generated and modified and strongly depends on the flow behavior of the material. Hence, rheology might be a suitable tool to simulate and examine this process. However, chemical interactions of the material are influencing the physical properties leading to the microstructure. In this research project it is spectroscopically investigated whether the heat applied in a rheometer induces the same molecular effects as these occurring during TSHMG of the model formulation caffeine anhydrous/Soluplus®. Hence, it is evaluated whether rheology can be used as a simulation tool to improve the understanding of the material behavior at molecular level during continuous melt granulation. Therefore, in-line Raman spectroscopy is executed during TSHMG and in situ Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) during oscillatory rheological experiments. The results from the in-line Raman monitoring revealed polymorph transition of caffeine anhydrous during twin screw melt granulation with Soluplus® which is stimulated depending on the binder concentration and/or granulation temperature. A correlation was seen between the FTIR spectra obtained during the rheological temperature ramp and the in-line collected Raman spectra during the melt granulation runs. The polymorphic conversion of caffeine anhydrous could be detected in the same temperature range with both techniques, proving the comparability of plate-plate rheometry and hot melt granulation (HMG) for this case with the used parameter settings. Process simulation using rheology combined with in situ FTIR seems a promising approach to increase process understanding and to facilitate binder and parameter selection for

  2. The sorption of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) onto surfaces of selected metal oxides and alumosilicates studied by in situ vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration behavior of actinides and other radioactive contaminants in the environment is controlled by prominent molecular phenomena such as hydrolysis and complexation reactions in aqueous solutions as well as the diffusion and sorption onto minerals present along groundwater flow paths. These reactions significantly influence the mobility and bioavailability of the metal ions in the environment, in particular at liquid-solid interfaces. Hence, for the assessment of migration processes the knowledge of the mechanisms occurring at interfaces is crucial. The required structural information can be obtained using various spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, the speciation of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) at environmentally relevant mineral-water interfaces of oxides of titania, alumina, silica, zinc, and alumosilicates has been investigated by the application of attenuated total reflection Fouriertransform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Moreover, the distribution of the hydrolysis products in micromolar aqueous solutions of U(VI) and Np(V/VI) at ambient atmosphere has been characterized for the first time, by a combination of ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, near infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy, and speciation modeling applying updated thermodynamic databases. From the infrared spectra, a significant change of the U(VI) speciation is derived upon lowering the U(VI) concentration from the milli- to the micromolar range, strongly suggesting the dominance of monomeric U(VI) hydrolysis products in the micromolar solutions. In contradiction to the predicted speciation, monomeric hydroxo species are already present at pH ≥ 2.5 and become dominant at pH 3. At higher pH levels (> 6), a complex speciation is evidenced including carbonate containing complexes. For the first time, spectroscopic results of Np(VI) hydrolysis reactions are provided in the submillimolar concentration range and at pH values up to 5.3, and they are comparatively discussed with U

  3. Mapping the metal uptake in plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Allison [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentine-tolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  4. Transient absorption spectroscopy in biology using the Super-ACO storage ring FEL and the synchrotron radiation combination

    CERN Document Server

    Renault, E; De Ninno, G; Garzella, D; Hirsch, M; Nahon, L; Nutarelli, D

    2001-01-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL, covering the UV range down to 300 nm with a high average power (300 mW at 350 nm) together with a high stability and long lifetime, is a unique tool for the performance of users applications. We present here the first pump-probe two color experiments on biological species using a storage ring FEL coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides, on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum (UV-IR), naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the associated transient species. We have demonstrated the feasibility with a dye molecule (POPOP) observing a two-color effect, signature of excited state absorption and a temporal signature with Acridine. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are carried out,...

  5. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure and Semiconductor Physics Dept.; Gourley, M.F. [Washington Hospital Center, DC (United States); Bellum, J. [Coherent Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  6. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    . We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 wavenumbers (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectra features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice. To advance the study of liquids with THz spectroscopy, we developed a new ultrafast nonlinear THz spectroscopic technique: heterodyne-detected, ultrafast THz Kerr effect (TKE) spectroscopy. We implemented a heterodyne-detection scheme into a TKE spectrometer that uses a stilbazoium-based THz emitter, 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl-stilbazolium 2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonate (DSTMS), and high numerical aperture optics which generates THz electric field in excess of 300 kV/cm, in the sample. This allows us to report the first measurement of quantum beats at terahertz (THz) frequencies that result from vibrational coherences initiated by the nonlinear, dipolar interaction of a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond THz pulse with the sample. Our instrument improves on both the frequency coverage, and sensitivity previously reported; it also ensures a backgroundless measurement of the THz Kerr effect in pure liquids. For liquid diiodomethane, we observe a quantum beat at 3.66 THz (122 wavenumbers), in exact agreement with the fundamental transition frequency of the lowest energy vibration of the molecule. This result provides new insight into dipolar vs. Raman selection rules at terahertz frequencies. To conclude we discuss future directions for the nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the Blake lab

  7. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Petersen, Christian; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2008-01-28

    The ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO:D(2)O ice at 180 K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is studied to characterize the micellar structure. Small reverse micelles with a water content up to approximately 150 water molecules contain an amorphous form of ice that shows remarkably different vibrational dynamics compared to bulk hexagonal ice. The micellar amorphous ice has a much longer vibrational lifetime than bulk hexagonal ice and micellar liquid water. The vibrational lifetime is observed to increase linearly from 0.7 to 4 ps with the resonance frequency ranging from 3100 to 3500 cm(-1). From the pump dependence of the vibrational relaxation the homogeneous linewidth of the amorphous ice is determined (55+/-5 cm(-1)). PMID:18247971

  8. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Petersen, Christian; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO :D2O ice at 180K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is studied to characterize the micellar structure. Small reverse micelles with a water content up to approximately 150 water molecules contain an amorphous form of ice that shows remarkably different vibrational dynamics compared to bulk hexagonal ice. The micellar amorphous ice has a much longer vibrational lifetime than bulk hexagonal ice and micellar liquid water. The vibrational lifetime is observed to increase linearly from 0.7to4ps with the resonance frequency ranging from 3100to3500cm-1. From the pump dependence of the vibrational relaxation the homogeneous linewidth of the amorphous ice is determined (55±5cm-1).

  9. Synthesis and biological characterization of new amino-phosphonates for mitochondrial pH determination by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of mitochondria targeted α-amino-phosphonates combining a diethoxy-phosphoryl group and an alkyl chain-connected triphenylphosphonium bromide tail were designed and synthesized, and their pH-sensitive 31P NMR properties and biological activities in vitro and in vivo were evaluated. The results showed a number of these mitoaminophosphonates exhibiting pKa values fitting the mitochondrial pH range, short relaxation, and chemical shift parameters compatible with sensitive 31P NMR detection, and low cytotoxicity on green algae and murine fibroblasts cell cultures. Of these, two selected compounds demonstrated to distribute at NMR detectable levels within the cytosolic and mitochondrial sites following their perfusion to isolated rat livers, with no detrimental effects on cell energetics and aerobic respiration. This study provided a new molecular scaffold for further development of in situ spectroscopic real-time monitoring of mitochondrion/cytosol pH gradients. (authors)

  10. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  11. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  12. Vibration syndrome and vibration in pedestal grinding.

    OpenAIRE

    Starck, J; Färkkilä, M; Aatola, S; Pyykkö, I; Korhonen, O.

    1983-01-01

    At one Finnish foundry all the workers had typical symptoms of vibration induced white finger (VWF) after they began using a new type of pedestal grinding machine. The objectives of this study were to establish the severity of the symptoms and the difference in vibration exposure between the new and the old machines. Vibration detection thresholds and grip forces were measured, as well as the vibration in the casting and in the wrist simultaneously. The mean latency for VWF among the grinders...

  13. Thermal expansion of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9}: A study by X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangir Murshed, M., E-mail: murshed@uni-bremen.de [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Mendive, Cecilia B.; Curti, Mariano [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Dean Funes 3350, B7600AYL Mar del Plata (Argentina); Šehović, Malik [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Friedrich, Alexandra [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Kristallographie, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fischer, Michael [Kristallographie, FB Geowissenschaften, Universität Bremen, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Gesing, Thorsten M. [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} powder samples were synthesized using the glycerine method. Single crystals were produced from the powder product in a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt. The lattice thermal expansion of the mullite-type compound was studied using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation for the zero pressure equation of state, where the temperature-dependent vibrational internal energy was calculated from the Debye characteristic frequency. Both the first-order and second-order Grüneisen approximations were applied for modeling the volumetric expansion, and the second-order approach provided physically meaningful axial parameters. The phonon density of states as well as phonon dispersion guided to set the characteristic frequency for simulation. The experimental infrared and Raman phonon bands were compared with those calculate from the DFT calculations. Selective Raman modes were analyzed for the thermal anharmonic behaviors using simplified Klemens model. The respective mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} showing the edge-sharing AlO{sub 6} octahedra running parallel to the c-axis. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} was studied using XRD, FTIR, Raman and DFT. • Metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation. • Phonon DOS and phonon dispersion helped to set the Debye frequency. • Mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. • Anharmonicity was analyzed for some selective Raman modes.

  14. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  15. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  16. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan, E-mail: jtavakkoli@ryerson.ca [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  17. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Wang, Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. Based on the experimental and the computational results, the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations. Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  18. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-Ning; Wang Guo; Zhang Yan

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.Based on the experimental and the computational results,the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations.Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  19. Theory of vibration protection

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    This text is an advancement of the theory of vibration protection of mechanical systems with lumped and distributed parameters. The book offers various concepts and methods of solving vibration protection problems, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and the fields of their effective applications. Fundamental approaches of vibration protection, which are considered in this book, are the passive, parametric and optimal active vibration protection. The passive vibration protection is based on vibration isolation, vibration damping and dynamic absorbers. Parametric vibration protection theory is based on the Shchipanov-Luzin invariance principle. Optimal active vibration protection theory is based on the Pontryagin principle and the Krein moment method. The book also contains special topics such as suppression of vibrations at the source of their occurrence and the harmful influence of vibrations on humans. Numerous examples, which illustrate the theoretical ideas of each chapter, ar...

  20. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012