WorldWideScience

Sample records for biology university college

  1. Options for Online Undergraduate Courses in Biology at American Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varty, Alison K.

    2016-01-01

    I aimed to document the online undergraduate course supply in biology to evaluate how well biology educators are serving the diverse and growing population of online students. I documented online biology course offerings in the 2015-2016 academic year at 96 American colleges and universities. I quantified differences in variety, extent, and…

  2. Options for Online Undergraduate Courses in Biology at American Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varty, Alison K

    I aimed to document the online undergraduate course supply in biology to evaluate how well biology educators are serving the diverse and growing population of online students. I documented online biology course offerings in the 2015-2016 academic year at 96 American colleges and universities. I quantified differences in variety, extent, and availability of courses offered by different kinds of academic institutions and characterized 149 online biology courses offered. Although there was no relationship between an institution's enrollment size and any measure of its online biology offerings, I found significantly more online biology course options at 2-year public compared with 4-year public and 4-year private schools. Courses offered for nonmajors, including students pursuing healthcare-related degrees, were three times as common as those intended for biology majors, who were more likely to be offered hybrid courses with face-to-face laboratories. These data indicate some deficiencies in online biology course options; options for students majoring in biology are limited at all types of institutions examined with a minority of 4-year institutions having any online options in biology. Significant investment of institutional resources in faculty training and technological support are necessary to develop online biology courses that will benefit a larger student population. © 2016 A. K. Varty. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar: Compost from Food Waste: Understanding Soil Chemistry and Soil Biology on a College/University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains information about the Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar Series titled Compost from Food Waste:Understanding Soil Chemistry and Soil Biology on a College/University Campus

  4. Forecasting College and University Revenues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary Research Group, Inc., New York, NY.

    This report examines issues and trends in college and university revenues. An introduction describes the study's organization and identifies data sources. An overview chapter summarizes major findings, including a forecast of college and university revenues from 1997 through 2001; trends in consumer spending on higher education; trends in tuition…

  5. The Biological Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1999-12-01

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. The Biological Universe provides a rich and colorful history of the attempts during the twentieth century to answer questions such as whether "biological law" reigns throughout the universe and whether there are other histories, religions, and philosophies outside those on Earth. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a "biophysical cosmology" that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe. This book will fascinate astronomers, historians of science, biochemists, and science fiction readers.

  6. High school and college biology: A multi-level model of the effects of high school biology courses on student academic performance in introductory college biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, John Francis

    The issue of student preparation for college study in science has been an ongoing concern for both college-bound students and educators of various levels. This study uses a national sample of college students enrolled in introductory biology courses to address the relationship between high school biology preparation and subsequent introductory college biology performance. Multi-Level Modeling was used to investigate the relationship between students' high school science and mathematics experiences and college biology performance. This analysis controls for student demographic and educational background factors along with factors associated with the college or university attended. The results indicated that high school course-taking and science instructional experiences have the largest impact on student achievement in the first introductory college biology course. In particular, enrollment in courses, such as high school Calculus and Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, along with biology course content that focuses on developing a deep understanding of the topics is found to be positively associated with student achievement in introductory college biology. On the other hand, experiencing high numbers of laboratory activities, demonstrations, and independent projects along with higher levels of laboratory freedom are associated with negative achievement. These findings are relevant to high school biology teachers, college students, their parents, and educators looking beyond the goal of high school graduation.

  7. Varsity letters documenting modern colleges and universities

    CERN Document Server

    Samuels, Helen Willa

    1998-01-01

    A study of the functions of colleges and universities, Varsity Letters is intended to aid those responsible for the documentation of these institutions. Samuels offers specific advice about the records of modern colleges and universities and proposes a method to ensure their adequate documentation. She also offers a method to analyze and plan the preservation of records for any type of institution.

  8. Theater Program Development in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Martinez, Ed.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to find answers to how best colleges and universities can adapt the teaching of theatre in its curriculum. It was then necessary to track the different ways drama has evolved throughout time and how its adoption in formal education has affected its students, both present and past. To this end the researcher examined theater from its earliest inception to its adoption by schools of higher education, more specifically, public colleges and universities.

  9. Astrobiology and the Biological Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    Four hundred years ago two astronomical world views hung in the balance: the geocentric and the heliocentric. Today astronomy faces a similar choice between two grand world views: a purely physical universe, in which cosmic evolution commonly ends in planets, stars and galaxies, and a biological universe, in which cosmic evolution routinely results in life, mind and intelligence. Astrobiology is the science providing the data to make this critical choice. This 20th century overview shows how we have arrived at the view that cosmic evolution may have resulted in life and intelligence in the universe. It examines how our astronomical world view has changed over the last century, recalls the opinions of astronomical pioneers like Russell, Shapley, and Struve on life in the universe, and shows how planetary science, planetary systems science, origins of life studies and SETI have combined to form a new discipline. Astrobiology now commands \\$50 million in direct funding from NASA, funds 15 Astrobiology Institute members around the country and four affiliates around the world, and seeks to answer one of astronomy's oldest questions. Whether we live in a mostly physical universe, as exemplified in Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, or in a biological universe, as portrayed in Arthur C. Clarke's works, this reality will have profound consequences, no less than the Copernican theory. Astrobiology also looks to the future of life; taking a long-term ``Stapledonian" view, it is possible we may live in a postbiological universe.

  10. Drexel University: College and University Computing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1985

    1985-01-01

    In the fall of 1982 Drexel became one of the first universities to introduce a formal microcomputer requirement by announcing that in September 1983 every entering student would need access to a microcomputer. The heart of the microcomputing program is Apple Computer's Macintosh. The microcomputing program is described. (MLW)

  11. American College Biology and Zoology Course Requirements: A de facto Standardized Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Frank; And Others

    Without a formal mechanism to produce consensus, American colleges generally have come to agree on what constitutes an appropriate set of course requirements for Biology and Zoology majors. This report describes a survey of American four-year colleges and universities offering biology and/or zoology degrees. Questionnaires were sent to 741 biology…

  12. The University of Vermont College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Martin

    This study of the origin and history of the University of Vermont College of Medicine begins with the appointment of John Pomeroy to the faculty in 1804, and traces the years that followed. Chiefly concerned with the individuals who were involved, it is a case study of the responses of one small medical school to reform movements, and its ability…

  13. Lighting Energy Management for Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Lighting Bureau, Washington, DC.

    Colleges and universities probably rely on more types of lighting than do other facilities. This booklet is intended to help administrators achieve the goal of lighting energy management--gaining maximum benefit from illumination systems while minimizing energy waste. The development of a lighting energy management plan requires knowledge of the…

  14. The Future of Comprehensive Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Norward J.

    The comprehensive colleges and universities--often former normal schools that have grown quickly in recent years--are seen to be affected primarily by declining financial resources, declining enrollment, and competition, now and in the near future. Financial resources are affected by higher priority placed on other state budget items; tax…

  15. Administration of Athletics in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steitz, Edward S., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to make available the best thoughts and methods in the area of athletic administration in colleges and universities. The sections are: (1) The Role of Athletics in Education; (2) Business Procedures; (3) Equipment and Supplies; (4) Planning, Construction, and Maintenance of Facilities; (5) School Law and Legal…

  16. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  17. Bibliography. College and University Business Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This regularly-updated bibliography is organized by chapter and is generally limited to publications that have specific application to colleges and universities. The chapters include: business administration in higher education; institutional planning; management information systems and data processing; risk management and insurance;…

  18. College & University Business Administration. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This text presents indepth coverage of five areas of college and university business administration, including administrative management, business management, fiscal management, and financial accounting and reporting. The section on administrative management encompasses institutional planning, management information systems and data processing,…

  19. What fosters entrepreneurs at university colleges?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mette Lindahl

    Questions we care about (objectives) In the wake of the second academic revolution (Etzkowitz, 2003), many important questions have been raised seeking the answer to how higher educational institutions can fulfil their new role in society. Catalysed by governmental regulation, where many higher...... of the following paper is to what extent the knowledge generated at the universities can be transferred directly to a university college context? The second question raised is centered on the “what” of entrepreneurship education relating to content: How can educational elements that enable and promote...... entrepreneurship at university colleges be identified in order to solidify the entrepreneurial education? If cases where students have become entrepreneurs are studied, as a method to identify entrepreneurship supporting and enabling educational elements, a future research question is raised: “How do student...

  20. Colleges and universities sticking to their guns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Jesse Perez; Sabina, Lou; Loffi, Jon

    Firearm possession on college and university campuses remains a volatile public policy issue among policymakers, legislators, scholars, and administrators. Given the American federal governmental structure, many states have developed legislative approaches to "carry on campus" policies throughout the years that align with federal law. This study explores the diversity of state approaches and nuances of "carry on campus" throughout recent years and current state legislation under consideration. The implications of "carry on campus" legislation vary on college campuses, depending on applicable state law; however, some general dynamics apply to all.

  1. Community College Student Perceptions of University Transfer Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Rick H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: It was the purpose of this study to identify and describe the perceived barriers that hindered California community college students from successful transfer to a four-year college or university and what services they perceived were needed to support the successful transfer to a four-year college or university. Methodology: This…

  2. Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada Partnership ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada Partnership 2007-2009. For almost 30 years, IDRC has enabled the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada to provide Canadian universities with liaison and information services on international development through its International Relations Division.

  3. Community College and University Student Gambling Beliefs, Motives, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherba, R. Thomas; Gersper, Beth E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform policymakers on current gambling beliefs, motives, and behaviors of both community college and university students in an effort to evaluate the extent of problem gambling in the overall college student population. To examine differences in gambling and problem gambling between community college and…

  4. Communities of Opportunity: Smart Growth Strategies for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbey, Matthew; Nelson, Kevin; Bagnoli, Peggy; Bagnoli, David; Droge, Martha; Cirino, Anna Marie

    2007-01-01

    Colleges and universities are growing, and they need new facilities to accommodate this growth. Whether it's space for new academic classrooms, laboratories, dormitories, research centers, business incubators, or space for retail and services necessary for a campus to thrive, college and university business officers are involved in decision-making…

  5. Visual outcome after cataract surgery at the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the visual outcome of patients who had cataract surgery in the University College Hospital Ibadan. Methodology: This is an observational descriptive, longitudinal study of consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery at the University College Hospital conducted between May ...

  6. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... Teaching Hospital, Calabar, 2University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria. Address for ... University College Hospital (U.C.H), Ibadan, in coma from acute stroke, from August 2004 to March 2005, was undertaken after obtaining ethical ... presentation, and on clinical grounds alone in 7 patients. After initial ...

  7. Bilingual Education in Colleges and Universities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chuanlian

    2011-01-01

    At present, there are many problems in the bilingual teaching of colleges and universities. Because of these problems, the bilingual education looks so difficult that it doesn't achieve wanted goals. Sometimes the colleges and universities have to give up the bilingual teaching halfway. This paper argues that the key manner to improve…

  8. Colleges and Universities Education Digest, 2005-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Marcia, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    The 2005-06 Education Digest includes data on basic student charges, fall enrollments, residence of students, degrees conferred, and faculty and staff. Data is compiled from annual surveys of Pennsylvania colleges and universities. In 2005-06, Pennsylvania had 149 colleges and universities consisting of 33 public and 116 private institutions.…

  9. Community College Transfers Can Thrive at Best Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froimson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Not surprisingly, low-income students are more likely than their higher-income peers to start postsecondary education at lower-cost community colleges than at four-year institutions. Add this fact to the booming enrollment at community colleges--approximately 7 million students or nearly half of all undergraduate students today--and one can…

  10. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  11. Enhancing the interfaces among schools, colleges, universities, and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' The 2005 Rae Report on higher education in Ontario recommended that the Provincial government 'reaffirm the mandate of colleges to focus on occupational education and labour market needs, while continuing to allow applied degrees and institutional evolution. Mandate colleges to reach out to the fifty percent of high school students not going on to further studies...' Another recommendation was 'encourage the distinct evolution of each institution (i.e. colleges and universities) and promote differentiation through the tuition framework, accountability arrangements and the design of the Province's funding formula. At the same time, require that colleges and universities recognize each others' related programming to create clear and efficient pathways for students.' Implementing these recommendations requires major changes in the interfaces among schools, colleges, universities and industry, and also in the attitudes of parents, the teaching profession, and employers. Will it happen? (author)

  12. Diminished Access: Fall 1982 Enrollment at Independent Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Julianne Still; Toppe, Christopher

    Results of the fall 1982 survey of enrollments at private colleges and universities are presented, with attention also directed to the effect of the freshman enrollment decline on institutional finance, determinants of enrollment, and future enrollment expectations. Of the approximately 1,500 independent colleges, almost 1,200 institutions…

  13. Entrepreneurship Education in American Community Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Nicole

    This is an analysis of entrepreneurship-education opportunities at various American community colleges, universities, and business schools. Roughly 100 institutions offer formal educational programs that focus on entrepreneurship; however, approximately 1,500 colleges offer courses in entrepreneurship and small-business management. Community…

  14. Initiating and Strengthening College and University Instructional Physical Activity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education supports the offering of strong college and university instructional physical activity programs (C/UIPAPs). With a rapid decline in physical activity levels, high stress levels, and unhealthy weight-loss practices among college-age students, it is apparent that C/UIPAPs embedded in the…

  15. Use of Technology in College and University English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bethany; Lassmann, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Many forms of technology are available to college and university instructors. Technology has become an important part of today's world and an important part of instruction in various classrooms. Many may see technology as reasonable to use in a science, mathematics, or art class. In this paper, different types of technology used in college and…

  16. College Tuition and Perceptions of Private University Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Tang, David Shin-Hsiung; Tang, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2004-01-01

    This research employs institutional characteristics and market-related factors to predict undergraduate students' tuition at 190 private colleges and universities in the USA. Results showed that the strongest correlations among variables for college tuition were reputation ranking and SAT scores. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression…

  17. TEL4Health research at University College Cork (UCC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Drachsler, H. (2013, 12 May). TEL4Health research at University College Cork (UCC). Invited talk given at Application of Science to Simulation, Education and Research on Training for Health Professionals Centre (ASSERT for Health Care), Cork, Ireland.

  18. Use of seatbelts by vehicle occupants in University College Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of seatbelts by vehicle occupants in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. AO Sangowawa, SEU Ekanem, BT Alagh, IP Ebong, B Faseru, O Uchendu, BJ Adekunle, VHS Shaahu, A Fajola, GI Ogbole ...

  19. The University and College Counseling Center and Malpractice Suits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimak, Richard E.; Berkowitz, Stanley R.

    1983-01-01

    Provides the university and college counseling center with management suggestions for and discussion of malpractice suits regarding issues that refer to sexual abuse, potentially dangerous, and suicidal clients. (Author/RC)

  20. A Survey of Bioethics Courses in U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Jon R.

    1977-01-01

    Data from questionnaires sent to every college and university in the United States ascertained that 26 percent of the 223 responding major institutions offered a bioethics course, most frequently presented by the biology department to medical students and taught most frequently by professors of ethics and philosophy background. Questionnaire and…

  1. A qualitative characterization of an introductory college nonmajors biology laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cherin Ann

    The nature of an undergraduate, nonmajors biology laboratory was investigated in this study. Student participants were enrolled in a general education biology laboratory course at the University of Northern Iowa. The researcher's purpose was to gain a characterization of the instructional format and laboratory activities experienced by students. Interpretation of student and instructor responses enabled an insider's view of the biology laboratory. The laboratory period was consistently described by both students and instructors as having three parts, Beginning, Middle, and End, with the End being of special importance for conceptual development. The instructional format of the three instructors differed within the three portions of the laboratory period, ranging from an inquiry-oriented, partial learning cycle to a fairly expository model labeled inform/verify/practice. There was striking similarity in intrasectional student and teacher descriptions of instructional format. Additionally, students experiencing the alternate instructor provided the same characterizations of instructional format as those provided by the instructor's usual students. There were no discernible patterns of instructional format based on sex or reasoning level. In addition to the central role of instructional format, three areas of importance emerged: the social aspects of learning, the collaborative and cooperative nature of laboratory work and learning, and the role of self-efficacy. Theory developed from and grounded in the data showed six factors important in the introductory college biology laboratory: collaborative and cooperative learning, student-student and teacher-student interactions, attitude and self-efficacy, learning process and learning style, effective instructional format, and science content. These factors were found to be similar to factors identified in the literature as important in K-12 science education. These factors were set in the context of schooling and learning

  2. The pipeline of physiology courses in community colleges: to university, medical school, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    Community colleges are significant in the landscape of undergraduate STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) education (9), including biology, premedical, and other preprofessional education. Thirty percent of first-year medical school students in 2012 attended a community college. Students attend at different times in high school, their first 2 yr of college, and postbaccalaureate. The community college pathway is particularly important for traditionally underrepresented groups. Premedical students who first attend community college are more likely to practice in underserved communities (2). For many students, community colleges have significant advantages over 4-yr institutions. Pragmatically, they are local, affordable, and flexible, which accommodates students' work and family commitments. Academically, community colleges offer teaching faculty, smaller class sizes, and accessible learning support systems. Community colleges are fertile ground for universities and medical schools to recruit diverse students and support faculty. Community college students and faculty face several challenges (6, 8). There are limited interactions between 2- and 4-yr institutions, and the ease of transfer processes varies. In addition, faculty who study and work to improve the physiology education experience often encounter obstacles. Here, we describe barriers and detail existing resources and opportunities useful in navigating challenges. We invite physiology educators from 2- and 4-yr institutions to engage in sharing resources and facilitating physiology education improvement across institutions. Given the need for STEM majors and health care professionals, 4-yr colleges and universities will continue to benefit from students who take introductory biology, physiology, and anatomy and physiology courses at community colleges. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  3. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World…

  4. CSBB: synthetic biology research at Newcastle University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipat, Anil; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2017-01-01

    The Centre for Synthetic Biology and the Bioeconomy (CSBB) brings together a far-reaching multidisciplinary community across all Newcastle University's faculties — Medical Sciences, Science, Agriculture and Engineering, and Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. The CSBB focuses on many different areas of Synthetic Biology, including bioprocessing, computational design and in vivo computation, as well as improving understanding of basic molecular machinery. Such breadth is supported by major national and international research funding, a range of industrial partners in the North East of England and beyond, as well as a large number of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. The CSBB trains the next generation of scientists through a 1-year MSc in Synthetic Biology. PMID:28620039

  5. Biological AMS at Uppsala University: Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.salehpour@angstrom.uu.s [Ion Physics, Angstroem Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Goeran [Ion Physics, Angstroem Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    In January 2007 a new research program was initiated at Uppsala University focusing on the biological applications of AMS. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator to study biological samples. With Microdosing applications in mind, a variety of measurements have been performed on human blood, plasma and urine that have been labeled with a {sup 14}C-labeled pharmaceutical drug covering a concentration range, spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by studying small sample amounts and low concentrations, we have demonstrated sensitivity in the hundred zeptomole range for a small pharmaceutical substance in human blood. Another application of interest, based on the enhanced {sup 14}C activity from the cold war bomb-peak, is dating of DNA molecules providing fundamental data for the regenerative medicine and stem cell research community. We show data on a sensitive carrier method for measuring the isotopic ratio of small biological sample in the few mugC range.

  6. CSBB: synthetic biology research at Newcastle University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-Moreno, Angel; Wipat, Anil; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2017-06-15

    The Centre for Synthetic Biology and the Bioeconomy (CSBB) brings together a far-reaching multidisciplinary community across all Newcastle University's faculties - Medical Sciences, Science, Agriculture and Engineering, and Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. The CSBB focuses on many different areas of Synthetic Biology, including bioprocessing, computational design and in vivo computation, as well as improving understanding of basic molecular machinery. Such breadth is supported by major national and international research funding, a range of industrial partners in the North East of England and beyond, as well as a large number of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. The CSBB trains the next generation of scientists through a 1-year MSc in Synthetic Biology. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Investment Policies for College and University Endowments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, William T.

    1999-01-01

    College trustees have a responsibility to institute investment policies that preserve real endowment value. The chief financial officer's responsibility varies, but at a minimum should provide the board with essential information and ensure that trustees understand the importance of policy decisions. Critical tasks include establishing and…

  8. Testing the universality of biology: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss whether it is possible to test the universality of biology, a quest that is of paramount relevance for one of its most recent branches, namely astrobiology. We review this topic in terms of the relative roles played on the Earth biota by contingency and evolutionary convergence. Following the seminal contribution of Darwin, it is reasonable to assume that all forms of life known to us so far are not only terrestrial, but are descendants of a common ancestor that evolved on this planet at the end of a process of chemical evolution. We also raise the related question of whether the molecular events that were precursors to the origin of life on Earth are bound to occur elsewhere in the universe, wherever the environmental conditions are similar to the terrestrial ones. We refer to 'cosmic convergence' as the possible occurrence elsewhere in the universe of Earth-like environmental conditions. We argue that cosmic convergence is already suggested by observational data. The set of hypotheses for addressing the question of the universality of biology can be tested by future experiments that are feasible with current technology. We focus on landing on Europa and the broader implications of selecting the specific example of the right landing location. We had discussed earlier the corresponding miniaturized equipment that is already in existence. The significance of these crucial points needs to be put into a wider scientific perspective, which is one of the main objectives of this review. (author)

  9. Testing the universality of biology: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.

    2007-05-01

    We discuss whether it is possible to test the universality of biology, a quest that is of paramount relevance for one of its most recent branches, namely astrobiology. We review this topic in terms of the relative roles played on the Earth biota by contingency and evolutionary convergence. Following the seminal contribution of Darwin, it is reasonable to assume that all forms of life known to us so far are not only terrestrial, but are descendants of a common ancestor that evolved on this planet at the end of a process of chemical evolution. We also raise the related question of whether the molecular events that were precursors to the origin of life on Earth are bound to occur elsewhere in the universe, wherever the environmental conditions are similar to the terrestrial ones. We refer to 'cosmic convergence' as the possible occurrence elsewhere in the universe of Earth-like environmental conditions. We argue that cosmic convergence is already suggested by observational data. The set of hypotheses for addressing the question of the universality of biology can be tested by future experiments that are feasible with current technology. We focus on landing on Europe and the broader implications of selecting the specific example of the right landing location. We had discussed earlier the corresponding miniaturized equipment that is already in existence. The significance of these crucial points needs to be put into a wider scientific perspective, which is one of the main objectives of this review. (author)

  10. The Influence of the Organizational Structures of Colleges and Universities on College Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.

    2002-01-01

    Reports the findings of a study conducted to determine the influence of various dimensions of organizational structure (bureaucratic, collegial, political, symbolic, and systemic) on college student learning. Findings indicate that dimensions of the structure of the colleges and universities as organizations exert both positive and negative…

  11. Retrospective evaluation of necrotizing fasciitis in university college ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-12

    Nov 12, 2011 ... Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Teaching Hospital, Ado‑Ekiti, 1Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery,. University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ... etiology of infection, bacteriology, and treatment received and complications were reviewed. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 15.

  12. Student Unions: The Implications for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felper, David; Dragga, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to unionize students at private universities are gaining momentum. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has agreed to reconsider whether graduate students at private nonprofit colleges and universities should be treated as employees under the National Labor Relations Act. The case, "New School", Case No. 02- RC-143009,…

  13. Attitudes of Introductory College Biology Students Toward Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Elaine C.; Simpson, Ronald D.

    1982-01-01

    Thurstone's Scale No. 30, Form A was used to survey attitudes of introductory college biology students (N=120) toward evolution. Results indicate the majority of these students believe in the theory of evolution. In addition, two demographic variables, sex and church influence, produced a significant correlation with the attitude scores.…

  14. Systems Management Internship in the Preparation of College Biology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Richard W.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a doctoral internship program that involves the interns in the teaching of a college biology course which uses electronic response and audiotutorial modes of instruction. Outlines the duties of first, second, and third year interns and states the advantages of such a program. (GS)

  15. Correlation between MCAT Biology Content Specifications and Topic Scope and Sequence of General Education College Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissing, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Most American colleges and universities offer gateway biology courses to meet the needs of three undergraduate audiences: biology and related science majors, many of whom will become biomedical researchers; premedical students meeting medical school requirements and preparing for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT); and students completing general education (GE) graduation requirements. Biology textbooks for these three audiences present a topic scope and sequence that correlates with the topic scope and importance ratings of the biology content specifications for the MCAT regardless of the intended audience. Texts for “nonmajors,” GE courses appear derived directly from their publisher's majors text. Topic scope and sequence of GE texts reflect those of “their” majors text and, indirectly, the MCAT. MCAT term density of GE texts equals or exceeds that of their corresponding majors text. Most American universities require a GE curriculum to promote a core level of academic understanding among their graduates. This includes civic scientific literacy, recognized as an essential competence for the development of public policies in an increasingly scientific and technological world. Deriving GE biology and related science texts from majors texts designed to meet very different learning objectives may defeat the scientific literacy goals of most schools’ GE curricula. PMID:24006392

  16. Correlation between MCAT biology content specifications and topic scope and sequence of general education college biology textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissing, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Most American colleges and universities offer gateway biology courses to meet the needs of three undergraduate audiences: biology and related science majors, many of whom will become biomedical researchers; premedical students meeting medical school requirements and preparing for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT); and students completing general education (GE) graduation requirements. Biology textbooks for these three audiences present a topic scope and sequence that correlates with the topic scope and importance ratings of the biology content specifications for the MCAT regardless of the intended audience. Texts for "nonmajors," GE courses appear derived directly from their publisher's majors text. Topic scope and sequence of GE texts reflect those of "their" majors text and, indirectly, the MCAT. MCAT term density of GE texts equals or exceeds that of their corresponding majors text. Most American universities require a GE curriculum to promote a core level of academic understanding among their graduates. This includes civic scientific literacy, recognized as an essential competence for the development of public policies in an increasingly scientific and technological world. Deriving GE biology and related science texts from majors texts designed to meet very different learning objectives may defeat the scientific literacy goals of most schools' GE curricula.

  17. Relationships between attitude and achievement among college biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Harold E.; Simpson, Ronald D.

    The purposes of this study were to (1) study changes in attitude toward science, school, and academic self among college biology students, and (2) to examine relationships between attitudes and achievement in an introductory college course in biology. The three attitude variables were assessed at the beginning and end of the study. Each of the three constructs was measured by the semantic differential and one additional instrument. One cognitive measure, biology achievement, was taken at the beginning and end of the study. This was accomplished by using the Nelson Biology Test. Another cognitive measure, grade in the course, as given by the instructor, was recorded at the end of the course. Normative data and correlation coefficients among pre- and postadministrations were calculated for each institution and the composite sample as well. An analysis of variance showed that while gains in scores on the Nelson Biology Test were significant beyond the 0.01 level of probability, changes in attitude scores were not. Correlations were calculated between the attitude and cognitive variables in this study. Relationships between academic self-concept and achievement in biology were the strongest. Data from this study show that while student cognitive behavior was changed during an introductory college biology course, selected attitudes either stayed the same or became slightly more negative. Affective as well as cognitive gains would appear to be desirable goals in college courses. As we learn more about relationships that exist between cognition and affect, science educators at all levels will become better equipped to improve learning in science.

  18. Acquaintance Rape on College and University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Felicia F.

    2004-01-01

    While a university experience offers young women many rewards, unfortunately, there are also significant dangers, and one of these dangers is men who are sexual predators. Acquaintance rape is a sexual assault perpetrated by someone who is known to the victim. It is a violent and serious crime that is far too common an occurrence at our…

  19. College Psychotherapy at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo Eun; Choi, Mi Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In the online interview presented in this article, two Korean counselors offer comments to questions regarding issues faced at a Korean University. They reflected on their roles and some of the many topics faced that included: (1) student misunderstanding about counseling needs, and how counseling questionnaires and the counselor helps them; (2)…

  20. Structure Building Predicts Grades in College Psychology and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M.; Daniel, David B.; Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Marsh, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing what skills underlie college success can allow students, teachers, and universities to identify and to help at-risk students. One skill that may underlie success across a variety of subject areas is structure building, the ability to create mental representations of narratives (Gernsbacher, Varner, & Faust, 1990). We tested if…

  1. Sleep Patterns of College Students at a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquer, LeAnne M.; Camden, Adrian E.; Gabriau, Krista M.; Johnson, C. Merle

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine the sleep patterns of college students to identify problem areas and potential solutions. Participants: A total of 313 students returned completed surveys. Methods: A sleep survey was e-mailed to a random sample of students at a North Central university. Questions included individual…

  2. Tuberculosis Screening and Targeted Testing of College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of American College Health, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Screening and targeted testing for tuberculosis (TB) is a key strategy for controlling and preventing infection on college and university campuses. Early detection provides an opportunity to promote the health of affected individuals through prompt diagnosis and treatment while preventing potential spread to others. Implementation of a screening…

  3. Leadership, Governance, and Sustainability of Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzell, Jack L., Jr.; Schexnider, Alvin J.

    2010-01-01

    A topic of continuing interest in American higher education and society is the future of historically black colleges and universities, commonly referred to as HBCUs. The nation's public and private black institutions of higher education have proved their mettle, and yet they face persistent challenges to survive. A huge part of the challenge black…

  4. Tax Arbitrage by Colleges and Universities. A CBO Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congressional Budget Office, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities enjoy a variety of federal tax preferences that are designed to support a broader public purpose--the advancement of higher education and research. Not only are institutions of higher learning exempt from paying federal income taxes, they also are eligible to receive tax deductible charitable contributions and allowed to…

  5. Forceps delivery at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forceps delivery at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. ... Ibadan, Nigeria. CO Aimakhu, O Olayemi, OO Enabor, FA Oluyemi, VE Aimakhu ... Methodology: A retrospective analysis of all forceps delivery done at this centre between the 1st of January 1997 and 31st December 2001, a 5-year period was done.

  6. Hepatitis B immunization at the University College Hospital, Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaccination of health care workers (HCWs) against hepatitis (HBV) infection is highly necessary in Nigeria where the infection occurs in hperendemic proportions. We hereby determine the trends in the administration of HBV vaccine at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. The study reviewed the records ...

  7. Trends of oral cancer in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the trend and recent pattern of oral cancer in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Method: A retrospective analysis of all cases of oral cancer (excluding lymphoid cancers) documented in the records of the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and ...

  8. Earthquake Preparedness 101: Guidelines for Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Governor's Office, Los Angeles. Office of Emergency Services.

    This document presents guidelines on emergency response and business recovery for colleges and universities in the event of an earthquake. The guidelines, developed by California institutions and revised based on experience with the Northridge earthquake, are provided under the following headings: (1) "To the President or Chancellor";…

  9. Earthquake Preparedness 101: Planning Guidelines for Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Governor's Office, Sacramento.

    This publication is a guide for California colleges and universities wishing to prepare for earthquakes. An introduction aimed at institutional leaders emphasizes that earthquake preparedness is required by law and argues that there is much that can be done to prepare for earthquakes. The second section, addressed to the disaster planner, offers…

  10. Colleges and Universities as Exemplars in the Development of Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligsohn, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the role of designed student experiences in the cultivation of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for ethical citizenship. This article focuses instead on the role of the college or university as an ethical guide for students. Drawing on Aristotle's conception of the role of habituation in ethical…

  11. Computer Viruses. Legal and Policy Issues Facing Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David R.; And Others

    Compiled by various members of the higher educational community together with risk managers, computer center managers, and computer industry experts, this report recommends establishing policies on an institutional level to protect colleges and universities from computer viruses and the accompanying liability. Various aspects of the topic are…

  12. Understanding Chinese international college and university students' physical activity behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yan

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Understanding factors that influence PA among Chinese international students is an important step in the process of promoting their long-term health and wellbeing. Designing program that address the identified key factors may help colleges and universities achieve this goal.

  13. Capital Costs: A Conceptual Framework for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Samuel G.

    2004-01-01

    The increased attention to costs in recent years at colleges and universities draws attention to the matter of whether all costs are reflected and accounted for in the institution's internal and external financial reports. One category--capital costs--is thought by some to be overlooked at times. The possible neglect of capital costs in…

  14. The Implicit Leadership Theories of College and University Presidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The definitions that college and university presidents offer when they are asked to interpret the meaning of leadership are consistent with leadership theories emphasizing social power, directive influence, and role behavior. Greater attention to the implications of alternative theories focusing on social exchange might help presidents be more…

  15. Retrospective evaluation of necrotizing fasciitis in university college ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF), although a potentially fatal fulminant infection has been largely under‑reported in the dental literature. Aims: To report our experience with cases seen and treated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Settings and Design: A descriptive retrospective clinical ...

  16. Overcoming Branding Barriers in Nonprofit, Private Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyr, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this Delphi study was to explore the views of experts in the field of nonprofit private colleges and universities in the United States to define branding and identify current barriers to branding, to discover how those barriers can be overcome, and to determine what barriers to branding are likely to occur 5 years in the…

  17. Impact of Universities' Promotional Materials on College Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jami J.; Lumsden, D. Barry

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of printed promotional materials on the recruitment of college freshmen using focus groups of students attending a large, southern metropolitan university. Students provided detailed suggestions on ways to improve the method of distribution, graphic design, and content of the materials. (Author/DB)

  18. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  19. New Choices Facing College and University Pension Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Melvin H., Ed.

    This publication presents a collection of essays from top investment thinkers and financial commentators who share their views on the revolutionary retirement plan options now available to college and university employees. The essays were prepared for a conference that was convened by the New England Board of Higher Education in Boston to help…

  20. Modeling, Identification and Control at Telemark University College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Lie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Master studies in process automation started in 1989 at what soon became Telemark University College, and the 20 year anniversary marks the start of our own PhD degree in Process, Energy and Automation Engineering. The paper gives an overview of research activities related to control engineering at Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Technology and Cybernetics.

  1. Computer anxiety among university and college students majoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined computer anxiety among university and college of education Physical and Health Education (PHE) majors. The influence of personal characteristics of gender, age and experience of PHE majors on computer anxiety level were analysed. The Computer Anxiety Scale (CAS) developed by Marcoulides ...

  2. Continuing Professional Education for Teachers and University and College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, the author explores a variety of aspects of continuing professional education for teachers and university and college faculty members. She discusses the kinds of knowledge that are addressed and the role of online learning in continuing professional education.

  3. Genome annotation in a community college cell biology lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, C Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning skills. Additionally, the project strengthens student understanding of the scientific method and contributes to student learning gains in curricular objectives centered around basic molecular biology, specifically, the Central Dogma. Importantly, inclusion of this project in the laboratory course provides students with a positive learning environment and allows for the use of cooperative learning strategies to increase overall student success. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Improving the academic performance of university biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Latasha Shireen

    Studies indicated that teaching styles and learning styles of students play a very important role in the academic success of students. A lack of knowledge about teaching styles and learning styles often complicates the challenge of learning and, therefore, affects the academic achievement of students. The research site at a college had a retention rate of 70% of its biology majors and needed to improve the retention rate of the biology program. The purpose of this study was to improve the academic performance of university biology students through a multicomponent program, the Student Retention Engagement Program. The 3 components included students and teachers understanding students' learning styles, teachers acquiring knowledge of learner-based teaching methodology, and peer mentoring. In the implementation of this applied dissertation, the researcher sought to increase the grade point averages of 100 Biology 103 students from 2.25 to at least an overall 2.50 out of a 4.00 point grade point average scale. After implementation of the intervention strategies. the overall retention ratc of biology majors was also targeted to improve from 70% to at least 75%. The focus of the dissertation was on the outcomes associated with implementing successful teaching and learning strategies with the biology students. In 1 component of the Student Retention Engagement Program, biology teachers learned to identify their preferred teaching styles through a teaching perspectives inventory administered during a professional development program. A training program focused on utilizing teaching strategies for specific student learning styles was implemented. Another component involved training and using upper class peer mentors. The supervisors of the Office of Retention selected upper class participants who held a 3.0 or higher grade point average. A learning style inventory was administered to the upper class peer mentors and participating students. The results helped to identify

  5. Initiating Knowledge Management in Colleges and Universities: A template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Agarwal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge Management (KM is a collaborative and integrated approach adopted at various levels to ensure that an organization’s knowledge assets are best utilized to increase organizational performance. While KM has been adopted in a large number of sectors and organizations, colleges and universities, and the higher education sector in general, is yet to take full advantage of the possibilities offered by KM. Also, while past research has sought to highlight the importance of implementing KM in higher education, there is a lack of a single, clear template for KM implementation that universities leaders and administrators can adopt. The contribution of the paper is a practical, actionable, step-by-step plan, as well as a diagrammatic, theoretical framework for initiating KM successfully in colleges and universities.

  6. Le francais assiste par ordinateur des colleges et des universities du Canada (French CALL in Canadian Colleges and Universities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougaieff, Andre

    This directory presents the results of a national survey of Canadian colleges and universities concerning faculty's use of computer-assisted French language instruction. The listings, arranged alphabetically by province or territory, and within these by institution, contain the responding faculty member's name, address, e-mail address, fax and…

  7. Active Learning Not Associated with Student Learning in a Random Sample of College Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Leonard, M. J.; Colgrove, C. A.; Kalinowski, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses randomly selected from a list of prominent colleges and universities to include instructors representing a broader population. We examined the relationship between active learning and student learning in the subject area of natural selection. We found no association between student learning gains and the use of active-learning instruction. Although active learning has the potential to substantially improve student learning, this research suggests that active learning, as used by typical college biology instructors, is not associated with greater learning gains. We contend that most instructors lack the rich and nuanced understanding of teaching and learning that science education researchers have developed. Therefore, active learning as designed and implemented by typical college biology instructors may superficially resemble active learning used by education researchers, but lacks the constructivist elements necessary for improving learning. PMID:22135373

  8. Active learning not associated with student learning in a random sample of college biology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T M; Leonard, M J; Colgrove, C A; Kalinowski, S T

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses randomly selected from a list of prominent colleges and universities to include instructors representing a broader population. We examined the relationship between active learning and student learning in the subject area of natural selection. We found no association between student learning gains and the use of active-learning instruction. Although active learning has the potential to substantially improve student learning, this research suggests that active learning, as used by typical college biology instructors, is not associated with greater learning gains. We contend that most instructors lack the rich and nuanced understanding of teaching and learning that science education researchers have developed. Therefore, active learning as designed and implemented by typical college biology instructors may superficially resemble active learning used by education researchers, but lacks the constructivist elements necessary for improving learning.

  9. The American College of Endocrinology and Endocrine University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Nelson B; Rodbard, Helena W; Hodgson, Stephen F; Baskin, H Jack

    2004-01-01

    Subspecialty training in endocrinology depends in part on local expertise, with fellows having "hands-on" experience in some areas but only "book knowledge" in others. To provide more uniform training in new technologies, The American College of Endocrinology developed Endocrine University, which provides on-site didactic and interactive sessions on thyroid ultrasound, bone densitometry, and other topics over 6 to 7 days. The inaugural event in 2002 was attended by 137 fellows. A second conference in 2003 had capacity attendance of 143. A third course is scheduled for 2004. Fellows pay a token registration fee; the College provides grants to defray the cost of registration, travel, etc. Financial support comes from the College and industry, with plans for an endowment to sustain the program. Fellows value the educational sessions and also the unique opportunity to meet and visit with their peers. This innovative program can serve as a model for other specialties.

  10. College Student Samples Are Not Always Equivalent: The Magnitude of Personality Differences Across Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Katherine S; Donnellan, M Brent; Kim, Su Yeong; Schwartz, Seth J; Zamboanga, Byron L

    2017-04-01

    This research examined the magnitude of personality differences across different colleges and universities to understand (a) how much students at different colleges vary from one another and (b) whether there are site-level variables that can explain observed differences. Nearly 8,600 students at 30 colleges and universities completed a Big Five personality trait measure. Site-level information was obtained from the Integrated Postsecondary Education System database (U.S. Department of Education). Multilevel models revealed that each of the Big Five traits showed significant between-site variability, even after accounting for individual-level demographic differences. Some site-level variables (e.g., enrollment size, requiring letters of recommendation) explained between-site differences in traits, but many tests were not statistically significant. Student samples at different universities differed in terms of average levels of Big Five personality domains. This raises the possibility that personality differences may explain differences in research results obtained when studying students at different colleges and universities. Furthermore, results suggest that research that compares findings for only a few sites (e.g., much cross-cultural research) runs the risk of overgeneralizing differences between specific samples to broader group differences. These results underscore the value of multisite collaborative research efforts to enhance psychological research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Black Male College Achievers and Resistant Responses to Racist Stereotypes at Predominantly White Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Shaun R.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Shaun R. Harper investigates how Black undergraduate men respond to and resist the internalization of racist stereotypes at predominantly White colleges and universities. Prior studies consistently show that racial stereotypes are commonplace on many campuses, that their effects are usually psychologically and academically…

  12. 20 CFR 656.18 - Optional special recruitment and documentation procedures for college and university teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... documentation procedures for college and university teachers. 656.18 Section 656.18 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR CERTIFICATION PROCESS FOR PERMANENT... and documentation procedures for college and university teachers. (a) Filing requirements...

  13. Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching......Rhizomes and plateaus: A study of digital communities of practice in University College English Teaching...

  14. The universal numbers. From Biology to Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    I will explain how the mathematicians have discovered the universal numbers, or abstract computer, and I will explain some abstract biology, mainly self-reproduction and embryogenesis. Then I will explain how and why, and in which sense, some of those numbers can dream and why their dreams can glue together and must, when we assume computationalism in cognitive science, generate a phenomenological physics, as part of a larger phenomenological theology (in the sense of the greek theologians). The title should have been "From Biology to Physics, through the Phenomenological Theology of the Universal Numbers", if that was not too long for a title. The theology will consist mainly, like in some (neo)platonist greek-indian-chinese tradition, in the truth about numbers' relative relations, with each others, and with themselves. The main difference between Aristotle and Plato is that Aristotle (especially in its common and modern christian interpretation) makes reality WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get: reality is what we observe, measure, i.e. the natural material physical science) where for Plato and the (rational) mystics, what we see might be only the shadow or the border of something else, which might be non physical (mathematical, arithmetical, theological, …). Since Gödel, we know that Truth, even just the Arithmetical Truth, is vastly bigger than what the machine can rationally justify. Yet, with Church's thesis, and the mechanizability of the diagonalizations involved, machines can apprehend this and can justify their limitations, and get some sense of what might be true beyond what they can prove or justify rationally. Indeed, the incompleteness phenomenon introduces a gap between what is provable by some machine and what is true about that machine, and, as Gödel saw already in 1931, the existence of that gap is accessible to the machine itself, once it is has enough provability abilities. Incompleteness separates truth and provable, and machines can

  15. Gambling behavior among Macau college and university students

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Sut Mei; Wong, Irene Lai Kuen; So, Ernest Moon Tong; Un, David Kin Cheong; Chan, Chris Hon Wa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This survey investigated gambling behavior among Chinese students studying in Macau colleges and universities. It also aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling, affect states and sensation seeking propensity. A convenience sample of 999 students (370 men, 629 women) filled a self-administered questionnaire consisted of the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) (Ferris and Wynne in The Canadian problem gambling index: User manual. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse,...

  16. Institutional Administrator's Beliefs about Accreditation at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Renard

    2016-01-01

    Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) continue to face challenges maintaining institutional accreditation in comparison to Predominately White Institutions (PWI). Historically Black colleges and universities represent 16% of the SACS membership, but accounted for 50% of the colleges and universities that lost accreditation over a…

  17. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Improving Operations through an Enterprise Resource Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    There are a variety of challenges facing colleges and universities today. With shrinking public funding, many colleges and universities must rethink their operations to ensure that they are operating efficiently. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have an even more daunting task in a downturned economy because they are often…

  18. Exploring the Utility and Application of Framing Devices in College/University President Speeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ira George

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the utility and application of the framing devices identified by Fairhurst (1993) and Fairhurst and Sarr (1996) in the college/university setting as evidenced through college/university presidents' speeches. Fifty-seven college/university presidents' speeches were collected from institution…

  19. 77 FR 42508 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The New York University College of Dentistry has completed an inventory... the New York University College of Dentistry. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  20. 75 FR 52021 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Port Clarence, Nome County... the human remains was made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in...

  1. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from.... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry...

  2. Influence of Incentives on Performance in a Pre-College Biology MOOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhang Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is concern that online education may widen the achievement gap between students from different socioeconomic classes. The recent discussion of integrating massive open online courses (MOOCs into formal higher education has added fuel to this debate. In this study, factors influencing enrollment and completion in a pre-college preparatory MOOC were explored. University of California at Irvine (UCI students of all preparation levels, defined by math Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT score, were invited to take a Bio Prep MOOC to help them prepare for introductory biology. Students with math SAT below 550 were offered the explicit incentive of an early change to the biology major upon successful completion of the MOOC and two additional onsite courses. Our results demonstrate that, among course registrants, a higher percentage of UCI students (>60% completed the course than non-UCI registrants from the general population (<9%. Female UCI students had a greater likelihood of enrolling in the MOOC, but were not different from male students in terms of performance. University students entering with low preparation outperformed students entering who already had the credentials to become biology majors. These findings suggest that MOOCs can reach students, even those entering college with less preparation, before they enter university and have the potential to prepare them for challenging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM courses.

  3. The Sorsogon State College on Becoming a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna L. Hapin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the standard requirements for a university, the Sorsogon State College has to produce graduates who manifest the training experts who will be involved in the professional practice and discovery of new knowledge. CHED Memorandum 46, series 2012 defines quality as the alignment and consistency of the learning environment with the institution’s vision, mission, and goals demonstrated by exceptional learning and service outcomes and the development of a culture of quality. This descriptive method of study utilized documentary analysis, unstructured interview, and focus group discussions (FGD which determined the status of the curricular program offerings of the College and assessed its readiness in terms of faculty complement, physical plant and facilities, and learning resources. SSC offers various curricular programs in its four campuses with their own concentration (Sorsogon City Campus concentration is in education, technology and engineering courses, Bulan campus in Business and IT courses, Magallanes campus in fisheries, and Castilla Campus in agriculture courses. Majority of the faculty members of the College are master’s degree holder with permanent status, few are holder of doctoral degree not enough to comply CHED typology standards. The learning resources of the College are enough to meet the needs of the students. The Sorsogon City Campus has the most density of population having the smallest land area among the four campuses. Other programs in the main campus have insufficient classrooms and some laboratory facilities are shared by the three departments including the graduate school program. In other campuses, their facilities have to be modernized and updated. The proposed strategic plan may be further reviewed and considered in the development plan of the College on becoming a university.

  4. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine and Pap Tests on College Campuses: How Do Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HSBCUs) Measure Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Kierra S.; Shoben, Abigail B.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Reiter, Paul L.; Paskett, Electra D.; Katz, Mira L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The availability of cervical cancer prevention services at college health centers was compared between historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and non-HBCUs. Methods: Four-year, non-primarily distant learning colleges, matching HBCUs with randomly selected non-HBCUs within the same states (N = 136) were examined. Data were…

  5. The Relationships between Epistemic Beliefs in Biology and Approaches to Learning Biology among Biology-Major University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between students' epistemic beliefs in biology and their approaches to learning biology. To this end, two instruments, the epistemic beliefs in biology and the approaches to learning biology surveys, were developed and administered to 520 university biology students, respectively. By and…

  6. The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, University of London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E H

    1995-01-01

    The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, London has arisen from need and from opportunity. The need is due to the relative neglect nationally and internationally of the most common serious brain disorder with important physical, psychological, and social complications. The relative neglect is reflected in services, research, charitable donations, public profile, and stigma and in a serious lack of professional education. The opportunity arose because of the existence in several medical institutions at Denmark Hill, London, of a group of medical and related colleagues with a special interest covering almost every aspect of this multidisciplinary disorder who agreed to combine their expertise in this initiative. The idea was born and developed in 1991-1992 and was supported by all the parent institutions: The Maudsley and King's College Hospitals, St. Piers Lingfield, The Institute of Psychiatry, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Life, Basic Medical and Health Sciences, all under the umbrella of King's College, University of London. Further stimulus and help came from a group of dedicated supporters in private and public life. There are three strands to this initiative: (a) a charity, The Fund for Epilepsy; (b) the clinical Centre for Epilepsy, which was formally opened at the Maudsley Hospital in July 1994; and (c) the academic Institute of Epileptology for research and teaching, which was launched on November 15, 1994.

  7. The Correlation Between Metacognition Level with Self-Efficacy of Biology Education College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridlo, S.; Lutfiya, F.

    2017-04-01

    Self-efficacy is a strong predictor of academic achievement. Self-efficacy refers to the ability of college students to achieve the desired results. The metacognition level can influence college student’s self-efficacy. This study aims to identify college student’s metacognition level and self-efficacy, as well as determine the relationship between self-efficacy and metacognition level for college students of Biology Education 2013, Semarang State University. The ex-post facto quantitative research was conducted on 99 students Academic Year 2015/2016. Saturation sampling technique determined samples. E-D scale collected data for self-efficacy identification. Data for assess the metacognition level collected by Metacognitive Awareness Inventory. Data were analysed quantitatively by Pearson correlation and linear regression. Most college students have the high level of metacognition and average self-efficacy. Pearson correlation coefficient result was 0.367. This result showed that metacognition level and self-efficacy has a weak relationship. Based on linear regression test, self-efficacy influenced by metacognition level up to 13.5%. The results of the study showed that positive and significant relationships exist between metacognition level and self-efficacy. Therefore, if the metacognition level is high, then self-efficacy will also be high (appropriate).

  8. Analysis of undergraduate cell biology contents in Brazilian public universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luis

    2017-04-01

    The enormous amount of information available in cell biology has created a challenge in selecting the core concepts we should be teaching our undergraduates. One way to define a set of essential core ideas in cell biology is to analyze what a specific cell biology community is teaching their students. Our main objective was to analyze the cell biology content currently being taught in Brazilian universities. We collected the syllabi of cell biology courses from public universities in Brazil and analyzed the frequency of cell biology topics in each course. We also compared the Brazilian data with the contents of a major cell biology textbook. Our analysis showed that while some cell biology topics such as plasma membrane and cytoskeleton was present in ∼100% of the Brazilian curricula analyzed others such as cell signaling and cell differentiation were present in only ∼35%. The average cell biology content taught in the Brazilian universities is quite different from what is presented in the textbook. We discuss several possible explanations for these observations. We also suggest a list with essential cell biology topics for any biological or biomedical undergraduate course. The comparative discussion of cell biology topics presented here could be valuable in other educational contexts. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Biology International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Cell Biology.

  9. 75 FR 33327 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the... College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of...

  10. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... University College of Dentistry, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from... College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Quassarte...

  11. Drexel University and Drexel University College of Medicine: an overview of their commitment to women through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erica; Follen, Michele

    2012-02-01

    The Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania was a groundbreaking institution and an ancestor to the Drexel University College of Medicine. The tradition of the Woman's Medical College lives on in the form of education and leadership programs dedicated to medical training for women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fertility awareness and attitudes towards parenthood among Danish university college students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Olsén; Marcussen, Signe; Backhausen, Mette Grønbæk

    2016-01-01

    at a Danish university college in February to April 2016. The participation rate was 99%, and 517 completed the questionnaire. RESULTS: Though the majority of all participants wished to have children in the future (>86%), there was significant difference between the genders (p = 0.002). Women rated having....... Perceived or experienced life changes related to parenthood were generally positive such as personal development. CONCLUSION: The majority of respondents wished to have children, but many desired to have these after the biological decline in female fertility. The moderate knowledge level among both genders...

  13. The Evolution of Developmental Education at the City University of New York and Bronx Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritze, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This chapter explores the evolution of open admissions and developmental education at the City University of New York, and discusses how CUNY and, in particular, Bronx Community College have addressed the challenges presented by underprepared college freshmen.

  14. 75 FR 60778 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Historically Black Colleges and Universities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... University, 601 South Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, Winston Salem, NC 27110. Grant: $800,000. 2. Benedict College, Dr. David Swinton, Benedict College, 1600 Harden Street, Columbia, SC, 29204-1086. Grant: $800...

  15. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  16. The First Hydrology (Geoscience) Degree at a Tribal College or University: Salish Kootenai College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, G.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    A new Hydrology Degree Program was developed at Salish and Kootenai College in western Montana. This program will begin to address the fact that our nation only awards 20 to 30 Geoscience degrees annually to Native American students. Previously absent from SKC and the other 36 Tribal Colleges or Universities (TCU) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related programs are specific Geoscience disciplines, particularly those focusing on hydrological and water based sciences. Though 23 TCU’s offer some classes to supplement their environmental science or natural resource programs. This program is timely and essential for addressing the concerns that Native Americans have who maintain sovereignty over approximately 20% of our nation’s fresh water resources which are becoming more stressed each year. The overall objective of this new SKC Hydrology degree program is to produce students who are able to “give voice” to the perspectives of Native peoples on natural resources and particularly water-related issues, including water rights, agriculture, environmental health (related to water), beliefs and spirituality related to water, and sustainability of water resources. It will provide the opportunity for interdisciplinary study in physical, chemical, and biological water resources and their management. Students will gain theoretical, conceptual, computational, and practical knowledge/experiences in quantifying, monitoring, qualifying, and managing today’s water resource challenges with particular emphasis on Tribal lands. Completion of the Associate of Science Degree will provide the student with the necessary skills to work as a hydrology- water quality- or geo-technician within the Reservation area, the U. S. Forest Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Reclamation, the United States Geological Society, and other earth science disciplines. The Bachelor’s Degree program provides students with a broad-based theoretical

  17. An excellence initiative in liberal arts and science education: the case of Amsterdam University College

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wende, Marijk; Wang, Q; Cheng, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Amsterdam University College (AUC) was established in 2009 as an excellence initiative jointly undertaken by the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and VU University Amsterdam (VU). AUC is a selective and residential honours college that offers an international liberal arts and sciences bachelor

  18. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Berea College, Berea, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Berea College, Berea, Kentucky, are described. The college-owned enterprises of the Boone Tavern Hotel and dining room, college farms and poultry, college laundry, college store, student craft industries, and the college press are discussed in terms of markets and…

  19. Science Ideals and Science Careers in a University Biology Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David E.

    2014-01-01

    In an ethnographic study set within a biology department of a public university in the United States, incongruity between the ideals and practice of science education are investigated. Against the background of religious conservative students' complaints about evolution in the curriculum, biology faculty describe their political intents for…

  20. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bushby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  1. The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Bartrip, Jon

    2009-04-01

    This research note gives details of 2 releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the Web. Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Web site, and information is provided about how to access the site. A description of the recordings and background information about the speakers who contributed recordings to UCLASS Releases One and Two are given. The sample types available in Release One are monologs. Release Two has monologs, readings, and conversations. Three optional software formats that can be used with the archive are described (although processing the archive is not restricted to these formats). Some perceptual assessment of the quality of each recording is given. An assessment of the strengths and limitations of the recording archive is presented. Finally, some past applications and future research possibilities using the recordings are discussed.

  2. Establishing Good Laboratory Practice at Small Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meryl Bornstein-Forst

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Good Laboratory Practice (GLP and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs provide guidelines for proper operation of equipment, maintenance and sanitation, reporting structures, and related activities. These practices are routinely employed at large academic and research-based institutions. However, they are often overlooked or omitted at smaller colleges and universities where staff and resources are limited. Incorrect assumptions and presumed responsibilities can lead to safety hazards, damage to equipment, loss of infrastructure, and confusion regarding operations and oversight. This report addresses the development of the “who, what, when, how, and where” policies and SOPs that constitute GLP. Once established and utilized by all departmental members, these structures ensure that academic and research-related activities are conducted safely and efficiently.

  3. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-04-24

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  4. Rice University: Innovation to Increase Student College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    "College readiness" means that a student can enter a college classroom without remediation and successfully complete entry-level college requirements (Conley, 2012). In order for students to be considered college ready, they must acquire skills, content knowledge, and behaviors before leaving high school. Research on high-school performance…

  5. Parallel universes of Black Six biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraev, Alexander

    2014-07-19

    Creation of lethal and synthetic lethal mutations in an experimental organism is a cornerstone of genetic dissection of gene function, and is related to the concept of an essential gene. Common inbred mouse strains carry background mutations, which can act as genetic modifiers, interfering with the assignment of gene essentiality. The inbred strain C57BL/6J, commonly known as "Black Six", stands out, as it carries a spontaneous homozygous deletion in the nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) gene [GenBank: AH009385.2], resulting in impairment of steroidogenic mitochondria of the adrenal gland, and a multitude of indirect modifier effects, coming from alteration of glucocorticoid-regulated processes. Over time, the popular strain has been used, by means of gene targeting technology, to assign "essential" and "redundant" qualifiers to numerous genes, thus creating an internally consistent "parallel universe" of knowledge. It is unrealistic to suggest phasing-out of this strain, given the scope of shared resources built around it, however, continuing on the road of "strain-unawareness" will result in profound waste of effort, particularly where translational research is concerned. The review analyzes the historical roots of this phenomenon and proposes that building of "parallel universes" should be urgently made visible to a critical reader by obligatory use of unambiguous and persistent tags in publications and databases, such as hypertext links, pointing to a vendor's strain description web page, or to a digital object identifier (d.o.i.) of the original publication, so that any research done exclusively in C57BL/6J, could be easily identified. This article was reviewed by Dr. Neil Smalheiser and Dr. Miguel Andrade-Navarro.

  6. Relación de algunos correlatos biológicos y demográficos con la práctica físico-deportiva en estudiantes universitarios. El caso de la Universidad de Guadalajara, México. (Relationship between some biological and demographics factors with physical-sport practice in college students. A case study of Guadalajara University, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena García Montes

    2009-01-01

    effective interventions, with suitable programs that foment the participation of the subjects. College students of the University of Guadalajara, Mexico (n = 1.207, were selected to carry out the study. Using the questionnaire, there were valued the sectors of the population that realize practice, which having been active it have stopped being, and those who have never joined leisure time physical activity. Between the principal results, to emphasize that little more than the half of college students join leisure time physical activity, being more probable the men with regard to the women, being these more feasible to the retire and to never have taken part in the practice. Rejecting associations between the physical - sports activity with the age, the overweight-obesity (BMI and injuries or days of disease, in this population. Turning out to be profitable to avoid the failure in the design of programs and to promote, the healthy benefits that the physical activity and the sport allows. Key words: biological and demographic factors; university students; physical activity.

  7. Assessment of Staff Retention in Private Universities in Ghana: A Study of the Perez University College, Winneba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwegyir-Aggrey, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Staff turnover especially among lecturers in private universities is high due to poor and disappointing conditions of service. This negatively affects effective teaching, learning and research. The purpose of the study was to examine the causes of staff turnover in private universities, using the Perez University College in Winneba as a case…

  8. Institutional Identity, Pressures for Change, and Executive Leadership at U.S. Catholic Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Alan B.; Dee, Jay R.; Manzo, Louis

    This study focused on how U.S. Catholic college and university presidents view the relationship between the Catholic church and Catholic institutions of higher education. The specific focus was on college and university presidents' perceptions of "Ex Corde Ecclesiae," a set of mandates issued by Pope John Paul II in 1990 and approved for…

  9. American College Test Assessment of Educational Hierarchies and Scholastic Survival at the University of the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Aurea Adrias

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain if the American College Test (ACT) that is widely used for student assessment in American colleges and universities can be used as a screening instrument at the University of the Philippines. The design utilized correlational and discriminatory techniques for data involving academic factors, and computer…

  10. Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions" examines the ways in which historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions have used the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) funds to enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  11. 28 CFR 92.6 - What colleges or universities can I attend under the Police Corps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., admits as regular students persons who are beyond the age of compulsory school attendance in the State in... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What colleges or universities can I... § 92.6 What colleges or universities can I attend under the Police Corps? (a) The choice of institution...

  12. 75 FR 9747 - Promoting Excellence, Innovation, and Sustainability at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... education, strengthen the capacity of historically black colleges and universities to provide the highest quality education, increase opportunities for these institutions to participate in and benefit from... Colleges and Universities (Initiative), to be housed in the Department of Education (Department). (b...

  13. Whatsapp for Educational Purposes for Female Students at College of Education--King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaad, Nawal Hamad Mohmad

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at finding out the educational usages of "Whatsapp" by the Saudi female students who are involved in the College of Education at King Saud University. To achieve the goal of this study, the researcher uses a simple sample of (122) female students from the Education College of King Saud University, which is chosen…

  14. Foundations for the Future: The Fundraising Role of Foundation Boards at Public Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the face of rising costs and a prolonged economic downturn, public colleges and universities are being challenged to increase their sources of private support and philanthropy. Drawing on the findings of a recent AGB survey of public college- and university-affiliated foundation board chairs and chief executive officers, Foundations for the…

  15. North American Christian Study Abroad Programs: Wheaton College and Whitworth University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad programs are in vogue today, especially among Christian colleges and universities. It is, therefore, appropriate to ask tough questions of these programs. Do they help our students become more mature followers of Jesus? Are they respectful of people in the target culture? College and university leaders must focus in particular on how…

  16. State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies: For Public Colleges and Universities, 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Allison C.; Carnahan, Julie; L'Orange, Hans P.

    2011-01-01

    This report, "State Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance Policies for Public Colleges and Universities: 2010-11", examines the philosophies, policies, and procedures that influence decision-making regarding public college and university tuition, student fees, and student financial aid programs. This report also provides information…

  17. 77 FR 68679 - Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU) AGENCIES: National Institute of Food and... Independence Avenue SW.; Washington, DC 20250-2299; Voice: 202-559-5088; Fax: 202-401-7752; Email: mlockhart...: PART 3434--HISPANIC-SERVING AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES CERTIFICATION PROCESS 0 1. The...

  18. 77 FR 59283 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The founders of our Nation's first colleges and universities for African Americans... path to freedom, independence, and success. More than 150 years later, America's Historically Black...

  19. The College and University Community Inventory: A New Tool To Assess Student Perceptions' of Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, William M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of the College and University Community Inventory (CUCI), an instrument designed to measure the extent of community within colleges and universities for students. Article discusses the methods for establishing the instrument's validity and ascertaining reliability indices. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/GCP)

  20. What Works in Student Retention? Fourth National Survey. Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the findings for public four-year colleges and universities that participated in ACT's 2010 What Works in Student Retention survey. The report contains information pertinent to only these institutions. Appended are: (1) Data for Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities; and (2) What Works in Student Retention: Instrument.…

  1. A Wake-Up Call: Enterprise Risk Management at Colleges and Universities Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    After five years of change and upheaval, why is it that governing boards of colleges and universities continue to consider risk on a largely ad hoc basis? The findings from this recent survey, conducted by the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) and United Educators (UE), indicate a modest increase in the use of risk…

  2. The State of Enterprise Risk Management at Colleges and Universities Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This survey was jointly conducted by the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) and United Educators (UE) and reports data on attitudes, practices and policies regarding enterprise risk management among American colleges and universities. The survey was completed by more than 600 respondents in June 2008. The population…

  3. Founding a new College of Medicine at Florida State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Myra M; Harris, J Ocie

    2005-11-01

    In 2000, the Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine was founded, becoming the first new allopathic medical school in the United States in over 20 years. The new medical school was to use community-based clinical training for the education of its students, create a technology-rich environment, and address primary care health needs of Florida's citizens, especially the elderly, rural, minorities, and underserved. The challenges faced during the creation of the new school, including accreditation and a leadership change, as well as accomplishments are described here. The new school admits a diverse student body made possible through its extensive outreach programs, fosters a humane learning environment through creation of student learning communities, has a distributed clinical training model-with clinical campuses in Orlando, Pensacola, Sarasota and Tallahassee, and with 70% of training occurring in ambulatory settings-and utilizes 21st-century information technology. The curriculum focuses on patient-centered clinical training, using the biopsychosocial model of patient care throughout the entire medical curriculum, promotes primary care and geriatrics medicine through longitudinal community experiences, relies on a hybrid curriculum for delivery of the first two years of medical education with half of class sessions occurring in small groups and on a continuum of clinical skills development throughout the first three years, and uses an interdisciplinary departmental model for faculty, which greatly facilitates delivery of an integrated curriculum. The first class was admitted in 2001 and graduated in May 2005. In February 2005, the FSU College of Medicine received full accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

  4. The Construction and Empirical Analysis of Financial Risk Early Warning System in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Jiaxu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, China's higher education into the period of rapid development, high growth will inevitably bring high demand for financial support, but the government investment can not keep up with the pace of development of colleges and universities, so many colleges and universities choose bank loans, blind expansion will be out of control Resulting in college financial crisis. This paper proposes a method to construct the financial risk evaluation model of colleges and universities. The model is based on the specific risk index system, and uses the analytic hierarchy process and Delphi expert scoring method as the theoretical basis. The model can calculate the type and level of financial risk in colleges and universities, and provide support for the system decision-making.

  5. Evaluation of Skills Needed in College Education by Colleges of Agriculture Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Universities in Alabama and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; Baba, Pauline A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine college skills Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee rated as essential to acquire in their college education. The data are from a survey of colleges of agriculture alumni who graduated from six land-grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee. IBM SPSS Statistical…

  6. First-Generation College Students' 1st-Year College Experiences: Challenges Attending a Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) face challenges when switching from high school to college and during their 1st-year in college. Additionally, FGCS may have difficulty understanding the steps required to prepare for and enroll in postsecondary education. The social capital theory examines support of social, academic, and cultural networks…

  7. Collaborative Efforts of Service Delivery Agencies, Colleges, and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Gabrielle; Ghazi, Mani

    The paper describes a collaborative program between a private non-profit agency providing services to the retarded and a local college in which a college faculty member used his sabbatical to provide training and clinical support to agency staff. A needs assessment of the 12 teachers and 24 teaching assistants involved resulted in identifying the…

  8. Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMillo, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of American college students attend two thousand or so private and public institutions that might be described as the Middle--reputable educational institutions, but not considered equal to the elite and entrenched upper echelon of the Ivy League and other prestigious schools. Richard DeMillo has a warning for these colleges and…

  9. Gambling behavior among Macau college and university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Sut Mei; Wong, Irene Lai Kuen; So, Ernest Moon Tong; Un, David Kin Cheong; Chan, Chris Hon Wa

    2017-01-01

    This survey investigated gambling behavior among Chinese students studying in Macau colleges and universities. It also aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling, affect states and sensation seeking propensity. A convenience sample of 999 students (370 men, 629 women) filled a self-administered questionnaire consisted of the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) (Ferris and Wynne in The Canadian problem gambling index: User manual. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto 2001a), the 8-item Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8) (Hoyle et al. Pers Individ Diff 32(3): 401-414, 2002), Bradburn's Affect Balance Scale (BABS) (Bradburn in The structure of psychological well-being. Aldine, Chicago 1969) and questions on gambling activities. The response rate is 65%. Results indicate 32.3% ( n  = 323) of the survey participants wagered on mahjong (61.8%), soccer matches (40.2%), Mark Six lottery (37.2%), card games (28.1%), land-based casino gambling (13.1%), slot machines (7.5%) and online casino games (2.0%). The average monthly stake was MOP $411. Seeking entertainment (18.7%), killing time (12.5%) and peer influence (11.1%) were the three main reasons for gambling. Using the PGSI, 3.6 and 5.3% of the students could be identified as moderate-risk and problem gamblers respectively. Men were significantly more vulnerable to gambling problems (X2(1) = 35.00, p   0.05). The study findings inform campus prevention programs and future research.

  10. Gambling behavior among Macau college and university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sut Mei Kam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This survey investigated gambling behavior among Chinese students studying in Macau colleges and universities. It also aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling, affect states and sensation seeking propensity. A convenience sample of 999 students (370 men, 629 women filled a self-administered questionnaire consisted of the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI (Ferris and Wynne in The Canadian problem gambling index: User manual. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto 2001a, the 8-item Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8 (Hoyle et al. Pers Individ Diff 32(3: 401–414, 2002, Bradburn’s Affect Balance Scale (BABS (Bradburn in The structure of psychological well-being. Aldine, Chicago 1969 and questions on gambling activities. The response rate is 65%. Results indicate 32.3% (n = 323 of the survey participants wagered on mahjong (61.8%, soccer matches (40.2%, Mark Six lottery (37.2%, card games (28.1%, land-based casino gambling (13.1%, slot machines (7.5% and online casino games (2.0%. The average monthly stake was MOP $411. Seeking entertainment (18.7%, killing time (12.5% and peer influence (11.1% were the three main reasons for gambling. Using the PGSI, 3.6 and 5.3% of the students could be identified as moderate-risk and problem gamblers respectively. Men were significantly more vulnerable to gambling problems (X2(1 = 35.00, p  0.05. The study findings inform campus prevention programs and future research.

  11. University presidents' perceptions and practice regarding the carrying of concealed handguns on college campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Thompson, Amy; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Dake, Joseph; Payton, Erica; Teeple, Karen

    2014-01-01

    To assess the perceptions and practices of a national sample of college and university presidents regarding their support for concealed handguns being carried on college campuses. The sample for this study consisted of a national random sample of 900 college or university presidents. In the spring of 2013, a 3-wave mailing procedure was used to ensure an adequate response rate to a valid and reliable questionnaire. The response rate was 46%, more than what was needed based on the power analysis. The vast majority (95%) of respondents were not supportive of carrying concealed handguns on campuses. They perceived there to be more disadvantages than advantages to handguns on campus. However, college administrators were not focused enough on the primary prevention of campus firearm trauma. The findings of this study suggest a number of activities that could be implemented to enhance safety on college and university campuses.

  12. Pathways from College to University: A Social Science Example from Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Ann; Samis, John; Hinch, Ron; Longo, Fabiola; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, William; Percival, Jennifer; De La Rocha, Arlene; Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil; Sanchez, Otto

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of a College to University Pathway Program in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at The University of Ontario Institute of Technology. The findings support the assertion that Pathway students perform as well as or better than students who enter university directly from secondary school. This finding is…

  13. Interracial Contact Effects on Racial Prejudice among Students at Selective Colleges and Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, W. Carson

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examined interracial contact and racial prejudice among white, black, Asian, and Latino college students at 28 elite colleges and universities in the United States. The study used longitudinal analyses to identify how interracial contact among college students influenced studentsâ racial prejudice. White students interacted almost exclusively with each other and with Asian students. Asian students interacted with each other and with white students. Latino students were...

  14. Toward university modeling instruction--biology: adapting curricular frameworks from physics to biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthey, Seth; Brewe, Eric

    2013-06-01

    University Modeling Instruction (UMI) is an approach to curriculum and pedagogy that focuses instruction on engaging students in building, validating, and deploying scientific models. Modeling Instruction has been successfully implemented in both high school and university physics courses. Studies within the physics education research (PER) community have identified UMI's positive impacts on learning gains, equity, attitudinal shifts, and self-efficacy. While the success of this pedagogical approach has been recognized within the physics community, the use of models and modeling practices is still being developed for biology. Drawing from the existing research on UMI in physics, we describe the theoretical foundations of UMI and how UMI can be adapted to include an emphasis on models and modeling for undergraduate introductory biology courses. In particular, we discuss our ongoing work to develop a framework for the first semester of a two-semester introductory biology course sequence by identifying the essential basic models for an introductory biology course sequence.

  15. Toward University Modeling Instruction—Biology: Adapting Curricular Frameworks from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthey, Seth; Brewe, Eric

    2013-01-01

    University Modeling Instruction (UMI) is an approach to curriculum and pedagogy that focuses instruction on engaging students in building, validating, and deploying scientific models. Modeling Instruction has been successfully implemented in both high school and university physics courses. Studies within the physics education research (PER) community have identified UMI's positive impacts on learning gains, equity, attitudinal shifts, and self-efficacy. While the success of this pedagogical approach has been recognized within the physics community, the use of models and modeling practices is still being developed for biology. Drawing from the existing research on UMI in physics, we describe the theoretical foundations of UMI and how UMI can be adapted to include an emphasis on models and modeling for undergraduate introductory biology courses. In particular, we discuss our ongoing work to develop a framework for the first semester of a two-semester introductory biology course sequence by identifying the essential basic models for an introductory biology course sequence. PMID:23737628

  16. The perspectives of nonscience-major students on success in community college biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Rajab, Oriana Sharon

    With more than 36% of nonscience-major community college students unable to successfully complete their general life science courses, graduation and transfer rates to four-year universities are negatively affected. Many students also miss important opportunities to gain some level of science proficiency. In an effort to address the problem of poor science achievement, this research project determined which factors were most significantly related to student success in a community college biology course. It also aimed to understand the student perspectives on which modifications to the course would best help them in the pursuit of success. Drawing heavily on the educational psychology schools of thought on motivation and self-efficacy of science learning, this study surveyed and interviewed students on their perceptions of which factors were related to success in biology and the changes they believed were needed in the course structure to improve success. The data revealed that the primary factors related to student success are the students' study skills and their perceived levels of self-efficacy. The findings also uncovered the critical nature of the professor's role in influencing the success of the students. After assessing the needs of the community college population, meaningful and appropriate curriculum and pedagogical reforms could be created to improve student learning outcomes. This study offered recommendations for reforms that can be used by science practitioners to provide a more nurturing and inspiring environment for all students. These suggestions revolved around the role of the instructor in influencing the self-efficacy and study skills of students. Providing more opportunities for students to interact in class, testing more frequently, establishing peer assistance programs, managing better the course material, and making themselves more available to students were at the forefront of the list. Examples of the potential benefits of increasing

  17. Predictors of College Students' Willingness to Use Social Network Services: The Case of Two Turkish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ali Kemal; Karaaslan, Abdulkerim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine predictors of social network services use among college students at two Turkish universities, with particular emphasis on Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, and Instagram. Design/methodology/approach: A written questionnaire was administered to 822 college students from various faculties. The data…

  18. Comparing Perceptions of Campus Crime Severity among Community College and Public Four-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Loren M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years violent crimes on several university campuses have been highlighted by mass media, drawing national attention to the issue of campus crime. Not all college campuses, however, experience the same level of crime. While community colleges serve roughly half of all undergraduates in the U.S., statistically these public institutions…

  19. Mental Health Service Usage by Students Attending an Historically Black College/University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Floyd T., II; Geyen, Dashiel; Rouce, Sandra D.; Griffith, Kimberly Grantham; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    The advent of a changing world market and global economy has intensified the pressure experienced by today's college students. Competition for jobs, admittance into graduate school programs, and membership into prestigious honor societies led Dr. Richard Kadison, chief of mental health services at Harvard University and author of "College of the…

  20. Birmingham University and Teacher Training: Day Training College to Department of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Traces the development of teacher education in Birmingham, England, from the Victorian period through the 1920s. Describes the transition of Mason College and the Birmingham Day Training College into the education department of Birmingham University. Discusses women's education, teacher training for men, student life, faculty, and curriculum. (DK)

  1. Degrees for What Jobs? Raising Expectations for Universities and Colleges in a Global Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Erin; Waits, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing that higher education, including community colleges, four-year colleges, and research universities, cannot help drive economic growth in their states unless students' academic success is linked to the needs of the marketplace, governors and state policymakers are beginning to move beyond their focus on getting more students to get…

  2. 27 CFR 22.104 - Educational organizations, colleges of learning, and scientific universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... faculty and curriculum and which normally have a regularly enrolled body of students in attendance at the..., colleges of learning, and scientific universities. 22.104 Section 22.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Use of Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.104 Educational organizations, colleges of learning...

  3. 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage among College Students from 8 Universities in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Blocker, Jill; Ip, Edward H.; Peters, Timothy R.; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to describe the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine coverage of college students. Participants: A total of 4,090 college students from 8 North Carolina universities participated in a confidential, Web-based survey in October-November 2009. Methods: Associations between self-reported 2009-2010 seasonal influenza…

  4. Fewer Resources, More Debt: Loan Debt Burdens Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Katherine M.; Williams, Krystal L.; Smith, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Student loans have become an increasingly important way for students and their families to pay for college, but for students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), student loan debt is a substantial burden. Students who attend these institutions--many of whom are low-income and first-generation--must borrow at higher rates and,…

  5. Design Core Commonalities: A Study of the College of Design at Iowa State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive study asks what a group of rather diverse disciplines have in common. It involves a cross-disciplinary examination of an entire college, the College of Design at Iowa State University. This research was intended to provide a sense of direction in developing and assessing possible core content. The reasoning was that material…

  6. More than Words, A Way of Life: Language Restoration Programs Reach beyond Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskus, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In North America, and worldwide, Indigenous languages are disappearing at an alarming rate. There are, however, models of success for language revitalization in immersion language programs, usually found in tribal colleges and universities. Whether the language learners are tribal college students greeting one another in their native language,…

  7. Perceived Norms and Marijuana Use at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Todd F.; Wahesh, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the extent of marijuana use and related risk-taking behavior by college students on historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Undergraduate students (N = 212) from an HBCU in the southern region of the United States completed anonymous questionnaires that assessed their marijuana-related behaviors and…

  8. State University of New York Maritime College Faculty Student Association--Selected Financial Management Practices. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit and State Financial Services.

    The Maritime College Faculty Student Association (FSA) is a campus-based, not-for-profit corporation that was formed to operate, manage, and promote educationally related services for the benefit of the campus community at the State University of New York Maritime College, which trains students to become licensed officers in the U.S. Merchant…

  9. What Works in Student Retention? Fourth National Survey. Private Four-Year Colleges and Universities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the findings for private four-year colleges that participated in ACT's 2010 What Works in Student Retention survey. The report contains information pertinent to only these institutions. Appended are: (1) Data for Private Four-Year Colleges and Universities; and (2) What Works in Student Retention: Instrument. (Contains 15…

  10. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  11. Inspiring Integration in College Students Reading Multiple Biology Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firetto, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Introductory biology courses typically present topics on related biological systems across separate chapters and lectures. A complete foundational understanding requires that students understand how these biological systems are related. Unfortunately, spontaneous generation of these connections is rare for novice learners. These experiments focus…

  12. The Structure of Arts, Science, and Humanities Colleges in Major Universities: A Macro-Sociological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Jones, Larry R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of arts, science, and humanities colleges within major universities was investigated to determine the relationship between number of faculty or students and the number of administrative levels, and the ratio of administrators to faculty. (SF)

  13. GASB 35: The New Financial Reporting Requirements for Public College and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayoumi, Mohammad H.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the basic financial reporting elements of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB-35) for public colleges and universities, including statements of net assets and cash flow reporting. The GASB-35's impact on facilities managers is discussed. (GR)

  14. Role of the Four-Year College and the University in Community Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Maurice F.

    1972-01-01

    To contribute to the development of community education, 4-year colleges and universities will have to acknowledge the continuousness and individuality of education and redefine the role of higher education vis-a-vis other educative institutions. (Author/JH)

  15. College Health Surveillance Network: Epidemiology and Health Care Utilization of College Students at US 4-Year Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C.; Keller, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This description of the College Health Surveillance Network (CHSN) includes methodology, demography, epidemiology, and health care utilization. Participants: Twenty-three universities representing approximately 730,000 enrolled students contributed data from January 1, 2011, through May 31, 2014. Methods: Participating schools uploaded…

  16. Teachers, Students, and Ideological Bias in the College Classroom. Wicked Problems Forum: Freedom of Speech at Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Joseph P.

    2018-01-01

    Discussions surrounding ideology and free speech on college and university campuses continually occur in the popular press. In this forum, Herbeck (see EJ1171161) chronicles several heated clashes over free speech that have recently erupted on campuses across the country, fueling news stories reported through traditional and social media. Issues…

  17. Presbycusis in Nigerians at the University College Hospital, Ibadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunleye, A O A; Labaran, A O

    2005-09-01

    Presbycusis refers to sensori-neural hearing impairment in elderly individuals resulting from the degenerative changes of aging. Characteristically, it involves bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, worse at high frequencies, which is associated with difficulty in speech discrimination and central auditory processing of information. The aim of this study is to present our observations on presbycusis as seen in Nigerians. A 41/2-year prospective study of 67 patients that presented with features of presbycusis in the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria between January 2000 and June 2004 was done. The diagnosis of presbycusis in each subject was based on history, clinical findings, and pure tone audiometry. 67 patients with features of presbycusis were seen and treated over the studied period with 37 males (55.2%), 30 females (44.8%) (M:F 1.2:1) and with an average age of 69.3 years (age range 46-90 years). Presbycusis constituted 2.4% of the 2817 otological cases seen during the studied period. Majority (64.1%) of the cases were of 6th to 8th decades of life. The symptoms were mainly of hearing loss 34 (50.7%), tinnitus 19 (28.4%), hearing loss and tinnitus together in 14 (20.9%) cases. Stria (metabolic) presbycusis 20 (29.9%) constituted the most common type of presbycusis seen in this study followed by mechanical presbycusis 15 (22.4%), neural presbycusis 14 (20.9%) and sensory presbycusis 7 (10.4%) respectively. Presbycusis has been found in this study to affect both males and females subjects almost equally, has an insidious onset as from fourth decades of life in our environment, of stria (metabolic) type mostly, presents with moderate to severe sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL), and constitute an important problem in the society as it occurs in an elderly population that relies on their special senses (especially auditory) to compensate for other age-associated disabilities.

  18. African American College Students at Predominantly White and Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to more fully understand the socialization experiences of African American college students, and to investigate and/or uncover new information that can offer meaningful insight for transforming institutional barriers that interfere with the success of African American college students. The existing literature…

  19. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

  20. Integrated Chemistry and Biology for First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdella, Beth R. J.; Walczak, Mary M.; Kandl, Kim A.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    A three-course sequence for first-year students that integrates beginning concepts in biology and chemistry has been designed. The first two courses that emphasize chemistry and its capacity to inform biological applications are described here. The content of the first course moves from small to large particles with an emphasis on membrane…

  1. The Impact of a Pathway College on Reputation and Brand Awareness for Its Affiliated University in Sydney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ann; Zhao, Jingsong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect that a prospective pathway college affiliated to a large comprehensive university in Sydney may have on the university's reputation. In particular, the association of reputation with preference for a pathway college, brand awareness and the opinion of college brand are examined.…

  2. Universal biology and the statistical mechanics of early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Biancalani, Tommaso; Jafarpour, Farshid

    2017-11-01

    All known life on the Earth exhibits at least two non-trivial common features: the canonical genetic code and biological homochirality, both of which emerged prior to the Last Universal Common Ancestor state. This article describes recent efforts to provide a narrative of this epoch using tools from statistical mechanics. During the emergence of self-replicating life far from equilibrium in a period of chemical evolution, minimal models of autocatalysis show that homochirality would have necessarily co-evolved along with the efficiency of early-life self-replicators. Dynamical system models of the evolution of the genetic code must explain its universality and its highly refined error-minimization properties. These have both been accounted for in a scenario where life arose from a collective, networked phase where there was no notion of species and perhaps even individuality itself. We show how this phase ultimately terminated during an event sometimes known as the Darwinian transition, leading to the present epoch of tree-like vertical descent of organismal lineages. These examples illustrate concrete examples of universal biology: the quest for a fundamental understanding of the basic properties of living systems, independent of precise instantiation in chemistry or other media. This article is part of the themed issue 'Reconceptualizing the origins of life'.

  3. The Inequality of Self-Efficacy between Junior College and Traditional University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education research highlights the difficulties students face when transitioning from a junior college to a traditional university. This study explored a gap between junior vs. traditional university students' academic self-efficacy beliefs. This study also controlled for the effects of the student role-identity and academic performance on…

  4. Exploring a Successful Community College Student Transition to a Research-University Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWine, Paul R.; Bresciani Ludvik, Marilee; Tucker, Mark; Mulholland, Shaila; Bracken, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to holistically investigate the environmental support needs of community college students as they transition into a research university. Both students and staff were interviewed to gain their perspective on the influences of the student transition process. Western University is a Carnegie classified Doctoral…

  5. "Adelante en Utah": Dilemmas of Leadership and College Access in a University-School-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Enrique, Jr.; Pérez-Torres, Judith C.; Oliva, Nereida

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses some of the issues that "Adelante," a 6-year university-school-community partnership, continues to encounter in addressing college access and parent and community leadership in a community of color. It provides the sociopolitical context as well as a description of the university and community partners that make…

  6. Waste Management in Universities and Colleges. Workshop Proceedings (Madison, Wisconsin, July 9-11, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    In response to a request from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Region V of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a workshop on waste management in universities and colleges. It consisted of four sessions: (1) managing general university waste and regulatory concerns; (2) chemical waste management; (3)…

  7. The Extent of Skills Mismatch among Childhood Education Graduates of Princess Alia University College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashash, Hyam M.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the extent of skill mismatch between the skills the childhood education graduates at Al-Balqa Applied University--Princess Alia University College acquired during their studies and those demanded in the labor market. The descriptive survey design was adopted and the purposive sampling technique was employed to…

  8. Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Resource Dependence: A Chow Test of Production Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupet, Jason

    2013-01-01

    While several studies have examined the impact of expenditures on graduation rates in higher education institutions, historically Black colleges and universities have strong government dependencies that suggest that these links might be different than for other universities. This paper investigates these links by estimating the production function…

  9. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bonnie; Magarati, Maya; Parker, Myra; Egashira, Leo; Kipp, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the activities of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington, Washington State, in collaborating with tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to examine alcohol, drug, and mental health issues among Native students. The authors provide first steps for the development of culturally…

  10. University Belonging, Friendship Quality, and Psychological Adjustment during the Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Laura D.; Richmond, Adeya

    2008-01-01

    The authors collected questionnaire data from college students (N = 79) at 2 time points during their freshman year to examine how changes in a sense of university belonging, quality of friendships, and psychological adjustment were associated. Students who had positive changes in university belonging had corresponding positive changes in…

  11. What is the Difference Between Motivation to Learn Mathematics in University and in College?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gudelytė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—This paper examines whether there is significant difference between Mykolas Romeris University and College of Applied Social Sciences students, their knowledge of Mathematics acquired at school, and the choice to take the final Mathematics examination or not; and their further studying results and motivation. Design/methodology/approach—Test results are analysed by statistical hypothesis testing methods. Findings—The motivation of University students, who have taken the Mathematics examination, to study and achieve better results, is stronger. Research limitations/implications—the represented method is one of the ways to inquiry of such problems. Practical implications—This study will help to identify the University and College students’ weaknesses and to show ways to improve the quality of studies. Originality/Value—The study should allow to measure the average time it takes University and College students of social sciences to understand a mathematical text.

  12. What Makes a Good University? A Literature Review regarding the "Soft Power" of Colleges and Universities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu-Bin; Dong, Jian-Mei

    2011-01-01

    During the past few years, "soft power" has been widely discussed and studied in China. Higher education, one of the largest components of national soft power, has begun to play an active and important role. In this article, we review the literature on the soft power of colleges and universities and describe ways to enhance it; we also…

  13. Evolution Acceptance and Epistemological Beliefs of College Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Deniz, Hasan; Anderson, Elizabeth Shevock

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary theory is central to biology, and scientifically accurate evolution instruction is promoted within national and state standards documents. Previous literature has identified students' epistemological beliefs as potential predictors of evolution acceptance. The present work seeks to explore more directly how student views of evolution…

  14. New vistas for developmental biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Scott F Gilbert1 Rocky S Tuan2. Department of Biology, Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, PA 19081, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, 1015 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA ...

  15. The Innovation Hyperlab - Linking Student Innovation at University and Pre-College Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, Randall

    2012-02-01

    We have created a laboratory environment to support collaboration between university and pre-college students on innovation and entrepreneurship projects. Called the ``Innovation Hyperlab,'' this facility is located in a K-12 complex called VistaPEAK schools in Aurora, Colorado. The lab is supported by four elements: a research-grade technical infrastructure of supplies and equipment for technical prototyping, a developing curriculum of ``learning modules on demand'' for rapid assimilation of technical skills, mentors from universities / medical schools / industry, and innovation projects stimulated by connections with the regional community. A current focus of projects is on medical technology development, linking tenth graders with university undergraduate research students and coordinated with the University of Colorado Denver's medical school. The Innovation Hyperlab is a work in progress and we will describe challenges that arise in connecting such a collaboration with traditional curriculum at both the university and pre-college levels.

  16. Does Eating Breakfast Affect the Performance of College Students on Biology Exams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gregory W.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the breakfast eating habits of 1,259 college students over an eleven year period to determine if eating breakfast had an impact upon their grade on a General Biology exam. The study determined that there was a significant difference in the performance on the exam with a higher percent of the participants, who had eaten…

  17. Active Learning "Not" Associated with Student Learning in a Random Sample of College Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Leonard, M. J.; Colgrove, C. A.; Kalinowski, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses…

  18. Diversified integration of practical teaching resources in ideological and political course in colleges and universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Chu, Biao

    2018-03-01

    To promote diversified integration and integrated use of practical teaching resources in ideological and political education in colleges and universities is helpful to extend the ideological and political teaching activities in colleges and universities, to update and supplement ideological and political knowledge, to build a harmonious learning environment for students and to comprehensively improve their ideological and political accomplishments. This article will analyze of ideological and political practical teaching resources diversified integration and the integration of programs by examples, and put forward personal opinions.

  19. Institutional Capacities in E-learning and Problem Based Learning at Universities and University Colleges in Tanzania and Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahms, Mona-Lisa; Zakaria, Hanan Lassen

    at these institutions to increase the use of these current teaching approaches. Since the 1970’s, PBL and other student activating teaching forms has gained increasing foothold at many universities especially in Northern Europe. Evidence is clear that students not only learn more by being active in problem solving...... in the teaching mo- dality at universities and schools. E.g. it opens for easy sharing of teaching resources, new ways of self-study and self-practices on flexible terms and an immense improvement of possibilities to use illustrations in teaching. But equally important it gives every teacher a possibility...... in Tanzania and two universities in Ghana to build up their competences in teaching in these two areas through a range of activities. This publication forms the baseline for the project and emerges from a large collection of data from all universities and university colleges....

  20. Florida International University: development and accreditation of Miami's Public College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, John A; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Dambach, George; O'Leary, J Patrick; Markham, Sanford; Bagby, Larry; Seecharan, Khaleel; Berkman, Ronald M

    2009-10-01

    Anticipating pressing health care needs in the region, Florida International University (FIU) proposed the FIU College of Medicine (COM), which was approved by the Florida Board of Governors in March 2006. The FIU COM provides a program of study enabling graduates to pursue a wide spectrum of professional careers. This includes careers in general and subspecialty private practice, academic medicine, public service, health care, and public policy leadership. Irrespective of career choice, the special emphasis of the FIU COM mission is its focus on community health in a diverse metropolitan region. Clinical facilities are met through a public partner and multiple private hospital affiliations. Educational objectives are organized into five strands reflecting the breadth of medical education and running concurrently through the four-year curriculum: (1) human biology, (2) disease, illness, and injury, (3) clinical medicine, (4) professional development, and (5) medicine and society. Founding teaching faculty with expertise in the core basic sciences will not only introduce core scientific concepts during the initial seven months but reinforce these same concepts during organ system integrated courses and clerkships. The Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program is an FIU COM innovation in which each medical student is a member of a team that throughout the four-year curriculum identifies and addresses health care needs and factors affecting health outcomes. Preliminary approval of FIU COM was conferred in February 2008, with the first cohort of 40 students matriculating in August 2009.

  1. paediatric endocrine disorders at the university college hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endocrine Science Research Group, University of Manchester, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital,. Manchester, UK. ... in the low socioeconomic status and the management of the cases were severely hampered ... Keywords: Endocrine disorders, Awareness, Rickets, Malnutrition, Financial constraints. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med ...

  2. Equal Employment + Equal Pay = Multiple Problems for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Sheldon Elliot; Reback, Joyce E.

    1974-01-01

    Issues involved in government regulation of university employment practices are discussed: confidentiality of records, pregnancy as a disability, alleged discrimination in benefits, tests and other employment criteria, seniority and layoff, reverse discrimination, use of statistics for determination of discrimination, and the Equal Pay Act. (JT)

  3. Systems Thinking Evidence from Colleges of Business and Their Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, John H.; Kowalsky, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated instances of the term "systems thinking" among the websites of the Top 25 business schools as ranked by "U. S. News and World Report" in 2010. Since a greater number of instances of the term and its variants in a university's web documents may indicate an increased interest of the institution in the…

  4. Beyond Reduction: Climate Change Adaptation Planning for Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Rochelle; Fisher, Erica; McKenzie, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to outline a unique six-step process for the inclusion of climate change adaption goals and strategies in a University Climate Change Plan. Design/methodology/approach: A mixed-method approach was used to gather data on campus climate change vulnerabilities and adaption strategies. A literature review…

  5. Universality of thermodynamic constants governing biological growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkrey, Ross; Olley, June; Ratkowsky, David; McMeekin, Tom; Ross, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models exist that quantify the effect of temperature on poikilotherm growth rate. One family of such models assumes a single rate-limiting 'master reaction' using terms describing the temperature-dependent denaturation of the reaction's enzyme. We consider whether such a model can describe growth in each domain of life. A new model based on this assumption and using a hierarchical Bayesian approach fits simultaneously 95 data sets for temperature-related growth rates of diverse microorganisms from all three domains of life, Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Remarkably, the model produces credible estimates of fundamental thermodynamic parameters describing protein thermal stability predicted over 20 years ago. The analysis lends support to the concept of universal thermodynamic limits to microbial growth rate dictated by protein thermal stability that in turn govern biological rates. This suggests that the thermal stability of proteins is a unifying property in the evolution and adaptation of life on earth. The fundamental nature of this conclusion has importance for many fields of study including microbiology, protein chemistry, thermal biology, and ecological theory including, for example, the influence of the vast microbial biomass and activity in the biosphere that is poorly described in current climate models.

  6. Universality of thermodynamic constants governing biological growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Corkrey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mathematical models exist that quantify the effect of temperature on poikilotherm growth rate. One family of such models assumes a single rate-limiting 'master reaction' using terms describing the temperature-dependent denaturation of the reaction's enzyme. We consider whether such a model can describe growth in each domain of life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new model based on this assumption and using a hierarchical Bayesian approach fits simultaneously 95 data sets for temperature-related growth rates of diverse microorganisms from all three domains of life, Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Remarkably, the model produces credible estimates of fundamental thermodynamic parameters describing protein thermal stability predicted over 20 years ago. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The analysis lends support to the concept of universal thermodynamic limits to microbial growth rate dictated by protein thermal stability that in turn govern biological rates. This suggests that the thermal stability of proteins is a unifying property in the evolution and adaptation of life on earth. The fundamental nature of this conclusion has importance for many fields of study including microbiology, protein chemistry, thermal biology, and ecological theory including, for example, the influence of the vast microbial biomass and activity in the biosphere that is poorly described in current climate models.

  7. Prostaglandins - universal biological regulators in the human body (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Tymoshchuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers of different industries pay great attention to the problem of prostaglandins. Objective: to study and systematize the basic questions of structure, biological action and metabolism of prostaglandins in the human body and using their analogues in pharmacy through the domestic and foreign literature data analysis. Prostaglandins – biologically active substances which are similar in effect to hormones, but are synthesized in cells of different tissues. Prostaglandins as universal cellular mediators are widely distributed in the body, synthesized in small amounts in almost all tissues, have both local and systemic effects. For each prostaglandin there is a target organ. On chemical structure they are small molecules related to eicosanoids - a group of fat-like substances (lipids. Depending on the chemical structure prostaglandins are divided into series (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J and three groups (1–3; type F isomers are to be indicated by additional letters α and β. Prostaglandins have an extremely wide range of physiological effects in the body and have three main functions: supporting, molecular, neurotransmitter. Most prostaglandins interact with specific receptors of plasma membranes, but some prostaglandins (group A can act without receptors. There is no stock of prostaglandins in the body, their life cycle is short, and they are quickly produced in response to biological stimulants exposure, have their effect in extremely small quantity and are rapidly inactivated in the bloodstream. Due to the extremely rapid breakdown of prostaglandins in the body they work near their place of secretion. Preparations of prostaglandins and their derivatives are used in experimental and clinical medicine for abortion and induction of labor, treatment of stomach ulcers, asthma, certain heart diseases, congenital heart defects in newborns, glaucoma, atherosclerosis, rheumatic and neurological diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes

  8. Tuition Discounting: Institutional Aid Patterns at Public and Private Colleges and Universities. Trends in Higher Education Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Sandy; Ma, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Recent data from the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges reveal significant variation in institutional aid patterns among colleges and universities. The undergraduate tuition discount rate--the ratio of institutional grant aid to published tuition and fee charges--is higher at private institutions than at public institutions, but there are…

  9. The Pursuit of Excellence: An Analysis of the Honors College Application and Enrollment Decision for a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Honors colleges housed in public universities began only in the last half century, but have become nearly ubiquitous over the last 20 years. This paper, using recent data from the oldest stand-alone honors college in the country, is the first to study how the application and enrollment decisions of honors college students differ from the general…

  10. Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning.

  11. Loneliness among adolescent college students at a midwestern university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medora, N; Woodward, J C

    1986-01-01

    The extent of loneliness of late adolescents in a midwestern university was studied in relation to selected variables and in comparison to other groups. It was found that women were lonelier than men, and that there was a relationship between loneliness and ease of making friends and loneliness and happiness during the past year. A difference also was found in loneliness scores among those with self-perceptions of loneliness. These adolescents were the sixth most lonely group out of thirteen previously studied groups.

  12. Complying with "Drug-Free Workplace" Laws on College and University Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence

    Beginning with the original executive order in 1986, drug-free workplace legislation has expanded its boundaries to include workers in private companies and state and local agencies and virtually all U.S. colleges and universities. This monograph reviews the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and its various implementing regulations from the…

  13. Palace coup rocks University College: Critics turn on moderniser who 'failed to lead and lacked vison'

    CERN Multimedia

    Woodward, W

    2002-01-01

    Sir Christopher Llewellyn Smith has resigned as head of University College London, forced out by a group of senior academics and Lord Young of Graffham, chairman of UCL's ruling body. Sir Chris has will occupy an unspecified research position in Oxford physics department, from the autumn (1 page).

  14. A Study of the Structure of Colleges of Arts and Sciences at Five Major Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Jones, Larry G.

    1978-01-01

    This study of organizational structure, administrative structure, and governance of colleges of arts and sciences at five major universities summarizes the issues involved and identifies some common concepts and arrangements. From the information obtained it seems unlikely that a single organizational structure exists or could be designed to serve…

  15. Content Analysis of Conceptually Based Physical Education in Southeastern United States Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Suzanne Ellen; Greene, Leon; Satinsky, Sonya; Neuberger, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to explore PE in higher education through the offering of traditional activity- and skills-based physical education (ASPE) and conceptually-based physical education (CPE) courses, and to conduct an exploratory content analysis on the CPE available to students in randomized colleges and universities in the…

  16. Beach Books: 2014-2016. What Do Colleges and Universities Want Students to Read outside Class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, David

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of American colleges and universities continue to assign a summer reading to entering freshmen--typically one book, which the students are asked to read outside their courses. Many institutions embed the common reading in a larger program of campus activities: typically, they invite the common reading author to help open the academic year…

  17. Examining the Adjustment Problems of Kenyan International Students Attending Colleges and Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokua, Rodgers Nyandieka

    2012-01-01

    The literature on international students from Africa, and particularly Kenya, is very limited despite the significant number of Kenyan international students attending colleges and universities in the United States. Therefore, the intent of this study was to examine the adjustment problems of Kenyan international students in the United States. The…

  18. Communication Conflict Styles, Perception of Ethical Environment, and Job Satisfaction among College and University Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Ayers, David F.

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the perceptions of college and university counselors (N = 669) regarding their ethical environment, job satisfaction, and ways of dealing with organizational conflict. Findings indicated that counselors manifested an average, but not positive, perception of their ethical environment. Job satisfaction was highest…

  19. The Agony of Education. Black Students at White Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, Joe R.; Vera, Hernan; Imani, Nikitah

    This book examines the barriers that African American students encounter in colleges that are predominantly white. Although many people, and much of the media, have presented a picture of U.S. universities as strongholds of multiculturalism that are devoted to racial equality. Interviews with 36 randomly selected black juniors and seniors at a…

  20. Leading across Boundaries: Collaborative Leadership and the Institutional Repository in Research Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Libraries often engage in services that require collaboration across stakeholder boundaries to be successful. Institutional repositories (IRs) are a good example of such a service. IRs are an infrastructure to preserve intellectual assets within a university or college, and to provide an open access showcase for that institution's research,…

  1. A Wish List for the Advancement of University and College Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, John B.

    2016-01-01

    University and college counseling centers continue to meet emerging challenges in higher education. This article addresses three issues: the need for a more unified organizational structure to represent the profession, the potential value for counseling centers in seeking accreditation, and the importance of specialized training for those entering…

  2. College and University Mergers: Recent Trends. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Given the current economic turbulence characterized, in part, by unprecedented business consolidations, talk of mergers has spread to higher education. At first glance, merger discussions may seem more appropriate to the corporate world than academe because American colleges and universities were not created in accordance with a centralized…

  3. Health-Related Fitness and Physical Activity Courses in U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Brad; Egeberg, James; Mozumdar, Arupendra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of health-related fitness (HRF) and physical activity (PA) courses at U.S. institutions of higher learning. Data were obtained from 116 two- and four-year colleges and universities. The results show that health-related fitness courses were offered at many 2-year (89.2%)…

  4. The Relationship between Fundraising Practice and Job Satisfaction at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Natalie T. J.; Waters, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Fundraising, as studied from a communications/public relations perspective, is an understudied function. This research examines fundraising at public and private historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), specifically exploring how these fundraisers incorporate various fundraising strategies into their communication outreach programs…

  5. Sexual Harassment Preventive/Protective Practices at U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Guziewicz, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey concerning thirteen recommended sexual harassment preventive/protective practices at U.S. colleges and universities. A majority of responding institutions had formal sexual harassment policies, offered counseling to student victims, and investigated all complaints. Relatively fewer schools provided student access to faculty…

  6. University and College Counselors as Athletic Team Consultants: Using a Structural Family Therapy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcover, Jason A.; Mettrick, Jennifer; Parcover, Cynthia A. D.; Griffin-Smith, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, university and college counselors are sought out by their institution's sports coaches for assistance in achieving team goals. Traditional sport psychology models that have the individual athlete as their primary focus are insufficient frameworks for team-level consultations. The authors believe that systemic approaches may provide…

  7. Career Services at Colleges and Universities: A 30-Year Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Bonita M.; Reardon, Robert C.; Bertoch, Sara C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines career planning programs and career services offices at colleges and universities in the United States as viewed by senior student affairs officers (SSAOs). Findings from a 1979 study of career services offices (CSOs) were compared to the current findings. Additionally, new areas of research were examined in order to provide…

  8. Caring for America's Colleges and Universities: Stewardship Lessons from the Getty Foundation Campus Heritage Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Robert Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Getty Foundation's Campus Heritage Initiative was to assist colleges and universities in the United States in managing and preserving the integrity of their significant historic buildings, sites, and landscapes. The projects supported through this initiative focused on research and survey of historic resources, preparation of…

  9. An Examination of Costs at Four-Year Public Colleges and Universities between 1989 and 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, John F. R.; Wade, John A.; Watkins, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, this paper examines the inflation-adjusted cost per student between 1989 and 1998 for a sample of four-year public colleges and universities. On average, per-student expenditures grew faster than inflation over the period; but expenditures on public service, academic support,…

  10. Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Promote Universally Designed College Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sally; McGuire, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Universal Design applied to college instruction has evolved and rapidly spread on an international scale. Diffusion of Innovation theory is described and used to identify patterns of change in this trend. Implications and strategies are discussed for promoting this inclusive approach to teaching in higher education.

  11. Transforming Community College Education at The City University of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Benno

    2013-01-01

    The City University of New York (CUNY) developed and implemented two evidence-based, educational initiatives at its community colleges. Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), on six campuses, helped 55 percent of students who enter with one or two developmental needs earn an associate degree within three years. This compares with 20…

  12. Current Fees Charging Practices and Perceptions in College and University Counseling Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    A questionnaire designed to assess the practice of charging special fees for counseling, testing, and outreach programs as well as the perceptions of counseling center directors on the fee issue was sent to 281 Directors of college and university counseling centers. Two hundred and twenty-five (80%) were returned. The results indicated that…

  13. True Merit: Ensuring Our Brightest Students Have Access to Our Best Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancola, Jennifer; Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The admissions process used today in America's most selective colleges and universities is a classic case of interest group politics gone awry. Nobody champions or fights for smart, low-income students. The result is an admissions process reduced to a series of "preferences." Taken together with other widely-used admissions practices,…

  14. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Bringing a Tradition of Engagement into the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    For historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), engagement is not an enhancement of their curriculum but part of their birthright. Founded in the Civil War/Reconstruction era, HBCUs had as their core mission educating freed slaves and other free black people to participate in the economy. Later, during the Jim Crow era, HBCUs educated…

  15. The Practice of Student Assessment: The Case of College of Natural Science, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soromessa, Teshome

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the practice of student assessment in the College of Natural Science of Addis Ababa University, specifically aimed at investigating whether or not science instructors are well aware of test blue-print, general principles of evaluation and rule of test construction as anticipated in the new education and training…

  16. The Application of Fourteenth Amendment Norms to Private Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Examines various theories that courts have used in applying Fourteenth Amendment criteria to nonpublic colleges and universities. Specifically examined are the agency theory for state actions; the public responsibility, government function,and stae involvement doctrines; the theory of permissive norms; and the concept of natural justice.…

  17. University Health Center Providers' Beliefs about Discussing and Recommending Sexual Health Prevention to Women College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Geshnizjani, Alireza; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual health concerns such as sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy remain substantial health problems faced by young adults, especially college women. University healthcare providers may be instrumental in increasing female patients' involvement in preventative sexual health behaviors, however little research has examined this…

  18. Why Are Women Underrepresented in Elite Colleges and Universities? A Non-Linear Decomposition Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielby, Rob; Posselt, Julie Renee; Jaquette, Ozan; Bastedo, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging female advantage in education has received considerable attention in the popular media and recent research. We examine a persistent exception to this trend: women's underrepresentation in America's most competitive colleges and universities. Using nationally generalizable data spanning four decades, we evaluate evidence for…

  19. Colleges and Universities with Degree or Certificate Bearing Programs in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudess, Jo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a list of colleges and universities with degree or certificate bearing programs in creativity. Since this focuses only on degree bearing programs, an individual might also focus on creativity by working with a specific faculty member in a more general program such as industrial-organizational psychology or…

  20. The Status of the Business Communication Course at U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Travis L.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the current status of the introductory business communication course at colleges and universities across the United States. Using data collected during the spring of 2008 from a national sample of 505 instructors, this study reveals a number of pedagogical and programmatic insights about (1) major course sponsors; (2) academic…

  1. The Foundation Handbook: A Private Foundation Approach to Fund Raising at State Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemish, Donald L.

    Guidelines for state colleges and universities who wish to use a foundation as an umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, are presented. In examining the need for a foundation, attention should be directed to: establishing credibility, marshalling volunteers, providing for a mechanism for accepting life…

  2. 20 CFR 404.1028 - Student working for a school, college, or university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student working for a school, college, or university. 404.1028 Section 404.1028 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE... or a political subdivision of a State for which work can only be covered by an agreement under...

  3. 76 FR 74703 - Cost of Living Adjustment for Performance of Musical Compositions by Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... announce a cost of living adjustment (``COLA'') of 3.5% in the royalty rates that colleges, universities... Judges shall publish a notice of the change in the cost of living as determined by the Consumer Price... rates set out in 37 CFR 381.5(c). The change in the cost of living as determined by the CPI-U during the...

  4. 78 FR 71501 - Cost of Living Adjustment for Performance of Musical Compositions by Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... announce a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 2% in the royalty rates that colleges, universities, and... change in the cost of living for the rate codified at Sec. 381.5(c)(3) relating to compositions in the... (1) ``the change in the cost of living as determined by the Consumer Price Index (all consumers, all...

  5. Lessons Learned: The Role of the Classics at Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Kenneth W.; O'Connor, Eugene M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the paradigm of Black insurgency and social uplift to the teaching of the Greek and Latin classics at Black colleges and universities during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It demonstrates how study of the classics helped construct the tools of Black agency by imparting three important lessons: the knowledge that…

  6. The Internal Audit Function: Playing an Expanded Role in College and University Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 90 colleges and universities found that 40 percent have internal audit departments. Information on auditor time allocation, salary ranges, departmental independence, and auditor roles and responsibilities was collected. A summary analysis by type of institution (large, small, research, nonresearch, public, independent, four-year,…

  7. College and University Codes of Conduct for Fund-Raising Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboni, Timothy C.

    2012-01-01

    Generation of voluntary support for colleges and universities has become an ever more important function that is key to the success of all postsecondary institutions. This is true even for public institutions, which have shifted from primarily focusing on alumni relations activities to executing billion dollar campaigns that equal those conducted…

  8. Characteristics of Jesuit Colleges and Universities in the United States: A Reciprocal Interdependence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, Jeffrey; Kendall, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    What common values do diverse Jesuit institutions share? In what ways are Jesuit colleges and universities working to maintain mission, identity, and traditions within the context of 21st-century higher education? To ground their response to these questions, the researchers first review the historical and ecclesial developments that have…

  9. Cultural Diversity in Introductory Psychology Textbook Selection: The Case for Historically Black Colleges/Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Clay, William A. L.; Broussard, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes a culturally relevant approach to introductory psychology textbook selection for students attending a historically Black college/university (HBCU). The following multistage procedure was used: (1) a survey of HBCU psychology departments was conducted to ascertain how they selected their introductory psychology…

  10. Factors That Influence Job Satisfaction of College and University Ombudsmen: A Phenomenological Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernard E.

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study sought to address the problem of low job satisfaction of college and university ombudsmen as evidenced by predictors of high attrition. Data show that within the next six years, a preponderance of ombudsman practitioners with one to five years of experience plan to depart from the profession. Using Kalleberg's Theory of…

  11. Assessing the Transition of Transfer Students from Community Colleges to a University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Malaney, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how pretransfer experiences and preparation, along with posttransfer experiences, influence the adjustment of community college transfer students to life on a four-year university campus. Results indicate that students who are best informed and who have most actively prepared for transfer are most likely to achieve higher grades and be…

  12. Adjustment Issues of International Students Enrolled in American Colleges and Universities: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Abrahao Andre

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of the literature concerning the adjustment issues experienced by international students enrolled in American colleges and universities. Convergent findings indicated that English fluency, social support, length of stay in the U.S., perceived discrimination or prejudice, establishing relationships with Americans, and…

  13. Presidential Succession: The Role of the President in Succession Planning at Baptist Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to examine the role of the president in succession planning at Baptist colleges and universities. Purposeful, criterion sampling yielded twelve presidents to participate in this study. They ranged in years of service from one to 13 years of experience as a president. Data collection…

  14. Military, University, and Police Agency Command and Staff Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses three models of command and staff colleges (CSC). Five university models, five United States Military models, and one police agency model are discussed. The 11 CSCs provide leadership development in various training and education programs all leading to the increased capabilities of leaders and potential leaders for public…

  15. Early Participation in the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacey Swearingen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze those US campuses that became signatories of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) during the charter membership period of December 2006 through September 15, 2007. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on literature in organizational change,…

  16. Faith-Learning Interaction in Graphic Design Courses in Protestant Evangelical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Integration or connectedness between faith and learning is a core aim of Protestant evangelical colleges and universities. It is pursued in a number of different ways in the academic programs of these institutions, even in commercially oriented courses that they offer, such as graphic design. However, the different ways that practical and…

  17. Disclosure of Sexual Assault Experiences among Undergraduate Women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Christine H.; Crosby, Carmen M.; Barrick, Kelle; Krebs, Christopher P.; Settles-Reaves, Beverlyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To document the sexual assault disclosure experiences of historically black college or university (HBCU) students. Participants: A total of 3,951 female, undergraduate students at 4 HBCUs. Methods: All women at the participating schools were recruited in November 2008 to participate in a Web-based survey including both closed- and…

  18. The Sexual Assault of Undergraduate Women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Christopher P.; Barrick, Kelle; Lindquist, Christine H.; Crosby, Carmen M.; Boyd, Chimi; Bogan, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Although research has shown that undergraduate women are at high risk for experiencing sexual assault, little research has been conducted with undergraduate women who are attending a historically Black college or university (HBCU). The purpose of this research is to document the prevalence of different types of sexual assault among undergraduate…

  19. Can We Talk? Employing Conversation to Ameliorate Undergraduate Distress at Catholic Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Susannah J. P.

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses students' need for robust relationships to counteract the epidemic of loneliness, anxiety, and depression pervading contemporary undergraduate life, and proposes that Catholic colleges and universities can find in Catholic theological anthropology a warrant for recognizing relationship-building as central to their mission.…

  20. Multidisciplinary Cooperation in GIS Education: A Case Study of US Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Mizuki; Thapa, Rajesh Bahadur; Oguchi, Takashi; Tsou, Ming-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of multidisplinary cooperation for Geographic Information Science (GIS) education programs that award GIS-related degrees or certificates at US colleges and universities. We classified departments and courses into ten major disciplines using Dewey Decimal Classification. In the 2007-2008 academic year, approximately…

  1. Models of Academic Governance and Institutional Power in Southern Baptist Related Liberal Arts Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Michael Shane

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive-quantitative study was to examine which models of academic governance are utilized by Southern Baptist related liberal arts colleges and universities. Special attention was given to the distribution of institutional power among seventeen campus leadership groups or power holders. Using J. Victor Baldridge's models…

  2. Extending the Progressive Tradition to Poor Countries: The Role of Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathuo, Shiko

    2016-01-01

    American universities and colleges have always been a bastion of liberalism and progressive thought. Historically, the academic community has supported social justice issues, given a voice to the poor, minorities and the disadvantaged, and brought to light subjects that are considered taboo elsewhere. Indeed, many social movements have either…

  3. Prevention of Bullying in Schools, Colleges, and Universities: Research Report and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educational Research Association (AERA), 2013

    2013-01-01

    The epicenter for bullying is schools, colleges, and universities, where vast numbers of children, youth, and young adults spend much of their time. Bullying--a form of harassment and violence--needs to be understood from a developmental, social, and educational perspective. The educational settings in which it occurs, and where prevention and…

  4. Acts of Racism and Intolerance at Connecticut Colleges and Universities 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Higher Education, Hartford.

    This report contains a summary of information submitted by public and independent colleges and universities in Connecticut concerning incidents of racism and intolerance that occurred on campuses during 1993. It reviews the number, type, and disposition of incidents that occurred and describes programs and activities undertaken to promote…

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  6. The Role of Women's Colleges and Universities in Providing Access to Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Kristen A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on a qualitative, comparative, multiple case study of the contributions and status of 21st century women's colleges and universities, this article analyzes the topic of women's access to postsecondary education in ten nations. Despite decreasing numbers of women-only institutions in some regions (e.g., North America), the sector is growing…

  7. Sleep Quality and Academic Performance in University Students: A Wake-Up Call for College Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Steven P.; Weaver, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Both sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality are prominent in American society, especially in college student populations. Sleep problems are often a primary disorder rather than secondary to depression. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sleep deprivation and/or poor sleep quality in a sample of nondepressed university students…

  8. Modelling and Managing Student Loyalty: A Study of a Norwegian University College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesset, Erik; Helgesen, Oyvind

    2009-01-01

    Higher education institutions are becoming increasingly businesslike, a shift that is transforming student loyalty into an important strategic theme for universities and colleges. This paper reports a "cross-over" study that uses well-known theories from service marketing in a new context, that of educational services addressing customer…

  9. Free Speech Tensions: Responding to Bias on College and University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan A.; Guida, Tonia; Smith, Stella; Ferguson, S. Kiersten; Medina, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Despite the increasing development of bias response teams on college and university campuses, little scholarship has examined these teams and, in particular, team leaders' approaches to understanding the role of free speech in responding to bias. Through semi-structured interviews, administrators who served on bias response teams at 19…

  10. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are…

  11. Sex Discrimination in the Tenure System at American Colleges and Universities: The Judicial Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    Traces the development of the law in the area of court litigation involving charges of sex discrimination in tenure decisions at colleges and universities. Points out the weaknesses and deficiencies of court responses to discrimination claims by women professors. Suggests guidelines to resolve these disputes and proposes solutions for eradicating…

  12. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders among Students in Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacob J.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores current research, diagnosis, and common problems of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among Christian college and university students. For years, ADHD was believed to dissipate as children mature, but current research contradicts that belief. Proctor (2009) and others detail the continuance of ADHD into…

  13. Academic Freedom in Canadian Higher Education: Universities, Colleges, and Institutes Were Not Created Equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Barry E.; Trotter, Lane D.

    2013-01-01

    There has been substantial discussion, research, and debate about the role of academic freedom within higher education, primarily centered on the university model. Not as well documented or understood is the issue of academic freedom within colleges and institutes in Canada. In this paper, we examine the current state of academic freedom in…

  14. Student Government; Organization and Function in Married-Student Housing Areas of Selected Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Norman F.

    This study, conducted in 12 institutions in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and Arizona, investigated the form and function of student government in college and university family housing areas; examined pertinent literature, legislative action, and litigation; sought problems common to students in family housing that could be…

  15. Six years of inclusive education at the University of Rwanda-College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2013-04-01

    Apr 1, 2013 ... Inclusive education is one of the emerging challenges in the Rwandan education today, just like in many other educational systems. The College of Education of the University of Rwanda developed and implemented the inclusive education program since 2008. Thirty students with severe disabilities ...

  16. How Prepared Are America's Colleges and Universities for Major Crises? Assessing the State of Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroff, Ian I.; Diamond, Michael A.; Alpaslan, Murat C.

    2006-01-01

    This article outlines a set of recommendations to college and university leaders and governing bodies on how to develop crisis-management systems to ensure that their institutions are as well prepared as possible for a wide range of crises. These recommendations are based, in part, on crisis-management programs developed for various business…

  17. Equine Education Programs and Related Studies as Found in Colleges and Universities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Carol L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and scope of equine education programs being offered in the colleges and universities throughout the country and the attitudes of specialists toward these programs. The paper is organized into five major categories: (1) introduction, statement of purpose, design and scope of the study, and…

  18. The Leadership Orientations of Public College and University Chief Financial Officers: A Frame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Charles Russell

    2013-01-01

    The role of the chief financial officer (CFO) is critical to the effective leadership of U.S. four-year public colleges and universities. Self-awareness and the capacity to view situations simultaneously in multiple ways and from different perspectives are essential elements of CFO effectiveness and success in the higher education environment. The…

  19. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  20. Do Colleges and Universities Increase Their Region's Human Capital? Staff Report No. 401

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Jaison R.; Deitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We investigate whether the degree production and research and development (R&D) activities of colleges and universities are related to the amount and types of human capital present in the metropolitan areas where the institutions are located. We find that degree production has only a small positive relationship with local stocks of human capital,…

  1. College/University Presidents and Crisis Communications: Interpretive Content Analysis of Newspaper Coverage in the Northeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiManno, Dorria L.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education institutions are under increased scrutiny from various constituencies. Frequently, external perceptions of a college or university are based on the image and actions of its president, known to those outside the institution primarily through coverage in the mass media. Support for an institution may depend heavily on these…

  2. 75 FR 56459 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... America A Proclamation Early in our Nation's history, higher education was not possible for most African... (HBCUs) have been valued resources for our country since their inception before the Civil War... National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, we honor these pillars of higher education in...

  3. The Language Needs Analysis Project at the College of Petroleum and Engineering, Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturkmen, Helen; Al-Huneidi, Amal

    A study of the English language needs and attitudes of students and faculty in Kuwait University's College of Petroleum and Engineering is reported. The objective was to create a basis for assessing the relevance of the institution's current English second language program. Data were gathered through: (1) interviews with faculty, teaching…

  4. Doing Business in the New Technology: Problems for College and University Counsel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Daniel W.; Gray, Todd D.

    1984-01-01

    Regulatory changes regarding public broadcasting and telecommunications facilities on college and university campuses allowing remunerative use of the facilities, and potential obstacles to remunerative use posed by state statutes, are discussed from legal and tax perspectives. The potential for double taxation is examined. (MSE)

  5. Showing Your Pride: A National Survey of Queer Student Centres in Canadian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, John; Rae, Jennifer; Bassi, Amandeep

    2015-01-01

    The presence of queer student centres (QSCs) across Canadian universities and colleges is largely unknown. It is an important area of investigation since queer-identified students have previously identified several benefits of these services, including receiving support from other queer individuals. The focus of the current study was to determine…

  6. Abortion in university and college female students of Arba Minch town, Ethiopia, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animaw, Worku; Bogale, Binyam

    2014-03-01

    Globally, unsafe abortion is a significant cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. One of the commonest problems facing university and college students is unwanted pregnancy followed by abortion. This study has aimed to assess abortion practice of university and college female students and to identify contributing factors. Cross-sectional study design was used in 2011. Female students from one university and three colleges of Arba Minch town were selected by proportional probability sampling method. Quantitative data were collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire and focus group discussions were also conducted. Eight hundred and thirteen study participants with median age 20 have been involved in the study. Among participants 173 (21.3%) had had sex, 54 (6.6%) had been pregnant, and out of the students who had been pregnant 23 (43.4%) had an induced abortion, 4 (17.3%) of which were done under unsafe conditions. Students' current living residence and knowledge of abortion law are the identified contributing factors to their abortion practices. A significant proportion of pregnancies in university and college students were terminated with induced abortion. Unsafe sex is the commonest cause of unplanned pregnancy that leads to abortion induction. Campus residents are more vulnerable to abortion induction. Knowledge of abortion law and abortion induction practices are statistically interrelated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Statistics of Universities, Colleges, and Professional Schools, 1917-18. Bulletin, 1920, No. 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    This report presents the statistics of 672 universities, colleges, and professional schools for the school year 1917-18. Of this number, 118 institutions were independent professional schools, including 78 schools of theology, 12 schools of law, 9 schools of medicine, 4 schools of veterinary medicine, 8 schools of dentistry, and 7 schools of…

  8. Leading the Campaign: Advancing Colleges and Universities. The ACE Series on Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to lead a campaign is essential to success for today's college or university president. And campaign experience at some level is generally now a prerequisite credential for presidential candidates, as well as deans and other academic leaders, on both public and private campuses. This book discusses fundamental campaign principles, but…

  9. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Honoring the Past, Engaging the Present, Touching the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter R.; Jewell, Joseph O.; Griffin, Kimberly A.; Wolf, De'Sha S.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the history, present, and future of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). We begin with a brief review of the existing literature on HBCUs, considering common themes and how these institutions changed over time within a broader socio-historical landscape. In addition to historical information, we use a…

  10. Through the Lens of Maslow's Hierarchy: Understanding Endowment Accumulation at Private Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flabiano, Heather Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities have been questioned regarding their use of endowments, with critics maintaining that these assets have significance beyond the financial benefits they provide and suggesting that institutions hoard endowment to attain unnecessary intangibles such as prestige. A few scholars have attempted to study the purposes of…

  11. Perception of the Effect of Leadership Styles on Organizational Commitment at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if a relationship exists between the perceived leadership style of supervisors and the organizational commitment level of the subordinate employees within Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Additionally, the study examined whether a difference exists in the organizational commitment levels of TCU…

  12. Exploring Perspectives of Transitional Leadership Styles at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Melvin L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) continue to strive for academic relevance in spite of the national problem of the misalignment of mission and values among their institutional leadership. The national problem was important to both the HBCU institutions and the entire academic community to establish global relevancy. The…

  13. African American Doctoral Students at For-Profit Colleges and Universities: A Critical Race Theory Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Many people regard the doctorate as the pinnacle of success. Despite the challenges of completing the terminal degree, the dream of earning the doctoral degree remains a goal for many every year. Understanding the phenomenon of African American student enrollment at for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs) is necessary because many African…

  14. Six years of inclusive education at the University of Rwanda-College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inclusive education is one of the emerging challenges in the Rwandan education today, just like in many other educational systems. The College of Education of the University of Rwanda developed and implemented the inclusive education program since 2008. Thirty students with severe disabilities (SwDs) have enrolled, ...

  15. Analyzing Four-Year Public University and Two-Year College Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the graduation rates between 2000 and 2015 of United States colleges and universities at the national, state, and institutional levels. This research focuses on two-year and four-year programs. Rates are investigated longitudinally along with variables that distinguish between public/private institutions, percentages of…

  16. 76 FR 58713 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... today. During National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, we pay homage to the daring..., and their place in the American narrative. They have produced many of our Nation's leaders in business, government, academia, and the military. Today, we recognize them as the crucibles of learning, where a young...

  17. Exploring Student and Advisor Experiences in a College-University Pathway Program: A Study of the Bachelor of Commerce Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is great interest across Ontario in the expansion of pathway programs between colleges and universities. Through strategic partnerships, two Ontario-based postsecondary institutions (a college and a university) have developed innovative and effective pathway programs that facilitate the transition of students between institutions…

  18. Surviving and Thriving: The Adaptive Responses of U.S. Four-Year Colleges and Universities during the Great Recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brint, Steven; Yoshikawa, Sarah R. K.; Rotondi, Matthew B.; Viggiano, Tiffany; Maldonado, John

    2016-01-01

    Press reports and industry statistics both give incomplete pictures of the outcomes of the Great Recession for U.S. four-year colleges and universities. To address these gaps, we conducted a statistical analysis of all articles that appeared in Lexis-Nexis on a sample of more than 300 U.S. colleges and universities during the Recession years. We…

  19. The Preparation of Master's-Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian M.; Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated college and university counseling center directors' perceptions of the adequacy of the preparation of master's-level counselors for work in college and university counseling centers. Results indicated that counselors were rated on average as prepared; however, many directors had concerns about counselors'…

  20. Tuition-Setting Authority and Deregulation at State Colleges and Universities. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    State support for public colleges and universities is based on a historic relationship; these institutions were established to perform the public service mission of predominantly educating residents from local and state-wide communities at a lower price than private, independent colleges and universities. In return, the states appropriated funds…

  1. Strategic Planning in the Business Enterprise of Christian Colleges and Universities: A Multi-Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Wayne Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Many tuition-driven private colleges and universities struggled for economic survival in the first decade of this millennium. The current study views higher education from a two-good framework that posits that every college and university provides teaching and service for the societal good while generating revenue from traditional business-like…

  2. Obesity Status and Body Satisfaction: Are There Differences between African American College Females at Black and White Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delores C. S.; Bonds, Jennifer R.

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this project were to 1) assess obesity status and body satisfaction among African American college students, and 2) to compare differences in these variables between students at a predominantly white university (PWU) and a historically black college and university (HBCU). Four hundred and two undergraduate females completed a…

  3. The Research of the Crisis Pre-Warning Management System under the Particularity of Nationalities Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The nationalities universities and colleges set up the crisis pre-warning management system, not only related to the management of our nationalities universities and colleges and their growth, but also related to the country's national unity plan in some way. However, because of minority students in the particularity of the national cultural…

  4. 77 FR 42510 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY; Correction AGENCY: National... of human remains under the control of the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The... Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma...

  5. Cultivation of personality awareness - The starting point of thinking and politics in colleges and universities in the current network information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie

    2018-03-01

    With the continuous development of network technology, the development of network information age has promoted the orderly development of ideological and political education in colleges and universities. It can effectively improve students' political accomplishments and continuously broaden the ways of thinking and education in colleges and universities. Ideological and political work to provide more information platform and education. This article will elaborate on the cultivation of personality consciousness in college ideological and political work under the network age and put forward corresponding measures.

  6. Stress, Anxiety, and Weight Gain among University and College Students: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Suzan A; de Vries, N K; Karavetian, Mirey; El-Rassi, Rola

    2018-02-01

    Stress and anxiety levels are elevated among university and college students. Although high stress levels can lead to an increase in adiposity, it is not clear whether stress and anxiety experienced when in university or college have an influence on students' weight. The aim of this systemic review was to investigate whether stress and anxiety levels encountered during university and college enrollment were associated with higher adiposity or weight changes among students. A search strategy was used to identify peer-reviewed studies published between 1985 and March 2017 using the following databases: Medline using Ovid; PubMed, CINAHL using EBSCO, Embase using Ovid, PSYCHINFO, and Open Access Theses and Dissertation. Two reviewers independently assessed the title, abstract, and then the full article of the studies that met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and quality assessment was conducted for the included studies. Twenty-five observational studies were identified in this review (23 cross-sectional and two longitudinal); 11 found that there was no association between stress and body mass index or weight change. In addition, five studies did not find a significant association between anxiety and body mass index. A few studies revealed stress and anxiety might be associated with higher or lower weight status, thus there is a possibility that stress can increase or decrease weight, demonstrating that a bidirectional influence on body mass index may exist. The current data in this review are inadequate to draw firm conclusions about the role of stress on weight change in university and college students. The inconsistency of results in the literature reviewed for this article suggest that a focus on longitudinal studies with adequate sample size would better evaluate the relationship between stress or anxiety and its influence on weight status or weight change among college and university students. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

  7. College Readiness: The Evaluation of Students Participating in the Historically Black College and University Program in Pre-Calculus and the Calculus Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Angela Renee

    2011-01-01

    This investigative research focuses on the level of readiness of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students entering Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the college Calculus sequence. Calculus is a fundamental course for STEM courses. The level of readiness of the students for Calculus can very well play a…

  8. Extending the Progressive Tradition to Poor Countries: The Role of Universities and Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiko Gathuo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available American universities and colleges have always been a bastion of liberalism and progressive thought. Historically, the academic community has supported social justice issues, given a voice to the poor, minorities and the disadvantaged, and brought to light subjects that are considered taboo elsewhere. Indeed, many social movements have either started in American universities or been energized by the actions of university students and faculty, and often with the support of university administrations. Yet, when it comes to dealing with global issues that affect poor nations, universities have not always acted as change agents. In some cases, universities have to been passive onlookers or been complacent in participating in maintaining the status quo. This essay discusses the external environmental challenges and the internal constraints that universities and colleges must grapple with in their efforts to play in the global sphere. Further, it espouses ways in which universities might contribute to the global common good through their actions externally, particularly with regard to public policy, and internally within their campuses. A particular emphasis is given to Africa.

  9. University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities: Blended Learning Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU [American Association of State Colleges and…

  10. Anemia among female college students attending the University of Sharjah, UAE: prevalence and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Ahmed Hasan

    2007-01-01

    Anemia remains a public health challenge worldwide. Very few studies have been conducted on anemia in the United Arab Emirates and they have focused on children and pregnant women. Little is known about anemia among college female students from a preliminary study of iron deficiency anemia that was conducted on medical college students. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of anemia among female college students attending the University of Sharjah (UoS) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A secondary analysis of the records of 258 complete blood cell count results from consented female college students. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were used to determine the prevalence of and classify anemia according to RBC indices and disease severity. Emirati students represented 50.8% of the studied population. The overall prevalence of anemia (Hb anemia, whereas 7.2% were moderately anemic and 2.3% Emirati students were severely anemic (hemoglobin anemia cases were microcytic (MCV 96fL). The results showed that anemia constitutes a health problem among female college students in the UAE, and most of the detected anemia was microcytic with mild severity. This warrants further study on a larger sample of healthy college students to validate these findings and eventually encourage the development of directed educational and nutritional programs to safeguard the health of these future mothers.

  11. Kyoto University-National Taiwan University International Symposium "Social Cognitive Biology on Representation of Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Sponsored by Kyoto University, National Taiwan University; Cosponsored by Unit for Advanced Studies of the Human Mind, Kyoto University, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Supported by Supporting Program for InteRaction-based Initiative Team Studies (SPIRITS), Kyoto University

  12. Curriculum alignment and higher order thinking in introductory biology in Arkansas public two-year colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Elizabeth Diane

    This dissertation identified the cognitive levels of lecture objectives, lab objectives, and test questions in introductory majors' biology. The study group included courses offered by 27 faculty members at 18 of the 22 community colleges in Arkansas. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to identify cognitive levels, the median lecture learning outcomes were at level 2 (Comprehension) and test assessments at Level 1 (Knowledge). Lab learning outcomes were determined to have a median of level 3 (Analysis). A correlation analysis was performed using SPSS software to determine if there was an association between the Bloom's level of lecture objectives and test assessments. The only significant difference found was at the Analysis level, or Bloom's level 4 (p=.043). Correlation analyses were run for two other data sets. Years of college teaching experience and hours of training in writing objectives and assessments were compared to the Bloom's Taxonomy level of lecture objectives and test items. No significant difference was found for either of these independent variables. This dissertation provides Arkansas two-year college biology faculty with baseline information about the levels of cognitive skills that are required in freshman biology for majors courses. It can serve to initiate conversations about where we are compared to a national study, where we need to be, and how we get there.

  13. Universal Design for Instruction: Extending the Universal Design Paradigm to College Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Joan M.; Scott, Sally S.

    2006-01-01

    Universal design for instruction (UDI) represents the systematic application of universal design, the construct from architecture and product development, to instructional practices in higher education. In addition to a description of the deliberative process by which UDI was developed, this article provides confirmatory evidence of the validity…

  14. What is the Difference Between Motivation to Learn Mathematics in University and in College?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gudelytė

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—This paper examines whether there is significant difference between Mykolas Romeris University and College of Applied Social Sciences students, their knowledge of Mathematics acquired at school, and the choice to take the final Mathematics examination or not; and their further studying results and motivation.Design/methodology/approach—Test results are analysed by statistical hypothesis testing methods.Findings—The motivation of University students, who have taken the Mathematics examination, to study and achieve better results, is stronger.Research limitations/implications—the represented method is one of the ways to inquiry of such problems.Practical implications—This study will help to identify the University and College students’ weaknesses and to show ways to improve the quality of studies.Originality/Value—The study should allow to measure the average time it takesUniversity and College students of social sciences to understand a mathematical text.Keywords: teaching mathematics, checking knowledge tests, quality of studies, statistical methods.Research type: research paper.

  15. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  16. ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 15 March). ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners. Presentation given at the plenary meeting of Learning &

  17. Energy Performance of Three Residential College Buildings in University of Malaya Campus, Kuala Lumpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Ainurzaman Jamaludin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three residential colleges located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were selected for energy performance analysis in regards to its implementation of bioclimatic design strategies. Specifically, passive design strategies on daylighting and natural ventilation were examined. In Malaysia, the residential college or hostel is a multi-residential building providing accommodation to university students. The three residential colleges in this study, namely C1, C2 and C3, were built in different years with different designs and forms, particularly with regards to enclosure and facade design, solar control devices, passive daylight concepts, and natural ventilation strategies. The building designs were carefully studied and an electric consumption analysis was carried out in each residential college. This study revealed that the wide-scale implementation of bioclimatic design strategies in college C2 help reduced the annual energy consumption. The building bioclimatic design features that are accountable to reduce energy consumption are the internal courtyard and balconies on each unit of floor area, as shown in C3.Results from this study highly recommend internal courtyard and balcony building combination for multi residential building design, especially in tropical urban regions.

  18. Institutional profile of pharmacogenetics within University of Michigan College of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Daniel L; Luzum, Jasmine A; Pasternak, Amy L; Ward, Kristen M; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Rae, James M; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2017-07-26

    The University of Michigan College of Pharmacy has made substantial investment in the area of pharmacogenomics to further bolster its activity in pharmacogenomics research, implementation and education. Four tenure-track faculty members have active research programs that focus primarily on the discovery of functional polymorphisms (HJ Zhu), and genetic associations with treatment outcomes in patients with cancer (DL Hertz), cardiovascular disease (JA Luzum) and psychiatric conditions (VL Ellingrod). Recent investments from the University and the College have accelerated the implementation of pharmacogenetics broadly across the institution and in targeted therapeutic areas. Students within the PharmD and other health science professions receive substantial instruction in pharmacogenomics, in preparation for careers in biomedical health in which they can contribute to the generation, dissemination and utilization of pharmacogenomics knowledge to improve patient care.

  19. The ICT-Integrated Pedagogy in the Colleges of Royal University of Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Par-Ola Zander; Penjor, Tandin; Dukpa, Dorji

    2014-01-01

    under Royal University of Bhutan. The study identifies the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLE), used as part of ICT-integrated pedagogy. However, the use of VLE has been found to be confined to be a platform where activities such as work plan, module descriptors, uploading assignments have been......This paper reports a research study on the integration of ICT and pedagogy in the colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan. It investigates whether ICT is integrated into the pedagogy, and if so, in what way. The samples (Faculty members) of the study were picked up randomly from ten colleges...... done. The interactive teaching-learning via VLE is considerably low, where only a few of the lecturers are found to be using VLE for discussion, class tests and quizzes besides the activities mentioned. The concepts and application of learning design or instructional design are confined to a few...

  20. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Summary of activities, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1985 to 1986 activities of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Radioactive Waste Management Research Program sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The first set of three awards was made in September,1984. In September, 1985, two of these projects were renewed and a new proposal was funded. The program has been enthusiastically received by the community of HBCUs and the program sponsor

  1. Divergent Streams: Race-Gender Achievement Gaps at Selective Colleges and Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Douglas S.; Probasco, LiErin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we extend previous research on racial performance gaps at 28 selective US colleges and universities by examining differences in grade achievement and graduate rates across race-gender categories. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshmen, we show that black males, black females, and Hispanic males attain significantly lower grades than other race-gender groups, and that black males are 35% less likely to graduate on-time than other race-gender groups. Analyse...

  2. Conceptions of Memorizing and Understanding in Learning, and Self-Efficacy Held by University Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chiang; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore Taiwanese university students' conceptions of learning biology as memorizing or as understanding, and their self-efficacy. To this end, two questionnaires were utilized to survey 293 Taiwanese university students with biology-related majors. A questionnaire for measuring students' conceptions of memorizing and…

  3. College and University Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century (ESSE 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. R.; Ruzek, M.; Schweizer, D.

    2002-12-01

    The NASA/USRA Cooperative University-based Program in Earth System Science Education (ESSE), initiated over a decade ago through NASA support, has led in the creation of a nationwide collaborative effort to bring Earth system science into the undergraduate classroom. Forty-five ESSE institutions now offer over 120 Earth system courses each year, reaching thousands of students annually with interdisciplinary content. Through the course offerings by faculty from different disciplines and the organizational infrastructure of colleges and universities emphasizing cross disciplinary curricula, programs, degrees and departments, the ESSE Program has led in systemic change in the offering of a holistic view of Earth system science in the classroom. Building on this successful experience and collaborative infrastructure within and among colleges, universities and NASA partners, an expanded program called ESSE 21 is being supported by NASA to extend the legacy established during the last decade. Through its expanded focus including partnerships with under represented colleges and universities, the Program seeks to further develop broadly based educational resources, including shared courses, electronic learning materials and degree programs that will extend Earth system science concepts in both undergraduate and graduate classrooms and laboratories. These resources emphasizing fundamentals of Earth system science advance the nation's broader agenda for improving science, technology, engineering and mathematics competency. Overall the thrust within the classrooms of colleges and universities is critical to extending and solidifying courses of study in Earth system and global change science. ESSE 21 solicits proposals from undergraduate institutions to create or adopt undergraduate and graduate level Earth system science content in courses, curricula and degree programs. The goal for all is to effect systemic change through developing Earth system science learning materials

  4. Factors related to the retention of biology knowledge in non-science college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William Thomas

    The primary purpose of this study was the identification of factors that contribute to the long-term retention of biology knowledge. Long-term retention is defined here as knowledge retained one, two, or three years following the completion of a two-semester college biology course. The factors examined for their influence on retention were primarily learner-centered in that they compared the qualities of the students rather than the nature of the instruction used. The variables examined for their relationship to long-term retention were: the student's learning approach (meaningful or rote), the student's perception of the relevance of the course content to his or her life, the student's interest in biology, the student's biology course grade, and the time between the completion of instruction and the retention measure. This study also examined how the impact of these variables on retention was related to the factual or conceptual nature of the biology content learned. The results of the regression analysis have revealed several interesting interactions among the variables examined. A student's tendency to utilize either a rote or more meaningful approach to learning interacts with his or her perception of course relevance in predicting biology knowledge retention. When the retention of higher-level biology concepts was examined, an interaction was observed between students' approaches to learning and the time between the course and the retention measure. Students with higher performance in the biology course demonstrated greater retention after one or two years but showed the greatest relative loss of retention following a three-year interval. Students' interest in biology, as measured by the frequency of biology related behaviors, showed a small positive correlation to long-term retention.

  5. Safety climate in university and college laboratories: impact of organizational and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih; Liu, Chi-Wei; Lu, Mu-Chen

    2007-01-01

    Universities and colleges serve to be institutions of education excellence; however, problems in the areas of occupational safety may undermine such goals. Occupational safety must be the concern of every employee in the organization, regardless of job position. Safety climate surveys have been suggested as important tools for measuring the effectiveness and improvement direction of safety programs. Thus, this study aims to investigate the influence of organizational and individual factors on safety climate in university and college laboratories. Employees at 100 universities and colleges in Taiwan were mailed a self-administered questionnaire survey; the response rate was 78%. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that organizational category of ownership, the presence of a safety manager and safety committee, gender, age, title, accident experience, and safety training significantly affected the climate. Among them, accident experience and safety training affected the climate with practical significance. The authors recommend that managers should address important factors affecting safety issues and then create a positive climate by enforcing continuous improvements.

  6. College and University Governance: The University of Virginia Governing Board's Attempt to Remove the President

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The report documents a major breakdown in governance at UVA, focusing on the role of the board of visitors and its rector, Helen Dragas, who initiated the effort to force the president's resignation. It finds that the events at the university resulted from "a failure by those charged with institutional oversight to understand the institution…

  7. Evolution and Personal Religious Belief: Christian University Biology-Related Majors' Search for Reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark W.; Staver, John R.; Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore Christian biology-related majors' perceptions of conflicts between evolution and their religious beliefs. This naturalistic study utilized a case study design of 15 undergraduate biology-related majors at or recent biology-related graduates from a mid-western Christian university. The broad sources of data…

  8. Experience of developing and implementing a motivation induction course for konyang university medical college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Beag Ju; Lee, Keumho; Kim, Kunil; Song, Daun; Hur, Yera

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a new course for Konyang University College of Medicine freshmen to motivate them with regard to their vision and medical professionalism and experience various learning methods of medical education. The course was developed by 4 faculty members through several intensive meetings throughout the winter of 2010. A 4-credit course was designed for 61 freshmen of Konyang University College of Medicine to provide structured guidance and an introduction to their medical education and increase their motivation with regard to their studies and school life. The course lasted for 4 weeks (February 28 to March 25), and every session of the program was evaluated by the students. The 'motivation induction course' consisted of the following sessions: university-wide: 'leadership camp' and 'special lectures for future vision;' college-wide: 'major immersion session,' 'Enneagram workshop,' 'STRONG workshop,' 'medical professionalism,' and 'team-based learning.' The group results were presented in a poster and by oral presentation and were awarded prizes for the best performance. Special features included: group discussion session on medical ethics, which used scenarios that were developed by a medical humanity course committee and visiting all departments and mentors of the medical college to fulfill their curiosity of their future major or workplace. Overall, the course was evaluated as satisfactory (M=4.22, SD=0.81). Although there was some dissatisfaction, the overall experience of the "motivation induction course" was a success. The course will continue to be valuable for freshmen in adapting to medical school and its culture and in defining one's view of a good doctor.

  9. The pattern of time management in college students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in the year 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ravari; Fatemeh Alhani; Monireh Anoosheh; Tayebeh Mirzaie-Khalilabadi

    2008-01-01

    Background: One potential coping strategy frequently offered by university counseling services is time management for studying. Besides stress relief, time management skills will positively influence key outcomes such as academic performance, problem-solving ability, and health. Thus, it is necessary to investigate how college students manage their timing for studying. The aim of the present study was to assess the pattern of college students' time management in Kerman University of Medical S...

  10. The Physiology undergraduate major in the University of Arizona College of Medicine: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J; Atwater, Anne E; Delamere, Nicholas A; Dantzler, William H

    2011-06-01

    The American Physiological Society (APS) and APS Council encourage the teaching of physiology at the undergraduate, graduate, and medical school levels to support the continued prominence of this area of science. One area identified by the APS Council that is of particular importance for the development of future physiologists (the "physiology pipeline") is the teaching of physiology and physiology-related topics at the undergraduate level. In this article, we describe the historical development and implementation of an undergraduate program offered through the Department of Physiology, a basic science department in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, culminating in a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences degree with a major in Physiology. Moreover, we discuss the current Physiology curriculum offered at our institution and explain how this program prepares our students for successful entry into a variety of postbaccalaureate professional programs, including medical school and numerous other programs in health professions, and in graduate study in the Masters and Doctoral programs in biomedical sciences. Finally, we cover the considerable challenges that we have faced, and continue to face, in developing and sustaining a successful physiology undergraduate major in a college of medicine. We hope that the information provided on the Physiology major offered by the Department of Physiology in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona will be helpful for individuals at other institutions who may be contemplating the development and implementation of an undergraduate program in Physiology.

  11. Curriculum Review and Revision at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Molgaard, Laura K; Malone, Erin

    Curriculum review is an essential part of ongoing curriculum development, and is a mandate of the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE), the accrediting body of all North American schools and colleges of veterinary medicine. This article describes the steps in curriculum review undertaken by the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (UMN CVM) in response to this mandate from the COE and to a recommendation from a recent collegiate review that was part of a larger university-level strategic planning effort. The challenges of reviewing and revising the curriculum within a short time frame were met by appointing a dedicated curriculum review board and by engaging students and faculty groups, both as focus groups and as specific faculty work sections within disciplines. Faculty voting on the process was very valuable as it permitted the curriculum review board and faculty groups to move ahead knowing there was a process in place for reassessment if most faculty did not agree with recommendations. Consistent support from the dean of the college and other administrators was vital in helping maintain momentum for curriculum review.

  12. Is metabolic rate a universal 'pacemaker' for biological processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of

  13. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Universities Space Research Association and Sinte Gleska University (SGU) have teamed with eight Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) to participate in a NASA Earth Science funded project, TRibal Earth Science and Technology Education (TRESTE) project which focuses on TCU faculty teaching undergraduate Earth science courses to non-science and science students, with particular attention to TCU faculty teaching K-12 pre- and in- service teachers. The eight partner TCUs are: Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Browning, MT, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND, Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago, NE, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge, SD, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, ND, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), Bismarck, ND. The goal of this 3-year project is to promote the use of NASA Earth science data and products in the classroom thereby enabling faculty to inspire undergraduate students to careers in Earth system science, the physical sciences, and related fields of science and engineering. To accomplish this goal we are targeting three areas: (1) course content - enhance the utilization of Earth system science and physical science concepts, (2) teaching methodology - develop problem-based learning (PBL) methods, and (3) tools and technology - increase the utilization of GIS and remote sensing in the classroom. We also have enlisted ESRI, NativeView and the USGS as collaborators. To date we have held an introductory "needs" workshop at the USGS EROS Data Center and two annual workshops, one at UTTC and the second at BCC. During these annual workshops we have divided our time among the three areas. We have modeled the workshops using the PBL or Case Study approach by starting with a story or current event. Topics for the annual workshops have been Drought and Forest and Grassland Fires. These topics led us into the solar radiation budget

  14. Evaluation of the quality of the college library websites in Iranian medical Universities based on the Stover model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasajpour, Mohammad Reza; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Today, the websites of college and university libraries play an important role in providing the necessary services for clients. These websites not only allow the users to access different collections of library resources, but also provide them with the necessary guidance in order to use the information. The goal of this study is the quality evaluation of the college library websites in Iranian Medical Universities based on the Stover model. This study uses an analytical survey method and is an applied study. The data gathering tool is the standard checklist provided by Stover, which was modified by the researchers for this study. The statistical population is the college library websites of the Iranian Medical Universities (146 websites) and census method was used for investigation. The data gathering method was a direct access to each website and filling of the checklist was based on the researchers' observations. Descriptive and analytical statistics (Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)) were used for data analysis with the help of the SPSS software. The findings showed that in the dimension of the quality of contents, the highest average belonged to type one universities (46.2%) and the lowest average belonged to type three universities (24.8%). In the search and research capabilities, the highest average belonged to type one universities (48.2%) and the lowest average belonged to type three universities. In the dimension of facilities provided for the users, type one universities again had the highest average (37.2%), while type three universities had the lowest average (15%). In general the library websites of type one universities had the highest quality (44.2%), while type three universities had the lowest quality (21.1%). Also the library websites of the College of Rehabilitation and the College of Paramedics, of the Shiraz University of Medical Science, had the highest quality scores. The results showed that there was a meaningful difference between the quality

  15. The Nature of Discourse throughout 5E Lessons in a Large Enrolment College Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickel, Aaron J.; Witzig, Stephen B.; Vanmali, Binaben H.; Abell, Sandra K.

    2013-04-01

    Large enrolment science courses play a significant role in educating undergraduate students. The discourse in these classes usually involves an instructor lecturing with little or no student participation, despite calls from current science education reform documents to elicit and utilize students' ideas in teaching. In this study, we used the 5E instructional model to develop and implement four lessons in a large enrolment introductory biology course with multiple opportunities for teacher-student and student-student interaction. Data consisted of video and audio recordings of whole-class and small-group discussions that took place throughout the study. We then used a science classroom discourse framework developed by Mortimer and Scott (2003) to characterize the discursive interactions in each 5E lesson phase. Analysis of the data resulted in two assertions. First, the purpose, communicative approach, patterns of discourse, and teaching interventions were unique to each 5E lesson phase. Second, the type of lesson topic influenced the content of the discourse. We discuss how the findings help characterize the discourse of each phase in a 5E college science lesson and propose a model to understand internalization through discursive interaction using this reform-based approach. We conclude with implications for facilitating discourse in college science lessons and future research. This study provides support for using the discourse framework to characterize discursive interaction in college science courses.

  16. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  17. Race in biology and anthropology: A study of college texts and professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Leonard; Hampton, Raymond E.; Littlefield, Alice; Hallead, Glen

    Information about social issues is underemphasized in college science education. This article takes the race concept as an example of this neglect. We review the history of the race concept and report the current status of the concept in textbooks and among professors. Responses to surveys of faculty at Ph.D.-granting departments indicate that 67% of biologists accept the concept of biological races in the species Homo sapiens, while only 50% of physical anthropologists do so. Content analysis of college textbooks indicates a significant degree of change over time (1936-1984) in physical anthropology but a lesser degree in biology. We suggest several reasons for the dissimilarity in the two disciplines. We propose continued use of the concept for some infrahuman species, while abandoning its application to Homo sapiens. For those biologists and anthropologists who continue to use the concept, scientific accuracy can be achieved by the presentation in lecture and text of the following ideas: first, consensus among scientists on the race concept's utility and accuracy does not exist; second, there is more variation within than between so-called races; third, discordant gradations due to natural selection, drift, and interbreeding make consistent racial boundary lines impossible to identify; fourth, past use of the race concept has had harmful consequences; fifth, the most precise study of human hereditary variation maps one trait at a time; and sixth, racial labels are misleading, especially as most populations have a cultural designation.

  18. Finding "safe" campuses: predicting the presence of LGBT student groups at North Carolina colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melinda D

    2013-01-01

    A key indicator of a supportive campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students is the existence of an LGBT student organization. This article integrates the research on high school LGBT policies and programs with social movement studies of campus activism to examine the characteristics associated with the existence of university-approved LGBT groups on North Carolina campuses. Drawing on data from the National Center for Education Statistics, campus Web sites, and other sources, logistic regression is used to examine the importance of public opinion, campus and community resources, and the institutional context in predicting the location of these student groups.

  19. Cnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann: The National Folklore Collection, University College Dublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ríonach uí Ógáin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann, The National Folklore Collection at University College Dublin and successor to the Irish Folklore Commission (1935-1970, consists of manuscript, photographic, and audio/video archives, as well as a specialist library and a music archive. It contains two million manuscript pages, thousands of hours of audio recordings, 80,000 photographs, and a number of paintings. The specialist library holds some 50,000 items relating to Irish and comparative folklore and ethnology. It is tasked with the preservation, dissemination, and augmentation of the collections.

  20. "Tribes sharing life": an organ donation educational intervention for American Indian tribal college and university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Belitz, Christine; Keckler, Arliss

    2011-11-01

    "Tribes Sharing Life" is an educational intervention about deceased organ donation for American Indian Tribal College and University (TCU) students. The classroom and web-based program was derived from cultural values and beliefs, and the Transtheoretical Model. The aim of this study was to develop and formatively evaluate the intervention for acceptability and satisfaction among advisory council members (n = 10) and TCU students (n = 22). Council evaluation results were strong. All items met the TCU student evaluation of the revised intervention resulted in overall mean scores that met criterion for acceptability and satisfaction. Tribes Sharing Life is a formatively evaluated intervention that should undergo efficacy testing.

  1. The State of Black Education: The Politics of Educating African American Students at Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earnest N. Bracey, Ph.D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In terms of higher education for African American students, the “school-to-prison pipeline” or Prison Industrial Complex must be totally dismantled in order to focus entirely on academic performance at colleges and universities and HBCUs. Additionally, mentors should be identified to tutor and guide and help black youngsters overcome their fear of learning and going to school, so that our whole society can benefit and improve academically. Finally, in this respect, we-the-people can move our nation forward by graduating people of color at higher institutions of learning, while providing them with a more productive life, and social advancement.

  2. Intimate partner violence victimization among undergraduate women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Kelle; Krebs, Christopher P; Lindquist, Christine H

    2013-08-01

    Despite the evidence that young and minority women may be particularly vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV), there is little research on the IPV experiences of minority undergraduate women. This study addresses this gap by estimating the prevalence of IPV and examining factors associated with experiencing IPV among undergraduate women attending Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs). Findings suggest alarmingly high victimization rates; however, factors associated with IPV among HBCU women are similar to those found in prior research with women in the general population. The results also suggest that some risk factors are differentially associated with experiencing specific types of IPV.

  3. Teacher and student actions to construct biology literacy at a community college: A bounded case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesel, Patricia

    2000-10-01

    Science content area literacy, particularly literacy development in college level biology, is the focus of this study. The study investigates the actions and activities of an instructor and six students over the course of 16 weeks. The study is in response to interest in the literate practices in science classes (NSES, 1996) and to the call for contextual studies that facilitate the learning of science (Borasi & Siegel, 1999; Moje, 1996; Nist & Holschuh, 1996; Prentiss, 1998). A collaborative study between the biology teacher and the researcher, this study investigates the practices believed to be effective for the development of biology literacy. Data sources, in the qualitative bounded case study (Bogdin & Biklin, 1982; Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Miles & Huberman, 1994), include: field notes of classroom observations, in-depth interviews (Seidman, 1992), class surveys, and literate artifacts. The data were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). The six students reveal similarities and differences regarding the actions, patterns, practices and use of materials and their beliefs about effective practice in the development of biology literacy. The results indicate that a variety of actions and activities are needed to facilitate the development of biology literacy. The common themes to develop from the students' data about effective teacher actions are the following: (a) involves and engages students in inquiry learning through group projects, hands-on, and group discussions; (b) relates examples, experiences, and stories; (c) exhibits expertise; (d) encourages a relaxed classroom atmosphere; (e) facilitates and coaches students; and (f) credits creativity. Further, students report their teacher to be an expert, in terms of science knowledge and literate practices, and that her expertise contributes to their understanding of biology literacy. The teachers' data reveals three themes embedded in her classroom actions: science as

  4. Tribal Colleges and Universities/American Indian Research and Education Initiatives Advanced Manufacturing Technical Assistance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, Stanley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The overall goal of this project is to establish a network of TCUs with essential advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities, associated training and education programs, and private sector and federal agency partnerships to both prepare an American Indian AM workforce and create economic and employment opportunities within Tribal communities through design, manufacturing, and marketing of high quality products. Some examples of high quality products involve next generation grid components such as mechanical energy storage, cabling for distribution of energy, and electrochemical energy storage enclosures. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is tasked to provide technical advising, planning, and academic program development support for the TCU/American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) Advanced Manufacturing Project. The TCUs include Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC), Navajo Technical University (NTU), Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), and Salish Kooteani College. AIHEC and Sandia, with collaboration from SIPI, will be establishing an 8-week summer institute on the SIPI campus during the summer of 2017. Up to 20 students from TCUs are anticipated to take part in the summer program. The goal of the program is to bring AM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) awareness and opportunities for the American Indian students. Prior to the summer institute, Sandia will be providing reviews on curriculum plans at the each of the TCUs to ensure the content is consistent with current AM design and engineering practice. In addition, Sandia will provide technical assistance to each of the TCUs in regards to their current AM activities.

  5. Variations of Language Learning Strategy Use among Three Colleges at a Private Four-Year Technology University in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Huei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the college students in Taiwan for the attributes of how their English test scores are being affected by language learning strategy use. The university is recognized as a second-tier technology university in Taiwan, as the students are considered to have low levels of English proficiency and learning motivation. A group…

  6. Contributions of the College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, to education, research, and technology transfer in watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene Sander

    2000-01-01

    The College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, has been heavily involved in providing research, education, and outreach concerning the management of watersheds. The Barr Report of 1956, a cooperative effort of the Salt River Project, the State Land Department and the University of Arizona, was a significant beginning that addressed the productivity of watersheds in...

  7. Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities. Statistical Summary, 1981-82 = Ontario Ministere des Colleges et Universites. Releve recapitulatif des statistiques de 1981-82.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities, Toronto.

    Data for 1981-1982 on students, staff, and finances for provincially-assisted postsecondary educational institutions in Ontario, Canada, are presented. Among others, the statistics cover the following topics: full-time undergraduate and graduate enrollment, by institution and program, at the universities, Ryerson, and the Ontario College of Art,…

  8. Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities. Statistical Summary, 1980-81 = Ontario Ministere des Colleges et Universites. Releve recapitulatif des statistiques de 1980-81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities, Toronto.

    Data for 1980-1981 on students, staff, and finances for provincially-assisted postsecondary educational institutions in Ontario, Canada, are presented. Among others, the statistics cover the following topics: full-time undergraduate and graduate enrollment, by institution and program, at the universities, Ryerson, and the Ontario College of Art,…

  9. Evolutionary Theory in Undergraduate Biology Programs at Lebanese Universities: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Hachem-El-Masri, Yasmine

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gauge the profile of evolutionary theory in Lebanese undergraduate biology programs. The research focused mainly on the views of university biology department heads, given that they are the people who exercise the most direct influence over their departments' ethos. An Australasian sample was chosen as a reference…

  10. Utilization of electronic communication (E-mail) with patients at university and college health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinstein, L

    2000-07-01

    To examine the utilization and potential uses and problems of electronic communication with patients. University and college health centers were surveyed about the type of utilization and policies of electronic communication with patients. The survey group consisted of 99 health centers predominantly serving students representing small-, medium-, and large-sized public and private colleges and universities. Eighty-nine health centers completed the survey. Of the responding health centers, 63.6% use some form of electronic communication with patients. Twenty-seven percent of the health centers give out some form of medical advice via E-mail or the Internet; 14.7% give out some laboratory results via E-mail; 3.4% make appointments via E-mail; and 63.6% give out administrative advice by E-mail. While there was consistent concern expressed about confidentiality and security, only five health centers had a policy about electronic communication. Uses were most common in nonclinical areas but did include health education, Web sites, medical advice, laboratory results, appointment-making or confirmation, and contacting hard-to-reach patients including those studying abroad. While electronic communication with patients was common, provision of direct medical advice was less common. Issues receiving little attention include determining the types of electronic communication that is acceptable to staff and students, determining the level of security of their current information system, educating staff about confidentiality and security issues, and establishing a comprehensive policy regarding electronic communication with patients.

  11. Frequency of tetanus toxoid immunization among college/university female students of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Murad; Murad, Rafat; Mumtaz, Seema; Azmi, Abdul Azim; Rehman, Rehana; Omm-E-Hani; Aziz, Nasir

    2010-01-01

    Tetanus is a deadly infectious disease for which immunisation is available in EPI at both infant level and for females of reproductive age. More than 95% of patients who develop tetanus have not been previously immunised. Objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of tetanus vaccination and to access the awareness of immunisation among females studying in 11 girls' colleges of Karachi and University of Karachi. A cross sectional study was conducted among 1,407 females studying in colleges and University of Karachi from April to August 2007 using a prescribed questionnaire. Among 1,407 female students who were interviewed for the study, 232 (16.48%) were not aware about tetanus immunisation program for females of reproductive age. Only 560 students (39.80%) received at least 1 of 5 recommended doses. Only 41 female students (2.91%) received complete course of 5 doses. Coverage of tetanus immunisation among literate females in most populous city of the country is far behind satisfactory. There is need for awareness and crash programs of tetanus immunisation.

  12. A Survey of Energy Drink Consumption Patterns Among College Students at a Mostly Hispanic University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Bou, Ernesto; De León-Arbucias, Jeidiel; Matos-Vergara, Nikol; Álvarez-Bagnarol, Yocasta; Ortega-Guzmán, Jesús; Narváez-Pérez, Karla; Cruz-Bermúdez, Nelson D; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink (ED) consumption patterns among Hispanic college students. We measured the prevalence and frequency of ED consumption according to gender, degree programs, and specific university-related and social situations. In addition, we assessed the frequency of consumption of EDs mixed with alcoholic beverages. Methods: A total of 508 college students from the University of Puerto Rico, the largest Hispanic institution of higher education statewide, completed an online questionnaire. Results: Twenty-one percent of participants reported consuming EDs with the majority consuming EDs either occasionally (every 2-3 months) or at least once or twice a month. Men were found to be more likely to consume EDs than women. Undergraduate students were found less likely to consume EDs than graduate students. Most students consumed EDs while studying and during social activities. More than one-third of participants that consume EDs admitted mixing them with an alcoholic beverage. Graduate students were found to consume EDs mixed with alcohol more often. Conclusions: The majority of students consumed EDs occasionally and while studying. Most side effects reported after consuming EDs were similar to previous findings. The higher consumption of EDs and of EDs mixed with alcohol by students in graduate programs could be explained by a higher and more complex study load requiring longer periods of wakefulness and concentration. Future studies looking at the consumption patterns of EDs in more competitive graduate programs such as medical and/or dentistry school should be considered.

  13. Information and communication technology related needs of college and university students with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Fichten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore variables related to how well the information and communication technologies (ICTs related needs of students with different disabilities are being met on campus at institutions of higher education, at home and in e-learning contexts. We also explore the disciplines and programmes pursued by students with different disabilities and the specialised ICTs they use. Method: A total of 1,354 Canadian university and junior/community college students with various disabilities completed the POSITIVES Scale. Results: Post-secondary students often have several disabilities which may affect how easily they can use ICTs. Students’ disabilities also influence the specialised ICTs they use and how well their ICT-related needs are being met. While the findings indicate that, overall, students’ ICT-related needs are generally well met, the results also show that these are better met on campus than at home, and at colleges than at universities. This is not related to institution size or to students’ disciplines. Conclusions: Our results show more favourable than unfavourable findings. Nevertheless, there are concerns around the availability of computers with adaptive software/hardware in specialised laboratories as well as with institutional ICT loan programmes; funding for ICTs for personal use; training, both on and off campus; and technical support off campus.

  14. Universal strain stiffening in biological gels and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Cornelis; Pastore, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Fred; Lubensky, Tom; Janmey, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, many biological materials get stiffer as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for physiologic function of tissues such as the blood vessel wall, has been documented since at least the 19th century but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. In various systems, different hypotheses ranging from complex multiphase structures to tensegrity models have been proposed to explain strain-stiffening in biological gels and tissues, and in these cases the specific viscoelastic properties depend critically on the detailed assembly and geometry of the highly ordered material. In this presentation we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for the most dramatic forms of strain stiffening found in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels ranging from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix gels to intact tissues such as the mesentery. The theory shows that the physics of semi flexible chains arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains independent of the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffness. These findings explain why stiff polymers are chosen over more flexibler ones in tissues where only a limited range of deformation is appropriate.

  15. Experiential Learning for Native American Students at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauve, M. L.; Moore, K.

    2003-12-01

    In reaffirming its commitment to Indian tribes and Alaska Native entities, the Federal Government issued Executive Order 13270 of July 3, 2002, stating the policy that " this Nation's commitment to education excellence and opportunity must extend as well to the tribal colleges and universities." Further, the Federal Government has called on the private sector to contribute to these colleges' educational and cultural mission. American University, through its American Indian Internship Program, has responded to this call. American University, a private liberal arts institution of higher education in the Nation's capital, has long ago recognized the importance of experiential learning in undergraduate education. For over 50 years, its Washington Semester Program brings students from other universities around the country and the world to American University's campus and to Washington, D.C. for a unique academic experience. The Washington Semester Program combines academic seminars in various fields of concentration with internship work in government agencies, congressional offices, non-profit organizations, foundations and research institutions in the Nation's capital. Students in this Program get to meet the Nation's leaders, experts in the field, and notable newsmakers while incorporating their academic skills and courses in practice at their internship assignments. The American Indian Internship Program (also knows as Washington Internship for Native Students-WINS) is one of the programs in Washington Semester. This program is designed to give American Indian students the chance to study issues of interest to the Native community and to gain valuable work experience through an internship in the Nation's capital. All costs to attend the program are paid by the internship sponsors and American University, including transportation between the students' home and Washington, DC, tuition and program fees for 6 credit hours in the summer and 12 credit hours in fall

  16. Assessment of the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University Photovoltaic Research Associates Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posey-Eddy, F.; McConnell, R. D.

    2002-08-01

    This report details the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Photovoltaic Research Associates Program, a small but remarkable program that directly affected dozens of minority undergraduate students in ways that changed many of their lives. The progress and accomplishments of undergraduates within the nine participating universities were monitored and assessed through their presentations at an annual NREL-sponsored HBCU conference. Although the funding was small, typically $400,000 per year, the money made a significant impact. The best students sometimes went on to the nation's top graduate schools (e.g., MIT) or important management positions in large companies. Other students had opportunities to learn how renewable energy could positively affect their lives and their neighbors' lives. A few were lucky enough to install photovoltaic lighting and water-pumping systems in Africa, and to see and feel firsthand the technical and emotional benefits of this technology for families and villages. Two of the schools, Texas Southern University and Central State University, were particularly successful in leveraging their DOE/NREL funding to obtain additional funding for expanded programs.

  17. Academic Performance of College of San Mateo Transfer Students at the University of California and State Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo Coll., CA.

    This study sought to find any difference between students' GPA at College of San Mateo and at 4-year institutions, to identify different characteristics among transfers and their relationship to academic performance, and to assess any relation between performance at a 4-year institution and choice of major in junior college. First-time transfers…

  18. Top Gainers: Some Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities Make Big Improvements in Minority Graduation Rates. College Results Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jennifer; Theokas, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Each year, nearly 400,000 minority students enroll as freshmen in a four-year college, hoping to realize all of the opportunities that earning a bachelor's degree affords. Many arrive on campus having overcome underfunded high schools, an intimidating college-admissions process, and daunting financial circumstances. Yet despite their persistence…

  19. 75 FR 60781 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Tribal Colleges and Universities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Indian College, 2522 Kwina Road, Bellingham, WA 98226. Grant: $800,000. Region IX 8. Din[eacute] College, Cliff John, Din[eacute] College, One Circle Drive, Route 12, Tsaile, AZ 86556. Grant: $700,000. Dated...

  20. Development of undergraduate nuclear security curriculum at College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Nasri A.; Mujaini, Madihah; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2017-01-01

    The Center for Nuclear Energy (CNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) has a great responsibility to undertake educational activities that promote developing human capital in the area of nuclear engineering and technology. Developing human capital in nuclear through education programs is necessary to support the implementation of nuclear power projects in Malaysia in the near future. In addition, the educational program must also meet the nuclear power industry needs and requirements. In developing a certain curriculum, the contents must comply with the university's Outcomes Based Education (OBE) philosophy. One of the important courses in the nuclear curriculum is in the area of nuclear security. Basically the nuclear security course covers the current issues of law, politics, military strategy, and technology with regard to weapons of mass destruction and related topics in international security, and review legal regulations and political relationship that determine the state of nuclear security at the moment. In addition, the course looks into all aspects of the nuclear safeguards, builds basic knowledge and understanding of nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear forensics and nuclear safeguards in general. The course also discusses tools used to combat nuclear proliferation such as treaties, institutions, multilateral arrangements and technology controls. In this paper, we elaborate the development of undergraduate nuclear security course at the College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional. Since the course is categorized as mechanical engineering subject, it must be developed in tandem with the program educational objectives (PEO) of the Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering program. The course outcomes (CO) and transferrable skills are also identified. Furthermore, in aligning the CO with program outcomes (PO), the PO elements need to be emphasized through the CO-PO mapping. As such, all assessments and distribution of Bloom Taxonomy

  1. The expanding universe of mass analyzer configurations for biological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of electrically charged gas-phase particles. All mass spectrometers combine ion formation, mass analysis, and ion detection. Although mass analyzers can be regarded as sophisticated devices that manipulate ions in space and time, the rich diversity of possible ways to combine ion separation, focusing, and detection in dynamic mass spectrometers accounts for the large number of instrument designs. A historical perspective of the progress in mass spectrometry that since 1965 until today have contributed to position this technique as an indispensable tool for biological research has been recently addressed by a privileged witness of this golden age of MS (Gelpí J. Mass Spectrom 43:419-435, 2008; Gelpí J. Mass Spectrom 44:1137-1161, 2008). The aim of this chapter is to highlight the view that the operational principles of mass spectrometry can be understood by a simple mathematical language, and that an understanding of the basic concepts of mass spectrometry is necessary to take the most out of this versatile technique.

  2. The Adult Learning Open University Determinants (ALOUD) study: Biological and psychological factors associated with learning performance in adult distance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neroni, Joyce; Gijselaers, Jérôme; Kirschner, Paul A.; De Groot, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Learning is crucial for everyone. The association between biological (eg, sleep, nutrition) and psychological factors (eg, test anxiety, goal orientation) and learning performance has been well established for children, adolescents and college students in traditional education. Evidence for these

  3. Arizona Student Success: A Comparative Study of Community College Transfer, Four-Year College Transfer, and Native University Students. A Final Report to the State, Its Leadership, and Its Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Quentin J.; Price, M. J.

    To develop a comprehensive picture of successful Arizona community college transfer students and to determine differences between two-year college transfer, four-year college transfer, and native university students, a study was conducted of the characteristics, goals, and outcomes of students graduating with a baccalaureate degree from four major…

  4. Great hospitals of Asia: the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Chi Heon; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Established in 1957, the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is the one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea. The seven past Chairmen (Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, Byung-Kyu Cho, Hyun Jib Kim, Hee-Won Jung, and Dong Gyu Kim) have devoted themselves to the development of the department. The current chair, Chun Kee Chung, assumed the position in July 2010. The current department comprises several clinical programs that encompass the entire spectrum of neurosurgical disorders, with 29 specialized faculty members and care teams in three hospitals: Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), Boramae Medical Center (BMC), and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The remarkable growth of the department during the last half century made it possible to perform 5,666 operations (3,299 at SNUH, 411 at BMC and 1,860 at SNUBH) during 2009. A total of 1,201 articles authored by faculty members were published in scientific journals between 1958 and 2009, approximately 32% of which were published in international journals. The department is regarded as the "Mecca" of neurosurgery in Korea because of its outstanding achievement and the many distinguished alumni with leadership roles in the academic field. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. College's hot topics? Wildfire and Hazards' risk perception among university's population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerzer, T.

    2014-12-01

    This research presents a novel perspective on college students and their risk perception in a fire prone US State; Idaho. Idaho was "top #1" in burned lands by acreage in 2012 with approximate 15% of all US burned lands; in 2013 "top #2". Past studies have conducted surveys on residents in high wildfire risk communities to learn what factors make homeowners more likely to engage in mitigation activities and therefore increase communities' resiliency. This research emphasis is on a population that deals with the threat of fire but is likely less invested through property ownership and other investment of risk; yet, equally threatened in quality of life. Are college students the left-out population in the 'planning for wildfires' and its communication process? Main hypothesis is that a college population will have a different perception and awareness (and therefore mitigation actions) than i.e. residents invested in the wild land urban interface (WUI). Dominant research methodologies in past studies are identified as surveys, focus groups, or interviews focusing on homeowners in fire prone areas that have witnessed wildfire or are exposed to increasing fire risk. Yet again, research on population that has no property ownership, investments at stake, and therefore no direct monetary values associated (but potentially non-monetary), is found little to none in these studies. The university population based study and its findings offers a contrast to current literature related to these traditional residents surveys/interviews. The study's survey and interactive spatial assessment of risk perception with allocation of perceived hazards zones promotes understanding of where risk is apparent for participants. Results are used to inform agencies such as campus emergency management, regional wild fire mitigation efforts, and to enhance public communication. Lessons learned include the challenges of a comprehensive inclusion process when mitigating for hazards and building

  6. Information Requirements of University Faculty. An Investigation into the Information Needs, Habits, and Attitudes of the Faculty of George Peabody College for Teachers of Vanderbilt University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleaves, Edwin S.; And Others

    Members of the faculty of George Peabody College for Teachers at Vanderbilt University were surveyed to discover their information needs, habits, and attitudes and to learn how the process of information gathering might influence the pace and direction of library policy. More than 60% of the 133 faculty members surveyed responded, and replies from…

  7. Gatekeeper training and access to mental health care at universities and colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Speer, Nicole; Brunwasser, Steven; Hahn, Elisabeth; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Gatekeeper training (GKT) programs are an increasingly popular approach to addressing access to mental health care in adolescent and young adult populations. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a widely used GKT program, Mental Health First Aid, in college student populations. A randomized control trial was conducted on 32 colleges and universities between 2009 and 2011. Campus residence halls were assigned to the intervention (Mental Health First Aid plus pre-existing trainings) or control condition (pre-existing trainings only) using matched pair randomization. The trainings were delivered to resident advisors (RAs). Outcome measures include service utilization, knowledge and attitudes about services, self-efficacy, intervention behaviors, and mental health symptoms. Data come from two sources: (1) surveys completed by the students (resident advisors and residents; N = 2,543), 2-3 months pre- and post-intervention; and (2) utilization records from campus mental health centers, aggregated by residence. The training increases trainees' self-perceived knowledge (regression-adjusted effect size [ES] = .38, p mental health care in the student communities in which the trainees live. Although GKT programs are widely used to increase access to mental health care, these programs may require modifications to achieve their objectives. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Divergent Streams: Race-Gender Achievement Gaps at Selective Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Douglas S; Probasco, Lierin

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we extend previous research on racial performance gaps at 28 selective US colleges and universities by examining differences in grade achievement and graduate rates across race-gender categories. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshmen, we show that black males, black females, and Hispanic males attain significantly lower grades than other race-gender groups, and that black males are 35% less likely to graduate on-time than other race-gender groups. Analyses consider an array of personal and institutional indicators of academic performance. Grades and graduation rates are improved by academic preparation (particularly high school GPA), scholarly effort, and, for graduation rates, membership in career-oriented or majority-white campus groups. Grade performance and graduation rates are undermined by a hostile racial climate on campus, family stress, and stereotype threat, all of which disproportionately affect minority students. We conclude with recommendations to college administrators for ways of selecting and supporting minority students to reduce differentials in academic achievement across race-gender groups.

  9. Female science faculty in liberal arts colleges and research universities: A case study of building careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Kerry Michelle

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the lives of twelve female science faculty in higher education, in both the Liberal Arts College and the Research University environments. The study focuses on two areas---the gender issue and women's positive experiences in being science faculty. The methods used are qualitative, including interviews and self-esteem, achievement-motivation, and self-descriptive word ranking scales, which were used to determine success and determination to understand the desire to continue in the field of academic science. The central findings of the study focused on the rampant gender and sexual discrimination that was apparent at the Liberal Arts College science department, and the desire to balance a family with a career. The common misperception that a woman cannot be an academic science and have a family appeared to have troubled most of the subjects in the study. It appeared that the support of a spouse and family are two factors that have led to the continuation of the majority of the women to want to remain in academic science. The issue of gender touched on the lack of financial compensation among some of the female science faculty in the study, as well as the need for more institutional and structural support for human relations within the science departments.

  10. Students' perception of mentoring at Bahria University Medical and Dental College, Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sobia; Omair, Aamir; Baig, Mukhtiar

    2015-06-01

    To assess the students' perception regarding mentoring at different stages of their studies at a private-sector medical college. The cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2012 to July 2014 at Bahria University Medical and Dental College, Karachi, and comprised students from first to fourth year. Data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire, which was developed after literature search and discussion. The total score for the 35 questions was used as the 'perception score' for the students. The perceptions among all students in an academic year were compared using the Kruskall-Wallis test for median score differences. Of the 401 students approached, 341(85%) completed the survey. The median perception scores for personal support (p=0.81) and career advice (p=0.07) were not different across the four years. There was a significant difference in the perception scores for role modelling (pStudents in pre-clinical years (1st/2nd years) rated their mentors higher on role modelling aspects of mentoring (pstudents' perception varied among preclinical and clinical groups when it came to the matter of career advising and role modelling.

  11. Eating disorder symptoms among undergraduate and graduate students at 12 U.S. colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, S K; Sonneville, K R

    2017-01-01

    We sought to estimate the prevalence of eating disorder symptoms in a large sample of U.S. college students and variations therein across student characteristics. Participants were 9713 students from 12 colleges and universities participating in the Healthy Bodies Study. We used gender-stratified logistic regression to estimate bivariate correlates of elevated eating disorder symptoms, past-month objective binge eating, and past-month compensatory behaviors across student characteristics including age, degree-level, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, first-generation status, citizenship, academic and extracurricular characteristics, and weight status. Eating disorder outcomes were based on the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire. We observed higher prevalence of objective binge eating among females relative to males (49% versus 30%, pobesity. When compared to individuals with a healthy weight, those with overweight had greater eating disorder risk (males OR=3.5; females OR=2.0), binge eating (males OR=2.1; females OR=1.9), and use of compensatory behaviors (males OR=1.5; females OR=1.3). This study suggests smaller gender difference in prevalence of eating disorder symptoms than previously reported and identifies students with overweight/obesity as salient targets for campus-based eating disorder screening and early intervention efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Social Cognitive Theory Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions of College Men at a Southeastern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Hannah M; Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use social cognitive theory to predict human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intentions of college men attending a large, southeastern university. Data collection comprised two phases. Phase I established face and content validity of the instrument by a panel of six experts. Phase II assessed internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha and predicted behavioral intentions applying multiple linear regression. HPV knowledge, expectations, self-efficacy to get HPV vaccine, situational perception, self-efficacy in overcoming barriers to get HPV vaccine, and self-control to get HPV vaccine were regressed on behavioral intentions. Situational perception and self-control to get HPV vaccine were significant predictors, accounting for 22% of variance in behavioral intentions to get vaccinated within the next 6 months. Overall, college men reported low behavioral intentions to getting vaccinated. Future interventions should target situational perception and self-control to increase HPV vaccination intentions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. The Effectiveness of a Case Study-Based First-Year Biology Class at a Black Women's College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi; Benning, Tracy; Woods, Natasha; McGinnis, Gene; Chu, Joanne; Netherton, Josh; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The authors used a case study-based approach in the introductory biology course at Spelman College. The course taught to entering freshmen was divided into three modules--ecology, evolution, and biodiversity, each designed around a case study. They noted that (1) case study teaching was dramatically more effective than the traditional lecture…

  14. An Examination of the Impact of a Biological Anti-Stigma Message for Depression on College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Laura A.; Campbell, Duncan G.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is one reason that some people avoid seeking mental health treatment. This study tested whether a biologically based anti-stigma message affected various stigma-related outcomes in college students. One hundred eighty-two undergraduate participants were randomly assigned to see a billboard presenting the message, "Depression is a brain…

  15. A Comparison of the Personalized System of Instruction and a Conventional Biology Course on the Achievement of Junior College Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Vernon D.; Vicks, Joann

    1982-01-01

    Compared conventional biology instruction to personalized system of instruction (PSI) and investigated relationship between achievement and selected variables (age, sex, family income/size, grade point average, motivational factors, treatment group, and California Achievement Test scores) of college students (N=80). Results, among others, indicate…

  16. Dieting behaviours, obesity and predictors of dieting among female college students at Palestinian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyari, W D; Henry, L J; Jones, C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore dieting practices of female Palestinian college students. Participants ( = 410) were selected by cluster-sampling from 4 Palestinian universities. A regression model investigated dieting using: body mass index (BMI); body satisfaction; self-esteem; dress style; exercise; sociocultural factors; residence; strength of faith; perceived impact of weight on social interaction; and number of previous times dieting. Significant predictors of dieting were low body satisfaction, number of previous dieting times, perceived media pressure, regular exercising, BMI, and perceived impact of weight on social interaction, The model accounted for 45% of the variance in dieting. Body satisfaction was not significantly correlated with self-esteem or strength of faith, which indicates that "internalization of thinness" may be becoming evident among populations in certain developing countries, as in "Western" countries.

  17. Leadership Development for Health Researchers at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Ronald L.; Braithwaite, Kisha; Oliver, Desiree; Holliday, Rhonda

    2009-01-01

    Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have traditionally been a magnet for Black students at all levels nationwide and have been an exemplar of mentorship models for preparing leaders in many fields. A research career development program for junior faculty scholars that leverages the unique strengths of HBCUs has the potential to promote diverse leadership in health research and advance practical understanding of how to address HIV/AIDS and related health challenges that ravage vulnerable communities. A program that creates institutional bonds between HBCUs and other academic institutions can create a groundbreaking framework for more-effective community-based participatory research. We present a rationale for supporting an HBCU-led collaborative research program, one that both advances junior faculty and explores the interrelationship between HIV/AIDS, mental health, and substance abuse through research in correctional facilities. PMID:19246669

  18. Institutional responses to communicable diseases at Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1900-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidney, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Between 1900 and 1940 students and staff risked their lives to attend, and teach at, Victoria College. Not only did Victoria experience three major epidemics--diphtheria in 1911, influenza from 1918 to 1920, and smallpox in 1927--but almost yearly one or two students contracted diseases such as scarlet fever, measles, and mumps. Yet at a time when there was no health insurance and few hospital facilities, how did the university cope with the problem? This paper examines the care provided to Victoria's residential students. In the process the paper illustrates not only the upheaval endured by individual students but also the enormous financial and emotional toll paid by the institution, especially by members of its female staff.

  19. Methods of voluntary reporting medication administration errors among nurses in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilesanmi, R E; Okojie, E O; Ojerinde, A C

    2016-06-01

    Reporting medication administration error (MAEs) is a significant strategy to ensure patient safety. Literature had it that most of what is reported as errors of administration is just a tip of the iceberg, suggesting that a lot more go unreported. The methods of reporting medication administration errors in Nigeria have not been well explored. This study examined the methods of reporting MAEs by nurses in selected wards. in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Nigeria. Methods- A cross sectional survey of 286 nurses, who were conveniently selected from Medical, Surgical and Accident and Emergency departments of the University College Hospital, Ibadan Nurses who gave consent to participate completed a 42-item structured questionnaire on the methods and reasons for non-reporting MAEs. Among the study cohort, 162(64.8%) admitted to have committed MAEs in the past, of which 137(84.4%) voluntarily reported. Common methods included reporting to inmmediate supervisor (88; 34%), and confiding in a colleague 62 (24.8%). Only 39 (15.6%) documented and completed report forms. In addition, 183 (73.2%) believed that anonymous reporting enhances the rate of reporting errors. The major reason for non-reporting was the fear of being punished and labelled as incompetent practitioner (Mean 3.82, ± 1.09). Findings suggest that not all MAEs committed by the study cohort were reported, and the methods used differ with individuals and units of practice. There is therefore a need to create more awareness that disclosure of MAEs will help to identify the specific causes of errors, thereby fostering safe practice.

  20. Adapting an Evidence-Based HIV Intervention for At-Risk African American College Women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities Who Use Alcohol and Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Marie Sawyer-Kurian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of the high prevalence of HIV incidence among African American adolescent and adult women along with substance use and risky sexual behavior among university students necessitates the development of a HIV intervention specifically addressing culture, gender, and college factors for female African American university students. The woman-focused HIV intervention was chosen for adaptation because it has been shown to be efficacious with reducing risk for African American women who use alcohol and drugs, and has been successfully adapted 7 times. The target population was African American college women enrolled at a historically Black university who use alcohol and other drugs, and who engaged in risky sex behaviors. To understand and assess the needs of this population, we conducted four focus groups with African American college women, two in-depth interviews with faculty, and a combination of in-depth interviews and focus groups with student affairs and health staff that were analyzed using content analysis. From this analysis, several themes emerged that were used to adapt the intervention. Emerging themes included challenges related to identity and societal stereotypes, lack of knowledge about sexual health (i.e., negotiating safer sex and the function of female and male anatomies, high incidents of pregnancy, negative consequences related to alcohol and marijuana use, and the need to incorporate testimonies from college students, media enhancements, and role-plays to convey intervention messages. After the preliminary adaptation, 11 college women reviewed the adapted intervention and provided positive feedback. Plans for future research are discussed.

  1. National Articulation and Transfer Network (NATN): Building an Alternative Pathway for Underserved Student Populations To Access Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) & Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA.

    This is a report on the National Articulation and Transfer Network (NATN) program, which seeks to increase the achievement and aspirations of students from underserved population, namely African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. More than 150 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI), and…

  2. The biological universe: the twentieth-century extraterrestrial life debate and the limits of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. Does `biological law' reign throughout the universe? Are there other histories, religions, and philosophies outside of those on Earth? Do extraterrestrial minds ponder the mysteries of the universe? The attempts toanswer these often asked questions form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of science and culture, and The Biological Universe is the first book to provide a rich and colorful history of those attempts during the twentieth century. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a `biophysical cosmology' that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe.

  3. Conceptions of Memorizing and Understanding in Learning, and Self-Efficacy Held by University Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chiang; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore Taiwanese university students' conceptions of learning biology as memorizing or as understanding, and their self-efficacy. To this end, two questionnaires were utilized to survey 293 Taiwanese university students with biology-related majors. A questionnaire for measuring students' conceptions of memorizing and understanding was validated through an exploratory factor analysis of participants' responses. As for the questionnaire regarding the students' biology learning self-efficacy (BLSE), an exploratory factor analysis revealed a total of four factors including higher-order cognitive skills (BLSE-HC), everyday application (BLSE-EA), science communication (BLSE-SC), and practical works (BLSE-PW). The results of the cluster analysis according to the participants' conceptions of learning biology indicated that students in the two major clusters either viewed learning biology as understanding or possessed mixed-conceptions of memorizing and understanding. The students in the third cluster mainly focused on memorizing in their learning while the students in the fourth cluster showed less agreement with both conceptions of memorizing and understanding. This study further revealed that the conception of learning as understanding was positively associated with the BLSE of university students with biology-related majors. However, the conception of learning as memorizing may foster students' BLSE only when such a notion co-exists with the conception of learning with understanding.

  4. Standards of the Network of Colleges and Universities Committed to the Elimination of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The background, goals and standards of the Network of Colleges and Universities Committed to the Elimination of Drug and Alcohol Abuse are described. The network was formed in 1987 at the instigation of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. A planning group met to establish the standards for…

  5. Theory of Planned Behavior: Sensitivity and Specificity in Predicting Graduation and Drop-Out among College and University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Amsel, Rhonda; Jorgensen, Mary; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Budd, Jillian; King, Laura; Jorgensen, Shirley; Asuncion, Jennison

    2016-01-01

    We examined sensitivity and specificity when using the three theory of planned behavior (TPB) scales (Perceived Behavioral Control, Subjective Norms, Attitude) to predict graduation and drop-out in a longitudinal study of 252 college and university students with disabilities and in a separate cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1380…

  6. How Well Does the Theory of Planned Behavior Predict Graduation among College and University Students with Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Amsel, Rhonda; Jorgensen, Shirley; Budd, Jillian; Jorgensen, Mary; Asuncion, Jennison; Barile, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a model to predict which students with disabilities will drop out before graduation and to investigate the drop out pattern of students with disabilities. To accomplish this we evaluated potential predictors of persistence and drop-out among 611 college and university students with various disabilities and…

  7. Nature and Extent of Catholic Identity Communicated through Official Websites of U.S. Catholic Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambescia, Stephen F.; Paolucci, Rocco

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Internet has significantly changed how organizations interact with their customers and constituents in the areas of marketing, information sharing, and engagement processes. College and university websites have become major communication venues for prospective students to learn about schools of interest to them. Catholic colleges…

  8. Does Federal Financial Aid Policy Influence the Institutional Aid Policies of Four-Year Colleges and Universities? An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Don; Kwon, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical work that examines the relationships between federal financial aid policy and institutional financial aid priorities and expenditures. This study uses Resource Dependency Theory to explore whether changes the amount of financial aid awarded by colleges and universities during the last fifty years are best explained…

  9. Continuous Practice-Based Research on the Use of Standardized Patients: Experience from Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yong; Wu, Yan; Lai, Yanni; Lu, Yingqing; Zou, Hejian; Feng, Xueshan

    2014-01-01

    In the past ten years, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) project team of the Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University has continuously conducted further study on the development and maintenance of standardized patients and their application in teaching. The team carried out a series of randomized controlled studies on the…

  10. Sexual Assault Policies and Consent Definitions: A Nationally Representative Investigation of U.S. Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Laurie M.; Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Magee, Erin P.; DeLong, Stephanie M.; Ashley, Olivia S.; Macy, Rebecca J.; Martin, Sandra L.; Moracco, Kathryn E.; Bowling, J. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Campus sexual assault (SA) policies and sexual consent definitions have not been widely studied. The study team conducted a nationally representative review of college and university websites (n = 995), assessing the prevalence of publicly accessible online policies and definitions and examining associations with school characteristics. A content…

  11. Christian Universities and Colleges: The Need to Train Instructors to Teach the Bible as Literature in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The author examines the national growth of Bible literacy courses in America's public schools and examines what steps Christian universities and colleges can take to help meet the demand for teachers for these courses. The author asserts that several sources of training are currently available, but declares that they will be unable to train a…

  12. The Criticality of Norms to the Functional Imperatives of the Social Action System of College and University Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, John M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I assert that the work of colleges and universities forms a social action system. I array the critical positions represented in this issue according to the four functional imperatives of social action systems: adaptation, goal attainment, integration, and pattern maintenance. I discuss the role of normative structures for these…

  13. The Reliability and Validity of the Cultural Congruity and University Environment Scales with Chicana/o Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Herrera, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Following the calls for increased research on the educational experiences of Chicana/o community college students, and the development of culturally applicable measures for communities of color, this study examined the utility and the applicability of the Cultural Congruity Scale (CCS) and University Environment Scale (UES) for use with Chicana/o…

  14. An Examination of Current and Proposed Drug-Testing Policies at U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudala, Paul J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administrators at 332 colleges and universities completed surveys about their schools' current or proposed policies for urine drug testing of employees, applicants, and students. Fewer than 7% of schools reported urine drug testing of employees and applicants, and only 2% tested students. Few additional institutions were planning to adopt testing…

  15. The Existence of Codes of Conduct for Undergraduate Teaching in Teaching-Oriented Four-Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyken-Segosebe, Dawn; Min, Yunkyung; Braxton, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Four-year colleges and universities that espouse teaching as their primary mission bear a responsibility to safeguard the welfare of their students as clients of teaching. This responsibility takes the form of a moral imperative. Faculty members hold considerable autonomy in the professional choices they make in their teaching. As a consequence,…

  16. Reimagining the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Environment: Exposing Race Secrets and the Binding Chains of Respectability and Othermothering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Nadrea; Butler, Malika; Beatty, Cameron C.

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how the intersections of gender, race, policy, and student differences at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) can impact student experience. Such an environment can displace and penalize those who do not adhere to the uniformity of heteronormative gender roles or respectability politics. Using…

  17. Visions of Vision: An Exploratory Study of the Role College and University Presidents Play in Developing Institutional Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWade, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research explores how college and university presidents engage in the process of developing formal institutional vision. The inquiry identifies roles presidents play in vision development, which is often undertaken as part of strategic-planning initiatives. Two constructs of leadership and institutional vision are used to examine…

  18. Statistical Summary, 1983-84 = Releve recapitulatif des statistiques de 1983-1984. [Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities, Toronto.

    Data for 1983-1984 on students, staff, and finances for provincially-assisted postsecondary education institutions in Ontario, Canada, are presented. The statistics cover: full-time undergraduate and graduate enrollment, by institution and program, at the universities, Ryerson, and the Ontario College of Art, 1983; educational background of new…

  19. Academic Leaderships Views of School Psychology and Black Students: The Case of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeks, Amirah; Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand academic leadership's views of the field of school psychology. This is the first study that has attempted to incorporate the views of historically Black college and university (HBCU) Psychology Department Chairs' regarding the field of school psychology and the potential development of school psychology…

  20. Universal Design: A Tool to Help College Students with Asperger's Syndrome Engage on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Colette M.; Colvin, Kathryn L.

    2013-01-01

    Transitioning from high school to college is challenging for many students, but for none more so than students with Asperger's syndrome. Colette M. Taylor and Kathryn L. Colvin introduce the concept of universal design as an effective approach to supporting this increasing subpopulation of students.

  1. Predicting College Math Success: Do High School Performance and Gender Matter? Evidence from Sultan Qaboos University in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Mazharul; Al-Ghassani, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of students of college of Science of Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Calculus I course, and examine the predictive validity of student's high school performance and gender for Calculus I success. The data for the study was extracted from students' database maintained by the Deanship of…

  2. Scholarly Productivity of Social Work Faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Are h-Index Scores a Suitable Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Isiah, Jr.; Smith, Belinda Davis; Green, Makeba T.; Anderson, Brian; Harry, Sonja V.; Byrd, Yolanda M.; Pratt-Harris, Natasha C.; Bolden, Errol S.; Hill, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Faculty scholarship at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) has in the past served as a blueprint for the Black masses. Even today, HBCU faculty scholarship continues to be an informative source to communicate accurate information regarding marginalized groups. This study examines h-index scores of 65 faculty members at five…

  3. Motorcycle Safety Education Programs: Report of a Survey of State Departments of Education and of Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association, Washington, DC.

    A survey of State departments of education and colleges and universities, conducted by the Motorcycle Industry Council Safety and Education Foundation, revealed the need for more teacher education programs, instructional materials, and organized workshops that promote motorcycle safety education. The primary interest indicated by State departments…

  4. The Impact of the College Assistance Migrant Program on Migrant Student Academic Achievement in the California State University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian D.

    2012-01-01

    The 7-year longitudinal study examined the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) impact on migrant student achievement in the California State University system. Participants included migrant students, Latinos, and general student populations from 2002-2009. The analysis of variance and chi-square test of independence were used to explore…

  5. Critical Success Factors in the Curriculum Alignment Process: The Case of the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camba, Pitzel; Krotov, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this article are to (a) assist business schools in understanding the curriculum alignment process, and (b) uncover critical success factors in curriculum alignment. Based on a case study conducted at the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University, a detailed curriculum alignment process description is provided. The process…

  6. Access to Success: A Phenomenological Study on Women of Color College and University Presidents in Their Ascension to the Presidency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Ana Liza V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences, successful career strategies, challenges and barriers, and effective leadership qualities of women of color college and university presidents in their ascension to the presidency. Methodology: For this qualitative, phenomenological research…

  7. Comparative Cost Study by Southeastern Regional Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges Standards Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke Univ., Durham, NC.

    Presented in this document are data pertaining to maintenance and operations costs at colleges and universities in the southeastern region of the U.S. The major accounts included in the cost analysis are: (1) physical plant administration, (2) building maintenance, (3) custodial services, (4) utilities, (5) landscape and grounds maintenance, and…

  8. Shared Governance and Organizational Commitment Reported by Enrollment Managers in the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Don Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Many faith-based liberal arts institutions are tuition-dependent and are forced to compete with both public institutions as well as private for-profit colleges and universities to maintain student enrollment levels. Some faith-based institutions have adopted strategic enrollment management policies and procedures that emulate the best practices…

  9. Impact of Electronic Resources and Usage in Academic Libraries in Ghana: Evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akussah, Maxwell; Asante, Edward; Adu-Sarkodee, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between impact of electronic resources and its usage in academic libraries in Ghana: evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana. The study was a quantitative approach using questionnaire to gather data and information. A valid response rate of 58.5% was assumed. SPSS…

  10. Uncertainty in a College-Town Housing Market: The Case of the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadayuki, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the costs that arise from uncertainty in the college-town housing market in the Urbana-Champaign metropolitan area, the home of the University of Illinois. This research resulted in two principal findings. First, the rental price of housing owned by property owners having more than 10 claims filed against them…

  11. Motivation and Self-Regulation in Community College Transfer Students at a Four-Year Online University

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Alexandra; Nadasen, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Motivation and self-regulation were examined in a sample of community college transfer students enrolled in a 4-year, online university. The relation between motivation and self-regulation and students' performance was examined, as was the association between these learner characteristics (i.e., motivation and self-regulation) and sociodemographic…

  12. Thomas Edison State College and Colorado State University: Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Enhance CE Unit Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Henry; Powell, Albert, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Edison State College (TESC) and Colorado State University (CSU) offer significant contrasts in institutional culture, student demographics, faculty and institutional priorities and approaches to distance education course development and delivery. This article offers case studies showing that widely disparate program design and delivery…

  13. Title IX in Intercollegiate Athletics: Litigation Risks Facing Colleges and Universities. AGB Public Policy [Paper] Series, No. 93-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Recently Title IX lawsuits have highlighted the vulnerability of colleges and universities to claims of gender discrimination in intercollegiate athletics. Female athletes have sued schools for eliminating varsity sports and for failing to create varsity teams. In addition, discrimination claims related to other gender-based issues have been…

  14. Tuition & Required Fees. New Jersey Colleges & Universities: 1977-78 Through 1983-84. ORM Volume 4: Brief Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delehanty, Kathleen

    1983-01-01

    Recent historical trends (1977-1978 through 1983-1984) in tuition and required fee charges in New Jersey colleges and universities are presented. Differences among New Jersey collegiate sectors and among different types of students (full- and part-time, undergraduate and graduate, resident and nonresident) are analyzed in terms of dollar and…

  15. Developing Online Tutorials to Improve Information Literacy Skills for Second-Year Nursing Students of University College Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kirsteen; Bolich, Cecilia; Duffy, Daniel; Quinn, Ciarán; Walsh, Kathryn; Connolly, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the process of developing online tutorials for a specified student group, in this case Second-Year Nursing students in University College Dublin. The product was commissioned by the Health Sciences Library and the UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery, and Health Systems. It was developed as a "Capstone Project" for part…

  16. Racial and Athletic Identity of African American Football Players at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Reed, Courtney; Steinfeldt, M. Clint

    2010-01-01

    This study examined racial and athletic identity among African American football players at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Negotiating the dualism of racial and athletic identities can be problematic because both roles are subject to prejudice and discrimination, particularly for…

  17. Gaps in college biology students' understanding of photosynthesis: Implications for human constructivist learning theory and college classroom practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffard, Phyllis Baudoin

    1999-11-01

    The main research question of this study was: What gaps in biochemical understanding are revealed by a range of university introductory biology students as they work through a critically acclaimed multimedia program on photosynthesis, and what are the corresponding implications for elaboration of the Ausubel-Novak-Gowin Learning Theory (ANG, now Human Constructivism)? Twelve students, mixed for ability, gender and ethnicity, were recruited from two sections of "Bio 101." Before and after instruction in photosynthesis, in-depth clinical interviews were conducted during which participants completed a range of cognitive tasks such as sorting, concept mapping, explaining and predicting. Some tasks involved interacting with a computer simulation of photosynthesis. This study primarily employed qualitative case study and verbal analysis methods. Verbal analysis of the clinical interviews revealed numerous gaps that were categorized into typologies. The two major categories were propositional gaps and processing gaps. Propositional gaps were evident in development of participants' concepts, links and constructs. Significant among these were conceptual distance gaps and continuity of matter gaps. Gaps such as convention gaps and relative significance gaps seem to be due to naivete in the discipline. Processing gaps included gaps in graphic decoding skills and relevant cognitive habits such as self-monitoring and consulting prior knowledge. Although the gaps were easier to detect and isolate with the above-average participants, all participants showed evidence of at least some of these gaps. Since some gaps are not unexpected at all but the highest literacy levels, not all the gaps identified are to be considered deficiencies. The gaps identified support the attention given by ANG theorists to the role of prior knowledge and metacognition as well as the value of graphic organizers in knowledge construction. In addition, this study revealed numerous gaps in graphic decoding

  18. Use of Expedited Partner Therapy for Sexually Transmitted Diseases in College and University Health Centers in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ryan; Martinez, Nina; Roberts, Craig; Habel, Melissa A; Leino, E Victor; Leichliter, Jami S

    2015-10-01

    We examined expedited partner therapy for chlamydia and gonorrhea in college and university health centers by institutional and policy characteristics. Expedited partner therapy awareness and use was low (44.1% used), did not differ by institutional characteristics, and differed by policy environment. Our findings suggest missed opportunities for sexually transmitted disease prevention in college and university health centers.

  19. An innovative behavioral science curriculum at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeberg, Marcia S; Scarbecz, Mark; Hottel, Timothy L

    2013-01-01

    Communication skills have long been associated with practice success in dentistry. The Commission on Dental Accreditation's standards state that "Graduates must be competent in the application of the fundamental principles of behavioral sciences" and that "Graduates must be competent in managing a diverse patient population and have...interpersonal and communications skills." A recent survey of U.S. dentists found an underutilization of communication skills by general dentists. The University of Tennessee College of Dentistry strives for continuous improvement and has implemented an innovative behavioral science curriculum to improve students' communication skills, consistent with the College's "patient-centered, comprehensive care" philosophy. We describe the design and implementation of our "Patient-Centered Dentistry" course, in which third-year dental students practice communication skills with simulated patients in the Kaplan Clinical Skills Center on the UTHSC campus. The clinical simulations involve the following scenarios: The Initial Interview with a Patient, Presenting a Treatment Plan, Treating Patients with Fear and Anxiety, Interviewing Considerations for Difficult Patients, Delivering Distressing News to Patients, and Coping with a Drug-Seeking Patient. Student simulations were videotaped and assessed by course instructors as well as clinical faculty, and students received immediate feedback by instructors and clinical faculty after their simulations. Students were provided with the opportunity to view their simulation performance and to reflect on their performance in order to recognize their communication strengths as well as areas for improvement. The use of simulation experiences is becoming a widespread and expected practice in health care education. The Patient-Centered Dentistry course provides students with the opportunity to experience the kinds of real-life situations that they would experience in dental practice, without risks to patients

  20. Lecture capture: enhancing learning through technology at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBacco, Priscilla M; Hetherington, Vincent J; Putman, David

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this research was to evaluate the Mediasite lecture capture system at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine (formerly the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine) to determine the acceptance, use and benefits to both students and faculty and to identify any concerns, limitations, and suggestions for expansion. There is extreme debate on the effect of lecture capture on student attendance included in the research. Two surveys were compiled, one each for students and faculty. These were distributed by email to the entire student body and all full-time and part-time faculty. Responses were voluntary. The questions sought to identify the priorities of the participant, reasons for viewing lectures compiled by course, to assess any effect on class attendance and to evaluate the ease and use of the technical function. There was also a section for subjective responses and suggestions. The tabulations proved a very high use of the program with the most important reason being to prepare for exams. The question of class attendance is still open to interpretation. Technically, the Mediasite system was ranked easy to use by both groups. The results of this survey confirm the concept of lecture capture as an integral segment of advanced education. Though this system should not replace class attendance, it is a vital supplement to course work and study. By reviewing all of the components of the survey those who may have concerns on its effectiveness are also aware of the advantages. The results of this study met all the objectives to evaluate use and obtain viewpoints to improve and expand the program.

  1. State of laboratory manual instruction in California community college introductory (non-majors) biology laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Michelle

    College students must complete a life science course prior to graduation for a bachelor's degree. Generally, the course has lecture and laboratory components. It is in the laboratory where there are exceptional opportunities for exploration, challenge and application of the material learned. Optimally, this would utilize the best of inquiry based approaches. Most community colleges are using a home-grown or self written laboratory manual for the direction of work in the laboratory period. Little was known about the motivation, development and adaptation of use. It was also not known about the future of the laboratory manuals in light of the recent learning reform in California Community Colleges, Student Learning Outcomes. Extensive interviews were conducted with laboratory manual authors to determine the motivation, process of development, who was involved and learning framework used in the creation of the manuals. It was further asked of manual authors their ideas about the future of the manual, the development of staff and faculty and finally, the role Student Learning Outcomes would play in the manual. Science faculty currently teaching the non-majors biology laboratories for at least two semesters were surveyed on-line about actual practice of the manual, assessment, manual flexibility, faculty training and incorporation of Student Learning Outcomes. Finally, an evaluation of the laboratory manual was done using an established Laboratory Task Analysis Instrument. Laboratory manuals were evaluated on a variety of categories to determine the level of inquiry instruction done by students in the laboratory section. The results were that the development of homegrown laboratory manuals was done by community colleges in the Los Angeles and Orange Counties in an effort to minimize the cost of the manual to the students, to utilize all the exercises in a particular lab and to effectively utilize the materials already owned by the department. Further, schools wanted to

  2. Representations of homosexuality and prejudice against homosexuals of college students in a course in biology education in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Nota, Juvencio Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the representations (explanations) of future biology teachers about the nature of homosexuality and the type of prejudice expressed against homosexuals. For this we applied questionnaires to 127 students of both sexes from first to fourth year biology course in Pedagogical University in Maputo. The results showed a bipolar representation of homosexuality reasoned explanations psychosocial and biological, but also a widespread prejudice. The analysis of the type of anchor...

  3. College/University Counseling Centers Supporting Study Away: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Charles C.; Spoltore, Janet Dee; Galvinhill, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Research points to significant numbers of students on college campuses experiencing mental health distress and an ever increasing number of college students who are choosing to make an off-campus educational experience a part of their college careers. When we consider both of these trends together, it is quite apparent that a significant number of…

  4. Credit Card Usage and Debt among College and University Students. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Tamara

    Since the late 1990s, lawmakers, college officials, consumer advocacy groups, and higher education practitioners have become increasingly concerned about the rising use of credit cards among college students. Some recent studies have provided information about credit card use among college students. These studies include: (1) a study conducted by…

  5. 1982-83 Texas College and University Real Estate Course Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    In 1983, the Texas Real Estate Research Center conducted its eighth annual survey of the real estate offerings of the state's two- and four-year colleges. Survey findings, based on a 90% response rate, included the following: (1) 90 institutions (46 community colleges and 44 four-year colleges) offered real estate courses during the 1982-83…

  6. Teaching National and General History of Music at College Level and at the University of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Tuksar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of music history at various colleges and at the University of Zagreb (founded in 1669, and renewed in 1874 started during the 1920s. However, its prehistory goes back to the 1890s: the first courses in music history were taught at the music school of the Narodni zemaljski glasbeni zavod (Institute of Music from 1890 on, only to be continued later at the Croatian Conservatory (1916. With the Academy of Music (1922 music history began to be taught at university level as a main, compulsory subject, while at the Faculty of Humanities (in 1928-1938; 1981-1994, the Catholic Theological Faculty with its Institute for Church Music (probably since 1951, the Teacher’s College (since 1951 and Croatian Studies (since 1994, all within the University of Zagreb (to which the Academy of Music joined only in 1980, it was taught in the form of a mixture of obligatory and elective subjects. Among a number of more or less outstanding personalities who figured as teachers of music history, including composers, music theorists, conductors, organists, music critics, and expert music historians, mention should be made of the world-known musicologist Dragan Plamenac (who served as ‘Privatdozent’ at the Faculty of Humanities in 1928-1938 period and of Josip Andreis, who taught Croatian and European music history in parallel at the Academy of Music from 1948 to 1972. In 1970 a modern Department of Musicology was created replacing the old Historical Department, where the new generation of musicologists such as Ivan Supičić and Koraljka Kos introduced new international standards in teaching methods. Tutorial books and other necessary literature for students were at first written by domestic musicologists, so that, for example, from 1950s to 1990s J. Andreis was the author of influential books covering both history of Croatian music and the history of European music, used not only in Croatia but also throughout the former Yugoslavia. The present teaching

  7. College and University Planning -- 1969. Selected Papers from Society for College and University Planning Annual Conference. (4th, Houston, Texas, August 17-20, 1969.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Frederick W., Ed.; Schmult, Carl V., Jr., Ed.

    Six major conference papers cover selected planning activities for eight institutions of higher education. Discussed are academic planning for the University of Houston; circulation, parking, and landscape planning for the University of California at Irvine; planning office organization and staffing at Harvard and Ohio State Universities; building…

  8. Cortisol, biochemical, and galvanic skin responses to music stimuli of different preference values by college students in biology and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderArk, S D; Ely, D

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine biochemical and galvanic skin responses to music stimuli. Specifically, 30 university biology and 30 music students' plasma levels of norepinephrine and cortisol and their galvanic skin responses were measured before and after listening to two different musical selections, one of which was preferred (liked) by the music students and not preferred (disliked) by the biology students. The music-listening sessions and the controlled silent sessions were done in an anechoic chamber. 30 biology majors and 30 music majors were in the experimental groups; 14 biology and 17 music majors comprised the control group. Analysis indicated that the cortisol levels and galvanic skin responses were significantly higher for the music majors than the biology majors. The data indicate that music majors listen more critically and analytically to music than biology majors, and cortisol levels are associated with this as increases in music majors and decreases in biology majors after the music.

  9. Missing Teeth and Prosthetic Treatment in Patients Treated at College of Dentistry, University of Dammam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaimaa M. Fouda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of completely and partially edentulous patients and their prosthetic treatment at the Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences (SDS, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, were investigated. Panoramic radiographs and medical records of adult patients (n=479, mean age 45.9 years, and range 25–96 years treated in 2011–2014 were examined. 6% of the patients were completely edentulous, 8% had single jaw edentulousness, and 74% were partially edentulous. Edentulousness was significantly correlated with age and the number of missing teeth was significantly higher among males (p<0.026. Diabetes was significantly associated with complete edentulousness, single edentulous jaw (p value 0.015, and partial edentulousness (p value 0.023. Kennedy class III was the most frequent class of partial edentulousness in single and/or both jaws (p=0.000. Patients having class I and/or class II were treated most often with removable partial dentures (RPD (p=0.000, while patients having class III were treated with fixed partial dentures (FPD. It was found that complete edentulousness increases in older age and the number of missing teeth was significantly higher among males. Kennedy class III was most common in both upper and lower jaw and was treated more often with FPD than with RPD.

  10. Masters theses from a university medical college: publication in indexed scientific journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Upreet; Singh, Navjeevan; Bhatia, Arati

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is an integral part of postgraduate medical education in India. Publication of the results of the thesis in an indexed journal is desirable; it validates the research and makes results available to researchers worldwide. To determine publication rates in indexed journals, of works derived from theses, and factors affecting publication. Postgraduate theses submitted over a five-year period (2001-05) in a university medical college were analyzed in a retrospective, observational study. Data retrieved included name and gender of postgraduate student, names, department and hierarchy of supervisor and co-supervisor(s), year submitted, study design, sample size, and statistically significant difference between groups. To determine subsequent publication in an indexed journal, Medline search was performed up to December 2007. Chi square test was used to compare publication rates based on categorical variables; Student's t-test was used to compare differences based on continuous variables. One hundred and sixty theses were retrieved, forty-eight (30%) were published. Papers were published 8-74 (33.7+/-17.33) months after thesis submission; the postgraduate student was first author in papers from 26 (54%) of the published theses. Gender of the student, department of origin, year of thesis submission, hierarchy of the supervisor, number and department of co-supervisors, and thesis characteristics did not influence publication rates. Rate of publication in indexed journals, of papers derived from postgraduate theses is 30%. In this study we were unable to identify factors that promote publication.

  11. Sounding narrative medicine: studying students' professional identity development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

    2014-02-01

    To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine's framework as it relates to students' professional development. On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Students' comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine--attention, representation, and affiliation--and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students' lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view.

  12. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Predictors of sickness absence in college and university educated self-employed: a historic register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnvoord, Liesbeth E C; Van der Klink, Jac J L; De Boer, Michiel R; Brouwer, Sandra

    2014-05-02

    Despite a large proportion of the workforce being self-employed, few studies have been conducted on risk factors for sickness absence in this population. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for future sickness absence in a population of college and university educated self-employed. In a historic register study based on insurance company files risk factors were identified by means of logistic regression analysis. Data collected at application for private disability insurance from 634 applicants were related to subsequent sickness absence periods of 30 days or more during a follow-up period of 7.95 years. Variables studied were self-reported lifestyle variables, variables concerning medical history and present health conditions and variables derived from the general medical examination including blood tests and urinary analysis. Results from analysis of data from 634 applicants for private disability insurance show that previous periods of sickness absence (OR 2.07), female gender (OR 2.04), health complaints listed in the health declaration (OR 1.88), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (OR 4.05) and the nature of the profession were related to a higher risk of sickness absence. Sickness absence was found to be related to demographic variables (gender, profession), medical variables (health complaints and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and to variables with both a medical and a behavioural component (previous sickness absence).

  14. Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students’ Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

  15. Evaluation of Microbial Contamination of Mobile Phone among Dentists in College of Dentistry in Baghdad University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool H. Al-Ghurabi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobiles have become one of the most indispensable accessories of profession and social life. The mobiles make life easier, but they pose a number of new hazards also. Objectives: The principle aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial contamination of mobile phones belonging to dentists in College of Dentistry in Baghdad University. Materials and Methods: 35 dentists (20 female and 15 male were enrolled in this study. Sampling was taken from each participant’s mobile by using moist sterile swab impregnated by normal saline for microbial analyses. Results: The findings of this study revealed that the growth of microorganisms has found in all samples taken from the mobile phones of dentists. The most common microorganisms detected were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus spp., Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. On the other hand, there was no significant difference (P>0.05 in the microorganisms isolated and their percentage frequency of occurrence between mobile phones for male and female. Concussions: The current results indicated that mobile phones can serve as a vector for crosstransmission of community-acquired pathogenic organisms for human.

  16. Learning-style preferences of Latino/Hispanic community college students enrolled in an introductory biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantopoulos, Helen D.

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify, according to the Productivity Environment Preference Survey (PEPS) instrument, which learning-style domains (environmental, emotional, sociological, and physiological) were favored among Latino/Hispanic community college students enrolled in introductory biology classes in a large, urban community college. An additional purpose of this study was to determine whether statistically significant differences existed between the learning-style preferences and the demographic variables of age, gender, number of prior science courses, second language learner status, and earlier exposure to scientific information. Methodology. The study design was descriptive and ex post facto. The sample consisted of a total of 332 Latino/Hispanic students enrolled in General Biology 3. Major findings. The study revealed that Latino/Hispanic students enrolled in introductory biology at a large urban community college scored higher for the learning preference element of structure. Students twenty-five years and older scored higher for the learning preference elements of light, design, persistence, responsibility, and morning time (p English language learners and those who learned English as their primary language (p instruments and on recent learning-style research articles on ethnically diverse groups of adult learners; and (2) Instructors should plan their instruction to incorporate the learning-style preferences of their students.

  17. Personal Qualities and College Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Warren W.; Breland, Hunter M.

    The extent to which personal and academic factors are important in college admission decisions was studied in 1978, based on data on 25,000 applicants to 9 colleges (Colgate University, Williams College, Ohio Wesleyan University, Kenyon College, Kalamazoo College, Occidental College, Hartwick College, University of Richmond, and Bucknell…

  18. The Issue for Development of Minban Universities and Colleges Contributing to Equality of Opportunity in Chinese Higher Education: Mainly on University and College Students Questionnaire at Heibei Province and Beijing City

    OpenAIRE

    楊, 雲; Yang, Yun

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the problems of Mimban(private)universities and colleges which are facing the challenge to contribute to the equality of opportunity in Chinese higher education. We examined the problems based on data collected from a questionnaire survey. The sample size was 1200 with a response rate of 81.2%. The question items included personal situations, family situations, fee paying and financial aid for student, the curriculum, the actual state of consciousness of employing etc. It ...

  19. First-generation college students and U.S. citizens: is the university perceived like family or strangers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shannon M; Karahalios, Vicky S; Ferrari, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    We examined school sense of community (SSOC) between university students who are first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 936) or students who are non-first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 3,556), and between first-generation college students (n = 1,114) and students who are non-first-generation college students (n = 3,378), both attending an urban and diverse Roman Catholic university. Participants reported their SSOC and whether the school was innovative and inclusive, examining whether a higher sense of school community and positive notions of one's campus mission related to being a first-generation U.S. citizen or a first-generation college student. Results showed that a lack of belongingness may lead to lower academic achievement, school dropouts, and less school involvement. Future research should explore why there is a differing impact on school sense of community and campus mission perception for students who are first-generation U.S. citizens or first-generation college students.

  20. Conveying campus sexual misconduct policy information to college and university students: Results from a 7-campus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S J; Edwards, K M; Banyard, V L; Stapleton, J G; Demers, J M; Moynihan, M M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of different methods (ie, in-class policy reading; in-class policy reading and discussion; no reading or discussion) to deliver campus sexual misconduct policy information to students on 7 campuses. A total of 1,195 participants at 7 colleges and universities participated in the study from August to October 2014. Participants were randomly assigned at the class level and completed pretest and posttest surveys assessing knowledge of campus policy and resources and confidence to seek help for sexual assault. Students exposed to a larger dosage of material (in-class policy reading plus discussion) showed greater positive changes in attitudes and knowledge than students who did not receive information or were only read the policy. However, on some indices, students who were only read the policy showed positive outcomes compared with students receiving no intervention. Colleges and universities must use engaging methods to disseminate campus sexual misconduct policies to students.

  1. Unseen disadvantage: how American universities' focus on independence undermines the academic performance of first-generation college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicole M; Fryberg, Stephanie A; Markus, Hazel Rose; Johnson, Camille S; Covarrubias, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    American universities increasingly admit first-generation college students whose parents do not have 4-year degrees. Once admitted, these students tend to struggle academically, compared with continuing-generation students--students who have at least 1 parent with a 4-year degree. We propose a cultural mismatch theory that identifies 1 important source of this social class achievement gap. Four studies test the hypothesis that first-generation students underperform because interdependent norms from their mostly working-class backgrounds constitute a mismatch with middle-class independent norms prevalent in universities. First, assessing university cultural norms, surveys of university administrators revealed that American universities focus primarily on norms of independence. Second, identifying the hypothesized cultural mismatch, a longitudinal survey revealed that universities' focus on independence does not match first-generation students' relatively interdependent motives for attending college and that this cultural mismatch is associated with lower grades. Finally, 2 experiments at both private and public universities created a match or mismatch for first-generation students and examined the performance consequences. Together these studies revealed that representing the university culture in terms of independence (i.e., paving one's own paths) rendered academic tasks difficult and, thereby, undermined first-generation students' performance. Conversely, representing the university culture in terms of interdependence (i.e., being part of a community) reduced this sense of difficulty and eliminated the performance gap without adverse consequences for continuing-generation students. These studies address the urgent need to recognize cultural obstacles that contribute to the social class achievement gap and to develop interventions to address them. 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Prevalence of obesity and overweight among the college students of the campus of health sciences of the university of Pernambuco

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane Tannuri Ferreira Lima Falcão; Marcelino Leite de Miranda; Roseane Maria Cavalcanti Silva

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of overweight and obesity is presented, currently, as one of the most important problems of public health. Objective: first to calculate the prevalence of obesity and overweight in the adolescent college students of the campus of health and sciences of the University of PE; to identify them according to: sex, age, monthly familiar income and life style. Methods: epidemiologic study and description, quantitative transversal line with characteristics. The population who took...

  3. USE OF E-RESOURCES BY THE FACULTY MEMBERS OF GUJARAT UNIVERSITY AFFILIATED SCIENCE COLLEGES OF AHMEDABAD CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha k. Jodhani

    2014-01-01

    This research study attempted to determine the several aspects of use of E-Resources by the teaching faculties of the Gujarat University affiliated Science Colleges. For data collection structural questionnaire was prepared and distributed to the 70 faculty members. The objectives of the study were to know the awareness about N-List programme of INFLIBNET Centre, purpose of use of e-resources, Linking patterns of e- resources and problem encountering while using the e-resources. Key words: E-...

  4. Gender Differences in Food Selections of Students at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Antonia S.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of proper nutrition and physical activity can lead to increased weight gain and development of chronic diseases. Studies show a nationwide trend in the number of college aged individuals being classified as overweight according to BMI calculations. College is a time of transition from adolescence to adulthood where habits that began in…

  5. From Foster Care to College: The Seita Scholars Program at Western Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrau, Yvonne A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 32,000 young people in the United States exit the foster care system in a typical year by aging out to independence (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2011). Despite available financial support for post-secondary education through the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, only 20% of college-qualified foster youth attend college and…

  6. Game Day Alcohol Expectancies among College Students from a University in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Tavis; Miller, Jeff; Miller, E. Maureen; Wohlwend, Jennifer; Reindl, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Background: The alcohol consumption associated with college sporting events depicts a public health challenge. Purpose: The aim of this investigation involved assessing the alcohol expectancies among college students associated with home football games and which of these expectancies was most predictive of high-risk drinking. Methods: Researchers…

  7. Community College Basic Skills Math Instructors' Experiences with Universal Design for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Multiple approaches have been used in U.S. community colleges to address the learning needs of postsecondary students who are underprepared in basic skills math. The purpose of this exploratory interview study was to gain a deeper understanding of community college basic skills math learning through instructors' lived experiences using the…

  8. Subprime Opportunity: The Unfulfilled Promise of For-Profit Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mamie; Engle, Jennifer; Cruz, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    As with the collapse of the subprime lending industry, the showdown between for-profit colleges and the government shows how the aspirations of the underserved, when combined with lax regulation, make the rich, richer and the poor, poorer. For-profit colleges provide high-cost degree programs that have little chance of leading to high-paying…

  9. Revising the Declension Narrative: Liberal Arts Colleges, Universities, and Honors Programs, 1870s-2010s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the prominent narrative asserting that liberal arts colleges have continuously declined in number and status over the past 130 years. Bruce A. Kimball identifies problems in this declension narrative and proposes a revision positing that the decline of liberal arts colleges began only after 1970. Further, he maintains that…

  10. Critical Components of Suicide Prevention Programs for Colleges and Universities: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite debate over whether or not college student suicide rates are greater or less than similar age groups not enrolled in higher education, the rates of college students experiencing suicide ideation, attempting suicide, and successfully committing suicide are indeed rising. A steady increase in these rates over the last 15 years is evidence…

  11. US College and University Student Health Screening Requirements for Tuberculosis and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Amy; Bell, Teal; Cohen, Nicole J.; Buckley, Kirsten; Leino, E. Victor; Even, Susan; Beavers, Suzanne; Brown, Clive; Marano, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Colleges are at risk for communicable disease outbreaks because of the high degree of person-to-person interactions and relatively crowded dormitory settings. This report describes the US college student health screening requirements among US resident and international students for tuberculosis (TB) and vaccine-preventable diseases…

  12. Minority stress and college persistence attitudes among African American, Asian American, and Latino students: perception of university environment as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin

    2011-04-01

    We examined whether perception of university environment mediated the association between minority status stress and college persistence attitudes after controlling for perceived general stress. Participants were 160 Asian American, African American, and Latino students who attended a predominantly White university. Results of a path model analysis showed that university environment was a significant mediator for the association between minority status stress and college persistence attitudes. Additionally, minority status stress was distinct from perceived general stress. Finally, the results from a multiple-group comparison indicated that the magnitude of the mediation effect was invariant across Asian American, African American, and Latino college students, thus supporting the generalizability of the mediation model.

  13. Biological accidents at work among resident physicians in specialist training at Bari University Hospital, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Antonella; Serra, Rosaria; Drago, Ignazio; Soleo, Leonardo; Lovreglio, Piero

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenon of accidents at work was investigated among the resident physicians of the School of Medicine, Bari University, by a self-administered anonymous questionnaire probing personal details and inquiring about any accidents at work experienced during the training period, and by a comparison with the accidents reported to the Hospital Accidents Registry. At least 1 biological accident was reported by 18.2% of the 450 participants, this percentage being significantly higher in the surgical area (33.3%), where biological accidents were much more rarely reported to either the Residency School Director or the Accidents Registry. In conclusion, despite an overall reduction compared with the past, the frequency both of biological accidents and of underreporting is still high among resident physicians, particularly in the surgical area. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Paediatric endocrine disorders at the university college hospital, ibadan: 2002 - 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, O O; Ogunbosi, B O; Ayoola, O O

    2013-12-01

    Until recently, most published research focus more on infectious diseases and malnutrition giving the impression that endocrine disorders are uncommon. Reports on endocrine disorders in children in developing countries are few compared to developed countries reflecting the different level of prevalence in the different geographical locations and or level of awareness and availability of facilities for proper diagnosis. This study aims at defining the burden of paediatric endocrine disorders in Ibadan. A review of records of children who presented at University College Hospital, Ibadan with paediatric endocrine disorders from 2002 to 2009 was carried out. During the eight-year period, a total of 110 children presented with various endocrine disorders but only 94 had complete data for this study. There were 47(50%) males and 37(39.4%) females, and in 10(10.6%) of them, had genital ambiguity at presentation. Patients' ages ranged from 2 weeks to 15 years with a median of 3 years. Many (35%) patients were malnourished with weight less than 80% of the expected weight for age and only 9% were overweight. Yearly distribution of cases showed a steady increase in number of cases from 2005. Rickets and metabolic disorders constituted 56.4% of patients; Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 12.8%, adrenal disoders in 10.6%, pubertal disorders in 5.3% and growth disorders in 4.3% of the patients. Thyroid disorders were present in 6.4%, obesity in 3.2% while the least common disorder was Diabetes insipidus (1%). About 58% of the children had parents in the low socioeconomic status and the management of the cases were severely hampered by lack of funds. About 60.6% of these patients were lost to follow up, during the period. Paediatric endocrine disorders are associated with a high incidence of malnutrition. Most patients presented with rickets which is a preventable condition.

  15. Baylor College of Medicine's support of Tulane University School of Medicine following Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Nancy S

    2007-08-01

    The authors describe how Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), with three other Texas medical schools, "adopted" virtually all the 620 medical students and 526 house officers of Tulane University School of Medicine and continued their education for eight months after most of New Orleans, including Tulane, was flooded on August 29, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina. Soon after, BCM's president asked all senior staff to take whatever actions were necessary to sustain Tulane, and on September 7, leaders from BCM and three other Texas medical schools met to plan the relocation of Tulane's students and programs. The authors explain how problems were overcome (e.g., locating the scattered Tulane students and staff, finding them lodging, obtaining their records, and providing financial aid and counseling), and how high-quality educational experiences were maintained for both Tulane's and BCM's students and residents while assisting Tulane's faculty in numerous ways, helping Tulane plan the enrollment of its following year's students, and undergoing Liaison Committee for Medical Education and Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education site visits to BCM. After the BCM-Tulane experience, BCM developed a disaster-management plan (available online) that could help other schools as they plan for disasters. The authors also offer lessons learned in the areas of communication, cooperation, curriculum, collaboration, contact with accrediting bodies, and compassion. They close by stating that when BCM faculty are asked "how could you take Tulane's medical school in?" their response is, "how could we not?" They continue: "In medical education, a frequent discussion is how to teach humanism and professionalism; we teach it best by modeling it."

  16. Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changzheng; Sun, Yangbo; Lv, Jun; Lusk, Anne C

    2017-08-18

    China has a historic system of wide cycle tracks, many of which are now encroached by cars, buses and bus stops. Even with these conditions, college students still bicycle. On campuses, students park their bikes on facilities ranging from kick-stand-plazas to caged sheds with racks, pumps and an attendant. In other countries, including Canada, some of the newer cycle tracks need to be wider to accommodate an increasing number of bicyclists. Other countries will also need to improve their bike parking, which includes garage-basement cages and two-tiered racks. China could provide lessons about cycle tracks and bike parking. This study applied the Maslow Transportation Level of Service (LOS) theory, i.e., for cycle tracks and bike parking, only after the basic needs of safety and security are met for both vehicle occupants and bicyclists can the higher needs of convenience and comfort be met. With random clustering, a self-administered questionnaire was collected from 410 students in six dormitory buildings at Peking University in Beijing and an environmental scan of bicycle parking conducted in school/office and living areas. Cycle tracks (1 = very safe/5 = very unsafe) shared with moving cars were most unsafe (mean = 4.6), followed by sharing with parked cars (4.1) or bus stop users (4.1) ( p bus lane beside a cycle track might be considered or, with China's recent increase in bike riding, shared bikes and E-bikes, perhaps cars/buses could be banned from the wide cycle tracks. In other countries, a widened cycle track entrance should deter cars. Everywhere, bike parking sheds could be built and redesigned with painted lines to offer more space and order, similar to car parking.

  17. A survey of the medical and dental consultants' management skills in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, C O; Arowojulo, M O; Obiechina, A E; Fasola, A O; Olumide, E A

    2003-12-01

    Good management/administration is vital in the realisation of any business objective whether in a private or public establishment. The aims of this study were to assess the level of knowledge and ability on management/administrative skills by Medical/Dental consultants as perceived by themselves; to stimulate more interest in management/administrative skills acquisition, and to suggest possible ways in achieving such skills by doctors. A self-evaluation questionnaire was distributed to the doctors and 88 of them completed and returned their forms. They consisted of 55 (62.5%) males and 33 (37.5%) females cutting across all the specialities in medicine and dentistry in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. In all, 42 (47.7%) of the respondents reported that they had good ability of management/administration while 46 (52.3%) were below average. Of the 55 males, 28 (31.8%) had good ability while 27 (30.7%) were below average. Fourteen (15.9%) of the females had good ability while (21.6%) were below average. Good knowledge was assumed by 41 (46.6%) of the respondents while 47 (53.4%) were below average. Twenty-seven (30.7%) of the males showed good knowledge as against 14 (15.9%) of the females. Twenty-eight (31.8%) of the males were below average as against 19 (21.6%) of the female respondents. The sex differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The surgeons significantly (Pskills than physicians though their claim of ability to perform was higher too but significant (P>0.05). The percentage of the consultants with good knowledge and ability was found to increase with increasing age except for those under 40 years of age. The differences were not significant (P>0.05). A strong positive correlation (r=0.948; Pskills will positively affect their performance abilities.

  18. PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF JOB STRESS AMONG JUNIOR DOCTORS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL, IBADAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeolu, J O; Yussuf, O B; Popoola, O A

    2016-12-01

    Doctors respond differently to their complex work environment, some find it stimulating while others find it stressful. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of stress among junior doctors in a teaching hospital in Southwest Nigeria. A descriptive cross sectional survey of all junior doctors employed at the University College Hospital, Ibadan was carried out. Information was collected with a structured pretested questionnaire from 253 doctors. Descriptive statistics were generated. T-test, chi square and logistic regression analyses were conducted using SPSS version 16. Statistical significance was set at 5%. Mean age of respondents was 29.9 (±4.1) years, 61.3% were males, 59% had spent less than 5 years in medical practice, and 34.8% were married. Majority (79.4%) were resident doctors. Prevalence of stress, job dissatisfaction and poor mental health were 31.6%, 15.4% and 9.9% respectively. Age, gender, years of medical practice, religion, ethnicity and marital status were not significantly associated with job stress (p>0.05). Doctors who were stressed were more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs (OR=2.33; CI=1.08-4.04) and to have poor mental health (OR=3.82; CI=1.47-9.95) than those who were not stressed. The prevalence of stress in this study is high, and job dissatisfaction and poor mental health have been implicated as determinants of stress. As such, there should be an improvement in doctors' welfare, health care facilities and delivery.

  19. Food insecurity prevalence among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, M Pia; Zaghloul, Sahar S; Holck, Peter; Dobbs, Joannie

    2009-11-01

    To assess the prevalence and identify possible predictors of food insecurity among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. Cross-sectional survey, including the US Department of Agriculture's Household Food Security Survey Module, demographic and spending variables. University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i (USA). Four hundred and forty-one non-freshmen students from thirty-one randomly selected classes. Twenty-one per cent of students surveyed were food-insecure, while 24 % were at risk of food insecurity. Students at higher risk of food insecurity included those who reported living on campus and those living off-campus with room mates. Those identifying themselves as Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, Filipinos and mixed were also at increased risk of food insecurity. Food insecurity is a significant problem among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. Food availability and accessibility should be increased for these students through the establishment of on-campus food banks and student gardens. Future studies should assess the prevalence of food insecurity in other college campuses nationwide.

  20. Image of Synthetic Biology and Nanotechnology: A Survey among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ineichen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the image of synthetic biology and nanotechnology in comparison to agricultural biotechnology and communication technology by examining spontaneous associations with, and deliberate evaluations of, these technologies by university students. Data were collected through a self-completion online questionnaire by students from two universities in Switzerland. The survey aimed to capture implicit associations, explicit harm-benefit evaluations and views on regulation. The data suggest overall positive associations with emerging technologies. While positive associations were most pronounced for nanotechnology, agricultural biotechnology was attributed with the least favorable associations. In contrast to its positive result in the association task, respondents attributed a high harm potential for nanotechnology. Associations attributed to synthetic biology were demonstrated to be more positive than for agricultural biotechnology, however, not as favorable as for nanotechnology. Contrary to the evaluations of nanotechnology, the benefit-examples of synthetic biology were evaluated particularly positively. Accordingly, the investigated technologies enjoy different esteem, with synthetic biology and nanotechnology both showing a more “exciting” image. Even though, the image of nanotechnology was demonstrated to be more pronounced it was also more heterogeneous across tasks while agricultural biotechnology remains contested. For all technologies, the predominant spontaneous concerns pertain to risks rather than an immoral nature inherent to these technologies. Our data suggest that harm-benefit analyses reveal only one aspect of the attitude toward emerging technologies. Survey questions addressing spontaneous associations with these technologies are a valuable addition for our picture of the image of emerging technologies.

  1. Predictive performance of the American College of Surgeons universal risk calculator in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Sasha; Wilson, Jacob; Abbatematteo, Joseph; Kubilis, Paul; Chakraborty, Saptarshi; Kshitij, Khare; Hoh, Daniel J

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) universal Surgical Risk Calculator is an online decision-support tool that uses patient characteristics to estimate the risk of adverse postoperative events. Further validation of this risk calculator in the neurosurgical population is needed; therefore, the object of this study was to assess the predictive performance of the ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator in neurosurgical patients treated at a tertiary care center. METHODS A single-center retrospective review of 1006 neurosurgical patients treated in the period from September 2011 through December 2014 was performed. Individual patient characteristics were entered into the NSQIP calculator. Predicted complications were compared with actual occurrences identified through chart review and administrative quality coding data. Statistical models were used to assess the predictive performance of risk scores. Traditionally, an ideal risk prediction model demonstrates good calibration and strong discrimination when comparing predicted and observed events. RESULTS The ACS NSQIP risk calculator demonstrated good calibration between predicted and observed risks of death (p = 0.102), surgical site infection (SSI; p = 0.099), and venous thromboembolism (VTE; p = 0.164) Alternatively, the risk calculator demonstrated a statistically significant lack of calibration between predicted and observed risk of pneumonia (p = 0.044), urinary tract infection (UTI; p calculator was assessed using the c-statistic. Death (c-statistic 0.93), UTI (0.846), and pneumonia (0.862) demonstrated strong discriminative performance. Discharge to a rehabilitation facility or nursing home (c-statistic 0.794) and VTE (0.767) showed adequate discrimination. Return to the operating room (c-statistic 0.452) and SSI (0.556) demonstrated poor discriminative performance. The risk prediction model was both well calibrated and discriminative only for 30-day

  2. Social norms information for alcohol misuse in university and college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxcroft, David R; Moreira, Maria Teresa; Almeida Santimano, Nerissa M L; Smith, Lesley A

    2015-12-29

    Drinking is influenced by youth perceptions of how their peers drink. These perceptions are often incorrect, overestimating peer drinking norms. If inaccurate perceptions can be corrected, young people may drink less. To determine whether social norms interventions reduce alcohol-related negative consequences, alcohol misuse or alcohol consumption when compared with a control (ranging from assessment only/no intervention to other educational or psychosocial interventions) among university and college students. The following electronic databases were searched up to July 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) only to March 2008. Reference lists of included studies and review articles were manually searched. No restriction based on language or date was applied. Randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised controlled trials that compared a social normative intervention versus no intervention, alcohol education leaflet or other 'non-normative feedback' alcohol intervention and reported on alcohol consumption or alcohol-related problems in university or college students. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. Each outcome was analysed by mode of delivery: mailed normative feedback (MF); web/computer normative feedback (WF); individual face-to-face normative feedback (IFF); group face-to-face normative feedback (GFF); and normative marketing campaign (MC). A total of 70 studies (44,958 participants) were included in the review, and 63 studies (42,784 participants) in the meta-analyses. Overall, the risk of bias assessment showed that these studies provided moderate or low quality evidence.Outcomes at four or more months post-intervention were of particular interest to assess when effects were sustained beyond the immediate short term. We have reported pooled effects across delivery modes

  3. Depression, desperation, and suicidal ideation in college students: results from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention College Screening Project at Emory University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Rosenberg, Jill; Moore, J David; Haas, Ann P; Koestner, Bethany; Hendin, Herbert; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine suicidal ideation and depression in undergraduate college students who participated in the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-sponsored College Screening Project at Emory University. The principal measure of depressive symptoms was the nine-item depression module from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Additional questions were focused on current suicidal ideation, past suicide attempts, and episodes of deliberate self-harm and on symptoms of anxiety and distress. Seven hundred and twenty-nine students participated over a 3-school-year interval (2002-2005). Most notably, 11.1% of the students endorsed current (past 4 weeks) suicidal ideation and 16.5% had a lifetime suicide attempt or self-injurious episode. Students with current suicidal ideation had significantly higher depression symptom severity than those without suicidal ideation (t = -9.34, df = 706, Pstudents with PHQ-9 scores of 15 or higher reported suicidal ideation compared to 5.7% of those with lower scores (chi(2) = 56.29, df = 1, Pstudents with moderately severe to severe depression (85%) or current suicidal ideation (84%) were not receiving any psychiatric treatment at the time of assessment. These results suggest that there is a strong relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in college students, and that suicidal feelings and actions are relatively common in this group. This underscores the need to provide effective mental health outreach and treatment services to this vulnerable population. As this analysis was based on data collected at a single institution, the results may not be representative of all college students or young adults.

  4. Teaching practices and professional development of biology professors at small, private, liberal arts colleges in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Sarah Elizabeth Bradford

    Science teaching in pre-college institutions has been undergoing reform in recent years, particularly since 1996, when the National Science Education Standards were published. This reform includes inquiry-based teaching, student-centered classrooms, authentic assessment, and collaborative learning. Professional development is also recommended in the Standards document as the means for preparing teachers for reform-based teaching in pre-college classrooms. In post-secondary institutions, there is no curriculum-governing body to institute reform, and college faculty have devised their own standards and methods for teaching science, most often in the form of lecture and traditional procedure-driven laboratory exercises. This study was conducted to find examples of reform-based biology teaching in small, private, liberal arts colleges in the Southeast, where teaching innovations may be more likely to occur due to the size and independence of the schools. Professional development opportunities were also examined, since these would be important in the development of new curricula and methods of teaching. Data were collected from 151 participants, representing 78.3% of these colleges in eight southeastern states, by survey and from three volunteers by on-site interviews. Teaching was the main responsibility reported by all respondents, with both lower and upper level biology courses taught by all participants. Significant differences were found in the use of reform-based teaching in lower level biology courses versus upper level biology courses. Overall average use of inquiry-based teaching was 70.5%, while student-centered learning was reported on average by 57% of respondents, authentic assessment was reported on average by 56.6% of respondents, and collaborative learning was reported on average by 56% of respondents. Professional development opportunities most frequently used were reported to be journal, books, and videotapes. Multivariate regression analyses revealed

  5. The biological universe. The twentieth century extraterrestrial life debate and the limits of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, S. J.

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. Does 'biological law' reign throughout the universe? Are there other histories, religions, and philosophies outside of those on Earth? Do extraterrestrial minds ponder the mysteries of the universe? The attempts to answer these often asked questions form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of science and culture, and this is the first book to provide a rich and colorful history of those attempts during the twentieth century. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, the author shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a 'biophysical cosmology' that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe.

  6. Oral biology in middle age: a history of the University at Buffalo Oral Biology PhD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, F A

    2014-05-01

    In 1960, the first Department of Oral Biology in the United States dedicated to the conduct of research, graduate biomedical research education, and the provision of basic oral science education for the DDS curriculum was established at the University at Buffalo. In 1963, the Department organized the first PhD Program in Oral Biology in the United States. This PhD program has produced a large cadre of oral health researchers, many of whom have gone on to make major contributions to dental research and education. This article provides a brief history of the program, the context within which the program was organized and developed, and a description of some of the many faculty, students, and fellows associated with the program. Additionally, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this program, a symposium, entitled "The Oral Microbiome, Immunity and Chronic Disease", was held on June 12-14, 2013, in Buffalo, New York. The proceedings are published online in Advances in Dental Research (2014, Vol. 26).

  7. Master's Theses in Progress in Selected Colleges and Universities, 1987-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mac A.

    1988-01-01

    Lists master's theses in progress in the following six schools during the 1986-87 and 1987-88 academic years: Hampton University, Howard University, North Carolina A & T State University, Alabama State University, and Jackson State University. Classifies the theses into 25 subject categories. For each item the name of the student, thesis…

  8. The impact of an introductory college-level biology class on biology self-efficacy and attitude towards science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Megan Elizabeth

    Self-efficacy theory was first introduced in a seminal article by Albert Bandura in 1977 entitled "Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change". Since its original introduction, self-efficacy has been a major focus of academic performance, anxiety, career development, and teacher retention research. Self-efficacy can be defined as the belief an individual possesses about their ability to perform a given task. Bandura proposed that self-efficacy should be measured at the highest level of specificity due to the fact that different people are efficacious in different areas. Interested in students' efficacy toward biology, Ebert-May, Baldwin, & Allred (1997) created and validated a survey to measure students' biology self-efficacy. Their survey was modeled after the guidelines for science literacy, and loaded to three sub-factors; methods of biology, generalization to other science courses, and application of the concepts. As self-efficacy theory has been related to effort expenditure and persistence (Bandura, 1977; 1997), one might think it would have some effect on students' attitudes toward the topic at hand. The current research investigated what changes in biology self-efficacy occurred after an introductory biology course with an inquiry based laboratory learning environment. In addition, changes in students' attitudes towards science were explored and how self-efficacy might affect them.

  9. The Development of Environment based Textbook in Biology Course at Tribhuwana Tunggadewi University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Aji Prasetiyo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental issues are rooted in human behavior is often found in everyday life, one contributing factor was not maximal the environment learning outcomes in the education. The purpose of this study is to develop environment based textbook in Biology course suited to the needs and character of college students. The development model used in this research and development are modified Thiagarajan et al model consists of three stages: define, design, and develop. The technique of collecting data using questionnaires validation for experts, and small-scale trials. The result of the development of textbooks showing the average results of the validation and testing is in the category with a good fit for use in accordance with the table eligibility criteria and product revision level.

  10. UltraPse: A Universal and Extensible Software Platform for Representing Biological Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu-Feng Du

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With the avalanche of biological sequences in public databases, one of the most challenging problems in computational biology is to predict their biological functions and cellular attributes. Most of the existing prediction algorithms can only handle fixed-length numerical vectors. Therefore, it is important to be able to represent biological sequences with various lengths using fixed-length numerical vectors. Although several algorithms, as well as software implementations, have been developed to address this problem, these existing programs can only provide a fixed number of representation modes. Every time a new sequence representation mode is developed, a new program will be needed. In this paper, we propose the UltraPse as a universal software platform for this problem. The function of the UltraPse is not only to generate various existing sequence representation modes, but also to simplify all future programming works in developing novel representation modes. The extensibility of UltraPse is particularly enhanced. It allows the users to define their own representation mode, their own physicochemical properties, or even their own types of biological sequences. Moreover, UltraPse is also the fastest software of its kind. The source code package, as well as the executables for both Linux and Windows platforms, can be downloaded from the GitHub repository.

  11. Operational Efficiency of Information Technology and Organizational Performance of State Universities and Colleges in Region VI, Philippines

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    Samson M. Lausa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years educational institutions have been investing increasingly substantial amount of money in integrating Information Technology (IT in the course of educational services delivery with the objective of improving operational efficiency and competitive advantage. The important role IT plays in educational institutions is unquestionable. It is regarded as a critical factor of innovation for growth and survival. The evaluation of the impact of this innovation in the educational system drives the researcher to undertake a study on Operational Efficiency of Information Technology and Organizational Performance of State Universities and Colleges (SUCs of Region VI, Philippines. Descriptive method was used utilizing a validated survey questionnaire which also involved the desk and field research conducted by a panel of two field researchers including the researcher himself covering selected SUCs of Region VI. Deans or department heads and faculty of the different colleges or departments, administrative and academic officials constitute the respondents of the study. Stratified proportional random sampling and purposive sampling were used in the study. Results of the study were viewed and analyzed using the Mean and the Pearson r Correlation Coefficient. Findings revealed that the operational efficiency of the SUCs of Region VI is moderately efficient while the majority of colleges/universities are performing moderately efficient. The study also revealed that the organizational performance of SUCs and the majority of colleges/universities are performing very satisfactory. Likewise, the findings also showed a significant relationship between the operational efficiency of information technology and organizational performance of SUCs. However, a significant relationship between operational efficiency and organizational performance of SUCs in instruction does not exist while a significant relationship exists in research, extension and

  12. Liberal Arts and Sciences Education for the 21st Century Knowledge Economy: A Case Study of Amsterdam University College, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Bog, Deirdre; van der Wende, Marijk; Jung, Insung; Nishimura, Mikiko; Sasao, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how Amsterdam University College (AUC), a liberal arts and science honours college in The Netherlands, promotes internationalization and adopts a global approach in its curriculum and academic community. It shows how global learning outcomes and 21st century skills can be

  13. Liberal Arts and Sciences Education for the 21st Century Knowledge Economy : A Case Study of Amsterdam University College, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wende, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how Amsterdam University College (AUC), a liberal arts and science honours college in The Netherlands, promotes internationalization and adopts a global approach in its curriculum and academic community. It shows how global learning outcomes and 21st century skills can be

  14. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  15. The Adult Learning Open University Determinants (ALOUD) Study: Biological and Psychological Factors Associated with Learning Performance in Adult Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neroni, Joyce; Gijselaers, Hieronymus J. M.; Kirschner, Paul A.; Groot, Renate H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning is crucial for everyone. The association between biological (eg, sleep, nutrition) and psychological factors (eg, test anxiety, goal orientation) and learning performance has been well established for children, adolescents and college students in traditional education. Evidence for these associations for adult distance students is lacking…

  16. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at Renaissance College (University of New Brunswick): A Case Study of SoTL at the Faculty Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents the case study of Renaissance College at the University of New Brunswick, discussing the faculty's achievements, challenges, and outlook for the future in the context of the scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada.

  17. College students identify university support for basic needs and life skills as key ingredient in addressing food insecurity on campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Watson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A recent University of California (UC systemwide survey showed that 42% of UC college students experience food insecurity, consistent with other studies among U.S. college students. As part of UC's efforts to understand and address student food insecurity, we conducted 11 focus group interviews across four student subpopulations at UC Los Angeles (n = 82. We explored student experiences, perceptions and concerns related to both food insecurity and food literacy, which may help protect students against food insecurity. Themes around food insecurity included student awareness about food insecurity, cost of university attendance, food insecurity consequences, and coping strategies. Themes around food literacy included existing knowledge and skills, enjoyment and social cohesion, and learning in the dining halls. Unifying themes included the campus food environment not meeting student needs, a desire for practical financial and food literacy “life skills” training, and skepticism about the university's commitment to adequately address student basic needs. The results of this study broadly suggest there is opportunity for the university to address student food insecurity through providing food literacy training, among other strategies.

  18. Do loans increase college access and choice?: examining the introduction of universal student loans

    OpenAIRE

    Bridget Terry Long

    2007-01-01

    The returns to college are substantial, including increased earnings and public benefits, such as better health and increased involvement in public service and giving. As a result, since the introduction of the Guaranteed Student Loan program in 1965 and the Pell Grant in 1972, the federal government has experimented with using financial aid to increase college access, choice, and affordability. ; Although years of research support the notion that financial aid can influence students' post-se...

  19. Undergraduate veterinary education at University College Dublin: a time of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael L; Jones, Boyd R

    2006-01-01

    The final-year Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine (MVB) class of 2005 were the first cohort of students to complete the new curriculum at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin (UCD). The new curriculum is a fundamental departure from the traditional curriculum that had served the veterinary profession in Ireland over many years. The change was not a precipitate action but the outcome of a prolonged and thorough examination of the realities of veterinary medicine, its science and its art, in the first decade of a new millennium. Over recent decades, rapid and fundamental changes have been witnessed in the economic, cultural, and ethical environment in which the veterinary profession operates, and these changes, coupled with the "information explosion," dictated an examination of the educational paradigm. The new curriculum exposes the first-year class to veterinary information technology and problem-based learning (PBL). In the second year, students are instructed in clinical examination, history taking, and client communication skills, in addition to further exposure to PBL. The third and fourth years are now systems-based, with coordinated input from microbiologists, parasitologists, pathologists, and clinicians in teaching each body system. The first lecture-free final year in the 104-year history of veterinary education in Ireland consists of clinical rotations and a four-week elective pursued within the faculty or at other recognized institutions. Students must also complete a minimum of 24 weeks' extramural studies (EMS). Critically, the development and assessment of all courses in the new undergraduate degree program has been driven by carefully thought out learning outcomes. The new curriculum will provide graduates with the essential knowledge and skills required for entry into the veterinary profession. Society expects these qualities from veterinarians in the interests of the communities they serve during their professional careers

  20. The perceived benefits of singing: findings from preliminary surveys of a university college choral society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, S M; Hancox, G

    2001-12-01

    Two exploratory studies are reported on the perceived benefits associated with active participation in choral singing. In the first study, 84 members of a university college choral society completed a brief questionnaire that asked whether they had benefited personally from their involvement in the choir and whether there were ways in which participation could benefit their health. A large majority of respondents agreed they had benefited socially (87%) and emotionally (75%), with 58% agreeing they had benefited in some physical way, and 49% spiritually. A content analysis of written comments served to elaborate the ways in which choir members felt they had benefited. Common themes expressed were: meeting new people, feeling more positive, increased control over breathing, feeling more alert and feeling spiritually uplifted. With respect to health benefits, 84% of participants gave answers, the main themes of which related to improved lung function and breathing, improved mood and stress reduction. In the second study, 91 members of the choir completed a structured questionnaire consisting of 32 statements about singing reflecting the ideas expressed in the first study. Over 40% of respondents strongly agreed that 'singing helps to make my mood more positive', 'singing is a moving experience for me sometimes', 'singing makes me feel a lot happier' and 'singing is good for my soul'. A principal components analysis followed by Oblimin rotation identified six dimensions of benefit associated with singing. These were labelled as: benefits for well-being and relaxation, benefits for breathing and posture, social benefits, spiritual benefits, emotional benefits, and benefits for heart and immune system. Cronbach alpha coefficients were satisfactory for all components except the third, social benefits, due primarily to the small number of items loading on this component. Women were significantly more likely to experience benefits for well-being and relaxation, younger

  1. Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changzheng; Sun, Yangbo; Lv, Jun; Lusk, Anne C.

    2017-01-01

    China has a historic system of wide cycle tracks, many of which are now encroached by cars, buses and bus stops. Even with these conditions, college students still bicycle. On campuses, students park their bikes on facilities ranging from kick-stand-plazas to caged sheds with racks, pumps and an attendant. In other countries, including Canada, some of the newer cycle tracks need to be wider to accommodate an increasing number of bicyclists. Other countries will also need to improve their bike parking, which includes garage-basement cages and two-tiered racks. China could provide lessons about cycle tracks and bike parking. This study applied the Maslow Transportation Level of Service (LOS) theory, i.e., for cycle tracks and bike parking, only after the basic needs of safety and security are met for both vehicle occupants and bicyclists can the higher needs of convenience and comfort be met. With random clustering, a self-administered questionnaire was collected from 410 students in six dormitory buildings at Peking University in Beijing and an environmental scan of bicycle parking conducted in school/office and living areas. Cycle tracks (1 = very safe/5 = very unsafe) shared with moving cars were most unsafe (mean = 4.6), followed by sharing with parked cars (4.1) or bus stop users (4.1) (p security (guard or camera), bicycle racks and bicycle parking services (pumps, etc.). If parking were improved, three quarters indicated they would bicycle more. While caged sheds were preferred, in living areas with 1597 parked bikes, caged sheds were only 74.4% occupied. For the future of China’s wide cycle tracks, perhaps a fence-separated bus lane beside a cycle track might be considered or, with China’s recent increase in bike riding, shared bikes and E-bikes, perhaps cars/buses could be banned from the wide cycle tracks. In other countries, a widened cycle track entrance should deter cars. Everywhere, bike parking sheds could be built and redesigned with painted lines

  2. Acceptability of Male Circumcision among College Students in Medical Universities in Western China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Jiang

    Full Text Available Male circumcision (MC has been shown to reduce the risk of female to male transmission of HIV. The goal of this survey was to explore MC's acceptability and the factors associated with MC among college students in medical universities in western China.A cross-sectional study was carried out in three provinces in western China (Guangxi, Chongqing and Xinjiang to assess the acceptability of MC as well as to discover factors associated with the acceptability among college students in medical universities. A total of 1,790 uncircumcised male students from three medical universities were enrolled in this study. In addition, 150 students who had undergone MC were also enrolled in the survey, and they participated in in-depth interviews.Of all the uncircumcised participants (n = 1,790, 55.2% (n = 988 were willing to accept MC. Among those who accepted MC, 67.3% thought that MC could improve their sexual partners' hygiene, 46.3% believed that HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs could be partially prevented by MC. The multivariable logistic regression indicates that MC's acceptability was associated with three factors: the redundant foreskin (OR = 10.171, 95% CI = 7.629-13.559, knowing the hazard of having a redundant foreskin (OR = 1.597, 95% CI = 1.097-2.323, and enhancing sexual pleasure (OR = 1.628, 95% CI = 1.312-2.021. The in-depth interviews for subjects who had undergone MC showed that the major reason for having MC was the redundant foreskin (87.3%, followed by the benefits and the fewer complications of having MC done. In addition, most of these participants (65.3% said that the MC could enhance sexual satisfaction.MC's acceptance among college students in medical universities is higher than it is among other populations in western China. An implementation of an MC programme among this population is feasible in the future.

  3. Factors Affecting Mental Health Service Utilization Among California Public College and University Students.

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    Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W; Mendelsohn, Joshua; D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Osilla, Karen Chan; Jaycox, Lisa H; Eberhart, Nicole K; Burnam, Audrey M; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-08-01

    Unmet need for mental health treatment among college students is a significant public health issue. Despite having access to campus mental health providers and insurance to cover services, many college students do not receive necessary services. This study examined factors influencing college students' use of mental health services. Online survey data for 33,943 students and 14,018 staff and faculty at 39 college campuses in California were analyzed by using logistic regressions examining the association between students' use of mental health services and student characteristics, campus environment, and the presence of a formal network of campus mental health clinics. Nineteen percent of students reported current serious psychological distress in the past 30 days, and 11% reported significant mental health-related academic impairment in the past year. Twenty percent reported using mental health services while at their current college, 10% by using campus services and 10% off-campus services. Students on campuses with a formal network of mental health clinics were more likely than students at community colleges to receive mental health services (odds ratio [OR] range=1.68-1.69), particularly campus services (OR=3.47-5.72). Students on campuses that are supportive of mental health issues were more likely to receive mental health services (OR=1.22), particularly on campus (OR=1.65). Students with active (versus low) coping skills were consistently more likely to use mental health services. Establishing more campus mental health clinics, fostering supportive campus environments, and increasing students' coping skills may reduce unmet need for mental health services among college students.

  4. A Best-Practice Model for Academic Advising of University Biology Majors

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    Heekin, Jonathan Ralph Calvin

    Biology faculty at an East Coast university believed their undergraduate students were not being well served by the existing academic advising program. The purpose of this mixed methods project study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the academic advising model in a biology department. Guided by system-based organizational theory, a learning organization model, and holistic theory emphasizing an individual's journey of academic and personal growth, an online survey, student focus groups, and faculty interviews were used to collect data, which developed recommendations for improving undergraduate academic advising in the biology department. Using Survey Monkey, 35 surveys were returned. Frequency tables, ANOVAs, and t tests produced the results of the survey. The results of the ANOVAs and t tests indicated statically significant differences (p focus groups. The results from the interviews and focus groups indicated that the role of mentor should remain at the faculty level, guiding students in what they can do with their degrees and discussing options that students may not have considered. The proposed model for academic advising may improve student success rates for undergraduates enrolled in the biology department at the current institution, as well as in science-oriented programs at other institutions, by providing better guidance to those who serve them in academic advising.

  5. Correct your own exam. Exercises for university students to develop writing skills in biology

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    Hódar José A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a project intended to improve an essential aspect of student learning, i.e. writing essay tests, directed to students of the Undergraduate Degree in Biology at the University of Granada (Spain. Previous results indicate that most students are well prepared and understand most of the concepts basic to Biology, as reflected in the multiple-choice questions, but perform poorly when answering the essay questions. This work seeks to improve speech, writing, and conceptual organization of student responses in the essay questions, and to maintain skills developed during this project. The core of the project was a session of correcting written exercises, conducted in groups during class time and led by the teacher. The analysis of the scores reveals better student performance, reflecting the usefulness of these exercises for improving the students’ skills in written expression

  6. How does undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding, in regard to the role of the seed plant root system, relate to their level of understanding of photosynthesis?

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    Njeng'ere, James Gicheha

    This research study investigated how undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding of the role of the seed plant root system relates to their level of understanding of photosynthesis. This research was conducted with 65 undergraduate non-majors biology who had completed 1 year of biology at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge and Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. A root probe instrument was developed from some scientifically acceptable propositional statements about the root system, the process of photosynthesis, as well as the holistic nature of the tree. These were derived from research reviews of the science education and the arboriculture literature. This was administered to 65 students selected randomly from class lists of the two institutions. Most of the root probe's items were based on the Live Oak tree. An in-depth, clinical interview-based analysis was conducted with 12 of those tested students. A team of root experts participated by designing, validating and answering the same questions that the students were asked. A "systems" lens as defined by a team of college instructors, root experts (Shigo, 1991), and this researcher was used to interpret the results. A correlational coefficient determining students' level of understanding of the root system and their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis was established by means of Pearson's r correlation (r = 0.328) using the SAS statistical analysis (SAS, 1987). From this a coefficient of determination (r2 = 0.104) was determined. Students' level of understanding of the Live Oak root system (mean score 5.94) was not statistically different from their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis (mean score 5.54) as assessed by the root probe, t (129) = 0.137, p > 0.05 one tailed-test. This suggests that, to some degree, level of the root system limits level of understanding of photosynthesis and vice versa. Analysis of quantitative and qualitative

  7. Factors Associated with Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status at U.S. Colleges and Universities.

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    Thompson, Vetta L Sanders; Butler-Barnes, Sheretta T; Jones, Brittni D; Wells, Anjanette A; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M; Williams, Sha-Lai

    2017-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain low, but college student vaccination could offset this trend. This study identifies characteristics that could enhance HPV vaccination among U.S. college students. Data were from the National College Health Assessment II survey (fall 2012, N = 18,919). Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations among demographic characteristics, college region and size, health status, receipt of health services, sexual health information, and HPV vaccination status. Among women, ethnic minorities, students attending schools in the South, those not receiving routine gynecological care in the past 12 months, and those unsure of when they last received gynecological care were less likely to report HPV vaccination. Among men, African Americans, students attending schools in the South and West, and those receiving sexually transmitted infection information were more likely to report vaccination. Data suggest that college health education can help to improve U.S. HPV vaccination rates. Campus health practitioners providing sexual health information and referrals are positioned to assist in this effort. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  8. Should Colleges Focus More on Personal and Social Responsibility? Initial Findings from Campus Surveys Conducted for the Association of American Colleges and Universities as Part of Its Initiative, Core Commitments: Educating Students for Personal and Social Responsibility

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    Antonaros, Mary; Barnhardt, Cassie; Holsapple, Matthew; Moronski, Karen; Vergoth, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    On behalf of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), researchers at the University of Michigan's Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education surveyed 23,000 undergraduate students and 9,000 campus professionals (faculty, academic administrators, and student affairs staff) at 23 institutions participating in…

  9. Multimodal Representation Contributes to the Complex Development of Science Literacy in a College Biology Class

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    Bennett, William Drew

    2011-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the science literacy of college genetics students who were given a modified curriculum to address specific teaching and learning problems from a previous class. This study arose out of an interest by the professor and researcher to determine how well students in the class Human Genetics in the 21st Century…

  10. Syntactical and Punctuation Errors: An Analysis of Technical Writing of University Students Science College, Taif University, KSA

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    Alamin, Abdulamir; Ahmed, Sawsan

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing errors committed by second language learners during their first year of study at the University of Taif, can offer insights and knowledge of the learners' difficulties in acquiring technical English communication. With reference to the errors analyzed, the researcher found that the learners' failure to understand basic English grammar…

  11. Does family history of alcohol problems influence college and university drinking or substance use? A meta-analytical review.

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    Elliott, Jennifer C; Carey, Kate B; Bonafide, Katherine E

    2012-10-01

    Family history of alcohol use problems is a reliable determinant of alcohol use and problems in the population at large, but findings are inconsistent when this issue is examined in college and university students. No quantitative summary of this literature has been reported to date. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis on the effects of family history on substance use and abuse in college and university students. A two-group contrast meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the differences in substance use and abuse between family history-positive and -negative students pursuing higher education. The studies that contributed data to this meta-analysis were conducted in five countries, with the majority of studies from the United States. A total of 65 published papers (53 samples) contributed data from 89 766 participants attending university or college. Effect sizes were coded for alcohol consumption, problems and use disorder symptoms, as well as other illegal drug use and abuse. Two independent coders calculated effect sizes and coded descriptive content about the papers, and discrepancies were reconciled. Family history was used as the grouping variable. Family history had a minimal effect on alcohol consumption, with stronger effects on alcohol consequences (Cohen's d: 0.21-0.25), alcohol use disorder symptoms (Cohen's d: 0.24) and other drug involvement (Cohen's d: 0.37-0.86). Relative to students without a family history of alcohol problems, students with positive family histories do not drink more, but may be at greater risk for difficulties with alcohol and drugs. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. The prevalence of and factors associated with current smoking among College of Health Sciences students, Mekelle University in northern Ethiopia.

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    Tadele Eticha

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is one of the greatest causes of preventable morbidity and mortality globally, and is responsible for many causes of untimely deaths. This survey was aimed to determine prevalence and factors associated with current smoking among the students of College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Ethiopia.A cross-sectional study was employed using a structured self-administered questionnaire among College of Health Sciences students in March 2013. A stratified random sampling method was employed to select study participants. Data were entered and analysed using of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0.Of the 193 students, 57 (29.5% of the students were current smokers. Most of the current smokers (89.4% smoked between 1-10 sticks of cigarette per day. The two main reasons cited for smoking cigarettes were peer pressure (43.9% and to relieve stress (36.8%. Being female (adjusted OR [AOR] = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.95 and Tigre by ethnicity (AOR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.74 were significantly less associated with current smoking. On the other hand, being second year students (AOR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.41, 10.46, khat chewing (AOR = 8.36; 95% CI: 2.60, 26.85 and taking illicit drugs (AOR = 10.59; 95% CI: 2.77, 40.51 were positively associated with current smoking cigarettes.The current smoking prevalence among students in College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University is high and therefore, effective smoking prevention and cessation intervention programs are required to reduce smoking among university students.

  13. The History of the Austin College Building and Old Main at Sam Houston State University

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    Singer, Erin; Shields, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    Austin Hall and Old Main serve as the heart of what is now Sam Houston State University. The buildings' rich histories help one to understand how Sam Houston State University and its proud teacher education heritage came to be. To begin with Austin Hall's story, the University's original building has a unique and interesting tale that journeys…

  14. University-Industry Relationships in Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences: The Role of Women Faculty

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    Crowe, Jessica A.; Goldberger, Jessica R.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing amount of research has been dedicated to studying university-industry relationships (UIRs). Researchers have studied the impacts of UIRs on the integrity of university research. However, while studies have examined the attitudes and actions of university administration and industry leaders with respect to UIRs, limited attention has…

  15. Student learning style preferences in college-level biology courses: Implications for teaching and academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitton, Jennifer Susan

    Education research has focused on defining and identifying student learning style preferences and how to incorporate this knowledge into teaching practices that are effective in engaging student interest and transmitting information. One objective was determining the learning style preferences of undergraduate students in Biology courses at New Mexico State University by using the online VARK Questionnaire and an investigator developed survey (Self Assessed Learning Style Survey, LSS). Categories include visual, aural, read-write, kinesthetic, and multimodal. The courses differed in VARK single modal learning preferences (p = 0.035) but not in the proportions of the number of modes students preferred (p = 0.18). As elsewhere, the majority of students were multimodal. There were similarities and differences between LSS and VARK results and between students planning on attending medical school and those not. Preferences and modalities tended not to match as expected for ratings of helpfulness of images and text. To detect relationships between VARK preferred learning style and academic performance, ANOVAs were performed using modality preferences and normalized learning gains from pre and post tests over material taught in the different modalities, as well as on end of semester laboratory and lecture grades. Overall, preference did not affect the performance for a given modality based activity, quiz, or final lecture or laboratory grades (p > 0.05). This suggests that a student's preference does not predict an improved performance when supplied with material in that modality. It is recommended that methods be developed to aid learning in a variety of modalities, rather than catering to individual learning styles. Another topic that is heavily debated in the field of education is the use of simulations or videos to replace or supplement dissections. These activities were compared using normalized learning gains from pre and post tests, as well as attitude surveys

  16. Medical students’ perception of the learning environment at King Saud University Medical College, Saudi Arabia, using DREEM Inventory

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    Soliman MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mona M Soliman,1,2 Kamran Sattar,2 Sami Alnassar,3 Faisal Alsaif,4 Khalid Alswat,5 Mohamed Alghonaim,6 Maysoon Alhaizan,7 Nawaf Al-furaih7 1Department of Physiology, 2Department of Medical Education, 3Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, 4Department of Surgery, King Saud University Medical City, 5Department of Internal Medicine, 6Department of Medicine, 7College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: The students’ perception of the learning environment is an important aspect for evaluation and improvement of the educational program. The College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU reformed its curriculum in 2009 from a traditional to a system-oriented hybrid curriculum.Objective: The objective of the present study was to determine the perception of the second batch (reformed curriculum of medical graduates about the educational environment at the College of Medicine, KSU, using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM scale.Methods: The fifth year medical students were asked to evaluate the educational program after graduation in May 2014. The questionnaire was distributed to the graduate students electronically. The DREEM questionnaire consisted of 50 items based on Likert’s scale; and five domains, namely, students’ perceptions of learning, perceptions of teachers, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 62 students participated in the study. The score for students’ perception of learning among medical students ranged from 2.93 to 3.64 (overall mean score: 40.17. The score for students’ perception of teachers ranged from 2.85 to 4.01 (overall mean score: 33.35. The score for students’ academic self-perceptions ranged from 3.15 to 4.06 (overall mean score: 28.4. The score for students’ perception of atmosphere ranged from 2.27 to 3.91 (overall mean score: 41.32. The

  17. The Effect of individual Difference on Perceptions of Job-related Stress among National College and University Librarians in Taiwan

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    Su-may Sheih Chen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Defined as an environmental force in the workplace, either real or imagined, job-related stress interacts with an individual’s perception. Individuals’ perceptions alter with age, gender, work experience, job characteristics, and personality behavior of individuals. In an attempt to gain a comprehensive understanding, this study examines the relationship between individual difference and the perceptions of job-related stress in the library settings of national colleges and universities on Taiwan. The result shows that individual difference is influential for librarians’ perceptions of job-related stress. [Article content in Chinese

  18. The scientific production in health and biological sciences of the top 20 Brazilian universities

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    R. Zorzetto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian scientific output exhibited a 4-fold increase in the last two decades because of the stability of the investment in research and development activities and of changes in the policies of the main funding agencies. Most of this production is concentrated in public universities and research institutes located in the richest part of the country. Among all areas of knowledge, the most productive are Health and Biological Sciences. During the 1998-2002 period these areas presented heterogeneous growth ranging from 4.5% (Pharmacology to 191% (Psychiatry, with a median growth rate of 47.2%. In order to identify and rank the 20 most prolific institutions in these areas, searches were made in three databases (DataCAPES, ISI and MEDLINE which permitted the identification of 109,507 original articles produced by the 592 Graduate Programs in Health and Biological Sciences offered by 118 public universities and research institutes. The 20 most productive centers, ranked according to the total number of ISI-indexed articles published during the 1998-2003 period, produced 78.7% of the papers in these areas and are strongly concentrated in the Southern part of the country, mainly in São Paulo State.

  19. Social norms interventions to reduce alcohol misuse in university or college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria Teresa; Smith, Lesley A; Foxcroft, David

    2009-07-08

    Drinking is influenced by youth (mis)perceptions of how their peers drink. If misperceptions can be corrected, young people may drink less. To determine whether social norms feedback reduces alcohol misuse in university or college students. Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Register of Trials; Central; MEDLINE; EMBASE; PsyInfo; CINAHL (up to March 2008). RCT or cluster RCT that evaluate social normative intervention with no intervention, alcohol education leaflet or other non-normative feedback intervention 2/3 authors extracted data. Included studies were assessed against criteria indicated in the Cochrane Reviewers Handbook version 5.0.0. Twenty-two studies were included (7,275 participants).Alcohol related problems: Significant reduction with Web/computer feedback (WF) (SMD -0.31 95% Cl -0.59 to -0.02), three studies, 278 participants. No significant effect of mailed feedback (MF), individual face-to-face feedback (IFF) or group face-to-face feedback (GFF).Peak Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) : Significant reduction with WF (SMD -0.77 95% Cl -1.25 to -0.28), two studies, 198 participants. No significant effect of MF or IFF.Drinking Frequency: Significant reduction with WF (SMD -0.38 95% Cl -0.63 to -0.13), two studies, 243 participants and IFF (SMD -0.39 95% Cl -0.66 to -0.12), two studies, 217 participants. No significant effect of MF.Drinking Quantity: Significant reduction with WF (SMD -0.35 95% Cl -0.51 to -0.18), five studies, 556 participants and GFF (SMD -0.32 95% Cl -0.63 to -0.02) three studies, 173 participants. No significant effect of MF or IF.Binge drinking: Significant reduction with WF (SMD -0.47 95% Cl -0.92 to -0.03) one study, 80 participants, IFF (SMD -0.25 95% Cl -0.49 to -0.02) three studies, 278 participants and and GFF (SMD -0.38 95% Cl -0.62 to -0.14) four studies, 264 participants. No significant effect for MF.BAC: No significant effect of MF and IFFDrinking norms: Significant reduction with WF (SMD -0.75 95% Cl -0.98 to -0.52 ) three studies

  20. College Choice and the University Brand: Exploring the Consumer Decision Framework

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    Stephenson, Amber L.; Heckert, Alex; Yerger, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Branding in higher education has become increasingly used as a mechanism of differentiation among competitors to attract prospective students. Although branding in higher education is a common phenomenon, little work has been done assessing the college selection process using a brand choice framework. This paper aims to fill the gap by…