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Sample records for biological trojan horse

  1. Delivery of Biologics Across the Blood-Brain Barrier with Molecular Trojan Horse Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2017-12-01

    Biologics are potential new therapeutics for many diseases of the central nervous system. Biologics include recombinant lysosomal enzymes, neurotrophins, decoy receptors, and therapeutic antibodies. These are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). All classes of biologics have been tested, without success, in clinical trials of brain disease over the last 25 years. In none of these past clinical trials was the biologic re-engineered to enable transport across the BBB. If the biologic does not cross the BBB, the drug cannot reach the target site in brain, and success in a clinical trial is not expected. Biologics can be re-engineered for BBB transport with the use of molecular Trojan horse technology. A BBB molecular Trojan horse is a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against an endogenous BBB receptor transporter, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. The receptor-specific MAb penetrates the brain via transport on the endogenous BBB receptor. The MAb acts as a molecular Trojan horse to deliver across the BBB the biologic pharmaceutical that is genetically fused to the MAb. The lead Trojan horse is a MAb against the human insulin receptor (HIR), and HIRMAb-derived fusion proteins have entered clinical trials for the treatment of brain disease.

  2. Trojan Horse Method: Recent Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R.; Rolfs, C.; Typel, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method allows for the measurements of cross sections in nuclear reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic features of the method are discussed and recent applications are presented

  3. A Trojan Horse in Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    "Trojan Horse" has become journalistic shorthand for an apparent attempt by a small group in East Birmingham to secure control of local non-faith schools and impose policies and practices in keeping with the very conservative (Salafist and Wahhabi) version of Islam which they hold. In this article, Pat Yarker gives an account of two…

  4. Invisible Trojan-horse attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Minshull, Carter; Jain, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the experimental feasibility of a Trojan-horse attack that remains nearly invisible to the single-photon detectors employed in practical quantum key distribution (QKD) systems, such as Clavis2 from ID Quantique. We perform a detailed numerical comparison of the attack performance...

  5. 'Trojan Horse" Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Poddiakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An advanced strategic behavior, which we term, “Trojan horse” teaching (ThT, is described. In this type of counteractive behavior, a “teacher”, ostensibly helping his or her rival to learn something, really teaches the rival useless or disadvantageous things. This interaction is an object of interdisciplinary research related to the theory of human capital, the theory of agency, knowledge management, the theory of conflict, and to social and educational psychology. Examples of ThT in real life, and results of experiential studies, including the administration of a survey concerning people’s beliefs about teaching “with evil intent”, and a set of experiments with participation of adults and children, have been described. Possible directions of artificial intelligence systems development related to ThT are described. General relations between: (a counteraction to learning, and (b development in spite of the counteraction are discussed.

  6. Trojan Horse Method: Recent Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2008-01-01

    Owing the presence of the Coulomb barrier at astrophysically relevant kinetic energies, it is very difficult, or sometimes impossible to measure astrophysical reaction rates in laboratory. This is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The THM is unique indirect technique allowing one measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysical relevant energies. The basic principle and a review of the main application of the Trojan Horse Method are presented. The applications aiming at the extraction of the bare S b (E) astrophysical factor and electron screening potentials U e for several two body processes are discussed

  7. Distortion effects in Trojan Horse applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; Irgaziev, B.; Bertulani, C. A.; Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN , Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Taskent University, Taskent (Uzbekistan); Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Universita di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2012-11-20

    Deuteron induced quasi-free scattering and reactions have been extensively investigated in the past few decades. This was done not only for nuclear structure and processes study but also for the important astrophysical implication (Trojan Horse Method, THM). In particular the width of the neutron momentum distribution in deuteron will be studied as a function of the transferred momentum. The same will be done for other nuclides of possible use as Trojan Horse particles. Trojan horse method applications will also be discussed because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the Trojan horse nucleus is a necessary input for this method. The impact of the width (FWHM) variation on the extraction of the astrophysical S(E)-factor is discussed.

  8. Invisible Trojan-horse attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Minshull, Carter; Jain, Nitin; Makarov, Vadim

    2017-08-21

    We demonstrate the experimental feasibility of a Trojan-horse attack that remains nearly invisible to the single-photon detectors employed in practical quantum key distribution (QKD) systems, such as Clavis2 from ID Quantique. We perform a detailed numerical comparison of the attack performance against Scarani-Ac´ın-Ribordy-Gisin (SARG04) QKD protocol at 1924 nm versus that at 1536 nm. The attack strategy was proposed earlier but found to be unsuccessful at the latter wavelength, as reported in N. Jain et al., New J. Phys. 16, 123030 (2014). However at 1924 nm, we show experimentally that the noise response of the detectors to bright pulses is greatly reduced, and show by modeling that the same attack will succeed. The invisible nature of the attack poses a threat to the security of practical QKD if proper countermeasures are not adopted.

  9. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-03-14

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  10. Theory of the Trojan-Horse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, Gerhard; Typel, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The Trojan-Horse method is an indirect approach to determine the energy dependence of S factors of astrophysically relevant two-body reactions. This is accomplished by studying closely related three-body reactions under quasi-free scattering conditions. The basic theory of the Trojan-Horse method is developed starting from a post-from distorted wave Born approximation of the T-matrix element. In the surface approximation the cross section of the three-body reaction can be related to the S-matrix elements of the two-body reaction. The essential feature of the Trojan-Horse method is the effective suppression of the Coulomb barrier at low energies for the astrophysical reaction leading to finite cross sections at the threshold of the two-body reaction. In a modified plane wave approximation the relation between the two-body and three-body cross sections becomes very transparent. Applications of the Trojan Horse Method are discussed. It is special interest that electron screening corrections are negligible due to the high projectile energy. (author)

  11. Theory of the Trojan-Horse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typel, S.; Baur, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Trojan-Horse method is an indirect approach to determine the energy dependence of S factors of astrophysically relevant two-body reactions. This is accomplished by studying closely related three-body reactions under quasi-free scattering conditions. The basic theory of the Trojan-Horse method is developed starting from a post-form distorted wave Born approximation of the T-matrix element. In the surface approximation the cross-section of the three-body reaction can be related to the S-matrix elements of the two-body reaction. The essential feature of the Trojan-Horse method is the effective suppression of the Coulomb barrier at low energies for the astrophysical reaction leading to finite cross-sections at the threshold of the two-body reaction. In a modified plane wave approximation the relation between the two- and three-body cross-sections becomes very transparent. The appearing Trojan-Horse integrals are studied in detail

  12. The Trojan Horse Method in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietrob, A.; Figuerab, P.; Gulino, M.; Lattuadab, M.; Miljanic, Dstroke; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.

    2003-01-01

    The basic features of the Trojan Horse Method are discussed together with a review of recent applications, aimed to extract the bare astrophysical S(E)-factor for several two-body processes. In this framework information on electron screening potential U e was obtained from the comparison with direct experiments

  13. Nuclear astrophysics and the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C. [University of Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [University of Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A.M. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-04-15

    In this review, we discuss the new recent results of the Trojan Horse Method that is used to determine reaction rates for nuclear processes in several astrophysical scenarios. The theory behind this technique is shortly presented. This is followed by an overview of some new experiments that have been carried out using this indirect approach. (orig.)

  14. Recent Studies on Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Gulino, M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of nuclear reactions that are important for the understanding of astrophysical problems received an increasing attention over the last decades. The Trojan Horse Method was proposed as a tool to overcome some of the problems connected with the measurement of cross-sections between charged particles at astrophysical energies. Here we present some recent studies on this method. (authors)

  15. DMPD: Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9287290 Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cell...ml) Show Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. PubmedID ...9287290 Title Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses

  16. The Trojan horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliotta, M.; Rolfs, C.; Lattuada, M.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Miljanic, Dj.; Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the Coulomb barrier, reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at the relevant Gamow energies, unless very favourable conditions are met (e.g. LUNA--underground experiments). Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive the astrophysical S(0)-factor. Various indirect processes have been used in order to obtain additional information on the parameters entering these extrapolations. The Trojan Horse Method is an indirect method which might help to bypass some of the problems typically encountered in direct measurements, namely the presence of the Coulomb barrier and the effect of the electron screening. However, a comparison with direct data in an appropriate energy region (e.g. around the Coulomb barrier) is crucial before extending the method to the relevant Gamow energy. Additionally, experimental and theoretical tests are needed to validate the assumptions underlying the method. The application of the Trojan Horse Method to some cases of interest is discussed

  17. Trojan Horse Particle Invariance: An Extensive Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L.; Lamia, L.; Cognata, M. La; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.; Bertulani, C. A.; Blokhintsev, L.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the Trojan Horse method (THM) has played a crucial role for the measurement of several particle (both neutron and charged one) induced cross sections for reactions of astrophysical interest. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases, many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance proves the relatively simple approach allowed by the pole approximation and sheds light in the involved reaction mechanisms. Here we shortly review the complete work for the binary 2 H(d,p) 3 H, 6 Li(d,α) 4 He, 6 Li(p,α) 3 He, 7 Li(p,α) 4 He reactions, by using the quasi free reactions after break-ups of different nuclides. Results are compared assuming the 6 Li and 3 He break-up in the case of the d(d,p)t, 6 Li(d,α) 4 He reactions and considering the 2 H and 3 He break-up for 6 Li(p,α) 3 He, 7 Li(p,α) 4 He reactions. These results, regardless of the Trojan Horse particle or the break-up scheme, confirms the applicability of the standard description of the THM and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nuclei for a whole spectra of different cases. This gives a strong basis for the understanding of the quasi-free mechanism which is the foundation on which the THM lies. (author)

  18. Distortion Effects on Trojan Horse Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Irgaziev, B. F.

    2011-01-01

    The widths of the spectator momentum distributions in several nuclei, which have been used as Trojan Horses, have been obtained as a function of the transferred momentum. Applications of Trojan Horse method will also be discussed. The study of processes relevant for astrophysics involving light nuclei has increased in the last decades due to the development of indirect methods. The present paper will also help to point out the distortion effects which arise at low energies in the study of three-body processes and will suggest some way to by-pass them in Trojan Horse Method (THM) applications. The goal of this paper is to compare the experimental momentum distribution of the spectator in the bound state a = (sx) extracted from the 2 → 3 particles (breakup, or breakup with rearrangement) reactions with the theoretical one. The theoretical momentum distribution has been calculated for the target a = (sx) using the Hulthen potential for a = d and Woods-Saxon one with the standard geometrical parameters, radius r 0 = 1.25 fm and diffuseness a = 0.65 fm, for other nuclei. (author)

  19. The Trojan Horse Method in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C., E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Cognata, M. La [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The study of energy production and nucleosynthesis in stars requires an increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction rates at the energies of interest. To overcome the experimental difficulties arising from the small cross sections at those energies and from the presence of the electron screening, the Trojan Horse Method has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available.

  20. Biological Trojan horse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fexby, Sara; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P. Ø.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a versatile pathogen causing millions of infections in humans every year. This bacterium can form multicellular aggregates when it expresses a self-associating protein, antigen 43 (Ag43), on its surface. We have discovered that Ag43-expressing E. coli cells are efficiently taken...... up by human defense cells, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), in an opsonin-independent manner. Surprisingly, the phagocytosed bacteria were not immediately killed but resided as tight aggregates within the PMNs. Our observations indicate that Ag43-mediated uptake and survival in PMNs constitute...

  1. Primordial nucleosynthesis revisited via Trojan Horse Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzone R.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN requires several nuclear physics inputs and nuclear reaction rates. An up-to-date compilation of direct cross sections of d(d,pt, d(d,n3He and 3He(d,p4He reactions is given, being these ones among the most uncertain bare-nucleus cross sections. An intense experimental effort has been carried on in the last decade to apply the Trojan Horse Method (THM to study reactions of relevance for the BBN and measure their astrophysical S(E-factor. The reaction rates and the relative error for the four reactions of interest are then numerically calculated in the temperature ranges of relevance for BBN (0.01

  2. Trojan Horse Method: recent applications in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L.; Tumino, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to extract the bare nucleus cross section (or equivalently the bare nucleus astrophysical factor) for astrophysically relevant reactions. The theory has been discussed in many works in relation to the different types of reactions studied. Here we present the methodology to select the quasi free mechanism in order to extract this important parameter.

  3. Trojan Horse Method: recent applications in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna ' Kore' , Enna (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to extract the bare nucleus cross section (or equivalently the bare nucleus astrophysical factor) for astrophysically relevant reactions. The theory has been discussed in many works in relation to the different types of reactions studied. Here we present the methodology to select the quasi free mechanism in order to extract this important parameter.

  4. Coding as a Trojan Horse for Mathematics Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George

    2015-01-01

    The history of mathematics educational reform is replete with innovations taken up enthusiastically by early adopters without significant transfer to other classrooms. This paper explores the coupling of coding and mathematics education to create the possibility that coding may serve as a Trojan Horse for mathematics education reform. That is,…

  5. Trojan-horse attacks on quantum-key-distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisin, N.; Fasel, S.; Kraus, B.; Zbinden, H.; Ribordy, G.

    2006-01-01

    General Trojan-horse attacks on quantum-key-distribution systems, i.e., attacks on Alice or Bob's system via the quantum channel, are analyzed. We illustrate the power of such attacks with today's technology and conclude that all systems must implement active counter measures. In particular, all systems must include an auxiliary detector that monitors any incoming light. We show that such counter measures can be efficient, provided that enough additional privacy amplification is applied to the data. We present a practical way to reduce the maximal information gain that an adversary can gain using Trojan-horse attacks. This does reduce the security analysis of the two-way plug-and-play implementation to those of the standard one-way systems

  6. At the origins of the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    During the seventies and eighties a long experimental research program on the quasi-free reactions at low energy was carried out by a small group of nuclear physicists, where Claudio Spitaleri was one of the main protagonists. Nowadays, a posteriori, the results of these studies can be considered an essential step preparatory to the application of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) in Nuclear Astrophysics.

  7. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O' Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  8. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and 6 Li(d,α) 4 He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely 6 Li and 3 He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions

  9. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN (Italy); Bertulani, C. A. [Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lamia, L.; Spartá, R. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Universitá Kore, Enna (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and {sup 6}Li(d,α){sup 4}He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely {sup 6}Li and {sup 3}He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  10. Recent astrophysical applications of the Trojan Horse Method to nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Fu, C.; Tribble, R.; Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is an unique indirect technique allowing to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysical relevant energies. The basic principle and a review of the recent applications of the Trojan Horse Method are presented. The applications aiming to the extraction of the bare astrophysical S b (E) for some two-body processes are discussed

  11. Designing Trojan Horses | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waging battle against cancer cells without inflicting damage on normal tissue has long been a goal for cancer treatment. A new type of drug called immunotoxins may help make this goal a reality. Much like the Greeks used a wooden horse to get soldiers inside the gates of Troy, immunotoxins use clever genetic engineering to get a lethal toxin inside cancer cells. Each

  12. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  13. Assessing the foundation of the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Hussein, M. S.; Typel, S.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the foundation of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) within the Inclusive Non-Elastic Breakup (INEB) theory. We demonstrate that the direct part of the INEB cross section, which is of two-step character, becomes, in the DWBA limit of the three-body theory with appropriate approximations and redefinitions, similar in structure to the one-step THM cross section. We also discuss the connection of the THM to the Surrogate Method (SM), which is a genuine two-step process.

  14. Ethics as a beneficial Trojan horse in a technological society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queraltó, Ramón

    2013-03-01

    This article explores the transformation of ethics in a globalizing technological society. After describing some basic features of this society, particularly the primacy it gives to a special type of technical rationality, three specific influences on traditional ethics are examined: (1) a change concerning the notion of value, (2) the decreasing relevance of the concept of axiological hierarchy, and (3) the new internal architecture of ethics as a net of values. These three characteristics suggest a new pragmatic understanding of ethics. From a pragmatic perspective, the process of introducing ethical values into contemporary society can be regarded as a beneficial Trojan horse, a metaphor that will be developed further.

  15. Technical Soddi Defenses: The Trojan Horse Defense Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Steel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the Trojan horse defense was at a crossroads, with two child pornography cases where it was successfully employed in the United Kingdom, resulting in acquittals.  The original Trojan horse defense has now become part of the more general “technical SODDI” defense, which includes the possibility of unknown actors using unsecured Wi-Fi connections or having physical access to a computer to perform criminal acts.  In the past ten years, it has failed to be effective in the United States for criminal cases, with no published acquittals in cases where it was the primary defense.  In the criminal cases where it has been used as leverage in plea negotiations, there has been either poor forensics performed by the prosecution or political pressure to resolve a matter.  On the civil side, however, the defense has been wildly successful, effectively shutting down large John Doe copyright infringement litigation against non-commercial violators.  

  16. Trojan horse attacks on counterfactual quantum key distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiuqing, E-mail: xqqyang@163.com [School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, 010051 Hohhot (China); Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Sun, Shihai, E-mail: shsun@nudt.edu.cn [Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Du, Yungang [College of Science, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, 010051 Hohhot (China); Wu, Lingan [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2016-04-22

    There has been much interest in “counterfactual quantum cryptography” (T.-G. Noh, 2009 [10]). It seems that the counterfactual quantum key distribution protocol without any photon carrier through the quantum channel provides practical security advantages. However, we show that it is easy to break counterfactual quantum key distribution systems in practical situations. We introduce the two types of Trojan horse attacks that are available for the two-way protocol and become possible for practical counterfactual systems with our eavesdropping schemes. - Highlights: • We find the attacks available for the two-way protocol become possible for the practical counterfactual systems. • It does not require the assumption that it works on the counterfactual systems only in a finite key scenario. • Compared to the other attack models, our scheme is relatively simple for an eavesdropper.

  17. Supramolecular "Trojan Horse" for Nuclear Delivery of Dual Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanbin; Shen, Haosheng; Zhan, Jie; Lin, Mingliang; Dai, Liuhan; Ren, Chunhua; Shi, Yang; Liu, Jianfeng; Gao, Jie; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear delivery and accumulation are very important for many anticancer drugs that interact with DNA or its associated enzymes in the nucleus. However, it is very difficult for neutrally and negatively charged anticancer drugs such as 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT). Here we report a simple strategy to construct supramolecular nanomedicines for nuclear delivery of dual synergistic anticancer drugs. Our strategy utilizes the coassembly of a negatively charged HCPT-peptide amphiphile and the positively charged cisplatin. The resulting nanomaterials behave as the "Trojan Horse" that transported soldiers (anticancer drugs) across the walls of the castle (cell and nucleus membranes). Therefore, they show improved inhibition capacity to cancer cells including the drug resistant cancer cell and promote the synergistic tumor suppression property in vivo. We envision that our strategy of constructing nanomaterials by metal chelation would offer new opportunities to develop nanomedicines for combination chemotherapy.

  18. Applications of the Trojan Horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio, E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    The study of the energy production in stars and related nucleosyntesis processes requires increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross section and reaction rates at interaction energy. In order to overcome the experimental difficulties, arising from small cross-sections involved in charge particle induced reactions at astrophysical energies, and from the presence of electron screening, it was necessary to introduce indirect methods. Trough these methods it is possible to measure cross sections at very small energies and retrieve information on electron screening effect when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect technique to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S-factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic theory of the THM is discussed in the case of non-resonant.

  19. Trojan horse at cellular level for tumor gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Guillaume; Grillon, Catherine; Nadim, Mahdi; Kieda, Claudine

    2013-08-10

    Among innovative strategies developed for cancer treatments, gene therapies stand of great interest despite their well-known limitations in targeting, delivery, toxicity or stability. The success of any given gene-therapy is highly dependent on the carrier efficiency. New approaches are often revisiting the mythic trojan horse concept to carry therapeutic nucleic acid, i.e. DNAs, RNAs or small interfering RNAs, to pathologic tumor site. Recent investigations are focusing on engineering carrying modalities to overtake the above limitations bringing new promise to cancer patients. This review describes recent advances and perspectives for gene therapies devoted to tumor treatment, taking advantage of available knowledge in biotechnology and medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Trojan Horse Method: A tool to explore electron screening effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R G; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Cognata, M La; Lamia, L; Romano, S; Sergi, M L [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy) and Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Rolfs, C; Strieder, F [Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Burjan, V; Kroha, V; Mrazek, J [Cyclotron Institute, Academy of Science, Rez (Czech Republic); Li, C; Wen, Q; Zhou, S [CIAE, Beijing (China); Tumino, A, E-mail: rgpizzone@lns.infn.i [Universita Kore, Erma (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    Owing the presence of the Coulomb barrier at astrophysically relevant energies, it is very difficult, or sometimes impossible to measure reaction rates for charged particle induced reactions. Moreover due to the presence of the electron screening effect in direct measurements, the relevant nuclear input for astrophysics, i.e. the bare nucleus S(E)-factor, can hardly be extracted. This is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The THM is an unique: indirect technique which allows one to measure reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest down the thermal energies typical of the different scenarios. The basic principle and a review of the main applications of the Trojan Horse Method are given. The applications aiming at the extraction of the bare S{sub b}(E) astrophysical factor and electron screening potentials U{sub e} for several two body processes are discussed.

  1. Big bang nucleosynthesis revisited via Trojan Horse method measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spartá, R.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Tumino, A. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bertulani, C. A.; Lalmansingh, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Commerce, TX 75025 (United States); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A., E-mail: rgpizzone@lns.infn.it [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    Nuclear reaction rates are among the most important input for understanding primordial nucleosynthesis and, therefore, for a quantitative description of the early universe. An up-to-date compilation of direct cross-sections of {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H, {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He, {sup 7}Li(p, α){sup 4}He, and {sup 3}He(d, p){sup 4}He reactions is given. These are among the most uncertain cross-sections used and input for big bang nucleosynthesis calculations. Their measurements through the Trojan Horse method are also reviewed and compared with direct data. The reaction rates and the corresponding recommended errors in this work were used as input for primordial nucleosynthesis calculations to evaluate their impact on the {sup 2}H, {sup 3,4}He, and {sup 7}Li primordial abundances, which are then compared with observations.

  2. Siderophore-dependent iron uptake systems as gates for antibiotic Trojan horse strategies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections. The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains is increasing, necessitating the urgent development of new strategies to improve the control of this pathogen. Its bacterial envelope constitutes of an outer and an inner membrane enclosing the periplasm. This structure plays a key role in the resistance of the pathogen, by decreasing the penetration and the biological impact of many antibiotics. However, this barrier may also be seen as the "Achilles heel" of the bacterium as some of its functions provide opportunities for breaching bacterial defenses. Siderophore-dependent iron uptake systems act as gates in the bacterial envelope and could be used in a "Trojan horse" strategy, in which the conjugation of an antibiotic to a siderophore could significantly increase the biological activity of the antibiotic, by enhancing its transport into the bacterium. In this review, we provide an overview of the various siderophore-antibiotic conjugates that have been developed for use against P. aeruginosa and show that an accurate knowledge of the structural and functional features of the proteins involved in this transmembrane transport is required for the design and synthesis of effective siderophore-antibiotic Trojan horse conjugates.

  3. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally

  4. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Enna Kore, Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  5. DNA Trojan Horses: Self-Assembled Floxuridine-Containing DNA Polyhedra for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Pan, Gaifang; Xue, Bai; Yan, Deyue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-10-02

    Based on their structural similarity to natural nucleobases, nucleoside analogue therapeutics were integrated into DNA strands through conventional solid-phase synthesis. By elaborately designing their sequences, floxuridine-integrated DNA strands were synthesized and self-assembled into well-defined DNA polyhedra with definite drug-loading ratios as well as tunable size and morphology. As a novel drug delivery system, these drug-containing DNA polyhedra could ideally mimic the Trojan Horse to deliver chemotherapeutics into tumor cells and fight against cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that the DNA Trojan horse with buckyball architecture exhibits superior anticancer capability over the free drug and other formulations. With precise control over the drug-loading ratio and structure of the nanocarriers, the DNA Trojan horse may play an important role in anticancer treatment and exhibit great potential in translational nanomedicine. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Influence of the α-d motion in 6Li on Trojan horse applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Musumarra, A.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.; Tudisco, S.; Miljanic, D.; Typel, S.

    2005-01-01

    The α-d cluster structure of 6 Li has been extensively investigated in the past few decades. In particular the width of the α momentum distribution in 6 Li has been studied as a function of the transferred momentum. These investigations are now reviewed and updated after recent experiments. Trojan horse method applications are also discussed because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the Trojan horse nucleus is a necessary input for this method. The impact of the width (FWHM) variation in the extraction of the astrophysical S(E) factor is discussed for the 6 Li(d,α) 4 He reaction

  7. Spectator invariance test in the study of the Trojan Horse Method 6,7Li fusion reactions via the Trojan Horse Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusion reactions play a crucial role for several astrophysical scenarios. At the low energies typical of such environments direct measurements of reaction cross sections are very difficult, and even sometimes impossible. In such cases the use of indirect methods can give a substantial help. The Trojan Horse Method (THM is based on the quasi-free break-up of a nucleus, which can be described in terms of a cluster structure. In such applications the independence of THM results with different break-up schemes, was tested using the quasi free3 He(6Li,ααH and 3He(7Li,αα2H reactions. Results were then compared with the direct behaviours obtained from available data as well as with the cross sections extracted from previous indirect investigations of the same binary reactions using a different nuclide as a Trojan Horse nucleus.

  8. Environmental mixtures of nanomaterials and chemicals: The Trojan-horse phenomenon and its relevance for ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naasz, Steffi; Altenburger, Rolf; Kühnel, Dana

    2018-04-22

    The usage of engineered nanomaterials (NM) offers many novel products and applications with advanced features, but at the same time raises concerns with regard to potential adverse biological effects. Upon release and emission, NM may interact with chemicals in the environment, potentially leading to a co-exposure of organisms and the occurrence of mixture effects. A prominent idea is that NM may act as carriers of chemicals, facilitating and enhancing the entry of substances into cells or organisms, subsequently leading to an increased toxicity. In the literature, the term 'Trojan-horse effect' describes this hypothesis. The relevance of this mechanism for organisms is, however, unclear as yet. Here, a review has been performed to provide a more systematic picture on existing evidence. It includes 151 experimental studies investigating the exposure of various NM and chemical mixtures in ecotoxicological in vitro and in vivo model systems. The papers retrieved comprised studies investigating (i) uptake, (ii) toxicity and (iii) investigations considering both, changes in substance uptake and toxicity upon joint exposure of a chemical with an NM. A closer inspection of the studies demonstrated that the existing evidence for interference of NM-chemical mixture exposure with uptake and toxicity points into different directions compared to the original Trojan-horse hypothesis. We could discriminate at least 7 different categories to capture the evidence ranging from no changes in uptake and toxicity to an increase in uptake and toxicity upon mixture exposure. Concluding recommendations for the consideration of relevant processes are given, including a proposal for a nomenclature to describe NM-chemical mixture interactions in consistent terms. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The "Trojan Horse" Affair and Radicalisation: An Analysis of Ofsted Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogra, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of the frequency with which the word radicalisation appears in 21 Ofsted reports published as a result of inspections carried out in some Birmingham schools following the "Trojan Horse" affair. The technique of key-words-in-context was employed to study the range of its uses in the corpus of the reports.…

  10. The Consequences of the Trojan Horse Affair and a Possible Way Forward for Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sarah; Hatcher, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The UK government seized the opportunity of the Trojan Horse affair to launch a damaging Islamophobic attack, eagerly relayed by a racist press, on the Muslim community in Birmingham and beyond, abusing Ofsted and the Prevent strategy as blatant instruments of ideologically-driven policy. The various reports found no evidence of radicalisation or…

  11. Trojan Horse particle invariance for 2H(d,p)3H reaction: a detailed study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R.G.; La Cognata, M.; Rinollo, A.; Spitaleri, C; Sparta, R.; Bertulani, C.A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Blokhintsev, L.; Lamia, L.; Tumino, A.

    2014-01-01

    The basic idea of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) is to extract the cross section in the low-energy region of a two-body reaction with significant astrophysical impact: a + x → c + C from a suitable quasi-free (QF) break-up of the so called Trojan Horse nucleus, e.g. A=x (+) s where usually x is referred to as the participant and s as the spectator particle. In the last decades the Trojan Horse method has played a crucial role for the measurement of several charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance for the binary d(d,p)t reaction was therefore tested using the quasi free 2 H( 6 Li, pt) 4 He and 2 H( 3 He,pt)H reactions after 6 Li and 3 He break-up, respectively. The astrophysical S(E)-factor for the d(d,p)t binary process was then extracted in the framework of the Plane Wave Approximation applied to the two different break-up schemes. Polynomial fits were then performed on the data giving S 0 = (75 ± 21) keV*b in the case of the 6 Li break-up, while for 3 He one obtains S 0 = (58 ± 2) keV*b. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nucleus also for the present case

  12. Two-step nuclear reactions: The Surrogate Method, the Trojan Horse Method and their common foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Mahir S. [DCTA, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Estudos Avancados, C. P. 72012, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C. P. 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    In this Letter I argue that the Surrogate Method, used to extract the fast neutron capture cross section on actinide target nuclei, which has important practical application for the next generation of breeder reactors, and the Trojan Horse Method employed to extract reactions of importance to nuclear astrophysics, have a common foundation, the Inclusive Non-Elastic Breakup (INEB) Theory. Whereas the Surrogate Method relies on the premise that the extracted neutron cross section in a (d, p) reaction is predominantly a compound-nucleus one, the Trojan Horse Method assumes a predominantly direct process for the secondary reaction induced by the surrogate fragment. In general, both methods contain both direct and compound contributions, and I show how these seemingly distinct methods are in fact the same but at different energies and different kinematic regions. The unifying theory is the rather well developed INEB theory. (orig.)

  13. Extraction of astrophysical cross sections in the Trojan-Horse method

    CERN Document Server

    Typel, S

    2000-01-01

    The Trojan-horse method has been proposed to extract S-matrix elements of a two-body reaction at astrophysical energies from a related reaction with three particles in the final case. This should be useful in cases where the direct measurement of the two-body reaction at the necessary low energie is experimentally difficult. The formalism of the Trojan-horse method for nuclear reactions is developed in detail from basic scattering theory including spin degrees of freedom of the nuclei and we specify the necessary approximations. The energy dependence of the three-body reaction is determined by characteristic functions that represent the theoretical ingredients for the method. In a plane-wave Born approximation of the T-matrix the differential cross section assumes a simple structure. Refs. 17 (author)

  14. Two-step nuclear reactions: The Surrogate Method, the Trojan Horse Method and their common foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Mahir S.

    2017-01-01

    In this Letter I argue that the Surrogate Method, used to extract the fast neutron capture cross section on actinide target nuclei, which has important practical application for the next generation of breeder reactors, and the Trojan Horse Method employed to extract reactions of importance to nuclear astrophysics, have a common foundation, the Inclusive Non-Elastic Breakup (INEB) Theory. Whereas the Surrogate Method relies on the premise that the extracted neutron cross section in a (d, p) reaction is predominantly a compound-nucleus one, the Trojan Horse Method assumes a predominantly direct process for the secondary reaction induced by the surrogate fragment. In general, both methods contain both direct and compound contributions, and I show how these seemingly distinct methods are in fact the same but at different energies and different kinematic regions. The unifying theory is the rather well developed INEB theory. (orig.)

  15. A Trojan Horse Approach to the Production of {sup 18}F in Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); José, J. [Departament de Física, EEBE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Hernanz, M., E-mail: lacognata@lns.infn.it [Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    Crucial information on nova nucleosynthesis can be potentially inferred from γ -ray signals powered by {sup 18}F decay. Therefore, the reaction network producing and destroying this radioactive isotope has been extensively studied in the last years. Among those reactions, the {sup 18}F(p, α ){sup 15}O cross-section has been measured by means of several dedicated experiments, both using direct and indirect methods. The presence of interfering resonances in the energy region of astrophysical interest has been reported by many authors including the recent applications of the Trojan Horse Method. In this work, we evaluate what changes are introduced by the Trojan Horse data in the {sup 18}F(p, α ){sup 15}O astrophysical factor recommended in a recent R-matrix analysis, accounting for existing direct and indirect measurements. Then the updated reaction rate is calculated and parameterized and implications of the new results on nova nucleosynthesis are thoroughly discussed.

  16. A Trojan-Horse Peptide-Carboxymethyl-Cytidine Antibiotic from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakova, Marina; Tsibulskaya, Darya; Mokina, Olga; Kulikovsky, Alexey; Nautiyal, Manesh; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Severinov, Konstantin; Dubiley, Svetlana

    2016-12-07

    Microcin C and related antibiotics are Trojan-horse peptide-adenylates. The peptide part is responsible for facilitated transport inside the sensitive cell, where it gets processed to release a toxic warhead-a nonhydrolyzable aspartyl-adenylate, which inhibits aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Adenylation of peptide precursors is carried out by MccB THIF-type NAD/FAD adenylyltransferases. Here, we describe a novel microcin C-like compound from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The B. amyloliquefaciens MccB demonstrates an unprecedented ability to attach a terminal cytidine monophosphate to cognate precursor peptide in cellular and cell free systems. The cytosine moiety undergoes an additional modification-carboxymethylation-that is carried out by the C-terminal domain of MccB and the MccS enzyme that produces carboxy-SAM, which serves as a donor of the carboxymethyl group. We show that microcin C-like compounds carrying terminal cytosines are biologically active and target aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and that the carboxymethyl group prevents resistance that can occur due to modification of the warhead. The results expand the repertoire of known enzymatic modifications of peptides that can be used to obtain new biological activities while avoiding or limiting bacterial resistance.

  17. Novel Method for Exchange of Impella Circulatory Assist Catheter: The "Trojan Horse" Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Colin T; Tamez, Hector; Tu, Thomas M; Yeh, Robert W; Pinto, Duane S

    2017-07-01

    Patients with an indwelling Impella may require escalation of hemodynamic support or exchange to another circulatory assistance platform. As such, preservation of vascular access is preferable in cases where anticoagulation cannot be discontinued or to facilitate exchange to an alternative catheter or closure device. Challenges exist in avoiding bleeding and loss of wire access in these situations. We describe a single-access "Trojan Horse" technique that minimizes bleeding while maintaining arterial access for rapid exchange of this percutaneous ventricular assist device.

  18. Trojan Horse Transit Contributes to Blood-Brain Barrier Crossing of a Eukaryotic Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H; Onken, Michael D; Cooper, John A; Klein, Robyn S; Doering, Tamara L

    2017-01-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the central nervous system (CNS) by restricting the passage of molecules and microorganisms. Despite this barrier, however, the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that is estimated to kill over 600,000 people annually. Cryptococcal infection begins in the lung, and experimental evidence suggests that host phagocytes play a role in subsequent dissemination, although this role remains ill defined. Additionally, the disparate experimental approaches that have been used to probe various potential routes of BBB transit make it impossible to assess their relative contributions, confounding any integrated understanding of cryptococcal brain entry. Here we used an in vitro model BBB to show that a "Trojan horse" mechanism contributes significantly to fungal barrier crossing and that host factors regulate this process independently of free fungal transit. We also, for the first time, directly imaged C. neoformans-containing phagocytes crossing the BBB, showing that they do so via transendothelial pores. Finally, we found that Trojan horse crossing enables CNS entry of fungal mutants that cannot otherwise traverse the BBB, and we demonstrate additional intercellular interactions that may contribute to brain entry. Our work elucidates the mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion and offers approaches to study other neuropathogens. The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that kills hundreds of thousands of people each year. One route that has been proposed for this brain entry is a Trojan horse mechanism, whereby the fungus crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as a passenger inside host phagocytes. Although indirect experimental evidence supports this intriguing mechanism, it has never been directly visualized. Here we directly image Trojan horse transit and show that it is regulated independently of free fungal entry, contributes

  19. The Trojan Horse method as an indirect approach for nuclear astrophysics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Cognata, M La; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L, E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.i [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique that provides a successful alternative path to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor for rearrangement reactions down to astrophysical energies. This is done by measuring the cross section for a suitable three body process in the quasi-free kinematics regime. Prescriptions and basic features will be presented together with some applications to demonstrate how THM works.

  20. The Trojan Horse Method for nuclear astrophysics and its recent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Depalo, R.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Galtarossa, F.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; La Commara, M.; La Rana, G.; Lattuada, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Piatti, D.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sergi, M. L.; Sgouros, O.; Silva, H.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trippella, O.; Tumino, A.; Yamaguchi, H.; Villante, F. L.; Zhang, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been applied extensively for the last 25 years to measure nuclear reaction cross sections of interest for astrophysics. Although it has been mainly applied for charged particle-induced reactions, recently it has been found to have also a relevant role for neutron-induced reactions. Here, some advantages of THM will be discussed and the preliminary results of the cosmological relevant 7Be(n,α)4He cross section measurement are discussed.

  1. Effectiveness of using a magnetic spectrograph with the Trojan Horse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, S.; Parikh, A.; Chen, A. A.; de Séréville, N.; Adsley, P.; Irvine, D.; Hammache, F.; Stefan, I.; Longland, R. F.; Tomlinson, J.; Morfuace, P.; Le Crom, B.

    2018-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method relies on performing reactions in a specific kinematic phase space that maximizes contributions of a quasi-free reaction mechanism. The hallmark of this method is that the incident particle can be accelerated to high enough energies to overcome the Coulomb barrier of the target, but once inside the target nucleus the relative motion of the clustered nuclei allows the reaction of interest to proceed at energies below this Coulomb Barrier. This method allows the experimentalist to probe reactions that have significance in astrophysics at low reaction energies that would otherwise be impossible due to the vanishing cross section. Traditionally the Trojan Horse method has been applied with the use of silicon detectors to observe the reaction products. In this study we apply the Trojan Horse method to a well studied reaction to examine the potential benefits of using a splitpole magnetic spectrograph to detect one of the reaction products. We have measure the three body 7Li(d,αn)α reaction to constrain the energy 7Li(d,α)α cross section. Measurements were first made using two silicon detectors, and then by replacing one detector with the magnetic spectrograph. The experimental design, limitations, and early results are discussed.

  2. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: use of a ligand-lytic peptide for selective destruction of symbiotic protozoa within termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a 'Trojan-Horse' that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates.

  3. A Trojan horse for positivism?: a critique of mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, Lynne S; Grant, Barbara M

    2007-01-01

    Mixed methods research is captured by a pragmatically inflected form of postpositivism. Although it passes for an alternative methodological movement that purports to breach the divide between qualitative and quantitative research, most mixed methods studies favor the forms of analysis and truth finding associated with positivism. We anticipate a move away from exploring more philosophical questions or undertaking modes of enquiry that challenge the status quo. At the same time, we recognize that mixed methods research offers particular strengths and that, although it serves as a Trojan Horse for positivism, it may productively carry other paradigmatic passengers.

  4. Theory of the Trojan-Horse Method - From the Original Idea to Actual Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typel, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The origin and the main features of the Trojan-horse (TH) method are delineated starting with the original idea of Gerhard Baur. Basic theoretical considerations, general experimental conditions and possible problems are discussed. Significant steps in experimental studies towards the implementation of the TH method and the development of the theoretical description are presented. This lead to the successful application of the TH approach by Claudio Spitaleri and his group to determine low-energy cross section that are relevant for astrophysics. An outlook with possible developments in the future are given.

  5. Recent applications of the the Trojan Horse method to nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania University (Italy) and INFN-Laboratoti Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2012-11-20

    Light elements lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB) have been used in the last years as possible probes for stellar structure. They are mainly destroyed by (p,a) reactions and cross section measurements for such channels are then needed. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) allows one to extract the astrophysical S(E)-factor without the experience of tunneling through the Coulomb barrier. In this work a resume of the recent new results about the {sup 11}B(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He reactions are shown.

  6. Indirect Techniques in Nuclear Astrophysics. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient and Trojan Horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Brown, S.

    2007-01-01

    We address two important indirect techniques, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the Trojan Horse (TH) methods. We discuss the application of the ANC technique to determine the astrophysical factor for the 13 C(α, n) 16 O reaction which is one of the neutron generators for the s processes in AGB stars. The TH method is a unique indirect technique allowing one to measure astrophysical S factors for rearrangement reactions down to astrophysically relevant energies. We derive equations connecting the cross sections for the binary direct and resonant reactions determined from the indirect TH reactions to direct cross sections measurements

  7. HIV and mature dendritic cells: Trojan exosomes riding the Trojan horse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Izquierdo-Useros

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted cellular vesicles that can induce specific CD4(+ T cell responses in vivo when they interact with competent antigen-presenting cells like mature dendritic cells (mDCs. The Trojan exosome hypothesis proposes that retroviruses can take advantage of the cell-encoded intercellular vesicle traffic and exosome exchange pathway, moving between cells in the absence of fusion events in search of adequate target cells. Here, we discuss recent data supporting this hypothesis, which further explains how DCs can capture and internalize retroviruses like HIV-1 in the absence of fusion events, leading to the productive infection of interacting CD4(+ T cells and contributing to viral spread through a mechanism known as trans-infection. We suggest that HIV-1 can exploit an exosome antigen-dissemination pathway intrinsic to mDCs, allowing viral internalization and final trans-infection of CD4(+ T cells. In contrast to previous reports that focus on the ability of immature DCs to capture HIV in the mucosa, this review emphasizes the outstanding role that mature DCs could have promoting trans-infection in the lymph node, underscoring a new potential viral dissemination pathway.

  8. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length about the hospital, its obligations, the influences it has upon the community, and the role of physicians and surgeons. He broached one of his old saws, the salary of attending physicians and their needed role in hospital management. His words were published in the diamond jubilee's records, but the hospital did not outlive its prominent guest professor, and it closed its doors in 1914. Just like the great historical city of Troy, New York's own Troy was on the brink of decline, and its hospital would be the first fatality. Therefore, it is almost prescient that the words of Osler, taken into historical context juxtaposed against the socioeconomic forces at work, are akin to the Greek's offering of a wooden edifice to end the Trojan War.

  9. %22Trojan Horse%22 strategy for deconstruction of biomass for biofuels production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Sinclair, Michael B.; Yu, Eizadora; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Hadi, Masood Z.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary

    2011-02-01

    Production of renewable biofuels to displace fossil fuels currently consumed in the transportation sector is a pressing multiagency national priority (DOE/USDA/EERE). Currently, nearly all fuel ethanol is produced from corn-derived starch. Dedicated 'energy crops' and agricultural waste are preferred long-term solutions for renewable, cheap, and globally available biofuels as they avoid some of the market pressures and secondary greenhouse gas emission challenges currently facing corn ethanol. These sources of lignocellulosic biomass are converted to fermentable sugars using a variety of chemical and thermochemical pretreatments, which disrupt cellulose and lignin cross-links, allowing exogenously added recombinant microbial enzymes to more efficiently hydrolyze the cellulose for 'deconstruction' into glucose. This process is plagued with inefficiencies, primarily due to the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, mass transfer issues during deconstruction, and low activity of recombinant deconstruction enzymes. Costs are also high due to the requirement for enzymes and reagents, and energy-intensive cumbersome pretreatment steps. One potential solution to these problems is found in synthetic biology-engineered plants that self-produce a suite of cellulase enzymes. Deconstruction can then be integrated into a one-step process, thereby increasing efficiency (cellulose-cellulase mass-transfer rates) and reducing costs. The unique aspects of our approach are the rationally engineered enzymes which become Trojan horses during pretreatment conditions. During this study we rationally engineered Cazy enzymes and then integrated them into plant cells by multiple transformation techniques. The regenerated plants were assayed for first expression of these messages and then for the resulting proteins. The plants were then subjected to consolidated bioprocessing and characterized in detail. Our results and possible implications of this work on developing

  10. Siderophore-drug complexes: potential medicinal applications of the 'Trojan horse' strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska, Agnieszka; Sloderbach, Anna; Marszałł, Michał Piotr

    2014-09-01

    The ability of bacteria to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents poses problems in the treatment of numerous bacterial infections. One method to circumvent permeability-mediated drug resistance involves the employment of the 'Trojan horse' strategy. The Trojan horse concept involves the use of bacterial iron uptake systems to enter and kill bacteria. The siderophore-drug complex is recognized by specific siderophore receptors and is then actively transported across the outer membrane. The recently identified benefits of this strategy have led to the synthesis of a series of siderophore-based antibiotics. Several studies have shown that siderophore-drug conjugates make it possible to design antibiotics with improved cell transport and reduce the frequency of resistance mutants. Growing interest in siderophore-drug conjugates for the treatment of human diseases including iron overload, cancer, and malaria has driven the search for new siderophore-drug complexes. This strategy may have special importance for the development of iron oxide nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Trojan Horse Strategy for Non-invasive Interference of Clock Gene in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marcel, Anjara; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Tran, Damien

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In this Trojan horse strategy, the unicellular alga Heterocapsa triquetra is the food supply used as a vector to feed oysters with Escherichia coli strain HT115 engineered to express the double-stranded RNA targeting gene. To test the efficacy of the method, the Clock gene, a central gene of the circadian clock, was targeted for knockout. Results demonstrated specific and systemic efficiency of the Trojan horse strategy in reducing Clock mRNA abundance. Consequences of Clock disruption were observed in Clock-related genes (Bmal, Tim1, Per, Cry1, Cry2, Rev.-erb, and Ror) and triploid oysters were more sensitive than diploid to the interference. This non-invasive approach shows an involvement of the circadian clock in oyster bioaccumulation of toxins produced by the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum.

  12. Low-energy d+d fusion via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A; Spitaleri, C; Kiss, G G; La Cognata, M; Pizzone, R G; Rapisarda, G G; Sergi, M L; Spartà, R; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Typel, S; Aliotta, M; Burjan, V; Kroha, V; Hons, Z; Mrazek, J; Piskor, S; Gimenez del Santo, M; Lamia, L; Romano, S

    2013-01-01

    The 2 H(d,p) 3 H and 2 H(d,n) 3 He reactions have been recently investigated from E dd =1.5 MeV down to 2 keV, by means of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) applied to the Quasi Free 3 He+d interaction at 18 MeV [1]. The knowledge of their fusion cross section at low energies is of interest for pure and applied physics. Both reactions belong to the network of processes to fuel the first inertial confinement fusion reactors in the range of kT= 1 to 30 keV. These energies overlap with the burning temperatures of deuterium in the Pre-main sequence of stellar evolution. They are key processes in the Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (SBBN), in an energy region from 50 to 300 keV and experimental data at least up to 1 MeV are required for an accurate calculation of the reaction rate. Providing experimental data for both channels from a single experiment and over the entire energy range of interest is crucial for an accurate calculation of the reaction rates. This is what has been obtained from the present Trojan Horse (TH) investigation with new reaction rates which deviate by more than 20% from available direct data. This represents also the first pioneering experiment in quasi free regime where the charged spectator is detected.

  13. 'I Never Did Anything Wrong'--Trojan Horse: A Qualitative Study Uncovering the Impact in Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Imran

    2018-01-01

    In 2014, the city of Birmingham (UK) became embroiled in a high-profile scandal that would bring it and the wider education system under disrepute. The 'Trojan Horse' affair, as it become known, began with an anonymised letter that claimed hard-line 'Islamists' were plotting and planning to take over a number of schools in Birmingham. Amongst the…

  14. The Devil Is "Not" in the Detail: Representational Absence and Stereotyping in the "Trojan Horse" News Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Sara; Gholami, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Using content analysis, this study investigated the coverage of the Trojan Horse news story aiming to ascertain whether its representation by the British press emphasized "Islamist extremism" over "poor school governance". The sample coverage was extracted from five national newspapers and ranged from 9 June (the date of…

  15. Human skin-derived fibroblasts used as a 'Trojan horse' for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccè, V; Vitale, A; Colombo, S; Bonomi, A; Sisto, F; Ciusani, E; Alessandri, G; Parati, E; Brambilla, P; Brambilla, M; La Porta, C A; Pessina, A

    2016-06-01

    Drug toxicity currently represents the main challenge of tumour chemotherapy. Our group recently developed a new method for drug delivery inspired by the 'Trojan Horse' concept. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to play the role of new 'horses' in delivering anti-tumour agents, without involving any genetic manipulation. As human stromal dermal fibroblasts (hSDFs) represent an interesting alternative to hMSCs, being easy to isolate, they could be an ideal candidate for this kind of procedure. To investigate whether hSDFs can take up and deliver paclitaxel (PTX) in sufficient concentrations to inhibit a very aggressive melanoma tumour (IgR39) in vitro. hSDFs were primed with high doses of PTX, and then the effect of drug delivery on IgR39 melanoma proliferation in vitro was evaluated using several assays (antiproliferation, transwell cocultures, rosette assays and colony growth assays). Furthermore, the cell cycle and PTX uptake/release mechanism of hSDFs were studied both under both normal and hypoxic conditions. hSDFs incorporated PTX and then released it with unaffected pharmacological activity, inhibiting human IgR39 melanoma growth in vitro. The hypoxic conditions did not induce changes in cell cycle pattern and the uptake-release mechanism with PTX was not affected. hSDFs can be used as a Trojan horse, as the released drug was functionally active. These results indicated that these cells could be used for clinical treatment as the drug was released into the cellular environment and the primed cells underwent apoptosis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. Trojan horse particle invariance studied with the 6Li(d,α)4He and 7Li(p,α)4He reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Blokhintsev, L.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Kiss, G. G.; Li, C.; Tumino, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Trojan horse nucleus invariance for the binary reaction cross section extracted from the Trojan horse reaction was tested using the quasifree 3 He( 6 Li,αα)H and 3 He( 7 Li,αα) 2 H reactions. The cross sections for the 6 Li(d,α) 4 He and 7 Li(p,α) 4 He binary processes were extracted in the framework of the plane wave approximation. They are compared with direct behaviors as well as with cross sections extracted from previous indirect investigations of the same binary reactions using deuteron as the Trojan horse nucleus instead of 3 He. The very good agreement confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation which suggests the independence of the binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan horse nucleus, at least for the investigated cases.

  17. A "Trojan horse" bispecific-antibody strategy for broad protection against ebolaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wec, Anna Z; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Herbert, Andrew S; Howell, Katie A; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Bakken, Russell R; Mittler, Eva; Christin, John R; Shulenin, Sergey; Jangra, Rohit K; Bharrhan, Sushma; Kuehne, Ana I; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Flyak, Andrew I; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Crowe, James E; Aman, M Javad; Dye, John M; Lai, Jonathan R; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-10-21

    There is an urgent need for monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies that broadly protect against Ebola virus and other filoviruses. The conserved, essential interaction between the filovirus glycoprotein, GP, and its entry receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) provides an attractive target for such mAbs but is shielded by multiple mechanisms, including physical sequestration in late endosomes. Here, we describe a bispecific-antibody strategy to target this interaction, in which mAbs specific for NPC1 or the GP receptor-binding site are coupled to a mAb against a conserved, surface-exposed GP epitope. Bispecific antibodies, but not parent mAbs, neutralized all known ebolaviruses by coopting viral particles themselves for endosomal delivery and conferred postexposure protection against multiple ebolaviruses in mice. Such "Trojan horse" bispecific antibodies have potential as broad antifilovirus immunotherapeutics. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Puglia, S. M. R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium ({sup 2}H), for the two lithium {sup 6,7}Li isotopes, for the {sup 9}Be and the one for the two boron {sup 10,11}B isotopes will be discussed.

  19. Trojan Horse Antibiotics-A Novel Way to Circumvent Gram-Negative Bacterial Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Glenn S

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been emerged as a major global health problem. In particular, gram-negative species pose a significant clinical challenge as bacteria develop or acquire more resistance mechanisms. Often, these bacteria possess multiple resistance mechanisms, thus nullifying most of the major classes of drugs. Novel approaches to this issue are urgently required. However, the challenges of developing new agents are immense. Introducing novel agents is fraught with hurdles, thus adapting known antibiotic classes by altering their chemical structure could be a way forward. A chemical addition to existing antibiotics known as a siderophore could be a solution to the gram-negative resistance issue. Siderophore molecules rely on the bacterial innate need for iron ions and thus can utilize a Trojan Horse approach to gain access to the bacterial cell. The current approaches to using this potential method are reviewed.

  20. Improving the security of multiparty quantum secret sharing against Trojan horse attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Fuguo; Li Xihan; Zhou Hongyu; Zhang Zhanjun

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the security of the multiparty quantum secret sharing (MQSS) protocol recently proposed by Zhang, Li, and Man [Phys. Rev. A 71, 044301 (2005)] and found that this protocol is secure for any other eavesdropper except for the agent Bob who prepares the quantum signals as he can attack the quantum communication with a Trojan horse. That is, Bob replaces the single-photon signal with a multiphoton one and the other agent Charlie cannot find this cheating as she does not measure the photons before they run back from the boss Alice, which reveals that this MQSS protocol is not secure for Bob. Finally, we present a possible improvement of the MQSS protocol security with two single-photon measurements and four unitary operations

  1. Social evolution in micro-organisms and a Trojan horse approach to medical intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam P; West, Stuart A; Diggle, Stephen P; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2009-11-12

    Medical science is typically pitted against the evolutionary forces acting upon infective populations of bacteria. As an alternative strategy, we could exploit our growing understanding of population dynamics of social traits in bacteria to help treat bacterial disease. In particular, population dynamics of social traits could be exploited to introduce less virulent strains of bacteria, or medically beneficial alleles into infective populations. We discuss how bacterial strains adopting different social strategies can invade a population of cooperative wild-type, considering public good cheats, cheats carrying medically beneficial alleles (Trojan horses) and cheats carrying allelopathic traits (anti-competitor chemical bacteriocins or temperate bacteriophage viruses). We suggest that exploitation of the ability of cheats to invade cooperative, wild-type populations is a potential new strategy for treating bacterial disease.

  2. Extended analysis of the Trojan-horse attack in quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Scott E.; Kok, Pieter

    2018-04-01

    The discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocols based on the 1984 protocol of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) are known to be secure against an eavesdropper, Eve, intercepting the flying qubits and performing any quantum operation on them. However, these protocols may still be vulnerable to side-channel attacks. We investigate the Trojan-horse side-channel attack where Eve sends her own state into Alice's apparatus and measures the reflected state to estimate the key. We prove that the separable coherent state is optimal for Eve among the class of multimode Gaussian attack states, even in the presence of thermal noise. We then provide a bound on the secret key rate in the case where Eve may use any separable state.

  3. Cellular Trojan horse based polymer nanoreactors with light-sensitive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Patric; Spulber, Mariana; Dinu, Ionel Adrian; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2014-08-07

    Stimulus-sensitive systems at the nanoscale represent ideal candidates for improving therapeutic and diagnostic approaches by producing rapid responses to the presence of specific molecules or conditions either by changing properties or by acting "on demand". Here we introduce an optimized light-sensitive nanoreactor based on encapsulation of a photosensitizer inside polymer vesicles to serve as an efficient source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) "on demand". Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, poly(2-methyloxazoline)-block-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(2-methyloxazoline), PMOXA-PDMS-PMOXA, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), PNVP-PDMS-PNVP, were used to encapsulate Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin (RB-BSA) inside the cavity of vesicles. The difference of copolymers molecular properties (hydrophobic to hydrophilic ratio, different chemical nature of the hydrophilic block) influenced the encapsulation ability, and uptake by cells, allowing therefore a selection of the most efficient polymer system. Nanoreactors were optimized in terms of (i) size, (ii) stability, and (iii) encapsulation efficiency based on a combination of light scattering, TEM, and UV-vis spectroscopy. By illumination, encapsulated RB-BSA conjugates generated in situ ROS, which diffused through the polymer membrane to the environment of the vesicles, as proved by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). Optimum illumination conditions were obtained based on the effect of the illumination time on the amount of ROS produced in situ by the encapsulated RB-BSA conjugates. ROS diffusion monitored by ESR was dependent on the molecular weight of copolymer that influences the thickness of the polymer membrane. Upon uptake into HeLa cells our nontoxic nanoreactors acted as a Trojan horse: they produced illumination-controlled ROS in sufficient amounts to induce cell death under photodynamic therapy (PDT) conditions. Straightforward

  4. Quantum hacking of two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution using Trojan-horse attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hong-Xin; Bao Wan-Su; Li Hong-Wei; Chou Chun

    2016-01-01

    We present a Trojan-horse attack on the practical two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution system. Our attack mainly focuses on the imperfection of the practical system that the modulator has a redundancy of modulation pulse-width, which leaves a loophole for the eavesdropper inserting a Trojan-horse pulse. Utilizing the unique characteristics of two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution that Alice only takes modulation operation on the received mode without any measurement, this attack allows the eavesdropper to render all of the final keys shared between the legitimate parties insecure without being detected. After analyzing the feasibility of the attack, the corresponding countermeasures are put forward. (paper)

  5. Quantum hacking of two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution using Trojan-horse attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Xin; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Chou, Chun

    2016-08-01

    We present a Trojan-horse attack on the practical two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution system. Our attack mainly focuses on the imperfection of the practical system that the modulator has a redundancy of modulation pulse-width, which leaves a loophole for the eavesdropper inserting a Trojan-horse pulse. Utilizing the unique characteristics of two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution that Alice only takes modulation operation on the received mode without any measurement, this attack allows the eavesdropper to render all of the final keys shared between the legitimate parties insecure without being detected. After analyzing the feasibility of the attack, the corresponding countermeasures are put forward. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304397 and 61505261).

  6. Electron screening effects in (p,α) reactions induced on boron isotopes studied via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamia, L; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Gulino, M; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L; Carlin, N; Gameiro Munhoz, M; Gimenez Del Santo, M; Kiss, G G; Somorjai, E; Kroha, V; Kubono, S; La Cognata, M; Pizzone, R G; Li, C; Wen, Qungang; Mukhamedzhanov, A

    2013-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method is a powerful indirect technique allowing one to measure the bare nucleus S(E)-factor and the electron screening potential for astrophysically relevant reactions without the needs of extrapolations. The case of the (p,α) reactions induced on the two boron isotopes 10,11 B is here discussed in view of the recent Trojan Horse (TH) applications to the quasi-free 10,11 B+ 2 H reactions. The comparison between the TH and the low-energy direct data allowed us to determine the electron screening potential for the 11 B(p,α) reaction, while preliminary results on the 10 B(p,α) reaction have been extracted.

  7. Study of the {sup 10}B(p,α){sup 7}Be reaction through the indirect Trojan Horse method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglia, S. M. R., E-mail: puglia@lns.infn.it [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and CSFNM-Centrosiciliano Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia,Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and DMFCI- Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Prague-Rez (Czech Republic); Carlin, N.; Del Santo, M. G.; Munhoz, M. G.; Souza, F.; Szanto de Toledo, A. [Universidade de São Paulo - DFN, São Paulo (Brazil); Chengbo, L.; Qungang, W.; Shu-Hua, Z. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-02-24

    Boron abundances in stellar atmospheres, as well as berillium and lithium ones, can give useful hints for non-standard transport processes discrimination in stars. They can also be relevant for understanding several astrophysical processes (e.g. primordial nucleosynthesis and spallation reactions in ISM). A comprehensive study of Li Be B abundances can therefore confirm or not the presence of non-standard mixing processes in stellar envelopes. For this reason nuclear processes producing or depleting boron isotope abundance need to be studied at astrophysical energies. The {sup 10}B(p,α){sup 7}Be reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan Horse Method. The Trojan Horse Method was thus applied to the {sup 10}B(d,α{sup 7}Be)n reaction, studied at 24 MeV. The obtained results will be discussed.

  8. The tale of a Trojan horse or the quest for market access? China and the World Trade Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Van Kerckhoven

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2001, China finally joined the WTO. The accession of China was looked forward to by many WTO members and China itself. However, observers had some fears that the Chinese accession would prove to be a Trojan horse, disrupting the working of the WTO. This paper looks into the Chinese accession and its involvement in the WTO Dispute Settlement and argues that these fears seem so far to be unfounded.

  9. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther eSchönrich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently estab-lishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems’ Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article.

  10. The Trojan Horse Liposome Technology for Nonviral Gene Transfer across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben J. Boado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of blood-borne gene therapy protocols to the brain is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Viruses have been extensively used as gene delivery systems. However, their efficacy in brain is limited by the lack of transport across the BBB following intravenous (IV administration. Recent progress in the “Trojan Horse Liposome” (THL technology applied to transvascular non-viral gene therapy of the brain presents a promising solution to the trans-vascular brain gene delivery problem. THLs are comprised of immunoliposomes carrying nonviral gene expression plasmids. The tissue target specificity of the THL is provided by peptidomimetic monoclonal antibody (MAb component of the THL, which binds to specific endogenous receptors located on both the BBB and on brain cellular membranes, for example, insulin receptor and transferrin receptor. These MAbs mediate (a receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL complex through the BBB, (b endocytosis into brain cells and (c transport to the brain cell nuclear compartment. The expression of the transgene in brain may be restricted using tissue/cell specific gene promoters. This manuscript presents an overview on the THL transport technology applied to brain disorders, including lysosomal storage disorders and Parkinson's disease.

  11. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  12. Low-energy d+d fusion reactions via the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A., E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna ' Kore' , Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A.M. [Cyclotron Institute Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Typel, S. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH - Theorie, Darmstadt (Germany); Aliotta, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (United Kingdom); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Gimenez del Santo, M. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kiss, G.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Kroha, V.; Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mrazek, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Piskor, S. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic); Rapisarda, G.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L.; Sparta, R. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2011-06-06

    The bare nucleus S(E) factors for the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured for the first time via the Trojan Horse Method off the proton in {sup 3}He from 1.5 MeV down to 2 keV. This range overlaps with the relevant region for Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as with the thermal energies of future fusion reactors and deuterium burning in the Pre-Main-Sequence phase of stellar evolution. This is the first pioneering experiment in quasi free regime where the charged spectator is detected. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from available direct data with new S(0) values of 57.4{+-}1.8 MeVb for {sup 3}H+p and 60.1{+-}1.9 MeVb for {sup 3}He+n. None of the existing fitting curves is able to provide the correct slope of the new data in the full range, thus calling for a revision of the theoretical description. This has consequences in the calculation of the reaction rates with more than a 25% increase at the temperatures of future fusion reactors.

  13. Pathogen Trojan Horse Delivers Bioactive Host Protein to Alter Maize Anther Cell Behavior in Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Egger, Rachel L; Ilau, Birger; Hammond, Reza; Teng, Chong; Meyers, Blake C; Doehlemann, Gunther; Walbot, Virginia

    2018-03-01

    Small proteins are crucial signals during development, host defense, and physiology. The highly spatiotemporal restricted functions of signaling proteins remain challenging to study in planta. The several month span required to assess transgene expression, particularly in flowers, combined with the uncertainties from transgene position effects and ubiquitous or overexpression, makes monitoring of spatiotemporally restricted signaling proteins lengthy and difficult. This situation could be rectified with a transient assay in which protein deployment is tightly controlled spatially and temporally in planta to assess protein functions, timing, and cellular targets as well as to facilitate rapid mutagenesis to define functional protein domains. In maize ( Zea mays ), secreted ZmMAC1 (MULTIPLE ARCHESPORIAL CELLS1) was proposed to trigger somatic niche formation during anther development by participating in a ligand-receptor module. Inspired by Homer's Trojan horse myth, we engineered a protein delivery system that exploits the secretory capabilities of the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis , to allow protein delivery to individual cells in certain cell layers at precise time points. Pathogen-supplied ZmMAC1 cell-autonomously corrected both somatic cell division and differentiation defects in mutant Zm mac1-1 anthers. These results suggest that exploiting host-pathogen interactions may become a generally useful method for targeting host proteins to cell and tissue types to clarify cellular autonomy and to analyze steps in cell responses. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Trojan Horse cross section measurements and their impact on primordial nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spartá, R.; Bertulani, C.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tumino, A.

    2018-01-01

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) nucleosynthesis requires several nuclear physics inputs and, among them, an important role is played by nuclear reaction rates. They are among the most important input for a quantitative description of the early Universe. An up-to-date compilation of direct cross sections of d(d,p)t, d(d,n)3He and 3He(d,p)4He reactions is given, being these ones among the most uncertain bare-nucleus cross sections. An intense experimental effort has been carried on in the last decade to apply the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to study reactions of relevance for the BBN and measure their astrophysical S(E)-factor. The result of these recent measurements is reviewed and compared with the available direct data. The reaction rates and the relative error for the four reactions of interest are then numerically calculated in the temperature ranges of relevance for BBN (0.01

  15. Sugar-Grafted Cyclodextrin Nanocarrier as a "Trojan Horse" for Potentiating Antibiotic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Neoh, Koon Gee; Xu, Liqun; Yuan, Liang; Leong, David Tai; Kang, En-Tang; Chua, Kim Lee; Hsu, Li Yang

    2016-05-01

    The use of "Trojan Horse" nanocarriers for antibiotics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against susceptible and resistant bacteria is investigated. Antibiotic carriers (CD-MAN and CD-GLU) are prepared from β-cyclodextrin grafted with sugar molecules (D-mannose and D-glucose, respectively) via azide-alkyne click reaction. The sugar molecules serve as a chemoattractant enticing the bacteria to take in higher amounts of the antibiotic, resulting in rapid killing of the bacteria. Three types of hydrophobic antibiotics, erythromycin, rifampicin and ciprofloxacin, are used as model drugs and loaded into the carriers. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the antibiotics in the CD-MAN-antibiotic and CD-GLU-antibiotic complexes for Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains, and a number of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains, including the methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA), are reduced by a factor ranging from 3 to >100. The CD-MAN-antibiotic complex is also able to prolong the stability of the loaded antibiotic and inhibit development of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in the bacteria. These non-cytotoxic sugar-modfied nanocarriers can potentiate the activity of existing antibiotics, especially against multidrug-resistant bacteria, which is highly advantageous in view of the paucity of new antibiotics in the pipeline.

  16. A prodrug-doped cellular Trojan Horse for the potential treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Oren; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Han, Edward; Rosen, David Marc; Musabeyezu, Juliet; Safaee, Helia; Ranganath, Sudhir; Ngai, Jessica; Heinelt, Martina; Milton, Yuka; Wang, Hao; Bhagchandani, Sachin H; Joshi, Nitin; Bhowmick, Neil; Denmeade, Samuel R; Isaacs, John T; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Despite considerable advances in prostate cancer research, there is a major need for a systemic delivery platform that efficiently targets anti-cancer drugs to sites of disseminated prostate cancer while minimizing host toxicity. In this proof-of-principle study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) that encapsulate the macromolecule G114, a thapsigargin-based prostate specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug. G114-particles (∼950 nm in size) were internalized by MSCs, followed by the release of G114 as an intact prodrug from loaded cells. Moreover, G114 released from G114 MP-loaded MSCs selectively induced death of the PSA-secreting PCa cell line, LNCaP. Finally, G114 MP-loaded MSCs inhibited tumor growth when used in proof-of-concept co-inoculation studies with CWR22 PCa xenografts, suggesting that cell-based delivery of G114 did not compromise the potency of this pro-drug in-vitro or in-vivo. This study demonstrates a potentially promising approach to assemble a cell-based drug delivery platform, which inhibits cancer growth in-vivo without the need of genetic engineering. We envision that upon achieving efficient homing of systemically infused MSCs to cancer sites, this MSC-based platform may be developed into an effective, systemic 'Trojan Horse' therapy for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to sites of metastatic PCa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-energy d+d fusion reactions via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Typel, S.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Gimenez del Santo, M.; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Pizzone, R.G.; Piskor, S.; Rapisarda, G.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L.; Sparta, R.

    2011-01-01

    The bare nucleus S(E) factors for the 2 H(d,p) 3 H and 2 H(d,n) 3 He reactions have been measured for the first time via the Trojan Horse Method off the proton in 3 He from 1.5 MeV down to 2 keV. This range overlaps with the relevant region for Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as with the thermal energies of future fusion reactors and deuterium burning in the Pre-Main-Sequence phase of stellar evolution. This is the first pioneering experiment in quasi free regime where the charged spectator is detected. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from available direct data with new S(0) values of 57.4±1.8 MeVb for 3 H+p and 60.1±1.9 MeVb for 3 He+n. None of the existing fitting curves is able to provide the correct slope of the new data in the full range, thus calling for a revision of the theoretical description. This has consequences in the calculation of the reaction rates with more than a 25% increase at the temperatures of future fusion reactors.

  18. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics. Asymptotic normalization coefficient and trojan horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Pirlepesov, F.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R.E.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Brown, B.A.; Nunes, F.M.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Cherubini, S.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Irgaziev, B.F.; Tang, X.D.

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the presence of the Coulomb barrier at astrophysically relevant kinetic energies it is very difficult, or sometimes impossible, to measure astrophysical reaction rates in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. Here we address two important indirect techniques, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the Trojan Horse (TH) methods. We discuss the application of the ANC technique for calculation of the astrophysical processes in the presence of subthreshold bound states, in particular, two different mechanisms are discussed: direct capture to the subthreshold state and capture to the low-lying bound states through the subthreshold state, which plays the role of the subthreshold resonance. The ANC technique can also be used to determine the interference sign of the resonant and nonresonant (direct) terms of the reaction amplitude. The TH method is unique indirect technique allowing one to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysically relevant energies. We explain why there is no Coulomb barrier in the sub-process amplitudes extracted from the TH reaction. The expressions for the TH amplitude for direct and resonant cases are presented. (orig.)

  19. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance

  20. Effects of distortion of the intercluster motion in 2H, 3He, 3H, 6Li, and 9Be on Trojan horse applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Irgaziev, B. F.

    2009-01-01

    Deuteron induced quasifree scattering and reactions have been extensively investigated in the past few decades as well as 6 Li, 3 H, 3 He, and 9 Be induced reactions. This was done not only for the investigation of nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms but also for important astrophysical applications (Trojan horse method). In particular the widths of the spectator momentum distributions in several nuclei, which have been used as Trojan horses, have been obtained as a function of the transferred momentum. Applications of Trojan horse method will also be discussed because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the nucleus is a important input for this method. This gives hints on distortion effects at low energies important for nuclear astrophysics.

  1. Trojan Horse Method and RIBs: The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy) and UniKORE, Enna (Italy)

    2012-11-12

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy this isotope in novae. Among these latter processes, the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O is one of the main {sup 18}F destruction channels. We report here on the preliminary results of the first experiment that applies the Trojan Horse Method to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction. The experiment was performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of The Tokyo University.

  2. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: {sup 18}F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Università KORE, Enna, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Binh, D. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address Institute of Physics and Electronics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bishop, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, Japan and present address Physik Department E12, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de masse, IN2P3, Orsay (France); De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O is one of the most important {sup 18}F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  3. Trojan Horse Method and RIBs: The 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of 18 F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy this isotope in novae. Among these latter processes, the 18 F(p,α) 15 O is one of the main 18 F destruction channels. We report here on the preliminary results of the first experiment that applies the Trojan Horse Method to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction. The experiment was performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of The Tokyo University.

  4. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: 18F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Binh, D.; Bishop, S.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of 18 F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the 18 F(p,α) 15 O is one of the most important 18 F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction

  5. Study of the 10B(p,α)7Be Reaction through the Indirect Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Tudisco, S.; Del Santo, M. G.; Carlin, N.; Souza, F.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Kroha, V.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Li, C.

    2010-01-01

    The 10 B(p,α) 7 Be reaction is the main responsible for 10 B destruction in stellar interior. In such environments the process takes places mainly through a resonant state of the compound 11 C nucleus. The 10 B(p,α) 7 Be reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan Horse Method using the 2 H( 10 B,α 7 Be)n three-body reaction. The experiment was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania. The 10 B(p,α) 7 Be reaction cross section has been extracted at low neutron momentum.

  6. Overcoming antibiotic resistance: Is siderophore Trojan horse conjugation an answer to evolving resistance in microbial pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhusia, Kalyani; Bajpai, Archana; Ramteke, P W

    2018-01-10

    Comparative study of siderophore biosynthesis pathway in pathogens provides potential targets for antibiotics and host drug delivery as a part of computationally feasible microbial therapy. Iron acquisition using siderophore models is an essential and well established model in all microorganisms and microbial infections a known to cause great havoc to both plant and animal. Rapid development of antibiotic resistance in bacterial as well as fungal pathogens has drawn us at a verge where one has to get rid of the traditional way of obstructing pathogen using single or multiple antibiotic/chemical inhibitors or drugs. 'Trojan horse' strategy is an answer to this imperative call where antibiotic are by far sneaked into the pathogenic cell via the siderophore receptors at cell and outer membrane. This antibiotic once gets inside, generates a 'black hole' scenario within the opportunistic pathogens via iron scarcity. For pathogens whose siderophore are not compatible to smuggle drug due to their complex conformation and stiff valence bonds, there is another approach. By means of the siderophore biosynthesis pathways, potential targets for inhibition of these siderophores in pathogenic bacteria could be achieved and thus control pathogenic virulence. Method to design artificial exogenous siderophores for pathogens that would compete and succeed the battle of intake is also covered with this review. These manipulated siderophore would enter pathogenic cell like any other siderophore but will not disperse iron due to which iron inadequacy and hence pathogens control be accomplished. The aim of this review is to offer strategies to overcome the microbial infections/pathogens using siderophore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Packaging and delivery of chemical weapons: a defensive trojan horse stratagem in chromodorid nudibranchs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Carbone

    Full Text Available Storage of secondary metabolites with a putative defensive role occurs in the so-called mantle dermal formations (MDFs that are located in the more exposed parts of the body of most and very likely all members of an entire family of marine mollusks, the chromodorid nudibranchs (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia. Given that these structures usually lack a duct system, the mechanism for exudation of their contents remains unclear, as does their adaptive significance. One possible explanation could be that they are adapted so as to be preferentially attacked by predators. The nudibranchs might offer packages containing highly repugnant chemicals along with parts of their bodies to the predators, as a defensive variant of the strategic theme of the Trojan horse.We detected, by quantitative (1H-NMR, extremely high local concentrations of secondary metabolites in the MDFs of six species belonging to five chromodorid genera. The compounds were purified by chromatographic methods and subsequently evaluated for their feeding deterrent properties, obtaining dose-response curves. We found that only distasteful compounds are accumulated in the reservoirs at concentrations that far exceed the values corresponding to maximum deterrent activity in the feeding assays. Other basic evidence, both field and experimental, has been acquired to elucidate the kind of damage that the predators can produce on both the nudibranchs' mantles and the MDFs.As a result of a long evolutionary process that has progressively led to the accumulation of defensive chemical weapons in localized anatomical structures, the extant chromodorid nudibranchs remain in place when molested, retracting respiratory and chemosensory organs, but offering readily accessible parts of their body to predators. When these parts are masticated or wounded by predators, breakage of the MDFs results in the release of distasteful compounds at extremely high concentration in a way that maximizes their repugnant

  8. Packaging and delivery of chemical weapons: a defensive trojan horse stratagem in chromodorid nudibranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marianna; Gavagnin, Margherita; Haber, Markus; Guo, Yue-Wei; Fontana, Angelo; Manzo, Emiliano; Genta-Jouve, Gregory; Tsoukatou, Maria; Rudman, William B; Cimino, Guido; Ghiselin, Michael T; Mollo, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Storage of secondary metabolites with a putative defensive role occurs in the so-called mantle dermal formations (MDFs) that are located in the more exposed parts of the body of most and very likely all members of an entire family of marine mollusks, the chromodorid nudibranchs (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia). Given that these structures usually lack a duct system, the mechanism for exudation of their contents remains unclear, as does their adaptive significance. One possible explanation could be that they are adapted so as to be preferentially attacked by predators. The nudibranchs might offer packages containing highly repugnant chemicals along with parts of their bodies to the predators, as a defensive variant of the strategic theme of the Trojan horse. We detected, by quantitative (1)H-NMR, extremely high local concentrations of secondary metabolites in the MDFs of six species belonging to five chromodorid genera. The compounds were purified by chromatographic methods and subsequently evaluated for their feeding deterrent properties, obtaining dose-response curves. We found that only distasteful compounds are accumulated in the reservoirs at concentrations that far exceed the values corresponding to maximum deterrent activity in the feeding assays. Other basic evidence, both field and experimental, has been acquired to elucidate the kind of damage that the predators can produce on both the nudibranchs' mantles and the MDFs. As a result of a long evolutionary process that has progressively led to the accumulation of defensive chemical weapons in localized anatomical structures, the extant chromodorid nudibranchs remain in place when molested, retracting respiratory and chemosensory organs, but offering readily accessible parts of their body to predators. When these parts are masticated or wounded by predators, breakage of the MDFs results in the release of distasteful compounds at extremely high concentration in a way that maximizes their repugnant impact.

  9. Trojan Horse Method: a useful tool for electron screening effect investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN and DMFCI Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Universita Kore, Enna (Italy); Li, C.; Wen, Q.; Zhou, S. [Department of Nuclear Physics, CIAE, Beijing (China); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J. [Cyclotron Institute, Academy of Science, Rez, Czech Rep. (Czech Republic); Carlin, N.; Gimenez del Santo, M.; Szanto de Toledo, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamaguchi, H. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Wako (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Direct measurements in the last decades have highlighted a new problem related to the lowering of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting nuclei due to the presence of the 'electron screening' in the laboratory measurements. It was systematically observed that the presence of the electronic cloud around the interacting ions in measurements of nuclear reactions cross sections at astrophysical energies gives rise to an enhancement of the astrophysical S(E)-factor as lower and lower energies are explored [H. Assenbaum, K. Langanke, C. Rolfs, Z. Phys. 327 (1987) 461]. Moreover, at present such an effect is not well understood as the value of the potential for screening extracted from these measurements is higher than the upper limit of theoretical predictions (adiabatic limit). On the other hand, the electron screening potential in laboratory measurement is different from that occurring in stellar plasmas thus the quantity of interest in astrophysics is the so-called 'bare nucleus cross section'. This quantity can only be extrapolated in direct measurements. These are the reasons that led to a considerable growth on interest in indirect measurement techniques and in particular the Trojan Horse Method (THM) [G. Baur, Phys. Lett. B 178, (1986) 135; S. Cherubini et al. Ap. J. 457, (1996) 855] Results concerning the bare nucleus cross sections measurements will be shown in several cases of astrophysical interest. In those cases the screening potential evaluated by means of the THM will be compared with the adiabatic limit and results arising from extrapolation in direct measurements.

  10. Desferrioxamine and desferrioxamine-caffeine as carriers of aluminum and gallium to microbes via the Trojan Horse Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huayhuaz, Jesus Antonio Alvarado; Vitorino, Hector Aguilar; Campos, Othon Souto; Serrano, Silvia Helena Pires; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Espósito, Breno Pannia

    2017-05-01

    Iron acquisition by bacteria and fungi involves in several cases the promiscuous usage of siderophores. Thus, antibiotic resistance from these microorganisms can be circumvented through a strategy of loading toxic metals into siderophores (Trojan Horse Effect). Desferrioxamine (dfo) and its cell-permeant derivative desferrioxamine-caffeine (dfcaf) were complexed with aluminum or gallium for this purpose. The complexes Me(dfo) and Me(dfcaf) (Me=Al 3+ and Ga 3+ ) were synthesized and characterized by mass spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Their relative stabilities were studied through competitive equilibria with fluorescent probes calcein, fluorescein-desferrioxamine and 8-hydroxyquinoline. Me(dfo) and Me(dfcaf) were consistently more toxic than free Me 3+ against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, demonstrating the Trojan Horse Effect. Wide spectrum antimicrobial action can be obtained by loading non-essential or toxic metal ions to microbes via a convenient siderophore carrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The Trojan Horse of the microbiological arms race: phage-encoded toxins as a defence against eukaryotic predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jason W; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2014-02-01

    Phage-encoded Shiga toxin (Stx) acts as a bacterial defence against the eukaryotic predator Tetrahymena. To function as an effective bacterial anti-predator defence, Stx must kill a broad spectrum of predators. Consistent with that assertion, we show here that bacterially encoded Stx efficiently kills the bacteriovore Acanthamoeba castellanii in co-culture. We also show that, in addition to Stx, the phage-encoded exotoxin, diphtheria toxin (Dtx) expressed by Corynebacterium diphtheriae also can function as part of an anti-predator strategy; it kills Acanthamoeba in co-culture. Interestingly, only exotoxins produced by bacteria internalized by the Acanthamoeba predator are cytolethal; the presence of purified Dtx or Stx in culture medium has no effect on predator viability. This finding is consistent with our results indicating that intoxication of Acanthamoeba by these exotoxins does not require a receptor. Thus bacteria, in the disguise of a food source, function as a 'Trojan Horse', carrying genes encoding an exotoxin into target organisms. This 'Trojan Horse' mechanism of exotoxin delivery into predator cells allows intoxication of predators that lack a cell surface receptor for the particular toxin, allowing bacteria-bearing exotoxins to kill a broader spectrum of predators, increasing the fitness of the otherwise 'defenceless' prey bacteria. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Trojan-horse mechanism in the cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles verified by direct intra- and extracellular silver speciation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, I-Lun; Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Wang, Chu-Fang; Chen, I-Chieh; Huang, Yuh-Jeen

    2015-03-17

    The so-called "Trojan-horse" mechanism, in which nanoparticles are internalized within cells and then release high levels of toxic ions, has been proposed as a behavior in the cellular uptake of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs). While several reports claim to have proved this mechanism by measuring AgNPs and Ag ions (I) in cells, it cannot be fully proven without examining those two components in both intra- and extracellular media. In our study, we found that even though cells take up AgNPs similarly to (microglia (BV-2)) or more rapidly than (astrocyte (ALT)) Ag (I), the ratio of AgNPs to total Ag (AgNPs+Ag (I)) in both cells was lower than that in outside media. It could be explained that H2O2, a major intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), reacts with AgNPs to form more Ag (I). Moreover, the major speciation of Ag (I) in cells was Ag(cysteine) and Ag(cysteine)2, indicating the possible binding of monomer cysteine or vital thiol proteins/peptides to Ag ions. Evidence we found indicates that the Trojan-horse mechanism really exists.

  13. Effects on distortion on the inter cluster motion in 2H, 3He, 6Li and 9Be on Trojan Horse applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    Deuteron induced quasi-free scattering and reactions have been extensively investigated in the past few decades as well as 6 L i, 3 H , 3 H e and 9 B e induced ones. This was done not only for nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms investigation but also for important astrophysical implications (Trojan Horse Method)[1]. In particular the width and the shape of the spectator momentum distribution inside several nuclei which have been used as Trojan Horse ones have been obtained as a function of the transferred momentum for all these nuclei. The behaviour of the width of the spectator momentum distribution as a function of the transferred momentum will be discussed extensively. This work is the continuation of what has been done for Li 6 in [2]. Moreover a complete study on Trojan Horse method applications will also be given because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the Trojan horse nucleus is a necessary input for the application of this method. This will give hints on distortion effects at low energies as well as implications for nuclear astrophysics.(author)

  14. New measurement of the B-11(p,alpha(0))Be-8 bare-nucleus S(E) factor via the Trojan horse method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Burjan, Václav; Carlin, N.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Munhoz, M. G.; Del Santo, M. G.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Zdeněk; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, Václav; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Wen, Q.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A .; de Toledo, A. S.; Tabacaru, G.; Tumino, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Zhou, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2012), 015106/1-015106/23 ISSN 0954-3899 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100480902; GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : astrophysical reactions * Trojan horse method Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.326, year: 2012

  15. Nuclear proton-proton elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to study charged particle two-body reactions at sub-Coulomb energies [1,2]. As known, it makes it possible to extract their cross sections down to the relevant energies without experiencing Coulomb suppression. For this reason, since a couple of decades it is successfully applied to rearrangement reactions of astrophysical interest. Recently, we have investigate the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude when the THM is applied to scattering processes. This was done by considering the p - p scattering at low energy, the simplest case where the Coulomb suppression can be observed. Proton-proton cross section was extensively studied in the past. Its energy trend appears to be very similar to that of n-n or p-n systems (1/E behaviour) except at lower proton relative energies, where a deep minimum shows up (E pp = 191.2 keV, θ cm = 90 o ). This minimum is interpreted as being the signature of the interference between nuclear and Coulomb scattering amplitudes. Therefore, if one considers that a non sizable Coulomb amplitude would make the minimum in the p-p cross section to disappear, the strong interference pattern offers an unique possibility to validate the THM suppression of Coulomb amplitude for scattering. This has been realized by measuring the p - p elastic scattering within the region of the minimum through the 2 H (p, pp)n reaction at 4.8 and 5 MeV in the quasi-free (QF) kinematics regime [3,4]. The THM p-p cross-section was extracted in the framework of the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation [5] down to E lab = 80 keV, and compared with the direct p-p behaviour. No minimum shows up in the THM data, whose trend appears to be smooth, much similar to that of the n-n or n-p cross-section. A detailed formalism was developed to build-up the expression of the theoretical half-off-shell p-p cross section, whose behaviour agrees with the THM data, given the fact that in its expression the Coulomb amplitude is

  16. Nanodiamonds act as Trojan horse for intracellular delivery of metal ions to trigger cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Guosheng; Yang, Jinrong; Zhang, Jichao; Li, Wenxin; Li, Aiguo; Tai, Renzhong; Fang, Haiping; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing

    2015-02-05

    good vehicles for metal ions delivery. NDs played the Trojan horse role by allowing large amounts of metal ions accumulate into living cells followed by subsequent release of ions in the interior of cells, which then led to cytotoxicity. The present experimental and theoretical results provide useful insight into understanding of cytotoxicity triggered by nanoparticle-ion interactions, and open new ways in the interpretation of nanotoxicity.

  17. Nematode eel parasite found inside acanthocephalan cysts--a "Trojan horse" strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Sebastian; Rueckert, Sonja; Kochmann, Judith; Knopf, Klaus; Sures, Bernd; Klimpel, Sven

    2014-11-18

    genus Pomphorhynchus using them as "Trojan horses". Providing that eels prey on the highly abundant round goby and that the latter transfers viable infective larvae of A. crassus, the new paratenic host might have a strong impact on the epidemiology of A. crassus.

  18. Trojan Horse measurement of the {sup 18}F(p, α){sup 15}O astrophysical S(E)-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R.G. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Roeder, B.T.; McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Tribble, R.E. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Rapisarda, G.G.; Sparta, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Bertulani, C.A. [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Cherubini, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Gulino, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); KORE University, Enna (Italy); La Cognata, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Crucial information on novae nucleosynthesis is linked to the abundance of {sup 18}F, which, due to great improvements in gamma-ray astronomy, can be detected in explosive environments. Therefore, the reaction network producing and destroying this radioactive isotope has been extensively studied in the last years. Among those reactions, the {sup 18}F(p, α){sup 15}O cross section has been measured by means of several dedicated experiments, both using direct and indirect methods. The presence of resonances in the energy region of astrophysical interest has been reported by many authors. In the present work a report on a recent experiment performed via the Trojan Horse Method (THM) is presented and the results are given and compared with the ones known in the literature, both direct and indirect. Data arising from THM measurements are then averaged and the reaction rate calculated in the novae energy range. (orig.)

  19. Indirect Study of the 16O+16O Fusion Reaction Toward Stellar Energies by the Trojan Horse Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayakawa S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 16O+16O fusion reaction is important in terms of the explosive oxygen burning process during late evolution stage of massive stars as well as understanding of the mechanism of low-energy heavy-ion fusion reactions. We aim to determine the excitation function for the most major exit channels, α+28Si and p+31P, toward stellar energies indirectly by the Trojan Horse Method via the 16O(20Ne, α28Siα and 16O(20Ne, p31Pα three-body reactions. We report preliminary results involving reaction identification, and determination of the momentum distribution of α-16O intercluster motion in the projectile 20Ne nucleus.

  20. Subthreshold resonances and resonances in the R -matrix method for binary reactions and in the Trojan horse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Shubhchintak, Bertulani, C. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the R -matrix approach to treat the subthreshold resonances for the single-level and one-channel and for the single-level and two-channel cases. In particular, the expression relating the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) with the observable reduced width, when the subthreshold bound state is the only channel or coupled with an open channel, which is a resonance, is formulated. Since the ANC plays a very important role in nuclear astrophysics, these relations significantly enhance the power of the derived equations. We present the relationship between the resonance width and the ANC for the general case and consider two limiting cases: wide and narrow resonances. Different equations for the astrophysical S factors in the R -matrix approach are presented. After that we discuss the Trojan horse method (THM) formalism. The developed equations are obtained using the surface-integral formalism and the generalized R -matrix approach for the three-body resonant reactions. It is shown how the Trojan horse (TH) double-differential cross section can be expressed in terms of the on-the-energy-shell astrophysical S factor for the binary subreaction. Finally, we demonstrate how the THM can be used to calculate the astrophysical S factor for the neutron generator 13C(α ,n )16O in low-mass AGB stars. At astrophysically relevant energies this astrophysical S factor is controlled by the threshold level 1 /2+,Ex=6356 keV. Here, we reanalyzed recent TH data taking into account more accurately the three-body effects and using both assumptions that the threshold level is a subthreshold bound state or it is a resonance state.

  1. Assessing the near threshold cross section of the O-17(n, alpha)C-14 reaction by means of the Trojan horse method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guardo, G. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Tang, X.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Goldberg, V.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Notani, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Wiescher, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 025807. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11001; GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear reactions * C-14 * Trojan Horse Method Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  2. Experimental study of the 6Li(d,α)4He reaction and its astrophysical implications via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzone, R.G.; Aliotta, M.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Blagus, S.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Rendic, D.; Soic, N.; Zadro, M.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Romano, S.; Lattuada, M.; Zappala, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The 6 Li(d,α) 4 He reaction, whose astrophysical importance is connected to the primordial nucleosynthesis in the framework of the Inhomogeneous Big Bang, has been studied by using the Trojan Horse Method (THM). We derive and discuss the cross section and the astrophysical S(E)-factor for E cm =0.025-0.7 MeV. Results are compared with data from a direct measurement

  3. Measurements of the neutron-induced reactions on 7Be with CRIB by the Trojan Horse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, S.; Abe, K.; Beliuskina, O.; Cha, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Ge, Z.; Gulino, M.; Hu, J.; Inoue, A.; Iwasa, N.; Kahl, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kiss, G.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; La Commara, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Lee, E. J.; Moon, J. Y.; Palmerini, S.; Parascandolo, C.; Park, S. Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Shimizu, H.; Spitaleri, C.; Tang, X. D.; Trippella, O.; Tumino, A.; , P., Vi; Yamaguchi, H.; Yang, L.; Zhang, N. T.

    2018-04-01

    The cosmological 7Li problem has been one of the big issues left in the standard Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. In order to determine the radiogenic 7Li abundance by the BBN, it is important to know the production and the destruction rate of 7Be rather than 7Li itself. We performed indirect measurements of the relevant neutron-induced reactions 7Be(n, p)7Li and 7Be(n, α)4He simultaneously by the Trojan Horse Method (THM) via the three-body reactions 7Be(d,7Lip)1H and 7Be(d, αα)1H. A 7Be radioactive-isotope (RI) beam at 3.16 MeV/u was produced at Center-for-Nuclear-Study RI Beam (CRIB) separator. The Q-value spectra shows the evidence of the three-body channels of interest. We confirmed that the THM was applicable to the present measurements by the momentum distributions of the spectator proton. Preliminary excitation functions are roughly consistent with the previous studies, moreover providing new data in the BBN energy range, and suggesting that new information about the 7Be(n, p1)7Li* contribution may be obtained by carrying out a further data analysis.

  4. Application of the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron induced reactions: the 17O(n, α14C reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulino M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 17O(n, α14C was studied using virtual neutrons coming from the quasi-free deuteron break-up in the three body reaction 17O+d → α+14C+p. This technique, called virtual neutron method, extends the Trojan Horse method to neutron-induced reactions allowing to study the reaction cross section avoiding the suppression effects coming from the penetrability of the centrifugal barrier. For incident neutron energies from thermal up to a few hundred keV, direct experiments have shown the population of two out of three expected excited states at energies 8213 keV and 8282 keV and the influence of the sub-threshold level at 8038 keV. In the present experiment the 18O excited state at E* = 8.125 MeV, missing in the direct measurement, is observed. The angular distributions of the populated resonances have been measured for the first time. The results unambiguously indicate the ability of the method to overcome the centrifugal barrier suppression effect and to pick out the contribution of the bare nuclear interaction.

  5. The ComP-ComA quorum system is essential for "Trojan horse" like pathogenesis in Bacillus nematocida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xidan Deng

    Full Text Available Bacillus nematocida B16 has been shown to use "Trojan horse" mechanism in pathogenesis that has characteristics of "social" behavior. The ComP-ComA system, a conserved quorum sensing system in the genus Bacillus, functions in many physiological processes including competence development, lipopeptide antibiotic surfactin production, degradative enzyme production and even some unknown functions. Here we investigated the requirement of ComP-ComA system in B. nematocida B16 for its pathogenicity against nematodes. The ΔcomP mutant displayed deficiencies in attracting and killing nematodes, due to the absence of attractive signal molecules and the decreased expressions of virulence factors, respectively. Contrarily, a complemented comP mutant at least partially resumed its pathogenicity. Our data from transcriptional analysis further confirmed that this signaling system directly or indirectly regulated the expressions of two major virulence proteases in the infection of B. nematocida B16. Bioinformatics analyses from comparative genomics also suggested that the potential target genes of transcription factor ComA were involved in the processes such as the synthesis of attractants, production of extracellular degradative enzymes and sortase, secondary metabolites biosynthesis, regulation of transcription factors, mobility, as well as transporters, most of which were different from a saprophytic relative B. subtilis 168. Therefore, our investigation firstly revealed that the participation and necessity of ComP-ComA signaling system in bacterial pathogenesis.

  6. AN UPDATED 6Li(p, α)3He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Pappalardo, L.

    2013-01-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. 6 Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low 6 Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of 6 Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U e . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the 6 Li(p, α) 3 He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U e value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the 2 H( 6 Li, α 3 He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T 9 and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  7. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L., E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.it; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Districti Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame 46556, Indiana (United States); Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  8. Study of 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Gulino, M.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Coc, A.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Kiss, G.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the still present uncertainties on its rate, the 17 O(p,α) 14 N is one of the most important reaction to be studied in order to get more information about the fate of 17 O in different astrophysical scenarios. The preliminary study of the three-body reaction 2 H( 17 O,α 14 N)n is presented here as a first stage of the indirect study of this important 17 O(p,α) 14 N reaction through the Trojan Horse Method (THM)

  9. Recognition of endophytic Trichoderma species by leaf-cutting ants and their potential in a Trojan-horse management strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Silma L.; Evans, Harry C.; Jorge, Vanessa L.; Cardoso, Lucimar A. O.; Pereira, Fernanda S. T.; Rocha, Fabiano B.; Barreto, Robert W.; Hart, Adam G.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between leaf-cutting ants, their fungal symbiont (Leucoagaricus) and the endophytic fungi within the vegetation they carry into their colonies are still poorly understood. If endophytes antagonistic to Leucoagaricus were found in plant material being carried by these ants, then this might indicate a potential mechanism for plants to defend themselves from leaf-cutter attack. In addition, it could offer possibilities for the management of these important Neotropical pests. Here, we show that, for Atta sexdens rubropilosa, there was a significantly greater incidence of Trichoderma species in the vegetation removed from the nests—and deposited around the entrances—than in that being transported into the nests. In a no-choice test, Trichoderma-infested rice was taken into the nest, with deleterious effects on both the fungal gardens and ant survival. The endophytic ability of selected strains of Trichoderma was also confirmed, following their inoculation and subsequent reisolation from seedlings of eucalyptus. These results indicate that endophytic fungi which pose a threat to ant fungal gardens through their antagonistic traits, such as Trichoderma, have the potential to act as bodyguards of their plant hosts and thus might be employed in a Trojan-horse strategy to mitigate the negative impact of leaf-cutting ants in both agriculture and silviculture in the Neotropics. We posit that the ants would detect and evict such ‘malign’ endophytes—artificially inoculated into vulnerable crops—during the quality-control process within the nest, and, moreover, that the foraging ants may then be deterred from further harvesting of ‘Trichoderma-enriched’ plants. PMID:28484603

  10. Can Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Silently Travel From the Gut to the Wound and Cause Postoperative Infection? Modeling the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezalek, Monika A; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Zaborin, Alexander; Okafor, Emeka; Chandrasekar, Laxmi; Bindokas, Vitas; Guyton, Kristina; Montgomery, Christopher P; Daum, Robert S; Zaborina, Olga; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alverdy, John C

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether intestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be the source of surgical site infections (SSIs). We hypothesized that gut-derived MRSA may cause SSIs via mechanisms in which circulating immune cells scavenge MRSA from the gut, home to surgical wounds, and cause infection (Trojan Horse Hypothesis). MRSA gut colonization was achieved by disrupting the microbiota with antibiotics, imposing a period of starvation and introducing MRSA via gavage. Next, mice were subjected to a surgical injury (30% hepatectomy) and rectus muscle injury and ischemia before skin closure. All wounds were cultured before skin closure. To control for postoperative wound contamination, reiterative experiments were performed in mice in which the closed wound was painted with live MRSA for 2 consecutive postoperative days. To rule out extracellular bacteremia as a cause of wound infection, MRSA was injected intravenously in mice subjected to rectus muscle ischemia and injury. All wound cultures were negative before skin closure, ruling out intraoperative contamination. Out of 40 mice, 4 (10%) developed visible abscesses. Nine mice (22.5%) had MRSA positive cultures of the rectus muscle without visible abscesses. No SSIs were observed in mice injected intravenously with MRSA. Wounds painted with MRSA after closure did not develop infections. Circulating neutrophils from mice captured by flow cytometry demonstrated MRSA in their cytoplasm. Immune cells as Trojan horses carrying gut-derived MRSA may be a plausible mechanism of SSIs in the absence of direct contamination.

  11. Pursuing Intracellular Pathogens with Hyaluronan. From a 'Pro-Infection' Polymer to a Biomaterial for 'Trojan Horse' Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Elita; Di Meo, Chiara; Oates, Angela; Coviello, Tommasina; Matricardi, Pietro

    2018-04-18

    Hyaluronan (HA) is among the most important bioactive polymers in mammals, playing a key role in a number of biological functions. In the last decades, it has been increasingly studied as a biomaterial for drug delivery systems, thanks to its physico-chemical features and ability to target and enter certain cells. The most important receptor of HA is ‘Cluster of Differentiation 44’ (CD44), a cell surface glycoprotein over-expressed by a number of cancers and heavily involved in HA endocytosis. Moreover, CD44 is highly expressed by keratinocytes, activated macrophages and fibroblasts, all of which can act as ‘reservoirs’ for intracellular pathogens. Interestingly, both CD44 and HA appear to play a key role for the invasion and persistence of such microorganisms within the cells. As such, HA is increasingly recognised as a potential target for nano-carriers development, to pursuit and target intracellular pathogens, acting as a ‘Trojan Horse’. This review describes the biological relationship between HA, CD44 and the entry and survival of a number of pathogens within the cells and the subsequent development of HA-based nano-carriers for enhancing the intracellular activity of antimicrobials.

  12. Capsules containing entomopathogenic nematodes as a Trojan horse approach to control the western corn rootworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of entomopathogenic nematodes in the biological control of soil insect pests is hampered by the costly and inadequate application techniques. As a possible solution we evaluated an encapsulation approach that offers effective application and may possibly attract the pest by adding attractant...

  13. Taming the Wildness of "Trojan-Horse" Peptides by Charge-Guided Masking and Protease-Triggered Demasking for the Controlled Delivery of Antitumor Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-03-29

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), also called "Trojan Horse" peptide, has become a successful approach to deliver various payloads into cells for achieving the intracellular access. However, the "Trojan Horse" peptide is too wild, not just to "Troy", but rather widely distributed in the body. Thus, there is an urgent need to tame the wildness of "Trojan Horse" peptide for targeted delivery of antineoplastic agents to the tumor site. To achieve this goal, we exploit a masked CPP-doxorubicin conjugate platform for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using charge-guided masking and protease-triggered demasking strategies. In this platform, the cell-penetrating function of the positively CPP (d-form nonaarginine) is abrogated by a negatively shielding peptide (masked CPP), and between them is a cleavable substrate peptide by the protease (MMP-2/9). Protease-triggered demasking would occur when the masked CPP reached the MMP-2/9-riched tumor. The CPP-doxorubicin conjugate (CPP-Dox) and the masked CPP-Dox conjugate (mCPP-Dox) were used as models for the evaluation of masking and demasking processes. It was found that exogenous MMP-2/9 could effectively trigger the reversion of CPP-cargo in this conjugate, and this trigger adhered to the Michaelis-Menten kinetics profile. This conjugate was sensitive to the trigger of endogenous MMP-2/9 and could induce enhanced cytotoxicity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumor cells. In vivo antitumor efficacy revealed that this masked conjugate had considerable antitumor activity and could inhibit the tumor growth at a higher level relative to CPP-cargo. Low toxicity in vivo showed the noticeably decreased wildness of this conjugate toward normal tissues and more controllable entry of antitumor agents into "Troy". On the basis of analyses in vitro and in vivo, this mCPP-cargo conjugate delivery system held an improved selectivity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumors and would be a promising strategy for tumor-targeted treatment.

  14. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stromal cells for cancer therapy: turning partners in crime into Trojan horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niess Hanno

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are adult progenitor cells with a high migratory and differentiation potential, which influence a broad range of biological functions in almost every tissue of the body. Among other mechanisms, MSCs do so by the secretion of molecular cues, differentiation toward more specialized cell types, or influence on the immune system. Expanding tumors also depend on the contribution of MSCs to building a supporting stroma, but the effects of MSCs appear to go beyond the mere supply of connective tissues. MSCs show targeted “homing” toward growing tumors, which is then followed by exerting direct and indirect effects on cancer cells. Several research groups have developed novel strategies that make use of the tumor tropism of MSCs by engineering them to express a transgene that enables an attack on cancer growth. This review aims to familiarize the reader with the current knowledge about MSC biology, the existing evidence for MSC contribution to tumor growth with its underlying mechanisms, and the strategies that have been developed using MSCs to deploy an anticancer therapy.

  15. Study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and University of Enna (Italy); Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); and others

    2014-05-02

    The experimental study of the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,α{sup 14}C){sup 1}H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J{sup π}=5{sup −}), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects.

  16. Study of the 17O(n,α)14C reaction: Extension of the Trojan Horse Method to neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardo, G. L.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; Boer, R. de; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; OBrien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    The experimental study of the 17 O(n,α) 14 C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To overcome the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the 17 O(n,α) 14 C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free 2 H( 17 O,α 14 C) 1 H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, J π =5 − ), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects

  17. Study of 16O(12C,α20Ne)α for the investigation of carbon-carbon fusion reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapisarda, G.G.; Spitaleri, C; Kiss, G.G.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.; Bordeanu, C.; Nita, C.; Pantelica, D.; Petrascu, H.; Velisa, G.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Szücs, T.; Trache, L.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-carbon fusion reaction represents a nuclear process of great interest in astrophysics, since the carbon burning is connected with the third phase of massive stars (M > 8 M ☉ ) evolution. In spite of several experimental works, carbon-carbon cross section has been measured at energy still above the Gamow window moreover data at low energy present big uncertainty. In this paper we report the results about the study of the 16 O( 12 C,α 20 Ne)α reaction as a possible three-body process to investigate 12 C( 12 C,α) 20 Ne at astrophysical energy via Trojan Horse Method (THM). This study represents the first step of a program of experiments aimed to measure the 12 C+ 12 C cross section at astrophysical energy using the THM. (paper)

  18. Trojan horses and guided missiles: targeted therapies in the war on arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mathieu; Onuoha, Shimobi C; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2015-06-01

    Despite major advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) led by the success of biologic therapies, the lack of response to therapy in a proportion of patients, as well as therapy discontinuation owing to systemic toxicity, are still unsolved issues. Unchecked RA might develop into progressive structural joint damage, loss of function and long-term disability, disorders which are associated with a considerable health-economic burden. Therefore, new strategies are required to actively target and deliver therapeutic agents to disease sites in order to promote in situ activity and decrease systemic toxicity. Polymer-drug conjugates can improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic agents, conferring desirable properties such as increased solubility and tissue penetration at sites of active disease. Additionally, nanotechnology is an exciting modality in which drugs are encapsulated to protect them from degradation or early activation in the circulation, as well as to reduce systemic toxicity. Together with the targeting capacity of antibodies and site-specific peptides, these approaches will facilitate selective accumulation of therapeutic agents in the inflamed synovium, potentially improving drug efficacy at disease sites without affecting healthy tissues. This Review aims to summarize key developments in the past 5 years in polymer conjugation, nanoparticulate drug delivery and antibody or peptide-based targeting--strategies that might constitute the platform for the next generation of RA therapeutics.

  19. Intelligent "Peptide-Gathering Mechanical Arm" Tames Wild "Trojan-Horse" Peptides for the Controlled Delivery of Cancer Nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Nan; Qi, Ling; Wang, Shu-Ran; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-12-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also called "Trojan-Horse" peptides, have been used for facilitating intracellular delivery of numerous diverse cargoes and even nanocarriers. However, the lack of targeting specificity ("wildness" or nonselectivity) of CPP-nanocarriers remains an intractable challenge for many in vivo applications. In this work, we used an intelligent "peptide-gathering mechanical arm" (Int PMA) to curb CPPs' wildness and enhance the selectivity of R 9 -liposome-based cargo delivery for tumor targeting. The peptide NGR, serving as a cell-targeting peptide for anchoring, and peptide PLGLAG, serving as a substrate peptide for deanchoring, were embedded in the Int PMA motif. The Int PMA construct was designed to be sensitive to tumor microenvironmental stimuli, including aminopeptidase N (CD13) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/9). Moreover, Int PMA could be specifically recognized by tumor tissues via CD13-mediated anchoring and released for cell entry by MMP-2/9-mediated deanchoring. To test the Int PMA design, a series of experiments were conducted in vitro and in vivo. Functional conjugates Int PMA-R 9 -poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 2000 -distearoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine (DSPE) and R 9 -PEG 2000 -DSPE were synthesized by Michael addition reaction and were characterized by thin-layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Int PMA-R 9 -modified doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (Int PMA-R 9 -Lip-DOX) exhibited a proper particle diameter (approximately 155 nm) with in vitro sustained release characteristics. Cleavage assay showed that Int PMA-R 9 peptide molecules could be cleaved by MMP-2/9 for completion of deanchoring. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies indicated that Int PMA-R 9 -Lip-DOX can respond to both endogenous and exogenous stimuli in the presence/absence of excess MMP-2/9 and MMP-2/9 inhibitor (GM6001) and effectively function under competitive receptor

  20. A novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to reduce the non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Sugeun; Ma, Xuehua; Li, Zihou; Tan, Mingqian; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-11-01

    One big challenge with active targeting of nanocarriers is non-specific binding between targeting molecules and non-target moieties expressed on non-cancerous cells, which leads to non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells. Here, we propose a novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to hide or expose the targeting molecules of nanocarriers on-demand. The non-specific uptake by non-cancerous cells can be reduced because the targeting molecules are hidden in hydrophilic polymers. The nanocarriers are still actively targetable to cancer cells because the targeting molecules can be exposed on-demand at tumor regions. Typically, Fe3O4 nanocrystals (FN) as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were encapsulated into albumin nanoparticles (AN), and then folic acid (FA) and pH-sensitive polymers (PP) were grafted onto the surface of AN-FN to construct PP-FA-AN-FN nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results confirm successful construction of PP-FA-AN-FN. According to difference of nanoparticle-cellular uptake between pH 7.4 and 5.5, the weight ratio of conjugated PP to nanoparticle FA-AN-FN (i.e. graft density) and the molecular weight of PP (i.e. graft length) are optimized to be 1.32 and 5.7 kDa, respectively. In vitro studies confirm that the PP can hide ligand FA to prevent it from binding to cells with FRα at pH 7.4 and shrink to expose FA at pH 5.5. In vivo studies demonstrate that our Trojan-horse targeting strategy can reduce the non-specific uptake of the PP-FA-AN-FN by non-cancerous cells. Therefore, our PP-FA-AN-FN might be used as an accurately targeted MRI contrast agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction at astrophysical energies using the Trojan Horse Method. Focus on the -3 keV subthreshold resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G.L.; Puglia, S.M.R.; Romano, S.; Sparta, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G.G.; Rogachev, G.V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208 are produced through the so-called s-process, namely through a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays. The 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ≤ 10 8 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140 - 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17 O. Direct measurements could not soundly establish its contribution owing to the cross section suppression at astrophysical energies determined by the Coulomb barrier between interacting nuclei. Indirect measurements and extrapolations yielded inconsistent results, calling for further investigations. The Trojan Horse Method turns out to be very suited for the study of the 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction as it allows us to access the low as well as the negative energy region, in particular in the case of resonance reactions. We have applied the Trojan Horse Method to the 13 C( 6 Li; n 16 O)d quasi-free reaction. By using the modified R-matrix approach, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (C(O(1/2+),α 13 C)] 2 of the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy for the 13 C(α,n) 16 O astrophysical factor. A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to (C(O(1/2+),α 13 C)] 2 = (6.7-0.6+0.9) fm -1 , slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction rate in agreement with the most results in the literature at ∼ 10 8 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to this innovative approach. (authors)

  2. Reproductive biology of horse mackerel Trachurus capensis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harvest control measures for Namibia and Angola are defined using reference points for spawning biomass, which requires knowledge of spawning potential and dynamics of fishery stocks. The reproductive biology of two species of horse mackerel, Trachurus capensis and Trachurus trecae, in these waters was ...

  3. Low-solubility particles and a Trojan-horse type mechanism of toxicity: the case of cobalt oxide on human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Roudeau, Stephane; Perrin, Laura; Carmona, Asuncion; Bresson, Carole; Darolles, Carine; Aloin, Valerie; Malard, Veronique; Gautier, Celine; Janin, Myriam; Floriani, Magali

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity of metal oxide particles towards lung cells are far from being understood. In particular, the relative contribution of intracellular particulate versus solubilized fractions is rarely considered as it is very challenging to assess, especially for low-solubility particles such as cobalt oxide (Co_3O_4). This study was possible owing to two highly sensitive, independent, analytical techniques, based on single-cell analysis, using ion beam microanalysis, and on bulk analysis of cell lysates, using mass spectrometry. Our study shows that cobalt oxide particles, of very low solubility in the culture medium, are readily incorporated by BEAS-2B human lung cells through endocytosis via the clathrin-dependent pathway. They are partially solubilized at low pH within lysosomes, leading to cobalt ions release. Solubilized cobalt was detected within the cytoplasm and the nucleus. As expected from these low-solubility particles, the intracellular solubilized cobalt content is small compared with the intracellular particulate cobalt content, in the parts-per-thousand range or below. However, we were able to demonstrate that this minute fraction of intracellular solubilized cobalt is responsible for the overall toxicity. Cobalt oxide particles are readily internalized by pulmonary cells via the endo-lysosomal pathway and can lead, through a Trojan-horse mechanism, to intracellular release of toxic metal ions over long periods of time, involving specific toxicity. (authors)

  4. A Trojan-Horse Strategy Including a Bacterial Suicide Action for the Efficient Use of a Specific Gram-Positive Antibiotic on Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Isabelle J

    2018-05-10

    In the alarming context of rising bacterial antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need to discover new antibiotics or increase and/or enlarge the activity of those currently in use. The need for new antibiotics is even more urgent in the case of Gram-negative bacteria, such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Enterobacteria, which have become resistant to many antibiotics and have an outer membrane with very low permeability to drugs. Vectorization of antibiotics using siderophores may be a solution to bypass such a bacterial wall: the drugs use the iron transporters of the outer membrane as gates to enter bacteria in a Trojan-horse strategy. Designing siderophore-antibiotics that can cross outer membranes has become almost routine, but their transport across the inner membrane is still a limiting step, as well as a strategy that allows dissociation of the antibiotic from the siderophore once inside the bacteria. Liu et al. ( J. Med. Chem. 2018 , DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.8b00218 ) report the synthesis of a siderophore-cephalosporin compound and demonstrate that β-lactams, such as cephalosporins, can serve as β-lactamase-triggered releasable linkers to allow intracellular delivery of Gram-positive antibiotics to Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. AN UPDATED {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. {sup 6}Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low {sup 6}Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of {sup 6}Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U{sub e} . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U{sub e} value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the {sup 2}H({sup 6}Li, {alpha} {sup 3}He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T{sub 9} and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  6. Real-time monitoring of the Trojan-horse effect of silver nanoparticles by using a genetically encoded fluorescent cell sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fang; Tang, Wenqin; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2018-04-26

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely incorporated into commercial products due to their antimicrobial properties. As a consequence, concerns about the adverse effects induced by AgNPs to humans and the environment need to be carefully examined. The existing literature reveals that AgNPs exhibit certain toxic effects, but it remains to be proved whether AgNPs or the ionic silver (Ag+) released from AgNPs are the main toxic species. Here, a genetically encoded fluorescent protein sensor with high affinity to Ag+ was developed. The resulting sensor, MT2a-FRET, was found to be ratiometric, sensitive and selective toward only Ag+ but inert against AgNPs. This makes this sensor a potential useful tool for monitoring the real-time intracellular dissolutions of AgNPs. Our data supported that AgNPs display the "Trojan-horse" mechanism, where AgNPs are internalized by cells and undergo dissolution intracellularly. We further found that cells exhibited a detoxification ability to remove active Ag+ from cells in 48 hours.

  7. Measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    The 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17 O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13 C( 6 Li,n 16 O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC

  8. Improved Results on Extraction of 11B(p, α0)8Be and 10B(p, α)7Be S(E)-Factor Through the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglia, S. M. R.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Tudisco, S.; Carlin, N.; Del Santo, M. G.; Kroha, V.; Souza, F.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Li, C.; Qungang, W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the 10 B(23p, α) 7 Be and 11 B(p, α) 8 Be reactions, studied via the indirect Trojan Horse Method (THM), is discussed. In the astrophysical context of light nuclei LiBeB depletion, the above mentioned reactions are the main responsible for the destruction of boron in the stellar interior. The THM application allows their investigation in the astrophysically relevant energy region, around the Gamow Peak (≅10 keV), overcoming the problems due to the presence of the Coulomb barrier and electron screening effect. The experimental procedure and the preliminary results are shown.

  9. Smart blood cell and microvesicle-based Trojan horse drug delivery: Merging expertise in blood transfusion and biomedical engineering in the field of nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Wen; Goubran, Hadi; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of nanomedicine are playing increasingly important roles in human health. Various types of synthetic nanoparticles, including liposomes, micelles, and other nanotherapeutic platforms and conjugates, are being engineered to encapsulate or carry drugs for treating diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, neurodegeneration, and inflammations. Nanocarriers are designed to increase the half-life of drugs, decrease their toxicity and, ideally, target pathological sites. Developing smart carriers with the capacity to deliver drugs specifically to the microenvironment of diseased cells with minimum systemic toxicity is the goal. Blood cells, and potentially also the liposome-like micro- and nano-vesicles they generate, may be regarded as ideally suited to perform such specific targeting with minimum immunogenic risks. Blood cell membranes are "decorated" with complex physiological receptors capable of targeting and communicating with other cells and tissues and delivering their content to the surrounding pathological microenvironment. Blood cells, such as erythrocytes, have been developed as permeable carriers to release drugs to diseased tissues or act as biofactory allowing enzymatic degradation of a pathological substrate. Interestingly, attempts are also being made to improve the targeting capacity of synthetic nanoparticles by "decorating" their surface with blood cell membrane receptor-like biochemical structures. Research is needed to further explore the benefits that blood cell-derived microvesicles, as a Trojan horse delivery systems, can bring to the arsenal of therapeutic micro- and nanotechnologies. This short review focuses on the therapeutic roles that red blood cells and platelets can play as smart drug-delivery systems, and highlights the benefits that blood transfusion expertise can bring to this exciting and novel biomedical engineering field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cryptococcal transmigration across a model brain blood-barrier: evidence of the Trojan horse mechanism and differences between Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii strain H99 and Cryptococcus gattii strain R265.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Tania C; Juillard, Pierre-Georges; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Kaufman-Francis, Keren; Dietmann, Anelia; Milonig, Alban; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges E R

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Cryptococcus gattii (Cg) cause neurological disease and cross the BBB as free cells or in mononuclear phagocytes via the Trojan horse mechanism, although evidence for the latter is indirect. There is emerging evidence that Cn and the North American outbreak Cg strain (R265) more commonly cause neurological and lung disease, respectively. We have employed a widely validated in vitro model of the BBB, which utilizes the hCMEC/D3 cell line derived from human brain endothelial cells (HBEC) and the human macrophage-like cell line, THP-1, to investigate whether transport of dual fluorescence-labelled Cn and Cg across the BBB occurs within macrophages. We showed that phagocytosis of Cn by non-interferon (IFN)-γ stimulated THP-1 cells was higher than that of Cg. Although Cn and Cg-loaded THP-1 bound similarly to TNF-activated HBECs under shear stress, more Cn-loaded macrophages were transported across an intact HBEC monolayer, consistent with the predilection of Cn for CNS infection. Furthermore, Cn exhibited a higher rate of expulsion from transmigrated THP-1 compared with Cg. Our results therefore provide further evidence for transmigration of both Cn and Cg via the Trojan horse mechanism and a potential explanation for the predilection of Cn to cause CNS infection. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Trojan Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Jupiter Trojans, in the context of giant planet migration models, can be thought of as an extension of the small body populations found beyond Neptune in the Kuiper Belt. Binaries are a distinctive feature of small body populations in the Kuiper Belt with an especially high fraction apparent among the brightest Cold Classicals. The binary fraction, relative sizes, and separations in the dynamically excited populations (Scattered, Resonant) reflects processes that may have eroded a more abundant initial population. This trend continues in the Centaurs and Trojans where few binaries have been found. We review new evidence including a third resolved Trojan binary and lightcurve studies to understand how the Trojans are related to the small body populations that originated in the outer protoplanetary disk.

  12. Hepatic Intra-arterial Delivery of a "Trojan-horses" Gene Therapy: A Pilot Study on Rabbit VX2 Hepatic Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Olivier; Amara, Ikram; Sapoval, Marc; Méachi, Tchao; Déan, Carole; Beaune, Philippe; de Waziers, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a "Trojan-horses" suicide gene therapy that consists of tumor-targeted gene delivery (vectorized by mesenchymal stem cells MSCs) encoding an enzyme that converts a harmless prodrug into cytotoxic metabolites in situ. Then, cytotoxic metabolites passively diffuse in the neighboring tumor cells and kill them (bystander effect). The goal of our study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of intra-arterial administration of MSCs transduced with an optimized gene (MSC-CYP2B6TM-RED) followed by intravenous administration of cyclophosphamide (CPA) into the VX2 rabbit liver tumor. Nine rabbits with a VX2 liver tumor were randomly assigned into three groups: Control group A (one rabbit) free of any treatment; Control group B (two rabbits) receiving intravenous injection of cyclophosphamide at day 3 and CPA at day 14; and Group C (six rabbits) receiving the GDEPT treatment, consisting of successive intra-arterial injection of transduced-MSCs at days 0 (n = 6) and 11 (n = 3), followed by injection of CPA at days 3 (n = 6) and 14 (n = 3). The tumor response was assessed by ultrasound scan every 7 days and histopathological analysis at sacrifice (D25). There was a significant difference in the tumor volume between control groups (A + B) and group C at D7: 38/19 cm 3 (p = 0.024); D11: 51/20 cm 3 (p = 0.024), and D25: 121/37 cm 3 (p = 0.048). Tumor necrosis was significantly greater and metastatic spread was lower for rabbits who received GDEPT (78% of total tumor surface) than for control animals (A + B) (22% of total tumor surface (p = 0.006). Intra-arterial delivery of transduced-MSCs is feasible and, after CPA injection, resulted in 78% tumor necrosis (p = 0.006) and less metastasis in a VX2 liver tumor model.

  13. Reduction in Brain Heparan Sulfate with Systemic Administration of an IgG Trojan Horse-Sulfamidase Fusion Protein in the Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boado, Ruben J; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Pardridge, William M

    2018-02-05

    Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA (MPSIIIA), also known as Sanfilippo A syndrome, is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the lysosomal enzyme, N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH), also known as sulfamidase. Mutations in the SGSH enzyme, the only mammalian heparan N-sulfatase, cause accumulation of lysosomal inclusion bodies in brain cells comprising heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Treatment of MPSIIIA with intravenous recombinant SGSH is not possible because this large molecule does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB penetration by SGSH was enabled in the present study by re-engineering this enzyme as an IgG-SGSH fusion protein, where the IgG domain is a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse transferrin receptor (TfR), designated the cTfRMAb. The IgG domain of the fusion protein acts as a molecular Trojan horse to deliver the enzyme into brain via transport on the endogenous BBB TfR. The cTfRMAb-SGSH fusion protein bound to the mouse TfR with high affinity, ED 50 = 0.74 ± 0.07 nM, and retained high SGSH enzyme activity, 10 043 ± 1003 units/mg protein, which is comparable to recombinant human SGSH. Male and female MPSIIIA mice, null for the SGSH enzyme, were treated for 6 weeks with thrice-weekly intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb alone, or 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-SGSH fusion protein, starting at the age of 2 weeks, and were euthanized 1 week after the last injection. Brain and liver HS, as determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, were elevated 30-fold and 36-fold, respectively, in the MPSIIIA mouse. Treatment of the mice with the cTfRMAb-SGSH fusion protein caused a 70% and 85% reduction in brain and liver HS, respectively. The reduction in brain HS was associated with a 28% increase in latency on the rotarod test of motor activity in male mice. The mice exhibited no injection related reactions, and only a low titer end of study antidrug antibody

  14. Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children or people with very little riding experience who are living in the household. Research how to properly care for your horse before purchase. Ask your veterinarian about the proper food, care, ...

  15. The 10B(p,α)7Be S(E)-factor from 5 keV to 1.5 MeV using the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglia, Sebastiana Maria Regina; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Lamia, Livio; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Carlin, Nelson; Cherubini, Silvio; Cvetinovic, Alexandra; D'Agata, Giuseppe; Dell'aquila, Daniele; Depalo, Rosanna; Gulino, Marisa; Guardo, Giovanni Luca; Indelicato, Iolanda; Lombardo, Ivano; Menegazzo, Roberto; Munhoz, Marcelo Gimenez; Pizzone, Rosario Gianluca; Rapisarda, Giuseppe Gabriele; Rigato, Valentino; Romano, Stefano; Sergi, Maria Letizia; Souza, Francisco; Sparta, Roberta; Tudisco, Salvo; Tumino, Aurora

    2018-01-01

    The 10B(p,α)7Be reaction is the main responsible for the 10B destruction in stellar interior [1]. In such environments this p-capture process occurs at a Gamow energy of 10 keV and takes places mainly through a resonant state (Ex = 8.701 MeV) of the compound 11C nucleus. Thus a resonance right in the region of the Gamow peak is expected to significantly influence the behavior of the astrophysical S(E)-factor. The 10B(p,α)7Be reaction was studied via the Trojan Horse Method (THM) applied to the 2H(10B,α7Be)n in order to extract the astrophysical S(E)-factor in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 1.5 MeV.

  16. New Parvovirus Associated with Serum Hepatitis in Horses after Inoculation of Common Biological Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divers, Thomas J; Tennant, Bud C; Kumar, Arvind; McDonough, Sean; Cullen, John; Bhuva, Nishit; Jain, Komal; Chauhan, Lokendra Singh; Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Lipkin, W Ian; Laverack, Melissa; Trivedi, Sheetal; Srinivasa, Satyapramod; Beard, Laurie; Rice, Charles M; Burbelo, Peter D; Renshaw, Randall W; Dubovi, Edward; Kapoor, Amit

    2018-02-01

    Equine serum hepatitis (i.e., Theiler's disease) is a serious and often life-threatening disease of unknown etiology that affects horses. A horse in Nebraska, USA, with serum hepatitis died 65 days after treatment with equine-origin tetanus antitoxin. We identified an unknown parvovirus in serum and liver of the dead horse and in the administered antitoxin. The equine parvovirus-hepatitis (EqPV-H) shares horses using a tetanus antitoxin contaminated with EqPV-H. Viremia developed, the horses seroconverted, and acute hepatitis developed that was confirmed by clinical, biochemical, and histopathologic testing. We also determined that EqPV-H is an endemic infection because, in a cohort of 100 clinically normal adult horses, 13 were viremic and 15 were seropositive. We identified a new virus associated with equine serum hepatitis and confirmed its pathogenicity and transmissibility through contaminated biological products.

  17. Trojan Horses or Local Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllner, Jakob; Klopf, Patricia; Nell, Phillip C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a multinational corporation's (MNC) decision to appoint host-country national (HCN) managers to foreign subsidiaries based on the institutional context of and familiarity with the host country. HCN managers are commonly associated with specialized knowledge, superior responsiveness...

  18. Trojan Horses or Local Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllner, Jakob; Klopf, Patricia; Nell, Phillip Christopher

    We investigate an MNC’s decision to appoint host-country national (HCN) managers to foreign subsidiaries based on the institutional context of and familiarity with the host country. HCN managers are commonly associated with specialized knowledge, superior responsiveness, and higher legitimacy. On...

  19. Trojan quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertjerenken, Bettina; Holthaus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We argue that a time-periodically driven bosonic Josephson junction supports stable, quasiparticle-like collective response modes which are N-particle analogs of the nonspreading Trojan wave packets known from microwave-driven Rydberg atoms. Similar to their single-particle counterparts, these collective modes, dubbed ‘flotons’, are well described by a Floquet–Mathieu approximation, and possess a well-defined discrete set of excitations. In contrast to other, ‘chaotic’ modes of response, the nonheating Trojan modes conform to a mean-field description, and thus may be of particular interest for the more general question under which conditions the reduction of quantum N-particle dynamics to a strongly simplified mean-field evolution is feasible. Our reasoning is supported by phase-space portraits which reveal the degree of correspondence beween the N-particle dynamics und the mean-field picture in an intuitive manner. (paper)

  20. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  1. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool to investigate low-energy resonances: the 18O(p, α)15N and 17O(p, α)14N cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Irgaziev, B.; Tumino, A.

    2010-01-01

    The 18 O(p, α) 15 N and 17 O(p, α) 14 N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the 2 H( 18 O, α 15 N)n and 2 H( 17 O, α 14 N)n reactions to deduce the 18 O(p, α) 15 N and 17 O(p, α) 14 N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the 18 O(p, α) 15 N and 17 O(p, α) 14 N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  2. The Trojan. [supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Trojan is the culmination of thousands of engineering person-hours by the Cones of Silence Design Team. The goal was to design an economically and technologically viable supersonic transport. The Trojan is the embodiment of the latest engineering tools and technology necessary for such an advanced aircraft. The efficient design of the Trojan allows for supersonic cruise of Mach 2.0 for 5,200 nautical miles, carrying 250 passengers. The per aircraft price is placed at $200 million, making the Trojan a very realistic solution for tomorrows transportation needs. The following is a detailed study of the driving factors that determined the Trojan's super design.

  3. Bare nucleus S(E) factor of the 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He reactions via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A; Spitaleri, C; Kiss, G G; Cognata, M La; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L; Spartà, R; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Typel, S; Aliotta, M; Burjan, V; Kroha, V; Hons, Z; Mrazek, J; Piskor, S; Santo, M Gimenez del

    2012-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to the 2 H(d,p) 3 H and 2 H(d,n) 3 He reactions by measuring the 2 H( 3 He,p 3 H) 1 H and 2 H( 3 He,n 3 He) 1 H processes in quasi free kinematics. The 3 He+d experiment was performed at 18 MeV, corresponding the a d-d energy range from 1.5 MeV down to 2 keV. This range overlaps with the relevant region for Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as with the thermal energies of future fusion reactors and deuterium burning in the Pre Main Sequence phase of stellar evolution. This is the first pioneering experiment in quasi free regime where the charged spectator is detected. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been extracted for the first time. They deviate by more than 15% from available direct data with new S(0) values of 57.4±1.8 MeVb for 3 H+p and 60.1±1.9 MeVb for 3 He+n. None of the existing fitting curves is able to provide the correct slope of the new data in the full range, thus calling for a revision of the theoretical description. This has consequences in the calculation of the reaction rates with more than a 25% increase at the temperatures of future fusion reactors.

  4. HARDWARE TROJAN IDENTIFICATION AND DETECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Samer Moein; Fayez Gebali; T. Aaron Gulliver; Abdulrahman Alkandari

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of techniques developed to detect hardware trojans are based on specific attributes. Further, the ad hoc approaches employed to design methods for trojan detection are largely ineffective. Hardware trojans have a number of attributes which can be used to systematically develop detection techniques. Based on this concept, a detailed examination of current trojan detection techniques and the characteristics of existing hardware trojans is presented. This is used to dev...

  5. The Trojan Color Conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    2018-02-01

    The Trojan asteroids of Jupiter and Neptune are likely to have been captured from original heliocentric orbits in the dynamically excited (“hot”) population of the Kuiper Belt. However, it has long been known that the optical color distributions of the Jovian Trojans and the hot population are not alike. This difference has been reconciled with the capture hypothesis by assuming that the Trojans were resurfaced (for example, by sublimation of near-surface volatiles) upon inward migration from the Kuiper Belt (where blackbody temperatures are ∼40 K) to Jupiter’s orbit (∼125 K). Here, we examine the optical color distribution of the Neptunian Trojans using a combination of new optical photometry and published data. We find a color distribution that is statistically indistinguishable from that of the Jovian Trojans but unlike any sub-population in the Kuiper Belt. This result is puzzling, because the Neptunian Trojans are very cold (blackbody temperature ∼50 K) and a thermal process acting to modify the surface colors at Neptune’s distance would also affect the Kuiper Belt objects beyond, where the temperatures are nearly identical. The distinctive color distributions of the Jovian and Neptunian Trojans thus present us with a conundrum: they are very similar to each other, suggesting either capture from a common source or surface modification by a common process. However, the color distributions differ from any plausible common source population, and there is no known modifying process that could operate equally at both Jupiter and Neptune.

  6. Indirect study of {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions at astrophysical energies by means of the Trojan Horse Method: recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Puglia, S.M.R.; Spitaleri, C.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Del Santo, M. Gimenez; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. Gameiro [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cherubini, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary); Kroha, V. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Kubono, S. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Li Chengbo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Wen Qungang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Sergi, M.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Szanto de Toledo, A. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wakabayashi, Y. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center - JAEA - Ibaraki (Japan); Yamaguchi, H. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Zhou Shuhua [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear (p,alpha) reactions destroying the so-called 'light-elements' lithium, beryllium and boron have been largely studied in the past mainly because their role in understanding some astrophysical phenomena, i.e. mixing-phenomena occurring in young F-G stars [A.M. Boesgaard et al., Astr. Phys. J, 991, 2005, 621]. Such mechanisms transport the surface material down to the region close to the nuclear destruction zone, where typical temperatures of the order of approx10{sup 6} K are reached. The corresponding Gamow energy E{sub 0}=1.22(Z{sub x}{sup 2}Z{sub X}{sup 2}T{sub 6}{sup 2}){sup 1/3} keV [C. Rolfs and W. Rodney, 'Cauldrons in the Cosmos', The Univ. of Chicago press, 1988] is about approx10 keV if one considers the 'boron-case' and replaces in the previous formula Z{sub x}=1, Z{sub X}=5 and T{sub 6}=5. Direct measurements of the two {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions in correspondence of this energy region are difficult to perform mainly because the combined effects of Coulomb barrier penetrability and electron screening [H.J. Assenbaum, K. Langanke and C. Rolfs, Z. Phys., 327, 1987, 461]. The indirect method of the Trojan Horse (THM) [G. Baur et al., Phys. Lett. B, 178, 1986, 135; G. Calvi et al., Nucl. Phys. A, 621, 1997, 139; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 493, 1999, 206] allows one to extract the two-body reaction cross section of interest for astrophysics without the extrapolation-procedures. Due to the THM formalism, the extracted indirect data have to be normalized to the available direct ones at higher energies thus implying that the method is a complementary tool in solving some still open questions for both nuclear and astrophysical issues [S. Cherubini et al., Astr. Phys. J, 457, 1996, 855; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2001, 005801; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2004, 055806; A. Tumino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 2007, 252502; M. La Cognata et al., Phys

  7. Trojan technical specification verification project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; Rickenback, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Trojan Technical Specification Verification (TTSV) project at the Trojan plant of Portland General Electric Company was motivated by the recognition that many numbers in the Trojan technical specifications (TTS) potentially lacked the consideration of instrument- and/or process-related errors. The plant setpoints were known to consider such errors, but many of the values associated with the limiting conditions for operation (LCO) did not. In addition, the existing plant instrument error analyses were based on industry values that do not reflect the Trojan plant-specific experience. The purpose of this project is to ensure that the Trojan plant setpoint and LCO values include plant-specific instrument error

  8. Publisher Correction: Invisible Trojan-horse attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Minshull, Carter; Jain, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML version of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper.......A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML version of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper....

  9. Trojan Horse Particle Invariance: An Extensive Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L.; Lamia, L.; Tumino, A.; Bertulani, C. A.; Blokhintsev, L.; Burjan, Václav; Kroha, Václav; La Cognata, M.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Sparta, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, 8-10 (2014), s. 1001-1004 ISSN 0177-7963 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : astrophysical implications * nuclear astrophysics * destruction Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014

  10. The Trojan Horse in American Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sidney

    Although violent demonstrations have occurred at only a few universities, moves toward direct confrontati"n with authority seen as repressive or hypocritical could take place at any college in the country. Part of the cause is the students' desire for national notoriety which TV affords. The growth of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)…

  11. A Trojan horse in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2009-01-01

    Available chemotherapeutics take advantage of the fast proliferation of cancer cells. Consequently slow growth makes androgen refractory prostate cancer resistant towards available drugs. No treatment is available at the present, when the cancer has developed metastases outside the prostate (T4 s...

  12. Trojan horse underdense plasma photocathode acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karger, Oliver [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; DESY, FLA Arbeitsbereich Beschleunigerphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Koenigstein, Thomas; Pretzler, Georg [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Rosenzweig, James B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hidding, Bernhard [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; DESY, FLA Arbeitsbereich Beschleunigerphysik, Hamburg (Germany); California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2013-07-01

    Relativistic electron beams with small emittance and size are needed for advanced applications such as free electron lasers (FEL) and other coherent light sources in the X-ray regime. Present laser plasma acceleration schemes are hardly able to provide electron beams of sufficient quality on a stable level. The concept of underdense plasma photocathode acceleration uses a beam-driven plasma wave in a two component gas mixture consisting a low ionisation threshold medium (LIT) and a high ionisation threshold medium (HIT) and a low-energy laser pulse. Shapeable electron bunches with sub-fs-length and unprecedented normalized emittance down to 10{sup -9} m rad can be produced. Based on this method, laboratory-sized-experimental setups may enable performance much better than today's conventional coherent hard X-ray sources. The presentation discusses the basic concept, shows recent numero-analytical results and the R and D towards experimental realization.

  13. Earth's Trojan asteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin; Wiegert, Paul; Veillet, Christian

    2011-07-27

    It was realized in 1772 that small bodies can stably share the same orbit as a planet if they remain near 'triangular points' 60° ahead of or behind it in the orbit. Such 'Trojan asteroids' have been found co-orbiting with Jupiter, Mars and Neptune. They have not hitherto been found associated with Earth, where the viewing geometry poses difficulties for their detection, although other kinds of co-orbital asteroid (horseshoe orbiters and quasi-satellites) have been observed. Here we report an archival search of infrared data for possible Earth Trojans, producing the candidate 2010 TK(7). We subsequently made optical observations which established that 2010 TK(7) is a Trojan companion of Earth, librating around the leading Lagrange triangular point, L(4). Its orbit is stable over at least ten thousand years.

  14. Thersites: a `jumping' Trojan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiganis, K.; Dvorak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical evolution of the asteroid (1868) Thersites, a member of the Trojan belt. Thersites is librating around the Lagrangian point L_4, following, however, a chaotic orbit. The equations of motion for Thersites as well as for a distribution of neighboring initial conditions are integrated numerically for 50 million years in the Outer Solar System model (OSS), which consists of the Sun and the four giant planets. Our results indicate that the probability that this asteroid will eventually escape from the Trojan swarm is rather high. In fact, 20% from our initial distribution escaped within the integration time. Many of the remaining ones also show characteristic `jumps' in the orbital elements, especially the inclination. Secular resonances involving the nodes of the outer planets are found to be responsible for this chaotic behavior. The width of libration and eccentricity values that lead to grossly unstable orbits are calculated and compared with previously known results on the stability of the Trojans. Finally, a very interesting behavior has been observed for one of the escaping asteroids as he `jumped' from L_4 to L_5 where he remained performing a highly inclined libration for ~ 2 Myrs before escaping from the Trojan swarm. According to Homer, Thersites was not only the ugliest of all Greeks that took part in the Trojan war, but also had the most intolerable personality. His nasty habit of making fun of everybody cost him his life, as the last person for whom he spoke ironically about was Achilles, the mightiest warrior of all Greeks, who killed Thersites with just one punch!

  15. A comparative study of economical separation and aggregation properties of biologically capped and thiol functionalized gold nanoparticles: selecting the eco-friendly trojan horses for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sunil; Thakur, Mukeshchand; Shah, Ritu; Oza, Goldie; Mewada, Ashmi; Sharon, Madhuri

    2013-09-01

    We are presenting facile bio-fabrication of extremely stable gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using medicinal plant Azadirachta indica (commonly called Neem) and its comparison with most commonly used glutathione (GSH) protected GNPs in terms of stability under physiological conditions, seperation using density gradient centrifugation and aggregation properties in the solution. There was dual peak at 536 and 662 nm indicating the presence of non-spherical GNPs including triangles, rods and hexagons in case of A. indica mediated GNPs unlike citrate stabilized GNPs which exhibited single sharp peak. Spherical GNPs were separated from the consortium of uniquely shaped nanoparticles bio-fabricated using A. indica leaf extract using sucrose density gradient centrifugation (SDGC).To comprehend the anti-agglomeration potentials of A. indica leaf mediated GNPs and GSH-GNPs under physiological conditions, flocculation parameters (FP) were calculated and found to be least for A. indica leaf mediated GNPs, indicating their exceptional stability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. New Parvovirus Associated with Serum Hepatitis in Horses after Inoculation of Common Biological Product

    OpenAIRE

    Divers, Thomas J.; Tennant, Bud C.; Kumar, Arvind; McDonough, Sean; Cullen, John; Bhuva, Nishit; Jain, Komal; Chauhan, Lokendra Singh; Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Lipkin, W. Ian; Laverack, Melissa; Trivedi, Sheetal; Srinivasa, Satyapramod; Beard, Laurie; Rice, Charles M.

    2018-01-01

    Equine serum hepatitis (i.e., Theiler’s disease) is a serious and often life-threatening disease of unknown etiology that affects horses. A horse in Nebraska, USA, with serum hepatitis died 65 days after treatment with equine-origin tetanus antitoxin. We identified an unknown parvovirus in serum and liver of the dead horse and in the administered antitoxin. The equine parvovirus-hepatitis (EqPV-H) shares

  17. The Economic Trojan Horse is Actually a German Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo-Victor Ionescu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the immigrants‘ impact on the EU‘s economy in the context of the latest immigrant crisis generated by Germany and France. The analysis in the paper covers not only the economic negative effects, but the social effects as well. The scientific approach is based on the latest official data. A distinct part of the paper deals with forecasting procedures able to point out the powerful negative impact of the immigrants on the labor market and public finances on short and medium terms. The main conclusion of the paper is that Germany is not able to manage this immigrant crisis and it will try to solve the problem putting pressure on other Member States or translating the crisis management to the global organism, as Davos Conference, for example.

  18. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  19. New Parvovirus Associated with Serum Hepatitis in Horses after Inoculation of Common Biological Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Divers, Thomas J; Tennant, Bud C; Kumar, Arvind

    2018-01-01

    Equine serum hepatitis (i.e., Theiler's disease) is a serious and often life-threatening disease of unknown etiology that affects horses. A horse in Nebraska, USA, with serum hepatitis died 65 days after treatment with equine-origin tetanus antitoxin. We identified an unknown parvovirus in serum ...

  20. The Trojan minor planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Christopher E.

    1988-08-01

    There are (March, 1988) 3774 minor planets which have received a permanent number. Of these, there are some whose mean distance to the sun is very nearly equal to that of Jupiter, and whose heliocentric longitudes from that planet are about 60°, so that the three bodies concerned (sun, Jupiter, minor planet) make an approximate equilateral triangle. These minor planets, which occur in two distinct groups, one preceding Jupiter and one following, have received the names of the heroes of the Trojan war. This paper concerns the 49 numbered minor planets of this group.

  1. Premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononetz, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    The premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant is discussed in outline form. The topics discussed include: an overview of Trojan; events leading to shutdown decision; Trojan's lifetime O ampersand M performance; Trojan's Regulatory performance; historical Trojan regulatory versus economic performance; applicable Oregon law; least-cost planning process; 1992 least cost plan; 1993 LCP update; LCP limitations; comparative performance analysis; management assessments; Trojan O ampersand M analysis; steam generator issues; quantification of deficiencies; quantification of impact of steam generator degradation; 'net benefits' test; conclusions from net benefits analysis; total disallowances; and conclusions and ramifications

  2. Trojan Decommissioning Project Cost Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael B. Lackey

    2000-01-01

    The Trojan nuclear plant (Trojan) was an 1160-MW(electric) four-loop pressurized water reactor located in Rainier, Oregon. The plant was permanently shut down in 1993 after ∼17 yr of commercial operation. The early plant closure was an economic decision. The key factors in the closure analysis were escalation of inspection and repair costs associated with steam generator tube cracking and the projected availability of inexpensive replacement power in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Since the plant closure, Portland General Electric (PGE) has been actively engaged in decommissioning. The Trojan Decommissioning Project currently has a forecast at completion of $429.7 million (all costs are in millions of 1997 dollars, unless otherwise noted). The cost performance of the Trojan Decommissioning Project to date is addressed, as well as the tools that are in place to provide cost control through completion of decommissioning

  3. Milton H. Erickson e o cavalo de tróia: a terapia não convencional no cenário da crise dos paradigmas em psicologia clínica Milton H. Erickson and the trojan horse: the nonconventional therapy in the paradigms crisis scenario in clinical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício S. Neubern

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo busca situar a obra de Milton Erickson no cenário da transição de paradigmas científicos, particularmente da psicologia clínica. Destaca-se que as contribuições desse autor, ao mesmo tempo em que denunciam as limitações do paradigma dominante, apontam na direção de pressupostos distintos, muito afins com as perspectivas de um paradigma emergente. A metáfora do cavalo de Tróia busca retratar a influência sutil e intensa do trabalho desse autor sobre as perspectivas consagradas, de modo que, enquanto fascina e causa admiração, traz em si um potencial elevado de reflexão crítica e incisiva sobre essas mesmas perspectivas. Destacando três aspectos centrais desse processo - a impossibilidade teórica, o resgate da subjetividade complexa e a busca de novas racionalidades - o artigo é concluído delineando possíveis caminhos para a concepção e o uso do legado de Erickson.This article places Milton Erickson's work in the scenerio of transition of scientific paradigms, especially in clinical psychology. The text shows that Erickson' contribution denounces the limitations of the dominant paradigm and at the same time points to different assumptions that are very similar to the emergent paradigm's perspectives. The trojan horse metaphor aims at showing the powerful and subtle influence of Erickson's work on sacred perspectives. While Erickson's work cause fascination and wonder it simultaneously provoques critical and incisive reflections about the sacred perspectives. This paper makes salient three main aspects - the theorical impossibility, the rescue of a complex subjectivity and, at last, the search of new racionalities. As a conclusion, possible pathways for understanding and using Erickson's legacy in the field of clinical psychology are enphasized.

  4. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A R; Gemini-Piperni, S; Travassos, R; Lemgruber, L; Silva, R C; Rossi, A L; Farina, M; Anselme, K; Shokuhfar, T; Shahbazian-Yassar, R; Borojevic, R; Rocha, L A; Werckmann, J; Granjeiro, J M

    2016-03-29

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of 'Trojan-horse' internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies.

  5. The first retrograde Trojan asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2018-04-01

    There are about six thousand asteroids which share Jupiter's orbit around the Sun. Called the 'Trojan asteroids', they co-exist easily with this giant planet because they travel in the same direction as it ('direct' or 'prograde' motion), and remain roughly 60 degrees ahead of or behind it in its orbit. Newly discovered asteroid 2015 BZ509 is on a retrograde orbit, but is nonetheless in a state dynamically analogous to that of the prograde Trojans. The discovery circumstances and the nature of the motion of this curious asteroid -the first of its kind- will be outlined.

  6. HIV As Trojan Exosome: Immunological Paradox Explained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, James E K

    2017-01-01

    The HIV pandemic is still a major global challenge, despite the widespread availability of antiretroviral drugs. An effective vaccine would be the ideal approach to bringing the pandemic to an end. However, developing an effective HIV vaccine has proven to be an elusive goal. Three major human HIV vaccine trials revealed a strong trend toward greater risk of infection among vaccine recipients versus controls. A similar observation was made in a macaque SIV vaccine study. The mechanism explaining this phenomenon is not known. Here, a model is presented that may explain the troubling results of vaccine studies and an immunological paradox of HIV pathogenesis: preferential infection of HIV-specific T cells. The central hypothesis of this perspective is that as "Trojan exosomes" HIV particles can directly activate HIV-specific T cells enhancing their susceptibility to infection. Understanding the biology of HIV as an exosome may provide insights that enable novel approaches to vaccine development.

  7. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2009-01-01

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps ∼10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching ∼25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an ∼35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the ∼4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  8. Trojan detection model based on network behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junrong; Liu Baoxu; Wang Wenjin

    2012-01-01

    Based on the analysis of existing Trojan detection technology, this paper presents a Trojan detection model based on network behavior analysis. First of all, we abstract description of the Trojan network behavior, then according to certain rules to establish the characteristic behavior library, and then use the support vector machine algorithm to determine whether a Trojan invasion. Finally, through the intrusion detection experiments, shows that this model can effectively detect Trojans. (authors)

  9. Comparison of the orbital properties of Jupiter Trojan asteroids and Trojan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Schmidt, Jrgen

    2018-06-01

    In a previous paper we simulated the orbital evolution of dust particles from the Jupiter Trojan asteroids ejected by the impacts of interplanetary particles, and evaluated their overall configuration in the form of dust arcs. Here we compare the orbital properties of these Trojan dust particles and the Trojan asteroids. Both Trojan asteroids and most of the dust particles are trapped in the Jupiter 1:1 resonance. However, for dust particles, this resonance is modified because of the presence of solar radiation pressure, which reduces the peak value of the semi-major axis distribution. We find also that some particles can be trapped in the Saturn 1:1 resonance and higher order resonances with Jupiter. The distributions of the eccentricity, the longitude of pericenter, and the inclination for Trojans and the dust are compared. For the Trojan asteroids, the peak in the longitude of pericenter distribution is about 60 degrees larger than the longitude of pericenter of Jupiter; in contrast, for Trojan dust this difference is smaller than 60 degrees, and it decreases with decreasing grain size. For the Trojan asteroids and most of the Trojan dust, the Tisserand parameter is distributed in the range of two to three.

  10. Investigating the ?Trojan Horse? Mechanism of Yersinia pestis Virulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Fitch, J P

    2005-02-08

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is a Gram-negative, highly communicable, enteric bacterium that has been responsible for three historic plague pandemics. Currently, several thousand cases of plague are reported worldwide annually, and Y. pestis remains a considerable threat from a biodefense perspective. Y. pestis infection can manifest in three forms: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. Of these three forms, pneumonic plague has the highest fatality rate ({approx}100% if left untreated), the shortest intervention time ({approx}24 hours), and is highly contagious. Currently, there are no rapid, widely available vaccines for plague and though plague may be treated with antibiotics, the emergence of both naturally occurring and potentially engineered antibiotic resistant strains makes the search for more effective therapies and vaccines for plague of pressing concern. The virulence mechanism of this deadly bacterium involves induction of a Type III secretion system, a syringe-like apparatus that facilitates the injection of virulence factors, termed Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), into the host cell. These virulence factors inhibit phagocytosis and cytokine secretion, and trigger apoptosis of the host cell. Y. pestis virulence factors and the Type III secretion system are induced thermally, when the bacterium enters the mammalian host from the flea vector, and through host cell contact (or conditions of low Ca{sup 2+} in vitro). Apart from the temperature increase from 26 C to 37 C and host cell contact (or low Ca{sup 2+} conditions), other molecular mechanisms that influence virulence induction in Y. pestis are largely uncharacterized. This project focused on characterizing two novel mechanisms that regulate virulence factor induction in Y. pestis, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding and quorum sensing, using a real-time reporter system to monitor induction of virulence. Incorporating a better understanding of the mechanisms of virulence and pathogenicity into detection systems, may allow us to anticipate both natural and engineered evolution of infectious diseases while laying the foundation for next-generation detection of biothreat agents.

  11. Public/Private Partnerships: A Trojan Horse for Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Lawrence; Chiarelott, Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Partnering with private industry is presented as a sensible solution to some faculties at institutions of higher education during the current economic downturn. The authors discuss the historic context for increased efficiencies and provide descriptions of how two institutions responded to the prospect of "collaborating" with a corporation. In one…

  12. Microcomputers in the Classroom: Trojan Horse or Teacher's Pet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, John K.

    Arguing that curriculum developers need to seek a better understanding of existing classroom orders before advising reform through new technology, this paper presents a review of research on the effects of microcomputers on the stabilities of classroom practice and describes a pilot study currently underway at Queens University in Ontario to…

  13. Taming Trojan Horses: Identifying and Mitigating Corporate Social Responsibility Risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey); N.A. Dentchev (Nikolay)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOrganizations are exposed to increasing pressures from their constituents to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles into their ongoing business practices. But accepting new and potentially open-ended commitments is not a harmless exercise, and companies may well

  14. TAMING TROJAN HORSES: IDENTIFYING AND MITIGATING CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY RISKS

    OpenAIRE

    P. P. M. A. R. HEUGENS; N. A. DENTCHEV

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOrganizations are exposed to increasing pressures from their constituents to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles into their ongoing business practices. But accepting new and potentially open-ended commitments is not a harmless exercise, and companies may well expose themselves to serious risks when embracing such principles. To identify these risks, we conducted two naturalistic studies: one exploratory, the other corroborative. The results show that CSR ado...

  15. The Trojan horse method in nuclear astrophysics: recent results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romano, S.; Spitareli, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Goldberg, V.Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Kroha, Václav; Burjan, Václav; Mrázek, Jaromír; Somorjai, E.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Z.; Gyurky, G.; Kiss, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2008), 014008-1-014008-7 ISSN 0954-3899 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : cross-sections Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.270, year: 2008

  16. Keeping out Trojan horses: auctions and bankruptcy in the laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onderstal, S.; van der Veen, A.

    2011-01-01

    If a government auctions the right to market a good, continuity is likely to be of significant importance. In a laboratory experiment, we compare the effects of bidders' limited liability in the first-price sealed-bid auction and the English auction in a common value setting. Our data strongly

  17. Academic Bill of Rights: Insurance Policy or Trojan Horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Travis

    2004-01-01

    Anyone can observe that rising social and political divisions have found their way onto the nation's campuses. In fact, the intensity of debates over issues such as war and peace, homosexuality, and affirmative action have transformed campuses--the marketplace of ideas--into an ideological battleground, with heated rhetoric in lecture halls and…

  18. Antibody drug conjugates - Trojan horses in the war on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, U; Kadambi, V J

    2011-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) consist of an antibody attached to a cytotoxic drug by means of a linker. ADCs provide a way to couple the specificity of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the cytotoxicity of a small-molecule drug and, therefore, are promising new therapies for cancer. ADCs are prodrugs that are inactive in circulation but exert their cytotoxicity upon binding to the target cancer cell. Earlier unsuccessful attempts to generate ADCs with therapeutic value have emphasized the important role each component plays in determining the efficacy and safety of the final ADC. Scientific advances in engineering antibodies for maximum efficacy as anticancer agents, identification of highly cytotoxic molecules, and generation of linkers with increased stability in circulation have all contributed to the development of the many ADCs that are currently in clinical trials. This review discusses parameters that guide the selection of the components of an ADC to increase its therapeutic window, provides a brief look at ADCs currently in clinical trials, and discusses future challenges in this field. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Integrated circuit authentication hardware Trojans and counterfeit detection

    CERN Document Server

    Tehranipoor, Mohammad; Zhang, Xuehui

    2013-01-01

    This book describes techniques to verify the authenticity of integrated circuits (ICs). It focuses on hardware Trojan detection and prevention and counterfeit detection and prevention. The authors discuss a variety of detection schemes and design methodologies for improving Trojan detection techniques, as well as various attempts at developing hardware Trojans in IP cores and ICs. While describing existing Trojan detection methods, the authors also analyze their effectiveness in disclosing various types of Trojans, and demonstrate several architecture-level solutions. 

  20. Lucy: Navigating a Jupiter Trojan Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbridge, Dale; Williams, Ken; Williams, Bobby; Jackman, Coralie; Weaver, Hal; Berry, Kevin; Sutter, Brian; Englander, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    In January 2017, NASA selected the Lucy mission to explore six Jupiter Trojan asteroids. These six bodies, remnants of the primordial material that formed the outer planets, were captured in the Sun-Jupiter L4 and L5 Lagrangian regions early in the solar system formation. These particular bodies were chosen because of their diverse spectral properties and the chance to observe up close for the first time two orbiting approximately equal mass binaries, Patroclus and Menoetius. KinetX, Inc. is the primary navigation supplier for the Lucy mission. This paper describes preliminary navigation analyses of the approach phase for each Trojan encounter.

  1. Rootkits, Trojans, backdoors and new developments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Decloedt, HE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available . Pg 9 Proceedings of the Workshop on ICT Uses in Warfare and the Safeguarding of Peace 4.2.2 DoS Trojans This type of Trojan gives the attacker the power to start a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack if there are enough victims. Win... in Warfare and the Safeguarding of Peace to achieve the final goal of the attack. This may be to steal information, disseminate spam or to launch a denial of service (DoS) attack on another computer system over a network. Eventually the compromise...

  2. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR TROJAN PLANETS IN THE KEPLER DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, Markus, E-mail: janson@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Trojans are circumstellar bodies that reside in characteristic 1:1 orbital resonances with planets. While all the trojans in our solar system are small ({approx}<100 km), stable planet-size trojans may exist in extrasolar planetary systems, and the Kepler telescope constitutes a formidable tool to search for them. Here we report on a systematic search for extrasolar trojan companions to 2244 known Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with epicyclic orbital characteristics similar to those of the Jovian trojan families. No convincing trojan candidates are found, despite a typical sensitivity down to Earth-size objects. This fact, however, cannot be used to stringently exclude the existence of trojans in this size range, since stable trojans need not necessarily share the same orbital plane as the planet, and thus may not transit. Following this reasoning, we note that if Earth-sized trojans exist at all, they are almost certainly both present and in principle detectable in the full set of Kepler data, although a very substantial computational effort would be required to detect them. Additionally, we also note that some of the existing KOIs could in principle be trojans themselves, with a primary planet orbiting outside of the transiting plane. A few examples are given for which this is a readily testable scenario.

  3. From Basking Ridge to the Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This presentation describes the activities of the Global Trajectory Optimization Lab, a subdivision of the Navigation and Mission Design Branch at NASA GSFC. The students will learn the basics of interplanetary trajectory optimization and then, as an example, the Lucy mission to the Jupiter Trojans will be described from both a science and engineering perspective.

  4. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ∼5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) × 10 –7 for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) × 10 7 planetesimals with absolute magnitude H disk ∼ 14-28 M Earth , is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  5. Albedos of Jovian Trojans, Hildas and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanishin, William; Tegler, Stephen C.

    2017-10-01

    We present distributions of optical V band albedos for samples of outer solar system minor bodies including Centaurs, Jovian Trojans and Hildas. Diameters come almost entirely from the NEOWISE catalog (Mainzer etal 2016- Planetary Data System). Optical photometry (H values) for about 2/3 of the approximately 2700 objects studied are from PanStarrrs (Veres et al 2015 Icarus 261, 34). The PanStarrs optical photometry is supplemented by H values from JPL Horizons (corrected to be on the same photometric system as the PanStarrs data) for the objects in the NEOWISE catalog that are not in the PanStarrs catalog. We compare the albedo distributions of various pairs of subsamples using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test. Examples of potentially interesting comparisons include: (1) The Hildas are 15-25% darker than the Trojans at a very high level of statistical significance. If the Hildas and Trojans started out with similar surfaces, the Hildas may have darkened due to the effects of gardening as they pass through zone III of the asteroid belt. (2) The median albedo of the gray Centaurs lies between that of the L4 and L5 Trojan groups (3) The median L5 Trojan cloud albedo is about 10% darker than that of the L4 cloud at a high level of significance. However, the modes of the L4 and L5 albedo distributions are very similar, perhaps indicating the presence of a distinct brighter component in the L4 cloud that is not found in the L5 cloud.

  6. Trojan, Hilda, and Cybele asteroids - New lightcurve observations and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard P.; Sauter, Linda M.

    1992-01-01

    Lightcurve observations of 23 Trojan, Hilda, and Cybele asteroids are presently subjected to a correction procedure for multiple-aspect lightcurves, followed by a quantitative, bias-corrected analysis of lightcurve amplitude distributions for all published data on these asteroids. While the largest Trojans are found to have a higher mean-lightcurve amplitude than their low-albedo, main-belt counterparts, the smaller Trojans and all Hildas and Cybeles display lightcurve properties resembling main-belt objects. Only the largest Trojans have retained their initial forms after subsequent collisional evolution; 90 km may accordingly represent a transitional magnitude between primordial objects and collision fragments.

  7. Trojan Asteroids: Spectral Groups, Volatiles, and Rotational Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, J. P.; Takir, D.; Stamper, N. G.; Lucas, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    Trojan asteroids comprise a substantial population of primitive bodies confined to Jupiter's stable Lagrange regions. ecause they likely became trapped in these orbits at the end of the initial phase of planetary formation and subsequent migration, the compositions of Trojans provide unique perspectives on chemical and dynamical processes that shaped the Solar System. Ices and organics are of particular interest for understanding Trojan histories. Published near-infrared (0.7 to 4.0 mm) spectra of Trojans show no absorption bands due to H2O or organics. However, if the Trojan asteroids formed at or beyond their present heliocentric distance of 5.2 AU and never spent significant amounts of time closer to the Sun, they should contain H2O ice. Two VNIR spectral groups exist within the Trojans: 2/3 of large Trojans form a cluster with very red (D-type-like) spectral slopes, while the other 1/3 cluster around less-red (P-type-like) slopes. Visible colors of smaller Trojans suggest that the ratio of red to less-red Trojans decreases with decreasing size, from which Wong and Brown (2015; AJ 150:174) suggest that the interiors of all Trojans are represented by the less-red spectral group. In order to further test the hypothesis that Trojans contain H­2O ice and complex organics and to test the result from visible colors that the spectral group ratio changes with size, we have measured near-infrared (0.8 - 2.5 μm) spectra of small ( 35 to 75 km) Trojans from both swarms using the SpeX spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We have also measured 2 - 4 μm spectra of several Trojans to search for spectral signatures of H2O and organics. We confirm that the two spectral groups persist to smaller sizes, and we still detect no absorption features that would be diagnostic of composition. The spectrum of two large Trojans show evidence of spectral slope variations with rotation, but spectra of several others do not. We will present the new spectra and

  8. DroydSeuss: A Mobile Banking Trojan Tracker - Short Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coletta, A.; van der Veen, V.; Maggi, F.

    2016-01-01

    After analyzing several Android mobile banking trojans, weobserved the presence of repetitive artifacts that describe valuable informationabout the distribution of this class of malicious apps. Motivatedby the high threat level posed by mobile banking trojans and by thelack of publicly available

  9. Leucocyte protein Trojan, a possible regulator of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar; Syrjänen, Riikka; Uchida, Tatsuya; Vainio, Olli

    2017-02-01

    Trojan is a leucocyte-specific protein, cloned from chicken embryonic thymocyte cDNA library. The molecule is a type I transmembrane protein with an extracellular CCP domain, followed by two FN3 domains. Its cytoplasmic tail is predicted to possess a MAPK docking and a PKA phosphorylation sites. Trojan has been proposed to have an anti-apoptotic role based on its differential expression on developing thymocyte subpopulations. Using a chicken cell line, our in vitro studies showed that upon apoptosis induction, Trojan expression rises dramatically on the surface of surviving cells and gradually decreases towards its normal levels as cells recover. When sorted based on their expression levels of Trojan, cells with high expression appeared less susceptible to apoptotic induction than those bearing no or low levels of Trojan on their surface. The mechanism by which the molecule exerts its function is yet to be discovered. We found that cells overexpressing Trojan from a cDNA plasmid show elevated steady-state levels of intracellular calcium, suggesting the molecule is able to transmit cytoplasmic signals. The mechanistic nature of Trojan-induced signalling is a target of future investigation. In this article, we conducted a series of experiments that suggest Trojan as an anti-apoptotic regulator. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. New Martian Trojans and an update on the Eureka cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christou, A. A.; Vaduvescu, O.; Tudor, V.; Asher, D. J.; Toma, R.; Knapen, J.; Ponomareva, A. A.

    The number of known Trojan asteroids of Mars has recently increased twofold [1, 2]. This has led to claims of a cluster [2] associated with the first Mars Trojan discovered, 5261 Eureka. The existence of an asteroid family so close to the Sun has implications for our understanding of asteroid

  11. WAR HORSES:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    War Horses: Helhesten and the Danish Avant-Garde During World War II This exhibition is the first to explore the history and significance of the accomplishments of Danish artists working during the Nazi occupation of their country (1940-45), who called themselves Helhesten, such as Ejler Bille......-1951), which they became part of. Cobra greatly influenced the development of European modern art after World War II. The exhibition includes over 100 works and reconstructs for the first time the most important exhibition these artists staged in Denmark during the war, 13 Artists in a Tent (1941). It draws...

  12. The 1990 MB: The first Mars Trojan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowell, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Asteroid 1990 MB was discovered during the course of the Mars and Earth-crossing Asteroid and Comet Survey. An orbit based on a 9-day arc and the asteroid's location near Mars L5 longitude led to speculation that it might be in 1:1 resonance with Mars, analogous to the Trojan asteroids of Jupiter. Subsequent observations strengthened the possibility, and later calculations confirmed it. The most recent orbit shows that the asteroid's semimajor axis is very similar to that of Mars.

  13. Silicate Phases on the Surfaces of Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Audrey; Emery, Joshua P.; Lindsay, Sean S.

    2017-10-01

    Determining the origin of asteroids provides an effective means of constraining the solar system’s dynamic past. Jupiter Trojan asteroids (hereafter Trojans) may help in determining the amount of radial mixing that occurred during giant planet migration. Previous studies aimed at characterizing surface composition show that Trojans have low albedo surfaces and are spectrally featureless in the near infrared. The thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength range has advantages for detecting silicates on low albedo asteroids such as Trojans. The 10 μm region exhibits strong features due to the Si-O fundamental molecular vibrations. Silicates that formed in the inner solar system likely underwent thermal annealing, and thus are crystalline, whereas silicates that accreted in the outer solar system experienced less thermal processing, and therefore are more likely to have remained in an amorphous phase. We hypothesize that the Trojans formed in the outer solar system (i.e., the Kuiper Belt), and therefore will have a more dominant amorphous spectral silicate component. With TIR spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we identify mineralogical features from the surface of 11 Trojan asteroids. Fine-grain mixtures of crystalline pyroxene and olivine exhibit a 10 μm feature with sharp cutoffs between about 9 μm and 12 μm, which create a broad flat plateau. Amorphous phases, when present, smooth the sharp emission features, resulting in a dome-like shape. Preliminary results indicate that the surfaces of analyzed Trojans contain primarily amorphous silicates. Emissivity spectra of asteroids 1986 WD and 4709 Ennomos include small peaks in the 10 μm region, diagnostic of small amounts of crystalline olivine. One explanation is that Trojans formed in the same region as Kuiper Belt objects, and when giant planet migration ensued, they were swept into Jupiter’s stable Lagrange points where they are found today. As such, it is possible that an ancestral group of Kuiper Belt

  14. Trojan asteroids - Populations, dynamical structure and origin of the L4 and L5 swarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Shoemaker, C.S.; Wolfe, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The origin of Trojan asteroids, their populations, and dynamical structures are examined. Data available of Trojan asteroids reveal that the total population of Trojans of greater than 15-km diam is roughly half that estimated for the main-belt asteroids. Two-thirds of the known Trojans are in the L4 swarm. Bright Trojans are as numerous in the L5 swarm as in L4 swarm, but faint L5 Trojans are only half as numerous. Similarities of characteristic orbital parameters among certain Trojans indicate the presence of five and possibly as many as eight collisional groups in the L4 swarm. It is suggested that the magnitude distribution of L4 Trojans is probably a result of strong collisional evolution. It is suggested that the present Trojans are chiefly fragments of Jupiter planetesimals that were captured during an episode of heavy flux near Jupiter during the dispersal of the planetesimal swarm. 40 refs

  15. Surface Composition of Trojan Asteroids from Thermal-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.; Emery, J. P.; Lindsay, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Asteroid origins provide an effective means of constraining the events that dynamically shaped the solar system. Jupiter Trojan asteroids (hereafter Trojans) may help in determining the extent of radial mixing that occurred during giant planet migration. Previous studies aimed at characterizing surface composition show that Trojans have low albedo surfaces and fall into two distinct spectral groups the near infrared (NIR). Though, featureless in this spectral region, NIR spectra of Trojans either exhibit a red or less-red slope. Typically, red-sloped spectra are associated with organics, but it has been shown that Trojans are not host to much, if any, organic material. Instead, the red slope is likely due to anhydrous silicates. The thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength range has advantages for detecting silicates on low albedo asteroids such as Trojans. The 10 µm region exhibits strong features due to the Si-O fundamental molecular vibrations. We hypothesize that the two Trojan spectral groups have different compositions (silicate mineralogy). With TIR spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we identify mineralogical features from the surface of 11 Trojan asteroids, five red and six less-red. Preliminary results from analysis of the 10 µm region indicate red-sloped Trojans have a higher spectral contrast compared to less-red-sloped Trojans. Fine-grain mixtures of crystalline pyroxene and olivine exhibit a 10 µm feature with sharp cutoffs between about 9 µm and 12 µm, which create a broad flat plateau. Amorphous phases, when present, smooth the sharp emission features, resulting in a dome-like shape. Further spectral analysis in the 10 µm, 18 µm, and 30 µm band region will be performed for a more robust analysis. If all Trojans come from the same region, it is expected that they share spectral and compositional characteristics. Therefore, if spectral analysis in the TIR reinforce the NIR spectral slope dichotomy, it is likely that Trojans were sourced from

  16. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry F. Vandamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order to improve their administration (oral, pulmonary and dermal, the nanocarriers can be spread into microparticles. These supramolecular associations can also modulate the kinetic releases of drugs entrapped in the nanoparticles. Different strategies to produce these hybrid particles and to optimize the release kinetics of encapsulated drugs are discussed in this review.

  17. Trojan Politics and the Assemblies of Iliad 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel P. Christensen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The public decision-making of the Trojans is portrayed as disorderly, authoritarian, and unresponsive, in contrast to the more open debates of the Achaeans, an institutional failing that contributes to the fall of the city.

  18. The principle of equivalence and the Trojan asteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, R.; Vucetich, H.

    1986-05-01

    An analysis of the Trojan asteroids motion has been carried out in order to set limits to possible violations to the principle of equivalence. Preliminary results, in agreement with general relativity, are reported. (author)

  19. Trojan and Hilda asteroid lightcurves. I - Anomalously elongated shapes among Trojans (and Hildas?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Binzel, Richard P.; Tholen, David J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Goguen, Jay

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of the available sample of lightcurves for 26 Trojan and Hilda asteroids with belt asteroid lightcurves shows the former to be distinguished by a higher incidence of high amplitudes rgan belt asteroids of comparable size, suggesting more elongated shapes; they currently have, moreover, only a few percent of the main-belt asteroids' collision frequency. A more modest collisional evolution that may have affected the relative degree of fragmentation of these bodies, and thus their shapes, is inferred.

  20. Modeling the Propagation of Trojan Malware in Online Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Faghani, Mohammad Reza; Nugyen, Uyen Trang

    2017-01-01

    The popularity and widespread usage of online social networks (OSN) have attracted cyber criminals who have used OSNs as a platform to spread malware. Among different types of malware in OSNs, Trojan is the most popular type with hundreds of attacks on OSN users in the past few years. Trojans infecting a user's computer have the ability to steal confidential information, install ransomware and infect other computers in the network. Therefore, it is important to understand propagation dynamics...

  1. Lucy: Surveying the diversity of Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, H.; Olkin, C.; Noll, K.; Marchi, S.

    2017-09-01

    The Lucy mission, selected as part of NASA's Discovery Program, is the first reconnaissance of the Jupiter Trojans, objects that hold vital clues to deciphering the history of the Solar System. Due to an unusual and fortuitous orbital configuration, Lucy, will perform a comprehensive investigation that visits six of these primitive bodies, covering both the L4 and L5 swarms, all the known taxonomic types, the largest remnant of a catastrophic collision, and a nearly equal mass binary. It will use a suite of high-heritage remote sensing instruments to map geologic, surface color and composition, thermal and other physical properties of its targets at close range. Lucy, like the human fossil for which it is named, will revolutionize the understanding of our origins.

  2. Welfare of Aged Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine McGowan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Horses form a unique and special part of their owners’ lives and aged horses are no exception. This review considers the health and management of aged horses, including the role of the owner and their perceptions of aged horses, potential threats or risks to their welfare and finally, factors affecting quality of life and euthanasia of aged horses. Owners of aged horses are concerned about the health, welfare and quality of life of their aged animals. Yet surveys of management and preventive healthcare reflect that there may be some limitations to what owners are actually achieving in practice. They show declining management as horses age, particularly for the retired horse and insufficient appropriate preventive healthcare via veterinary surgeons. The veterinary surgeon plays an essential and influential role in preventive healthcare, management of diseases and disorders and ultimately in the decision making process for euthanasia of aged horses at the end of their lives. The value of aged horses should not be underestimated by veterinarians and others working with them and the continuing care of aged horses should be regarded with the same importance as the care of younger horses with more obvious monetary value.

  3. Identification of copy number variants in horses

    KAUST Repository

    Doan, R.

    2012-03-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) represent a substantial source of genetic variation in mammals. However, the occurrence of CNVs in horses and their subsequent impact on phenotypic variation is unknown. We performed a study to identify CNVs in 16 horses representing 15 distinct breeds (Equus caballus) and an individual gray donkey (Equus asinus) using a whole-exome tiling array and the array comparative genomic hybridization methodology. We identified 2368 CNVs ranging in size from 197 bp to 3.5 Mb. Merging identical CNVs from each animal yielded 775 CNV regions (CNVRs), involving 1707 protein- and RNA-coding genes. The number of CNVs per animal ranged from 55 to 347, with median and mean sizes of CNVs of 5.3 kb and 99.4 kb, respectively. Approximately 6% of the genes investigated were affected by a CNV. Biological process enrichment analysis indicated CNVs primarily affected genes involved in sensory perception, signal transduction, and metabolism. CNVs also were identified in genes regulating blood group antigens, coat color, fecundity, lactation, keratin formation, neuronal homeostasis, and height in other species. Collectively, these data are the first report of copy number variation in horses and suggest that CNVs are common in the horse genome and may modulate biological processes underlying different traits observed among horses and horse breeds.

  4. Dust arcs in the region of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The surfaces of the Trojan asteroids are steadily bombarded by interplanetary micrometeoroids, which releases ejecta of small dust particles. These particles form the faint dust arcs that are associated with asteroid clouds. Here we analyze the particle dynamics and structure of the arc in the region of the L4 Trojan asteroids. Methods: We calculate the total cross section of the L4 Trojan asteroids and the production rate of dust particles. The motion of the particles is perturbed by a variety of forces. We simulate the dynamical evolution of the dust particles, and explore the overall features of the Trojan dust arc. Results: The simulations show that the arc is mainly composed of grains in the size range 4-10 microns. Compared to the L4 Trojan asteroids, the dust arc is distributed more widely in the azimuthal direction, extending to a range of [30, 120] degrees relative to Jupiter. The peak number density does not develop at L4. There exist two peaks that are azimuthally displaced from L4.

  5. Candidate Binary Trojan and Hilda Asteroids from Rotational Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnett, Sarah M.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph R.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2017-10-01

    Jovian Trojans (hereafter, Trojans) are asteroids in stable orbits at Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points, and Hilda asteroids are inwards of the Trojans in 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter. Due to their special dynamical properties, observationally constraining the formation location and dynamical histories of Trojans and HIldas offers key input for giant planet migration models. A fundamental parameter in assessing formation location is the bulk density - with low-density objects associated with an ice-rich formation environment in the outer solar system and high-density objects typically linked to the warmer inner solar system. Bulk density can only be directly measured during a close fly-by or by determining the mutual orbits of binary asteroid systems. With the aim of determining densities for a statistically significant sample of Trojans and Hildas, we are undertaking an observational campaign to confirm and characterize candidate binary asteroids published in Sonnett et al. (2015). These objects were flagged as binary candidates because their large NEOWISE brightness variations imply shapes so elongated that they are not likely explained by a singular equilibrium rubble pile and instead may be two elongated, gravitationally bound asteroids. We are obtaining densely sampled rotational light curves of these possible binaries to search for light curve features diagnostic of binarity and to determine the orbital properties of any confirmed binary systems by modeling the light curve. We compare the We present an update on this follow-up campaign and comment on future steps.

  6. Trojan Asteroid Lightcurves: Probing Internal Structure and the Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of the small bodies of the solar system reveal important clues about the condensation and formation of planetesimal bodies, and ultimately planets in planetary systems. Dynamics of small bodies have been utilized to model giant planet migration within our solar system, colors have been used to explore compositional gradients within the protoplanetary disk, & studies of the size-frequency distribution of main belt asteroids may reveal compositional dependences on planetesimal strength limiting models of planetary growth from collisional aggregration. Studies of the optical lightcurves of asteroids also yield important information on shape and potential binarity of asteroidal bodies. The K2 mission has allowed for the unprecedented collection of Trojan asteroid lightcurves on a 30 minute cadence for baselines of 10 days, in both the L4 and L5 Trojan clouds. Preliminary results from the K2 mission suggest that Trojan asteroids have bulk densities of 1 g/cc and a binary fraction ≤ 33 percent (Ryan et al., 2017, Astronomical Journal, 153, 116), however Trojan lightcurve data is actively being collected via the continued K2 mission. We will present updated results of bulk density and binary fraction of the Trojan asteroids and compare these results to other small body populations, including Hilda asteroids, transNeptunian objects and comet nuclei to test dynamical models of the origins of these populations.

  7. Genetic drift. Descent, lineage, and pedigree of the Trojans in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, Euterpe

    2007-12-15

    Homer's Iliad, is an epic poem that describes the last 70 days of the Trojan War, which was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans. Here, the descent, lineage, and the pedigree of the Trojans are presented. In the Illiad, they are said to have originated from Zeus. Beginning with him, the Trojan pedigree comprised 17 men in 8 generations with Dardanus, founder of Dardania in the second generation; Tros, King of the Trojans in the fourth generation; and the two heroes Hector and Aeneas in the eighth generation. In the seventh generation, Priam, as King of the Trojans, had a huge family, including 50 sons: 19 children with his wife Hecabe, other sons with many different wives, and some daughters as well. Hector, the first born, became leader of the Trojans. Hector's brother, Paris, in abducting Helen of Sparta, the wife of King Menelaus, caused the Trojan War to break out. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Microfluidic conceived Trojan microcarriers for oral delivery of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ikram Ullah; Serra, Christophe A; Anton, Nicolas; Er-Rafik, Mériem; Blanck, C; Schmutz, Marc; Kraus, Isabelle; Messaddeq, Nadia; Sutter, Christophe; Anton, Halina; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-09-30

    In this study, we report on a novel method for the synthesis of poly(acrylamide) Trojan microparticles containing ketoprofen loaded poly(ethyl acrylate) or poly(methyl acrylate) nanoparticles. To develop these composite particles, a polymerizable nanoemulsion was used as a template. This nanoemulsion was obtained in an elongational-flow micromixer (μRMX) which was linked to a capillary-based microfluidic device for its emulsification into micron range droplets. Downstream, the microdroplets were hardened into Trojan particles in the size range of 213-308 μm by UV initiated free radical polymerization. The nanoemulsion size varied from 98 -132 nm upon changes in surfactant concentration and number of operating cycles in μRMX. SEM and confocal microscopy confirmed the Trojan morphology. Under SEM it was observed that the polymerization reduced the size of the nanoemulsion down to 20-32 nm for poly(ethyl acrylate) and 10-15 nm for poly(methyl acrylate) nanoparticles. This shrinkage was confirmed by cryo-TEM studies. We further showed that Trojan microparticles released embedded nanoparticles on contact with suitable media as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In a USP phosphate buffer solution of pH 6.8, Trojan microparticles containing poly(ethyl acrylate) nanoparticles released 35% of encapsulated ketoprofen over 24h. The low release of the drug was attributed to the overall low concentration of nanoparticles and attachment of some of nanoparticles to the poly(acrylamide) matrix. Thus, this novel method has shown possibility to develop Trojan particles convieniently with potential to deliver nanoparticles in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RGB Colors of the Jovian Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyuan; Zhang, Xiaofei; University of Western Australia, Youth Astronomy Teachers' Link

    2017-10-01

    We use SPIRIT I&II telescopes which has 43cm diameter, to observe around 50 Jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to the limiting magnitude of our equipment, We only choose some bright asteriods as our targets.To testify the feasibility of using RGB Bayer filter system for research project, we use the RGB Bayer filter system instead of the Johnson-Cousins BVR filters system. Once proved, the photometry data will be significantly enlarged. More collected data can be used on scientific researches and more scholars can do relevant researches by using the RGB Bayer filter system. What we did is using a software called Astrometrica to measure the magnitude of the asteroids under RGB filter. Then we transform the RGB data to BVR data. Later on we calculate the color index by using those BVR data from our calculations. The final step to do the statistic work and make graphs, and compare it with the former research data. We are aim to find same result as the research before, or why there are differnt result.We are still in the process of handling the data, so the final result will be released at the conference. This project is based on data acquired using the SPIRIT robotic telescopes at The University of Western Australia. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Paul Luckas, SPIRIT Program Manager.The project is supported by The University of Western Australia, Youth Astronomy Teachers' Link.

  10. Facial trauma in the Trojan War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralli, Ioanna; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Mourouzis, Konstantinos; Piagkou, Mara; Rallis, George

    2015-06-01

    The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer represent the cornerstones of classical Greek literature and subsequently the foundations of literature of the Western civilization. The Iliad, particularly, is the most famous and influential epic poem ever conceived and is considered to be the most prominent and representative work of the ancient Greek epic poetry. We present the injuries that involve the face, mentioned so vividly in the Iliad, and discuss the aetiology of their extraordinary mortality rate. We recorded the references of the injuries, the attacker and defender involved, the weapons that were used, the site and the result of the injury. The face was involved in 21 trauma cases. The frontal area was traumatized in 7 cases; the oral cavity in 6; the auricular area in 4; the orbits and the retromandibular area in 3; the mandible and the nose in 2; and the maxilla, the submental and the buccal area in 1, respectively. The mortality rate concerning the facial injuries reaches 100%. Homer's literate dexterity, charisma and his unique aptitude in the narration of the events of the Trojan War have established him as the greatest epic poet. We consider the study of these vibrantly described events to be recreational and entertaining for everyone but especially for a surgeon.

  11. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bone scintigraphy for horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Scintigraphy (bone scan) is being used approximately since 1980 in the horse under general anaesthesia. With the construction of custom-made overhead gantries for gamma-cameras scintigraphy found widespread entry in big equine referral hospitals for bone-scanning of the standing horse. Indications for the use of a bone scan in the horse are inflammatory alterations in the locomotor apparatus. It is primarily used for diagnosis of lameness of unknown origin, suspect of stress fracture or hairline fracture and for horses with bad riding comfort with suspected painful lesions in the spine. (orig.)

  13. Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half of the objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015). A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004). Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  14. Trojan Nuclear Plant. Annual operating report: January--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojan generated 28,791,044 MW hours of electricity, an output greater than any other commercial U.S. plant. Availability factor was 92.6 percent and the capacity factor was 68.6 percent. Data are presented concerning operations, maintenance, changes, tests, experiments, specifications, and modifications. Also reported are effluents, waste disposal, meteorology data, radiation doses, chemical uses, and environmental surveillance

  15. A Martian origin for the Mars Trojan asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishook, D.; Jacobson, S. A.; Morbidelli, A.; Aharonson, O.

    2017-08-01

    Seven of the nine known Mars Trojan asteroids belong to an orbital cluster1,2 named after its largest member, (5261) Eureka. Eureka is probably the progenitor of the whole cluster, which formed at least 1 Gyr ago3. It has been suggested3 that the thermal YORP (Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack) effect spun up Eureka, resulting in fragments being ejected by the rotational-fission mechanism. Eureka's spectrum exhibits a broad and deep absorption band around 1 μm, indicating an olivine-rich composition4. Here we show evidence that the Trojan Eureka cluster progenitor could have originated as impact debris excavated from the Martian mantle. We present new near-infrared observations of two Trojans ((311999) 2007 NS2 and (385250) 2001 DH47) and find that both exhibit an olivine-rich reflectance spectrum similar to Eureka's. These measurements confirm that the progenitor of the cluster has an achondritic composition4. Olivine-rich reflectance spectra are rare amongst asteroids5 but are seen around the largest basins on Mars6. They are also consistent with some Martian meteorites (for example, Chassigny7) and with the material comprising much of the Martian mantle8,9. Using numerical simulations, we show that the Mars Trojans are more likely to be impact ejecta from Mars than captured olivine-rich asteroids transported from the main belt. This result directly links specific asteroids to debris from the forming planets.

  16. Novel leukocyte protein, Trojan, differentially expressed during thymocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar; Motobu, Maki; Salmi, Jussi; Uchida, Tatsuya; Vainio, Olli

    2010-04-01

    "Trojan" is a novel cell surface protein, discovered from chicken embryonic thymocytes on the purpose to identify molecules involved in T cell differentiation. The molecule is predicted as a type I transmembrane protein having a Sushi and two fibronectin type III domains and a pair of intracellular phosphorylation sites. Its transcript expression is specific for lymphoid tissues and the presence of the protein on the surface of recirculating lymphocytes and macrophages was confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. In thymus, about half of the double negative (CD4(-) CD8(-)) and CD8 single positive and the majority of CD4 single positive cells express Trojan with a relatively high intensity. However, only a minority of the double positive (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells are positive for Trojan. This expression pattern, similar to that of some proteins with anti-apoptotic and function, like IL-7Ralpha, makes Trojan an attractive candidate of having an anti-apoptotic role. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Existence of global attractor for the Trojan Y Chromosome model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the long time behavior of solution for the equation derived by the Trojan Y Chromosome (TYC model with spatial spread. Based on the regularity estimates for the semigroups and the classical existence theorem of global attractors, we prove that this equations possesses a global attractor in $H^k(\\Omega^4$ $(k\\geq 0$ space.

  18. Hardware Trojan Side-Channels based on Physical Unclonable Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, Z.; Makkes, M.X.; Ardagna, C.A.; Zhou, J.

    2011-01-01

    The separation design and fabrication process in the semiconductor industry leads to potential threats such as trojan side-channels (TSCs). In this paper we design a new family of TSCs from physical unclonable functions (PUFs). In particular, a dedicated attack on the PRESENT block cipher is

  19. A HYPOTHESIS FOR THE COLOR BIMODALITY OF JUPITER TROJANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: iwong@caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    One of the most enigmatic and hitherto unexplained properties of Jupiter Trojans is their bimodal color distribution. This bimodality is indicative of two sub-populations within the Trojans, which have distinct size distributions. In this paper, we present a simple, plausible hypothesis for the origin and evolution of the two Trojan color sub-populations. In the framework of dynamical instability models of early solar system evolution, which suggest a common primordial progenitor population for both Trojans and Kuiper Belt objects, we use observational constraints to assert that the color bimodalities evident in both minor body populations developed within the primordial population prior to the onset of instability. We show that, beginning with an initial composition of rock and ices, location-dependent volatile loss through sublimation in this primordial population could have led to sharp changes in the surface composition with heliocentric distance. We propose that the depletion or retention of H{sub 2}S ice on the surface of these objects was the key factor in creating an initial color bimodality. Objects that retained H{sub 2}S on their surfaces developed characteristically redder colors upon irradiation than those that did not. After the bodies from the primordial population were scattered and emplaced into their current positions, they preserved this primordial color bimodality to the present day. We explore predictions of the volatile loss model—in particular, the effect of collisions within the Trojan population on the size distributions of the two sub-populations—and propose further experimental and observational tests of our hypothesis.

  20. A HYPOTHESIS FOR THE COLOR BIMODALITY OF JUPITER TROJANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most enigmatic and hitherto unexplained properties of Jupiter Trojans is their bimodal color distribution. This bimodality is indicative of two sub-populations within the Trojans, which have distinct size distributions. In this paper, we present a simple, plausible hypothesis for the origin and evolution of the two Trojan color sub-populations. In the framework of dynamical instability models of early solar system evolution, which suggest a common primordial progenitor population for both Trojans and Kuiper Belt objects, we use observational constraints to assert that the color bimodalities evident in both minor body populations developed within the primordial population prior to the onset of instability. We show that, beginning with an initial composition of rock and ices, location-dependent volatile loss through sublimation in this primordial population could have led to sharp changes in the surface composition with heliocentric distance. We propose that the depletion or retention of H 2 S ice on the surface of these objects was the key factor in creating an initial color bimodality. Objects that retained H 2 S on their surfaces developed characteristically redder colors upon irradiation than those that did not. After the bodies from the primordial population were scattered and emplaced into their current positions, they preserved this primordial color bimodality to the present day. We explore predictions of the volatile loss model—in particular, the effect of collisions within the Trojan population on the size distributions of the two sub-populations—and propose further experimental and observational tests of our hypothesis.

  1. Horse trichinellosis, an unresolved puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozio E.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of routine controls to detect Trichinella larvae in horse-meat, human infections due to horse-meat consumption continue to occur in France and Italy, The epidemiology of horse trichinellosis since its discovery in 1975 is outlined, addressing the possible modes of natural transmission to horses, the need to develop more sensitive methods for detecting Trichinella larvae in horses, and the economic impact of horse trichinellosis. Investigations of human outbreaks due to horse-meat consumption have implicated single cases of inadequate veterinary controls on horses imported from non-European Union countries. In particular, most cases of human infection have been attributed to horses imported from Eastern Europe, where pig trichinellosis is re-emerging and the main source of infection in horses.

  2. A cyber kill chain based taxonomy of banking Trojans for evolutionary computational intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwia, D; Dehghantanha, A; Choo, K-KR; Slaughter, J

    2017-01-01

    Malware such as banking Trojans are popular with financially-motivated cybercriminals. Detection of banking Trojans remains a challenging task, due to the constant evolution of techniques used to obfuscate and circumvent existing detection and security solutions. Having a malware taxonomy can facilitate the design of mitigation strategies such as those based on evolutionary computational intelligence. Specifically, in this paper, we propose a cyber kill chain based taxonomy of banking Trojans...

  3. Nanocarriers Conjugated with Cell Penetrating Peptides: New Trojan Horses by Modern Ulysses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappavigna, Silvia; Misso, Gabriella; Falanga, Annarita; Perillo, Emiliana; Novellino, Ettore; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Grieco, Paolo; Caraglia, Michele; Galdiero, Stefania

    Nanomedicine has opened the way to the design of more efficient diagnostics and therapeutics. Moreover, recent literature has illustrated the use of short cationic and/or amphipathic peptides, known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), for mediating advanced drug delivery. CPPs exploit their ability to enter cells and enhance the uptake of many cargoes ranging from small molecules to proteins. The distinctive properties of nanocarriers (NC) based systems provide unforeseen benefits over pure drugs for biomedical applications and constitute a challenging research field particularly focused on imaging and delivery; nonetheless, several problems have to be overcome to make them a viable option in clinic. The use of CPPs improves significantly their delivery to specific intracellular targets and thus readily contributes to their use both for effective tumor therapy and gene therapy. A key issue is related to their mechanism of uptake, because although classical CPPs enhance NCs' uptake, the entry mechanism involves the endocytic pathway, which means that the delivered material is sequestered within vesicles and only a small amount will escape from this environment and reach the desired target. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in the use of CPP for enhanced delivery of nanocarriers, nucleic acids, and drugs, we will discuss their uptake mechanisms and we will describe novel approaches to improve endosomal escape of internalized nanosystems.

  4. James Joyce’s Trojan Hobby-Horse: The Iliad and the Collective Unconscious Ulysses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Fuchs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available James Joyce’s Ulysses rewrites the Homeric Odyssey in such a way that the ancient myth provides a structural pattern, which gives order and meaning to a seemingly chaotic and meaningless contemporary world – an aspect which T. S. Eliot called the “mythical method”. As the characters of Ulysses are ignorant of this ordering device, they function as Jungian archetypes rather than individuals: Their deeds correspond to a mythical framework which is not actively remembered but provides a collective unconsciousness that guides their lives as a principle of order and continuity. What they do is meaningful although they consider themselves as insignificant agents thrown into a seemingly chaotic world. Whereas scholars have focused on Homer’s Odyssey as an archetypal (i.e. collective unconscious key to the cultural memory of the mythical roots of Western culture, they have turned a comparatively blind eye to the fact that Homer’s corresponding work of the Iliad has a similar function for the mythopoetic design of Ulysses. This paper is going to reconstruct Joyce’s neglected intertextual dialogue with the Iliad as an archetypal key to the cultural memory of the roots of Western civilisation.

  5. Wage Returns to University Disciplines in Greece: Are Greek Higher Education Degrees Trojan Horses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanos, Ilias; Pouliakas, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the wage returns to qualifications and academic disciplines in the Greek labour market. Exploring wage responsiveness across various degree subjects in Greece is interesting, as it is characterised by high levels of graduate unemployment, which vary considerably with the field of study, and relatively low levels of wage…

  6. Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells as an Anti-Cancer Trojan Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Drela, Katarzyna; Rozycka, Justyna; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based gene therapy holds a great promise for the treatment of human malignancy. Among different cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are emerging as valuable anti-cancer agents that have the potential to be used to treat a number of different cancer types. They have inherent migratory properties, which allow them to serve as vehicles for delivering effective therapy to isolated tumors and metastases. MSCs have been engineered to express anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-angiogenic agents that specifically target different cancers. Another field of interest is to modify MSCs with the cytokines that activate pro-tumorigenic immunity or to use them as carriers for the traditional chemical compounds that possess the properties of anti-cancer drugs. Although there is still controversy about the exact function of MSCs in the tumor settings, the encouraging results from the preclinical studies of MSC-based gene therapy for a large number of tumors support the initiation of clinical trials. PMID:27460260

  7. Action research in inter-organisational networks : - impartial studies or the Trojan horse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the literature on action research has been aimed at intra-organisational issues. These studies have distinguished between two researcher roles: The problem-solver and the observer. This article addresses the distinct challenges of action research in inter-organisational projects....... In addition to the problem-solver and observer roles, the researcher in an inter-organisational setting can serve as a legitimiser of the project and manage to involve partners that in an ordinary business-to-business setting would not have participated. Based on an action research project in a Danish inter......-organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and potentially the credibility of the researchers. The article...

  8. Pumped hydroelectric storage utilization assessment: Forerunner of renewable energy integration or Trojan horse?

    OpenAIRE

    KOUGIAS IOANNIS; SZABO SANDOR

    2017-01-01

    Pumped hydroelectric storage (PHS) is the main utility-scale storage technology. Although PHS systems generally constitute a fraction of generation, they receive increasing attention due to their potential balancing role towards higher penetration of variable renewable energy sources (RES). In the European context it is widely believed that PHS are key elements of the ongoing energy transition. The present analysis examines if this assumption is valid and PHS utilization grows parallel to RES...

  9. Low-energy d plus d fusion reactions via the Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Typel, S.; Burjan, Václav; Del Santo, M. G.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Pizzone, R. G.; Piskoř, Štěpán; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Sparta, R.; Aliotta, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 700, č. 2 (2011), s. 111-115 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11001; GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Nuclear astrophysics * Nucleosynthesis * Plasma physics * Few-body physics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2011

  10. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics. Asymptotic normalization coefficient and Trojan Horse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Brown, S.; Burjan, Václav; Kroha, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 787, - (2007), 321C-328C ISSN 0375-9474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : VERTEX CONSTANT * S-factor Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.096, year: 2007

  11. Behold the Trojan Horse: Instructional vs. Productivity Computing in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Liza

    This background paper for a symposium on the school of the future reviews the current instructional applications of computers in the classroom (the computer as a means or the subject of instruction), and suggests strategies that administrators might use to move toward viewing the computer as a productivity tool for students, i.e., its use for word…

  12. Government Aid to Private Schools: Is It a Trojan Horse? A CIE Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard E., Ed.

    In this publication, six scholars interested in private education and knowledgeable in economic policy and politics present several different views of government aid to private schools. In the lead essay, William Cage argues that supporters of private schooling are shortsighted in advocating public aid for private education. Government aid, says…

  13. Action Research in Inter-organisational Networks - Impartial studies or the Trojan Horse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Bergenholtz, Carsten; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, the literature on action research has been aimed at intra-organisational issues. These studies have distinguished between two researcher roles: The problem-solver and the observer. This article addresses the distinct challenges of action research in inter-organisational projects. I...

  14. EU Common Energy Policy: A Trojan Horse for Member States? / Anna-Maria Galojan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Galojan, Anna-Maria, 1982-

    2009-01-01

    Euroopa Liidu ja Venemaa suhetest energeetika valdkonnas. Autor leiab, et Eesti peaks aktiivselt osalema Euroopa Liidu ühise energiapoliitika väljatöötamisel ning mõstma, et see on osa välis- ja kaitsepoliitikast

  15. Endoscopic Vein Harvesting for Coronary Bypass Grafting: A Blessing or a Trojan Horse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Accord

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional open harvest of the great saphenous vein (GSV during CABG results in approximately 7% donor-site complications. Using endoscopic vein harvesting (EVH the full GSV length can be harvested through a 3 cm incision. This nonsystematic review discusses several key issues concerning EVH, based on an extensive Pubmed search. Found studies show that EVH results in reduced number of wound complications, less postoperative pain, earlier postoperative mobilisation, reduced length of hospital stay, and is more cost-effective. Initial studies did not find significant differences in graft histology, patency, or clinical outcome. However, in 2009 convincing evidence of inferior histological graft properties became available. Furthermore, an observational study showed that EVH resulted in significantly more graft stenosis, was associated with higher mortality, more myocard infarction, and more reinterventions. Most recent publications could not confirm these findings, however larger randomised controlled trials focusing on graft quality are being awaited.

  16. Implementation of the K-12 NREN: Equity, Access, and a Trojan Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodas, Steven

    The proposed deployment of the National Research and Education Network (NREN) offers an unprecedented opportunity for shaping a new expression of civic and pedagogical culture. It can be a positive force for change or a regressive distribution of resources and influence to those already most in possession of them. To prepare for the NREN, the…

  17. 'Parental Rights:' The Trojan Horse of the Religious Right Attack on Public Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    People for the American Way, Washington, DC.

    The potential intended and unintended impact of parental rights initiatives on public education and child welfare agencies and on existing laws demands further scrutiny of the legislation and of its proponents and their motivations. Proponents assert that parental rights initiatives would guarantee parents' rights to direct the upbringing of their…

  18. New Courses for Trojan Horses: Rethinking RPL in a South African Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbrecht, Terry

    2009-01-01

    This article reflects on some of the findings of a research project which investigated the practice of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) within a major national teacher upgrading project in South Africa--the National Professional Diploma in Education (NPDE). The article analyses the ways in which a range of contextual factors have positioned RPL…

  19. Teacher Evaluation as Trojan Horse: The Case for Teacher-Developed Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    In his focus article "How Is Testing Supposed to Improve Schooling?" Ed Haertel distinguishes between seven uses of educational tests as a function of the intended action and what or who will be influenced by the intended action. He then applies Mike Kane's interpretive argument approach (Kane, 2006) as a basis for speculating about the validity…

  20. Trojan horse or horn of plenty? Reflections on allowing CCS in the CDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coninck, Heleen de

    2008-01-01

    The discussion around allowing CO 2 capture and geological storage (CCS) into the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is important, as the CDM is currently the only structural incentive for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the developing world. Without the potential incentives given by the CDM, CCS in developing countries will only take place sporadically in niche sectors. The debate around CCS in the CDM has developed into a highly polarised discussion, with a deep divide between proponents and opponents and no view on reconciliation between the various perspectives. Environmental organisations and several developing-country parties in the climate negotiations are increasingly vehemently opposed against CCS in the CDM, and industrialised countries, several large fossil-fuel-dependent developing countries and industry view CCS as a natural option under the CDM, provided some surmountable technical and procedural barriers are taken care of. This paper argues that the efforts of those trying to bring the discussion to a close by solving technical and procedural issues around CCS in the CDM will not lead to agreement because of underlying convictions of all stakeholders. Six convictions are identified and discussed. Based on the discussion of the convictions of both opponents and proponents, research needs and a potential negotiation package are suggested. The research needs are primarily in the field of the CDM market impacts of CCS, the issue of enhanced oil emission accounting, and sustainable development aspects, and particularly whether developing countries could actually benefit from technological leadership in the field of CCS, or whether they will be worse off. Devoting attention to the identified convictions could provide information for a more acceptable negotiation package on CCS in the CDM. (author)

  1. The electronic cigarette: a knight in shining armour or a Trojan horse?†

    OpenAIRE

    Schluger, Neil W.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes have caused a sharp debate in the public health community, with some promoting them as a means of harm reduction for tobacco users and some taking a strong stand against them because of fear of renormalising smoking behaviour and interrupting tobacco control progress. People with mental health problems smoke at high rates and e-cigarettes seem a potentially attractive method of cessation in this population, and their use should be studied carefully.

  2. The electronic cigarette: a knight in shining armour or a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluger, Neil W

    2014-10-01

    Electronic cigarettes have caused a sharp debate in the public health community, with some promoting them as a means of harm reduction for tobacco users and some taking a strong stand against them because of fear of renormalising smoking behaviour and interrupting tobacco control progress. People with mental health problems smoke at high rates and e-cigarettes seem a potentially attractive method of cessation in this population, and their use should be studied carefully.

  3. A "Trojan horse" strategy to reverse drug-resistance in brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pinzon-Daza, Martha L.

    2014-01-01

    Los gliomas malignos representan una de las formas más agresivas de los tumores del sistema nervioso central (SNC). De acuerdo con la clasificación de los tumores cerebrales de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS), los astrocitomas han sido categorizados en cuatro grados, determinados por la patología subyacente. Es así como los gliomas malignos (o de alto grado) incluyen el glioma anaplásico (grado III) así como el glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grado IV),estos últimos los más agresiv...

  4. Red Trojan Horses? A New Look at Chinese SOEs' Outward Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How dangerous is Chinese outward foreign direct investment (OFDI because of the state's influence over business, particularly state-owned enterprises (SOEs? To what extent are business and politics interwoven in Chinese investment decisions? Crucial knowledge is lacking on the relationship between the state and companies in China's OFDI. This study does not claim to completely refute the conventional view that Chinese companies, particularly SOEs, are controlled by the state in their OFDI activities. However, it tries to provide some evidence that suggests the need for a revised look at them. It argues that although Chinese SOEs are supported by Chinese diplomacy and loans in their OFDI and have a tacit understanding of certain strategic goals of the state, they enjoy autonomy to make business decisions and have prioritized maximizing their own business interests. Importantly, this is enabled by the state's view that the profit of SOEs is consistent with national interests.

  5. Large Dam Development: From Trojan Horse to Pandora’s Box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, R.; Zwarteveen, M.; Bakker, K.; Flyvbjerg, B.

    This chapter argues that there are important distinctions between large dam development in the twentieth century and the twenty-first century by conceptually framing dams not as mere objects in space but also as agents in dynamic and contested spatial strategies. This is illustrated by two examples:

  6. Writing Trojan Horses and War Machines: The Creative Political in Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    North American music education is a commodity sold to pre-service and in-service music teachers. Like all mass-produced consumables, it is valuable to the extent that it is not creative, that is, to the extent that it is reproducible. This is demonstrated in curricular materials, notably general music series textbook and music scores available…

  7. Revolution, Evolution or a Trojan Horse? Piloting Assessment for Learning in Some Scottish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Alison; Hallam, Susan; Peffers, Jack; Robertson, Pamela; Stobart, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses some of the findings of an evaluation of Project One of the "Assessment is for Learning" Development Programme in 16 Scottish primary schools and two junior high schools in which teachers developed formative assessment strategies aimed at improving teaching and learning. Drawing on data from pupils, teachers and…

  8. Delivery of Nanotethered Therapies to Brain Metastases of Primary Breast Cancer Using a Cellular Trojan Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    transport in tissue based on the acquired medical images of an individual patient (CT and MRI ) with sufficient accuracy and at accelerated rates for...anatomical and physiological information provided by imaging modalities such as CT, Ultrasound, PET, MRI , etc. In the current work we have developed a...capability to develop and optimize treatment plans for optimal release of pharmaceuticals in the treatment of cancer. Future work will test and

  9. Demystifying the epidemic among Achaeans during the Trojan War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Laios, Konstantinos; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2014-12-01

    Although some modern scholars believe that Homer had at least a basic medical education, given that a plethora of medical terms may be found in his poems, in the case of the pestilence that killed the Achaeans (one of the Hellenic peoples believed to have inhabited the Peloponnese) at Troy, his reference was simply informative. No symptoms were mentioned and the only thing known was that mules and dogs were the first to die. While Delphic Apollo was usually on the side of Peloponnesians, during the Trojan War Apollo Smintheus (the Mouse God) sided with the Trojans. Apollo was invoked as Smintheus by his priest Chryses two times and on both occasions a pestilence ensued. In our paper we try to clarify whether this pestilence, as we believe, was caused by a member of the Alphavirus genus, which can inflict a serious epidemic both on human and animal species, especially in equines.

  10. Jupiter Trojan's Shallow Subsurface: Direct Observation By Radar Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herique, A.; Plettemeier, D.; Beck, P.; Michel, P.; Kumamoto, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    Most of the Jupiter's Trojan are classified as spectral type P or D from visible and near-IR observations. Still, major question remain regarding theire origin and geological evolution: What ices are present in their interior, and in what amount? What is the abundance and the nature of the organic fraction? Did they experience some level of differentiation powered by 26Al? Answering theses question is the goal of the Solar-Power Sail JAXA mission [1, 2]. This mission plans to study the surface by remote sensing in the optical in IR domain. This probe will carry a large-sized lander with a drill to sample the constitutive material at meter depth in order to complement physical and chemical properties measured by on-board instruments. The sample return is an option under study.Radar sounding of the shallow subsurface would be envisaged in complement to this payload. Sounding radar could provide the structure of the first tens of meters of the Trojan surface. It will allow identifying layering, ice lens, and embedded block. It also will enable to reconnect the surface with the deep interior in order to identify exogenous / pristine material. For the surface package, the drilling and the sample return, radar sounding is a unique opportunity to support the selection of the landing site and to provide the greater geological context of the samples that will be returned to Earth.In this paper, we will detail the objective of this instrument and then we will outline the proposed instrument, which is inheriting from the radar developed for the AIDA/AIM mission.[1] Mori, O. et al., Science experiments on a Jupiter Trojan Asteroid in the solar powerd sail mission. LPSC 2016 - 1822.[2] Okada, T. et al., Science and Exploration of a Jupiter Trojan Asteroid in the solar-power sail mission. LPSC 2017 - 1828.

  11. WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS OF THE JOVIAN TROJAN POPULATION: TAXONOMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Masiero, J. R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Nugent, C. R., E-mail: tgrav@psi.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We present updated/new thermal model fits for 478 Jovian Trojan asteroids observed with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using the fact that the two shortest bands used by WISE, centered on 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, are dominated by reflected light, we derive albedos of a significant fraction of these objects in these bands. While the visible albedos of both the C-, P-, and D-type asteroids are strikingly similar, the WISE data reveal that the albedo at 3.4 {mu}m is different between C-/P- and D-types. The albedo at 3.4 {mu}m can thus be used to classify the objects, with C-/P-types having values less than 10% and D-types have values larger than 10%. Classifying all objects larger than 50 km shows that the D-type objects dominate both the leading cloud (L {sub 4}), with a fraction of 84%, and trailing cloud (L {sub 5}), with a fraction of 71%-80%. The two clouds thus have very similar taxonomic distribution for these large objects, but the leading cloud has a larger number of these large objects, L {sub 4}/L {sub 5} = 1.34. The taxonomic distribution of the Jovian Trojans is found to be different from that of the large Hildas, which is dominated by C- and P-type objects. At smaller sizes, the fraction of D-type Hildas starts increasing, showing more similarities with the Jovian Trojans. If this similarity is confirmed through deeper surveys, it could hold important clues to the formation and evolution of the two populations. The Jovian Trojans does have similar taxonomic distribution to that of the Jovian irregular satellites, but lacks the ultra red surfaces found among the Saturnian irregular satellites and Centaur population.

  12. WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS OF THE JOVIAN TROJAN POPULATION: TAXONOMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated/new thermal model fits for 478 Jovian Trojan asteroids observed with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using the fact that the two shortest bands used by WISE, centered on 3.4 and 4.6 μm, are dominated by reflected light, we derive albedos of a significant fraction of these objects in these bands. While the visible albedos of both the C-, P-, and D-type asteroids are strikingly similar, the WISE data reveal that the albedo at 3.4 μm is different between C-/P- and D-types. The albedo at 3.4 μm can thus be used to classify the objects, with C-/P-types having values less than 10% and D-types have values larger than 10%. Classifying all objects larger than 50 km shows that the D-type objects dominate both the leading cloud (L 4 ), with a fraction of 84%, and trailing cloud (L 5 ), with a fraction of 71%-80%. The two clouds thus have very similar taxonomic distribution for these large objects, but the leading cloud has a larger number of these large objects, L 4 /L 5 = 1.34. The taxonomic distribution of the Jovian Trojans is found to be different from that of the large Hildas, which is dominated by C- and P-type objects. At smaller sizes, the fraction of D-type Hildas starts increasing, showing more similarities with the Jovian Trojans. If this similarity is confirmed through deeper surveys, it could hold important clues to the formation and evolution of the two populations. The Jovian Trojans does have similar taxonomic distribution to that of the Jovian irregular satellites, but lacks the ultra red surfaces found among the Saturnian irregular satellites and Centaur population.

  13. DNA nanotechnology: On-command molecular Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Christof M.

    2017-12-01

    Lipid-motif-decorated DNA nanocapsules filled with photoresponsive polymers are capable of delivering signalling molecules into target organisms for biological perturbations at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  14. WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS OF THE JOVIAN TROJANS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Blauvelt, E.; DeBaun, E.; Elsbury, D.; Gautier, T. IV; Gomillion, S.; Hand, E.; Wilkins, A.; Spahr, T.; McMillan, R. S.; Walker, R.; Cutri, R.; Wright, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the preliminary analysis of over 1739 known and 349 candidate Jovian Trojans observed by the NEOWISE component of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). With this survey the available diameters, albedos, and beaming parameters for the Jovian Trojans have been increased by more than an order of magnitude compared to previous surveys. We find that the Jovian Trojan population is very homogenous for sizes larger than ∼10 km (close to the detection limit of WISE for these objects). The observed sample consists almost exclusively of low albedo objects, having a mean albedo value of 0.07 ± 0.03. The beaming parameter was also derived for a large fraction of the observed sample, and it is also very homogenous with an observed mean value of 0.88 ± 0.13. Preliminary debiasing of the survey shows that our observed sample is consistent with the leading cloud containing more objects than the trailing cloud. We estimate the fraction to be N(leading)/N(trailing) ∼ 1.4 ± 0.2, lower than the 1.6 ± 0.1 value derived by Szabó et al.

  15. Genome-wide detection of copy number variations among diverse horse breeds by array CGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Recent studies have found that copy number variations (CNVs are widespread in human and animal genomes. CNVs are a significant source of genetic variation, and have been shown to be associated with phenotypic diversity. However, the effect of CNVs on genetic variation in horses is not well understood. In the present study, CNVs in 6 different breeds of mare horses, Mongolia horse, Abaga horse, Hequ horse and Kazakh horse (all plateau breeds and Debao pony and Thoroughbred, were determined using aCGH. In total, seven hundred CNVs were identified ranging in size from 6.1 Kb to 0.57 Mb across all autosomes, with an average size of 43.08 Kb and a median size of 15.11 Kb. By merging overlapping CNVs, we found a total of three hundred and fifty-three CNV regions (CNVRs. The length of the CNVRs ranged from 6.1 Kb to 1.45 Mb with average and median sizes of 38.49 Kb and 13.1 Kb. Collectively, 13.59 Mb of copy number variation was identified among the horses investigated and accounted for approximately 0.61% of the horse genome sequence. Five hundred and eighteen annotated genes were affected by CNVs, which corresponded to about 2.26% of all horse genes. Through the gene ontology (GO, genetic pathway analysis and comparison of CNV genes among different breeds, we found evidence that CNVs involving 7 genes may be related to the adaptation to severe environment of these plateau horses. This study is the first report of copy number variations in Chinese horses, which indicates that CNVs are ubiquitous in the horse genome and influence many biological processes of the horse. These results will be helpful not only in mapping the horse whole-genome CNVs, but also to further research for the adaption to the high altitude severe environment for plateau horses.

  16. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqing Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed.

  17. Horse in the Turkmen Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna BEŞEN DELİCE

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Horses have provided speed and mobility for Turkish people in steppes. Through war capability and skil ls of riding horse they were successful against resident communities in different geographies throughout history and when circumstances became difficult they migrated to convenient land riding horses. They benefited from horse's milk and meat as well as it s power and speed. In feast and festivals they compete with each other using horses, even if they played on horseback. This indicates that horses were how important for Turks in the political, civil, economic, social and cultural fields. Horse was located in the center of the lives of Turks throughout history. Such that, robbing a horse conneted was capital offence as well as rebellion, treason, murder, adultery according to the criminal law of the former Turks. Horse still has not lost its importance in t he present Turkish regions, especially Central Asian geography. Horse is so important for Turkmens that horse figure has taken place in the state coat of arms of Turkmenistan and the last sunday in April is celebrated as a feast in Turkmenistan. Ahal - Teke which is most exclusive horse breed of the word is brought up in Turkmenistan. Horse has also an important place in the vocabulary. In this work, it would be determine horse’s important in social and cultural life of Turkmens as following both language and non - language indicators.

  18. A Survey of Rotation Lightcurves of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids in the L4 Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert; Warner, Brian; James, David; Rohl, Derrick; Connour, Kyle

    2017-10-01

    Jovian Trojan asteroids are of interest both as objects in their own right and as possible relics of Solar System formation. Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, Jovian Trojan asteroids and cometary nuclei. Asteroid lightcurves give information about processes that have affected a group of asteroids including their density. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We have been carrying out a survey of Trojan lightcurve properties comparing small Trojan asteroids with comets (French et al 2015). We present new lightcurve information for 39 Trojans less than about 35 km in diameter. We report our latest results and compare them with results from the sparsely-sampled lightcurves from the Palomar Transient Factory (Waszazak et al., Chang et al. 2015). The minimum densities for objects with complete lightcurves are estimated and are found to becomparable to those measured for cometary nuclei. A significant fraction (~40%) of thisobserved small Trojan population rotates slowly (P > 24 hours), with measured periods as over 500 hours (Waszczak et al 2015). The excess of slow rotators may be due to the YORP effect. Results of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test suggest that the distribution of Trojan rotation rates is dissimilar to those of Main Belt Asteroids of the same size.

  19. Polyuria and polydipsia in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Erica C

    2007-12-01

    Polyuria and polydipsia provide a diagnostic challenge for the equine clinician. This article describes the various known causes of polyuria and polydipsia in horses and provides a description of a systematic diagnostic approach for assessing horses with polyuria and polydipsia to delineate the underlying cause. Treatment and management strategies for addressing polyuria and polydipsia in horses are also described.

  20. Review of the functional morphology, biology and perturbation impacts on the boreal, habitat-forming horse mussel Modiolus modiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae: Modiolinae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Grete E.; Morton, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The boreal bivalve Modiolus modiolus is common subtidally where it aggregates to form extensive, long-lived, biogenic habitats with a diverse associated flora and, especially, fauna. Despite this ecological importance, M. modiolus has not been described in terms of its functional morphology and o...... several M. modiolus habitats with deleterious impacts on ecosystem functioning. Post-impact recovery times are slow and dependent on both local and mega-population distributions...... and overall biology. Modiolus modiolus is a typical epibenthic, suspension-feeding mytilid, albeit with anatomical modifications adapting it to a partially buried, gregarious lifestyle in a stable environment experiencing medium–high energy levels. The juvenile shell is covered partly in byssal setae secreted...... and locality. With age (≥ 20–45 years), shells often become deformed, particularly posteriorly and around the byssal gape, thereby increasing reproductive capacity (gonadal volume) without increasing somatic growth. Information on the biology, reproductive strategy and life history traits of M. modiolus...

  1. Trailing (L5) Neptune Trojans: 2004 KV18 and 2008 LC18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Pu; Zhou Liyong; Li Jian

    2012-01-01

    The population of Neptune Trojans is believed to be bigger than that of Jupiter Trojans and that of asteroids in the main belt, although only eight members of this distant asteroid swarm have been observed up to now. Six leading Neptune Trojans around the Lagrange point L 4 discovered earlier have been studied in detail, but two trailing ones found recently around the L 5 point, 2004 KV18 and 2008 LC18, have not yet been investigated. We report our investigations on the dynamical behaviors of these two new Neptune Trojans. Our calculations show that the asteroid 2004 KV18 is a temporary Neptune Trojan. Most probably, it was captured into the trailing Trojan cloud no earlier than 2.03 × 10 5 yr ago, and it will not maintain this position later than 1.65 × 10 5 yr in the future. Based on the statistics from our orbital simulations, we argue that this object is more like a scattered Kuiper belt object. By contrast, the orbit of 2008 LC18 is much more stable. Among the clone orbits spreading within the orbital uncertainties, a considerable portion of clones may survive on the L 5 tadpole orbits for 4 Gyr. The strong dependence of the stability on the semimajor axis and resonant angle suggests that further observations are badly required to constrain the orbit in the stable region. We also discuss the implications of the existence and dynamics of these two trailing Trojans over the history of the solar system.

  2. Residues of diflubenzuron on horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) leaves and their efficacy against the horse chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejmanová, Jana; Cvacka, Josef; Hrdý, Ivan; Kuldová, Jelena; Mertelík, Josef; Muck, Alexander; Nesnerová, Petra; Svatos, Ales

    2006-03-01

    Residues of the insect growth regulator diflubenzuron were quantified on horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) leaves treated with a diflubenzuron 480 g litre(-1) SC, Dimilin. To analyse the samples, an analytical procedure was developed involving a simple extraction step followed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an octadecyl-modified silica column with methanol + 0.01 M ammonium acetate mobile phase. The results showed diflubenzuron to be highly stable on horse chestnut leaves; more than 4 months (127 days) after application, 38% (on average) of the insecticide still remained on/in the leaves. The data confirmed biological observations showing diflubenzuron's long-term efficacy against the horse chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella Deschka and Dimić, which is the most important pest of the horse chestnut in Europe. The hypothesis of possible penetration of diflubenzuron into the leaf mass is explored and discussed.

  3. Retrofitting Trojan Nuclear Plant's spent resin transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The spent resin slurry transport system at the Trojan Nuclear Plant operated by Portland General Electric Company is one of the most advanced systems of its type in the nuclear industry today. The new system affords the plant's operators safe remote sonic indication for spent resin and cover water levels, manual remote dewatering and watering capability to establish desirable resin-to-water volumetric ratios, reliable non-mechanical resin agitation utilizing fixed spargers, and controllable process flow utilizing a variable speed recessed impeller pump

  4. Trojan wavepackets in helium - by core-Rydberg interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinski, M.; Eberly, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors exhibit the existence of core-induced shape invariant wave packets in helium analogous to the Trojan wave packets predicted for hydrogen. They show that the core dipole moment oscillating with the Rabi frequency in the presence of a laser field will cause both radical and angular confinement of an outer Rydberg electron moving around a nearly circular orbit if the parameters of the orbit are properly chosen. They find the relation between the Rabi frequency of the core electron oscillations, laser field strength and the parameters of the Rydberg orbit of the outer electron

  5. True single-molecule DNA sequencing of a pleistocene horse bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2011-01-01

    -preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing...

  6. Xenophon on Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Cedilnik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Xenophon’s writings on horses, the paper begins with a partial account of his life prior to his decision to join Cyrus, and continues by outlining his attitude to horses, animals with whom he lived in close contact. Except for the period spent campaigning with Cyrus’ Greek mercenaries (401–400 BC, the life of Xenophon remains largely unknown, raising a number of still unanswered questions. While the final answers are probably going to remain obscure, it may be surmised – on the basis of his horse writings as well – that the author came from an affluent family. As an Athenian of substance, he would have been classified as a knight, and since the representatives of this class fought in the Athenian cavalry, it was this combat arm to which he would have belonged. There is no hard and fast evidence that he took an active part in the last years of the Peloponnesian War. However, his fairly detailed account of the Athenian developments following the peace treaty suggests that Xenophon remained in the city during the rule of the Thirty Tyrants, when many residents were obliged to leave, and, as a cavalry mem- ber, actively supported the regime to the end. In fact, Xenophon’s presentation of the contemporary events highlights the cavalry’s role to the extent that it appears to have played a crucial part in defending the city and regime. But despite the cavalry’s support of the Thirty, its members do not seem to have flocked out of Athens in the uncertain conditions which followed the fall of the Thirty and the restoration of democracy. Thus Xenophon’s decision to join Cyrus the Younger’s expedition may have been influenced not by his recent support of the Thirty alone, but also by reasons unknown today. While there is no solid proof of his closer association with horses prior to Cyrus’ expedition, Xenophon’s writing in the Anabasis leaves no doubt that he spent at least the greater part of the campaign on horseback. The

  7. Dynamical evolution of a fictitious population of binary Neptune Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, Adrián

    2018-03-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of a synthetic population of Binary Neptune Trojans, under the influence of the solar perturbations and tidal friction (the so-called Kozai cycles and tidal friction evolution). Our model includes the dynamical influence of the four giant planets on the heliocentric orbit of the binary centre of mass. In this paper, we explore the evolution of initially tight binaries around the Neptune L4 Lagrange point. We found that the variation of the heliocentric orbital elements due to the libration around the Lagrange point introduces significant changes in the orbital evolution of the binaries. Collisional processes would not play a significant role in the dynamical evolution of Neptune Trojans. After 4.5 × 109 yr of evolution, ˜50 per cent of the synthetic systems end up separated as single objects, most of them with slow diurnal rotation rate. The final orbital distribution of the surviving binary systems is statistically similar to the one found for Kuiper Belt Binaries when collisional evolution is not included in the model. Systems composed by a primary and a small satellite are more fragile than the ones composed by components of similar sizes.

  8. KIC 8462852: Will the Trojans return in 2021?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Fernando J.; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Fernandez-Soto, Alberto; Martínez, Vicent J.

    2018-01-01

    KIC 8462852 stood out among more than 100 000 stars in the Kepler catalogue because of the strange features of its light curve: a wide, asymmetric dimming taking up to 15 per cent of the light at D793 and a period of multiple, narrow dimmings happening approximately 700 d later. Several models have been proposed to account for this abnormal behaviour, most of which require either unlikely causes or a finely tuned timing. We aim at offering a relatively natural solution, invoking only phenomena that have been previously observed, although perhaps in larger or more massive versions. We model the system using a large, ringed body whose transit produces the first dimming and a swarm of Trojan objects sharing its orbit that causes the second period of multiple dimmings. The resulting orbital period is T ≈ 12 yr, with a semi-major axis a ≈ 6 au. Our model allows us to make two straightforward predictions: we expect the passage of a new swarm of Trojans in front of the star starting during the early months of 2021, and a new transit of the main object during the first half of 2023.

  9. THE PUZZLING MUTUAL ORBIT OF THE BINARY TROJAN ASTEROID (624) HEKTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchis, F.; Cuk, M. [Carl Sagan Center at the SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Durech, J. [Astronomical Institute, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Castillo-Rogez, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Vachier, F.; Berthier, J. [IMCCE-Obs de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Wong, M. H.; Kalas, P.; Duchene, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Van Dam, M. A. [Flat Wavefronts, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Hamanowa, H. [Hamanowa Observatory, Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1204 (Japan); Viikinkoski, M., E-mail: fmarchis@seti.org [Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-03-10

    Asteroids with satellites are natural laboratories to constrain the formation and evolution of our solar system. The binary Trojan asteroid (624) Hektor is the only known Trojan asteroid to possess a small satellite. Based on W. M. Keck adaptive optics observations, we found a unique and stable orbital solution, which is uncommon in comparison to the orbits of other large multiple asteroid systems studied so far. From lightcurve observations recorded since 1957, we showed that because the large Req = 125 km primary may be made of two joint lobes, the moon could be ejecta of the low-velocity encounter, which formed the system. The inferred density of Hektor's system is comparable to the L5 Trojan doublet (617) Patroclus but due to their difference in physical properties and in reflectance spectra, both captured Trojan asteroids could have a different composition and origin.

  10. THE PUZZLING MUTUAL ORBIT OF THE BINARY TROJAN ASTEROID (624) HEKTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchis, F.; Cuk, M.; Durech, J.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Vachier, F.; Berthier, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalas, P.; Duchene, G.; Van Dam, M. A.; Hamanowa, H.; Viikinkoski, M.

    2014-01-01

    Asteroids with satellites are natural laboratories to constrain the formation and evolution of our solar system. The binary Trojan asteroid (624) Hektor is the only known Trojan asteroid to possess a small satellite. Based on W. M. Keck adaptive optics observations, we found a unique and stable orbital solution, which is uncommon in comparison to the orbits of other large multiple asteroid systems studied so far. From lightcurve observations recorded since 1957, we showed that because the large Req = 125 km primary may be made of two joint lobes, the moon could be ejecta of the low-velocity encounter, which formed the system. The inferred density of Hektor's system is comparable to the L5 Trojan doublet (617) Patroclus but due to their difference in physical properties and in reflectance spectra, both captured Trojan asteroids could have a different composition and origin

  11. Annual Report for 2003 Wild Horse Research and Field Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason; Singer, Francis J.; Zeigenfuss, Linda C.

    2004-01-01

    As stated in the Wild Horse Fertility Control Field Trial Plan, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has an immediate need for a safe, effective contraceptive agent to assist in the management of the large number of wild horses on western rangelands. The BLM and the U.S. Geological Survey-Biological Resources Discipline (USGS/BRD) are testing the immunocontraceptive agent Porcine Zonae Pellucida (PZP) in field trials with three free-roaming herds of western wild horses. Extensive research has already been conducted on the safety, efficacy, and duration of PZP applications in both domestic and feral horses on eastern barrier islands and in some select trials I with wild horses in Nevada managed by the BLM. However, significant questions remain concerning the effects of I PZP application at the population level in the wild, as well as effects at the individual level on behavior, social structure, and harem dynamics of free-ranging animals. These questions are best answered with field trials on wild horse herds under a tight research protocol. The ultimate goal is to provide the BLM with the protocols and information necessary to begin using fertility control to regulate population growth rates in wild horse herds on a broader scale. Fertility control is intended to assist the conventional capture, removal, and adoption process as a I means of controlling excess numbers of wild horses and burros, and to greatly reduce the adoption costs and numbers of animals handled. Fertility control is not intended to totally replace the removal and adoption process.

  12. The origin of ambling horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutke, Saskia; Andersson, Leif; Benecke, Norbert; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson; Gonzalez, Javier; Hallsson, Jón Hallsteinn; Lõugas, Lembi; Magnell, Ola; Morales-Muniz, Arturo; Orlando, Ludovic; Pálsdóttir, Albína Hulda; Reissmann, Monika; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Mariana B; Ruttkay, Matej; Trinks, Alexandra; Hofreiter, Michael; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-08-08

    Horseback riding is the most fundamental use of domestic horses and has had a huge influence on the development of human societies for millennia. Over time, riding techniques and the style of riding improved. Therefore, horses with the ability to perform comfortable gaits (e.g. ambling or pacing), so-called 'gaited' horses, have been highly valued by humans, especially for long distance travel. Recently, the causative mutation for gaitedness in horses has been linked to a substitution causing a premature stop codon in the DMRT3 gene (DMRT3_Ser301STOP) [1]. In mice, Dmrt3 is expressed in spinal cord interneurons and plays an important role in the development of limb movement coordination [1]. Genotyping the position in 4396 modern horses from 141 breeds revealed that nowadays the mutated allele is distributed worldwide with an especially high frequency in gaited horses and breeds used for harness racing [2]. Here, we examine historic horse remains for the DMRT3 SNP, tracking the origin of gaitedness to Medieval England between 850 and 900 AD. The presence of the corresponding allele in Icelandic horses (9(th)-11(th) century) strongly suggests that ambling horses were brought from the British Isles to Iceland by Norse people. Considering the high frequency of the ambling allele in early Icelandic horses, we believe that Norse settlers selected for this comfortable mode of horse riding soon after arrival. The absence of the allele in samples from continental Europe (including Scandinavia) at this time implies that ambling horses may have spread from Iceland and maybe also the British Isles across the continent at a later date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of the avian Trojan gene family reveals contrasting evolutionary constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Petrov

    Full Text Available "Trojan" is a leukocyte-specific, cell surface protein originally identified in the chicken. Its molecular function has been hypothesized to be related to anti-apoptosis and the proliferation of immune cells. The Trojan gene has been localized onto the Z sex chromosome. The adjacent two genes also show significant homology to Trojan, suggesting the existence of a novel gene/protein family. Here, we characterize this Trojan family, identify homologues in other species and predict evolutionary constraints on these genes. The two Trojan-related proteins in chicken were predicted as a receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase and a transmembrane protein, bearing a cytoplasmic immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif. We identified the Trojan gene family in ten other bird species and found related genes in three reptiles and a fish species. The phylogenetic analysis of the homologues revealed a gradual diversification among the family members. Evolutionary analyzes of the avian genes predicted that the extracellular regions of the proteins have been subjected to positive selection. Such selection was possibly a response to evolving interacting partners or to pathogen challenges. We also observed an almost complete lack of intracellular positively selected sites, suggesting a conserved signaling mechanism of the molecules. Therefore, the contrasting patterns of selection likely correlate with the interaction and signaling potential of the molecules.

  14. The differing magnitude distributions of the two Jupiter Trojan color populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Emery, Joshua P., E-mail: iwong@caltech.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Jupiter Trojans are a significant population of minor bodies in the middle solar system that have garnered substantial interest in recent years. Several spectroscopic studies of these objects have revealed notable bimodalities with respect to near-infrared spectra, infrared albedo, and color, which suggest the existence of two distinct groups among the Trojan population. In this paper, we analyze the magnitude distributions of these two groups, which we refer to as the red and less red color populations. By compiling spectral and photometric data from several previous works, we show that the observed bimodalities are self-consistent and categorize 221 of the 842 Trojans with absolute magnitudes in the range H<12.3 into the two color populations. We demonstrate that the magnitude distributions of the two color populations are distinct to a high confidence level (>95%) and fit them individually to a broken power law, with special attention given to evaluating and correcting for incompleteness in the Trojan catalog as well as incompleteness in our categorization of objects. A comparison of the best-fit curves shows that the faint-end power-law slopes are markedly different for the two color populations, which indicates that the red and less red Trojans likely formed in different locations. We propose a few hypotheses for the origin and evolution of the Trojan population based on the analyzed data.

  15. System-level protection and hardware Trojan detection using weighted voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hany A M; Alkabani, Yousra; Selim, Gamal M I

    2014-07-01

    The problem of hardware Trojans is becoming more serious especially with the widespread of fabless design houses and design reuse. Hardware Trojans can be embedded on chip during manufacturing or in third party intellectual property cores (IPs) during the design process. Recent research is performed to detect Trojans embedded at manufacturing time by comparing the suspected chip with a golden chip that is fully trusted. However, Trojan detection in third party IP cores is more challenging than other logic modules especially that there is no golden chip. This paper proposes a new methodology to detect/prevent hardware Trojans in third party IP cores. The method works by gradually building trust in suspected IP cores by comparing the outputs of different untrusted implementations of the same IP core. Simulation results show that our method achieves higher probability of Trojan detection over a naive implementation of simple voting on the output of different IP cores. In addition, experimental results show that the proposed method requires less hardware overhead when compared with a simple voting technique achieving the same degree of security.

  16. A NEAR-INFRARED SEARCH FOR SILICATES IN JOVIAN TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bin; Jewitt, David

    2011-01-01

    We obtained near-infrared (NIR; 0.8-2.5 μm) spectra of seven Jovian Trojan asteroids that have been formerly reported to show silicate-like absorption features near 1 μm. Our sample includes the Trojan (1172) Aneas, which is one of the three Trojans known to possess a comet-like 10 μm emission feature, indicative of fine-grained silicates. Our observations show that all seven Trojans appear featureless in high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. The simultaneous absence of the 1 μm band and the presence of the 10 μm emission can be understood if the silicates on (1172) Aneas are iron-poor. In addition, we present NIR observations of five optically gray Trojans, including three objects from the collisionally produced Eurybates family. The five gray Trojans appear featureless in the NIR with no diagnostic absorption features. The NIR spectrum of Eurybates can be best fitted with the spectrum of a CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, which hints that the C-type Eurybates family members may have experienced aqueous alteration.

  17. Characterization of the avian Trojan gene family reveals contrasting evolutionary constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar; Syrjänen, Riikka; Smith, Jacqueline; Gutowska, Maria Weronika; Uchida, Tatsuya; Vainio, Olli; Burt, David W

    2015-01-01

    "Trojan" is a leukocyte-specific, cell surface protein originally identified in the chicken. Its molecular function has been hypothesized to be related to anti-apoptosis and the proliferation of immune cells. The Trojan gene has been localized onto the Z sex chromosome. The adjacent two genes also show significant homology to Trojan, suggesting the existence of a novel gene/protein family. Here, we characterize this Trojan family, identify homologues in other species and predict evolutionary constraints on these genes. The two Trojan-related proteins in chicken were predicted as a receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase and a transmembrane protein, bearing a cytoplasmic immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif. We identified the Trojan gene family in ten other bird species and found related genes in three reptiles and a fish species. The phylogenetic analysis of the homologues revealed a gradual diversification among the family members. Evolutionary analyzes of the avian genes predicted that the extracellular regions of the proteins have been subjected to positive selection. Such selection was possibly a response to evolving interacting partners or to pathogen challenges. We also observed an almost complete lack of intracellular positively selected sites, suggesting a conserved signaling mechanism of the molecules. Therefore, the contrasting patterns of selection likely correlate with the interaction and signaling potential of the molecules.

  18. System-level protection and hardware Trojan detection using weighted voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A.M. Amin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of hardware Trojans is becoming more serious especially with the widespread of fabless design houses and design reuse. Hardware Trojans can be embedded on chip during manufacturing or in third party intellectual property cores (IPs during the design process. Recent research is performed to detect Trojans embedded at manufacturing time by comparing the suspected chip with a golden chip that is fully trusted. However, Trojan detection in third party IP cores is more challenging than other logic modules especially that there is no golden chip. This paper proposes a new methodology to detect/prevent hardware Trojans in third party IP cores. The method works by gradually building trust in suspected IP cores by comparing the outputs of different untrusted implementations of the same IP core. Simulation results show that our method achieves higher probability of Trojan detection over a naive implementation of simple voting on the output of different IP cores. In addition, experimental results show that the proposed method requires less hardware overhead when compared with a simple voting technique achieving the same degree of security.

  19. Population control of Martian Trojans by the Yarkovsky & YORP effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Apostolos; Borisov, Galin; Jacobson, Seth A.; Colas, Francois; dell'Oro, Aldo; Cellino, Alberto; Bagnulo, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Mars is the only terrestrial planet supporting a stable population of Trojan asteroids. One, (5261) Eureka, has a family of smaller asteroids of similar composition (Borisov et al, 2017; Polishook et al, 2017) that likely separated from Eureka within the last 1 Gyr (Ćuk et al, 2015). Two other Trojans, (101429) 1998 VF31 and (121514) 1999 UJ7, of similar size and on similar orbits to Eureka, are not associated with families of asteroids, begging the question of what makes Eureka special.The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect may have formed the Eureka family (Christou, 2013; Ćuk et al, 2015) by the spinning off of ``YORPlets’’, a mechanism also responsible for close orbital pairs of small Main Belt asteroids (Pravec et al, 2010). Eureka’s fast rotation rate (P=2.69 hr; Koehn et al, 2014), right at the so-called ``spin barrier’’ (Warner et al, 2009), apparently supports this.We obtained photometry of 101429 and 121514 to find out their rotation periods. We find an unusually long, ˜50 hr period for 121514; the asteroid may be in a ``tumbling’’ rotational state that inhibits YOPRlet production. On the other hand, the faster (P=7.7 hr) rotation we obtain for 101429 does not preclude it from having been spun up to the rotational fission limit during the most recent 10s of Myr.Instead, 101429’s location near a secular resonance (Scholl et al, 2005) may lead to rapid loss of any YORPlet asteroids. Indeed, test particles started at 101429’s orbit and evolving under the Yarkovsky effect escape within a few hundred Myr, several times faster than particles started near Eureka. We conclude that the stability enjoyed by asteroids in Eureka’s orbital vicinity, combined with the ability to readily populate that vicinity with new asteroids, are likely responsible for Eureka’s status as the only Martian Trojan with a family.

  20. Welfare in horse breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, M.L.H.; Sandøe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    and identifies areas in which data is lacking. We suggest that all methods of horse breeding are associated with potential welfare problems, but also that the judicious use of ARTs can sometimes help to address those problems. We discuss how negative welfare effects could be identified and limited and how...... positive welfare effects associated with breeding might be maximised. Further studies are needed to establish an evidence base about how stressful or painful various breeding procedures are for the animals involved, and what the lifetime welfare implications of ARTs are for future animal generations....

  1. AHP 47: RAG DRUG: A FAITHFUL HORSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lcags so lhun 'grub ལྕགས་སོ་ལྷུན་འགྲུབ། (Klu sgrub ཀླུ་སྒྲུབ།

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available My family had three horses in 2016, but when I was about five years old (2006 we had seven horses. Over time, we sold four horses to people living in other communities. We do not want to sell horses to Chinese and Muslim businessmen because Father says, "They take the horses directly to big slaughterhouses and kill them." Instead, we prefer to sell our livestock, including sheep, yaks, and goats to Tibetans, even though the payment is less. ...

  2. Morphological evolution of the Haflinger horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasquini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Haflinger horse has certainly a lot of success, considering its popularity not only in its native region, South Tyrol, but also worldwide. Therefore, for its preservation and mainly for a larger diffusion of these horses, Haflinger horse’ breeders thought it could be useful to change, with an appropriated selection, the functional type, originally a pack-horse and a horse for agricultural work, into a saddle horse for riding purpose (Pagnacco, 1994...

  3. Morphological evolution of the Haflinger horse

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pasquini; S. Rizzi; A. Falaschini

    2011-01-01

    The Haflinger horse has certainly a lot of success, considering its popularity not only in its native region, South Tyrol, but also worldwide. Therefore, for its preservation and mainly for a larger diffusion of these horses, Haflinger horse’ breeders thought it could be useful to change, with an appropriated selection, the functional type, originally a pack-horse and a horse for agricultural work, into a saddle horse for riding purpose (Pagnacco, 1994)...

  4. Quantitative heartbeat coupling measures in human-horse interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Valenza, Gaetano; Baragli, Paolo; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2016-08-01

    We present a study focused on a quantitative estimation of a human-horse dynamic interaction. A set of measures based on magnitude and phase coupling between heartbeat dynamics of both humans and horses in three different conditions is reported: no interaction, visual/olfactory interaction and grooming. Specifically, Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC), Mean Phase Coherence (MPC) and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) have been used as estimators of the amount of coupling between human and horse through the analysis of their heart rate variability (HRV) time series in a group of eleven human subjects, and one horse. The rationale behind this study is that the interaction of two complex biological systems go towards a coupling process whose dynamical evolution is modulated by the kind and time duration of the interaction itself. We achieved a congruent and consistent statistical significant difference for all of the three indices. Moreover, a Nearest Mean Classifier was able to recognize the three classes of interaction with an accuracy greater than 70%. Although preliminary, these encouraging results allow a discrimination of three distinct phases in a real human-animal interaction opening to the characterization of the empirically proven relationship between human and horse.

  5. Lightcurve Analysis of L5 Trojan Asteroids at the Center for Solar System Studies 2017 September to December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.

    2018-04-01

    Lightcurves for four Jovian Trojan asteroids were obtained at the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3) from 2017 September to December. From observations in 2016 June, 2759 Idomeneus was found to be another candidate for the special case of very wide binaries. This would be the fifth confirmed Jovian Trojan binary asteroid.

  6. Color Variation on the Surfaces of Jupiter’s Greek and Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph; Trilling, David E.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2017-10-01

    The L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter are populated with thousands of known, and possibly hundreds of thousands of unknown, Greek and Trojan Asteroids. Understanding the environmental and weathering conditions experienced by these objects over their lifetimes could constrain formation models for the Solar System. In an effort to shine some light on this issue, we have collected partial, simultaneous, lightcurves in both Johnson-Cousins V and I filters for a dozen large Jupiter Trojans. We found significant signs of color variation over the surfaces of four of these objects, and more subtle signs on an additional four. The most convincing examples of variation occur on (4709) Ennomos and (4833) Meges. Such a variation in color with rotation likely implies a large surface feature such as a recent crater. That such a high fraction of observed Trojans display these signatures could imply a more active collisional history for Jupiter Trojans than previously thought. It is therefore likely that one or more of the targets for the Lucy mission will have experienced a large, relatively recent, cratering event. This may help us obtain a much more in-depth understanding of the evolutionary processes ongoing for the Jupiter Trojan populations.

  7. Horse Shampoo for Human Hair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac Anca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lately, a new idea has caught the attention of young people of both genders, being debated in consultation rooms, during classes, and especially on social media: is using horse shampoo for human hair wrong or not?

  8. BINARY CANDIDATES IN THE JOVIAN TROJAN AND HILDA POPULATIONS FROM NEOWISE LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnett, S.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T., E-mail: Sarah.Sonnett@jpl.nasa.gov [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Determining the binary fraction for a population of asteroids, particularly as a function of separation between the two components, helps describe the dynamical environment at the time the binaries formed, which in turn offers constraints on the dynamical evolution of the solar system. We searched the NEOWISE archival data set for close and contact binary Trojans and Hildas via their diagnostically large light curve amplitudes. We present 48 out of 554 Hilda and 34 out of 953 Trojan binary candidates in need of follow-up to confirm their large light curve amplitudes and subsequently constrain the binary orbit and component sizes. From these candidates, we calculate a preliminary estimate of the binary fraction without confirmation or debiasing of 14%-23% for Trojans larger than ∼12 km and 30%-51% for Hildas larger than ∼4 km. Once the binary candidates have been confirmed, it should be possible to infer the underlying, debiased binary fraction through estimation of survey biases.

  9. On the construction of the Kolmogorov normal form for the Trojan asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Gabern, F; Locatelli, U

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the stability of the Trojan asteroids for the planar Restricted Three-Body Problem (RTBP), by extending the usual techniques for the neighbourhood of an elliptic point to derive results in a larger vicinity. Our approach is based on the numerical determination of the frequencies of the asteroid and the effective computation of the Kolmogorov normal form for the corresponding torus. This procedure has been applied to the first 34 Trojan asteroids of the IAU Asteroid Catalog, and it has worked successfully for 23 of them. The construction of this normal form allows for computer-assisted proofs of stability. To show it, we have implemented a proof of existence of families of invariant tori close to a given asteroid, for a high order expansion of the Hamiltonian. This proof has been successfully applied to three Trojan asteroids.

  10. Effects of ozonated autohemotherapy on the antioxidant capacity of Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Nao; Endo, Yoshiro; Kikkawa, Lisa; Korosue, Kenji; Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Kitauchi, Akira; Katamoto, Hiromu; Hidaka, Yuichi; Hagio, Mitsuyoshi; Torisu, Shidow

    2016-01-01

    The performance of horses undergoing regular intense exercise is adversely affected by oxidative stress. Thus, it is important to increase antioxidant production in horses in order to reduce oxidative stress. Ozonated autohemotherapy (OAHT) reportedly promotes antioxidant production. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of OAHT on antioxidant capacity. Ten Thoroughbred horses were used in this study. After the OAHT, we collected serum samples and measured biological antioxidant potential (BAP). We found that BAP began to increase after the OAHT and was significantly higher in the OAHT group than at 3 (Phorses.

  11. THE 3–4  μ m SPECTRA OF JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. E., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    To date, reflectance spectra of Jupiter Trojan asteroids have revealed no distinctive absorption features. For this reason, the surface composition of these objects remains a subject of speculation. Spectra have revealed, however, that the Jupiter Trojan asteroids consist of two distinct sub-populations that differ in the optical to near-infrared colors. The origins and compositional differences between the two sub-populations remain unclear. Here, we report the results from a 2.2–3.8 μ m spectral survey of a collection of 16 Jupiter Trojan asteroids, divided equally between the two sub-populations. We find clear spectral absorption features centered around 3.1 μ m in the less-red population. Additional absorption consistent with that expected from organic materials might also be present. No such features are see in the red population. A strong correlation exists between the strength of the 3.1 μ m absorption feature and the optical to near-infrared color of the objects. While, traditionally, absorptions such as these in dark asteroids are modeled as being due to fine-grain water frost, we find it physically implausible that the special circumstances required to create such fine-grained frost would exist on a substantial fraction of the Jupiter Trojan asteroids. We suggest, instead, that the 3.1 μ m absorption on Trojans and other dark asteroids could be due to N–H stretch features. Additionally, we point out that reflectivities derived from WISE observations show a strong absorption beyond 4 μ m for both populations. The continuum of 3.1 μ m features and the common absorption beyond 4 μ m might suggest that both sub-populations of Jupiter Trojan asteroids formed in the same general region of the early solar system.

  12. THE 3–4  μ m SPECTRA OF JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    To date, reflectance spectra of Jupiter Trojan asteroids have revealed no distinctive absorption features. For this reason, the surface composition of these objects remains a subject of speculation. Spectra have revealed, however, that the Jupiter Trojan asteroids consist of two distinct sub-populations that differ in the optical to near-infrared colors. The origins and compositional differences between the two sub-populations remain unclear. Here, we report the results from a 2.2–3.8 μ m spectral survey of a collection of 16 Jupiter Trojan asteroids, divided equally between the two sub-populations. We find clear spectral absorption features centered around 3.1 μ m in the less-red population. Additional absorption consistent with that expected from organic materials might also be present. No such features are see in the red population. A strong correlation exists between the strength of the 3.1 μ m absorption feature and the optical to near-infrared color of the objects. While, traditionally, absorptions such as these in dark asteroids are modeled as being due to fine-grain water frost, we find it physically implausible that the special circumstances required to create such fine-grained frost would exist on a substantial fraction of the Jupiter Trojan asteroids. We suggest, instead, that the 3.1 μ m absorption on Trojans and other dark asteroids could be due to N–H stretch features. Additionally, we point out that reflectivities derived from WISE observations show a strong absorption beyond 4 μ m for both populations. The continuum of 3.1 μ m features and the common absorption beyond 4 μ m might suggest that both sub-populations of Jupiter Trojan asteroids formed in the same general region of the early solar system.

  13. Hektor - an exceptional D-type family among Jovian Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozehnal, J.; Brož, M.; Nesvorný, D.; Durda, D. D.; Walsh, K.; Richardson, D. C.; Asphaug, E.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we analyse Jovian Trojans in the space of suitable resonant elements and we identify clusters of possible collisional origin by two independent methods: the hierarchical clustering and a so-called randombox. Compared to our previous work, we study a twice larger sample. Apart from Eurybates, Ennomos and 1996 RJ families, we have found three more clusters - namely families around asteroids (20961) Arkesilaos, (624) Hektor in the L4 libration zone and (247341) 2001 UV209 in L5. The families fulfill our stringent criteria, I.e. a high statistical significance, an albedo homogeneity and a steeper size-frequency distribution than that of background. In order to understand their nature, we simulate their long term collisional evolution with the Boulder code and dynamical evolution using a modified SWIFT integrator. Within the framework of our evolutionary model, we were able to constrain the age of the Hektor family to be either 1-4 Gyr or, less likely, 0.1-2.5 Gyr, depending on initial impact geometry. Since (624) Hektor itself seems to be a bilobed-shape body with a satellite, I.e. an exceptional object, we address its association with the D-type family and we demonstrate that the moon and family could be created during a single impact event. We simulated the cratering event using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This is also the first case of a family associated with a D-type parent body.

  14. Horse domestication and conservation genetics of Przewalski's horse inferred from sex chromosomal and autosomal sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Allison N; Peng, Lei; Goto, Hiroki; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver A; Makova, Kateryna D

    2009-01-01

    Despite their ability to interbreed and produce fertile offspring, there is continued disagreement about the genetic relationship of the domestic horse (Equus caballus) to its endangered wild relative, Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalskii). Analyses have differed as to whether or not Przewalski's horse is placed phylogenetically as a separate sister group to domestic horses. Because Przewalski's horse and domestic horse are so closely related, genetic data can also be used to infer domestication-specific differences between the two. To investigate the genetic relationship of Przewalski's horse to the domestic horse and to address whether evolution of the domestic horse is driven by males or females, five homologous introns (a total of approximately 3 kb) were sequenced on the X and Y chromosomes in two Przewalski's horses and three breeds of domestic horses: Arabian horse, Mongolian domestic horse, and Dartmoor pony. Five autosomal introns (a total of approximately 6 kb) were sequenced for these horses as well. The sequences of sex chromosomal and autosomal introns were used to determine nucleotide diversity and the forces driving evolution in these species. As a result, X chromosomal and autosomal data do not place Przewalski's horses in a separate clade within phylogenetic trees for horses, suggesting a close relationship between domestic and Przewalski's horses. It was also found that there was a lack of nucleotide diversity on the Y chromosome and higher nucleotide diversity than expected on the X chromosome in domestic horses as compared with the Y chromosome and autosomes. This supports the hypothesis that very few male horses along with numerous female horses founded the various domestic horse breeds. Patterns of nucleotide diversity among different types of chromosomes were distinct for Przewalski's in contrast to domestic horses, supporting unique evolutionary histories of the two species.

  15. The earliest horse harnessing and milking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Alan K; Stear, Natalie A; Bendrey, Robin; Olsen, Sandra; Kasparov, Alexei; Zaibert, Victor; Thorpe, Nick; Evershed, Richard P

    2009-03-06

    Horse domestication revolutionized transport, communications, and warfare in prehistory, yet the identification of early domestication processes has been problematic. Here, we present three independent lines of evidence demonstrating domestication in the Eneolithic Botai Culture of Kazakhstan, dating to about 3500 B.C.E. Metrical analysis of horse metacarpals shows that Botai horses resemble Bronze Age domestic horses rather than Paleolithic wild horses from the same region. Pathological characteristics indicate that some Botai horses were bridled, perhaps ridden. Organic residue analysis, using delta13C and deltaD values of fatty acids, reveals processing of mare's milk and carcass products in ceramics, indicating a developed domestic economy encompassing secondary products.

  16. Comet nuclei and Trojan asteroids - A new link and a possible mechanism for comet splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, W.K.; Tholen, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Relatively elongated shapes, implied by recent evidence of a greater incidence of high amplitude lightcurves for comet nuclei and Trojan asteroids than for similarly scaled main belt asteroids, are suggested to have evolved among comet nuclei and Trojans due to volatile loss. It is further suggested that such an evolutionary course may account for observed comet splitting; rotational splitting may specifically occur as a result of evolution in the direction of an elongated shape through sublimation. Supporting these hypotheses, the few m/sec separation velocities projected for rotationally splitting elongated nuclei are precisely in the observed range. 40 refs

  17. Trial application of reliability technology to emergency diesel generators at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.M.; Boccio, J.L.; Karimian, S.; Azarm, M.A.; Carbonaro, J.; DeMoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a trial application of reliability technology to the emergency diesel generator system at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant is presented. An approach for formulating a reliability program plan for this system is being developed. The trial application has shown that a reliability program process, using risk- and reliability-based techniques, can be interwoven into current plant operational activities to help in controlling, analyzing, and predicting faults that can challenge safety systems. With the cooperation of the utility, Portland General Electric Co., this reliability program can eventually be implemented at Trojan to track its effectiveness

  18. Treating insect-bite hypersensitivity in horses with active vaccination against IL-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettelschoss-Gabriel, Antonia; Fettelschoss, Victoria; Thoms, Franziska; Giese, Christoph; Daniel, Michelle; Olomski, Florian; Kamarachev, Jivko; Birkmann, Katharina; Bühler, Maya; Kummer, Martin; Zeltins, Andris; Marti, Eliane; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2018-03-28

    Insect-bite hypersensitivity is the most common allergic dermatitis in horses. Excoriated skin lesions are typical symptoms of this seasonal and refractory chronic disease. On a cellular level, the skin lesions are characterized by massive eosinophil infiltration caused by an underlying allergic response. To target these cells and treat disease, we developed a therapeutic vaccine against equine IL-5 (eIL-5), the master regulator of eosinophils. The vaccine consisted of eIL-5 covalently linked to a virus-like particle derived from cucumber mosaic virus containing the tetanus toxoid universal T-cell epitope tt830-843 (CMV TT ). Thirty-four Icelandic horses were recruited and immunized with 400 μg of eIL-5-CMV TT formulated in PBS without adjuvant (19 horses) or PBS alone (15 horses). The vaccine was well tolerated and did not reveal any safety concerns but was able to induce anti-eIL-5 autoantibody titers in 17 of 19 horses. This resulted in a statistically significant reduction in clinical lesion scores when compared with previous season levels, as well as levels in placebo-treated horses. Protection required a minimal threshold of anti-eIL-5 antibodies. Clinical improvement by disease scoring showed that 47% and 21% of vaccinated horses reached 50% and 75% improvement, respectively. In the placebo group no horse reached 75% improvement, and only 13% reached 50% improvement. Our therapeutic vaccine inducing autoantibodies against self IL-5 brings biologics to horses, is the first successful immunotherapeutic approach targeting a chronic disease in horses, and might facilitate development of a similar vaccine against IL-5 in human subjects. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Malware Memory Analysis for Non-specialists: Investigating Publicly Available Memory Image for the Tigger Trojan Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    help to current and ongoing investigations, as opposed to relying entirely on a few select expert software reverse engineers. ii DRDC-RDDC...utilitaires de récupération de données et des logiciels antivirus . Volatility est un cadriciel populaire et évolutif à code source ouvert pour l’analyse...184H2 20H1.7 Detailed list of software tools used

  20. Albumin as a "Trojan Horse" for polymeric nanoconjugate transendothelial transport across tumor vasculatures for improved cancer targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Cai, Kaimin; Yang, Xujuan; Yin, Lichen; Zhang, Yanfeng; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Helferich, William G; Fan, Timothy M; Cheng, Jianjun

    2018-05-01

    Although polymeric nanoconjugates (NCs) hold great promise for the treatment of cancer patients, their clinical utility has been hindered by the lack of efficient delivery of therapeutics to targeted tumor sites. Here, we describe an albumin-functionalized polymeric NC (Alb-NC) capable of crossing the endothelium barrier through a caveolae-mediated transcytosis pathway to better target cancer. The Alb-NC is prepared by nanoprecipitation of doxorubicin (Doxo) conjugates of poly(phenyl O-carboxyanhydrides) bearing aromatic albumin-binding domains followed by subsequent surface decoration of albumin. The administration of Alb-NCs into mice bearing MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts with limited tumor vascular permeability resulted in markedly increased tumor accumulation and anti-tumor efficacy compared to their conventional counterpart PEGylated NCs (PEG-NCs). The Alb-NC provides a simple, low-cost and broadly applicable strategy to improve the cancer targeting efficiency and therapeutic effectiveness of polymeric nanomedicine.

  1. 2009 Carolyn Wood Sherif Award Address: Riding Trojan Horses from Symbolism to Structural Change--In Feminist Psychology, Context Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Beverly

    2010-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the historical 2008 presidential election, I discuss the ways that the election of marginalized group members to public office can be used to silence the discourse on the social marginalization of group members and to remove these analyses from their appropriate context. I emphasize the need to materialize alternatives to…

  2. Policy Reforms, Trojan Horses, and Imaginary Friends: The Role of External Stakeholders in Internal Quality Assurance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria João; Teixeira, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The governance of higher education has been changing across Europe, most notably in response to the reform agenda that has been pervading many higher education systems. This wave of reforms has given enhanced visibility to external stakeholders, which has been often received with contrasting views. Some regarded it as a factor that would undermine…

  3. The Trojan Horse Method application on the 10B(p,α0)7Be reaction cross section measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetinović, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Spartá, R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Puglia, S. M.; La Cognata, M.; Cherubini, S.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    The 10B(p,α0)7Be reaction cross section has been measured in an wide energy range from 2.2 MeV down to 3 keV in a single experiment applying THM. Optimized experimental set-up ensured good energy resolution leading to a good separation of α0 and α1 contributions to the cross section coming from the 7Be ground and first excited state, respectively.

  4. Arts-Based Research: Trojan Horses and Shibboleths. The Liabilities of a Hybrid Research Approach. "What Hath Eisner Wrought?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David

    2009-01-01

    The term "arts-based research" has been debated for some time now. In an article strongly in favor of this approach Bean (2007) identifies three species: "Research on the arts (italics in the original) (art history, visual and cultural studies, media studies etc.)...Research for the arts, refers to research into applied techniques, materials and…

  5. Extremism and Neo-Liberal Education Policy: A Contextual Critique of the Trojan Horse Affair in Birmingham Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers new insights into the effects of neo-liberal education policies on some Muslim majority schools in Birmingham. It critically reveals how the implementation of neo-liberal education policies, pursued by both Labour and Conservative Governments, has contributed to the failure of some mechanisms of school leadership and governance.…

  6. Delivery of Nano-Tethered Therapies to Brain Metastases of Primary Breast Cancer Using a Cellular Trojan Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    empirical method was developed to simulate photon transport in tissue based on the acquired medical images of an individual patient (CT and MRI ) with... MRI , etc. In the current work we have developed a fast voxel based empirical approach which can estimate photon fluence in the brain and evaluate...These tools provide the capability to develop and optimize treatment plans for optimal release of pharmaceuticals to metastatic breast cancer in the

  7. Balancing the principles: why the universality of human rights is not the Trojan horse of moral imperialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semplici, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the 'global' level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the basis for the most relevant international declarations and documents, is not exempt from the charge. However, the refusal of a top-down conception of the universal as a sort of product for exportation should not be confused with a relativistic landscape, where all the cows can be indifferently black or white. This contribution aims at outlining an approach, which reconciles universalism as enshrined in founding human rights declarations with respect for cultural diversity. In order to do so, two conceptual frameworks are discussed: the 'tool-kit' model and the morals/ethics difference. The example of the right to quality health care confirms the argument that striking a balance between cherishing pluralism and defending some fundamental rights and obligations does not amount to an assertion of moral imperialism.

  8. Transpalpebral eye enucleation in the standing horse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mogens Teken

    Transpalpebral eye enucleation in the standing horse. The Nordic Equine Veterinary Conference, Proceedings, Copenhagen. Denmark. Nov. 2011.......Transpalpebral eye enucleation in the standing horse. The Nordic Equine Veterinary Conference, Proceedings, Copenhagen. Denmark. Nov. 2011....

  9. Four Legged Healers: Horse Culture as Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Plume, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    For tribal communities to overcome the health disparities that plague them, they need to honor Indigenous healthcare paradigms. The Horse Nation Initiative at Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College embraces the people's historical connection to the horse as an avenue to wellness.

  10. Horse Husbandry and Preventive Health Practices in Australia: An Online Survey of Horse Guardians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirrilly R; Clarkson, Larissa; Riley, Christopher B; van den Berg, Mariette

    2018-02-08

    Little is known about the horse health management practices of Australian horse caregivers (owners). This article presents findings from a convenience sample of 505 horse owners who participated in an online survey. No large-scale welfare issues were identified, but there were some areas of potential concern, including owners who did not regularly deworm their horses (4%), a lack of strategic parasite control (3.1%), and a lack of regular dental care (11%). Several participants did not have their horse's hooves regularly shod or trimmed (2%), and 14% had an unqualified person maintain their horse's hooves. One in five owners (19%) did not vaccinate their horses against tetanus. The findings are discussed in relation to current Australian horse health guidelines and traditional sources of horse health information, together with recommendations for providing horse owners with relevant information in relevant forms.

  11. Periorbital skull fractures in five horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, J.P.; Barber, S.M.; Bailey, J.V.; Fretz, P.B.; Pharr, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Periorbital skull fractures were diagnosed in 5 horses, and were associated with ophthalmic complications including corneal ulceration, uveitis, and entrapment of the eye by retrobulbar bone fragments. Physical examination was of greater diagnostic use than radiography. Surgical repair was performed on all horses and was associated with a more favorable postoperative appearance in horses treated acutely; however, the cosmetic results were considered acceptable in all horses. Major postoperative complications were not observed

  12. The Trojan war dated by two solar eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Goran

    The Trojan War was very significant for the ancient Greeks and they dated historical events according to the number of years after the fall of Troy. However, there was already in antiquity no consensus as to the exact date of the war when compared with different epochs. Even after the modern discovery of the ancient city, there has been disagreement among different excavators as to which layer corresponds to the city mentioned in the Iliad attributed to Homer. In this paper an attempt is made to identify the strange obscuration of the sun that occurred during the final battle of the Iliad as a total solar eclipse close to the southern border of the zone of totality. There exists only one solar eclipse that corresponds to the description in the text and this is the total solar eclipse of June 11, in 1312 BC. When I first presented this date in 1986, there was a difference of about 60 years compared with the most common archaeological dating at that time. My date is now fully supported by the latest results from the German-American excavation that identifies the fall of Homer's Troy with the destruction of the archaeological layer Troy VIh, dated to about 1300 BC. Further independent support is provided by another solar eclipse that dates the reign of the Hittite king Muwatalli II. This king wrote a letter to king Alaksandu in Wilusa, identified as the Hittite name for Ilios, the most frequently used name for Troy in the Iliad. Alexander was another name for Paris who abducted Helen, the crime that resulted in the war. Muwatalli II was king 1315-1297 BC, according to the chronology for the Hittite Kingdom based on a solar eclipse in 1335 BC, during the tenth year of King Mursili II (1345- 1315 BC), the father of Muwatalli II.

  13. Paediatric horse-related trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Jane E; Theodore, Sigrid G; Stockton, Kellie A; Kimble, Roy M

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective cohort study reported on the epidemiology of horse-related injuries for patients presenting to the only tertiary paediatric trauma hospital in Queensland. The secondary outcome was to examine the use of helmets and adult supervision. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was examined in relation to helmet use. Morbidity and mortality were also recorded. Included were all patients presenting with any horse-related trauma to the Royal Children's Hospital in Brisbane from January 2008 to August 2014. Data were retrospectively collected on patient demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), mechanism of injury (MOI), safety precautions taken, diagnoses and surgical procedures performed. Included in the analysis were 187 incidents involving 171 patients. Most patients were aged 12-14 years (36.9%) and female (84.5%). The most common MOI were falls while riding horses (97.1%). Mild TBI (24.6%) and upper limb fractures (20.9%) were common injuries sustained. Patients who wore helmets had significantly reduced hospital LOS and severity of TBI when compared with those who did not wear helmets (P horses, in addition to being a compulsory requirement whilst horse riding. Prompts in documentation may assist doctors to record the use of safety attire and adult supervision. This will allow future studies to further investigate these factors in relation to clinical outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R.; Parshad, Rana; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May M.

    2013-01-01

    of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped

  15. Rotation Frequencies of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; James, David J.; Coley, Daniel; Connour, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half the 131 objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015).A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004).Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  16. The upcoming mutual event season for the Patroclus-Menoetius Trojan binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.; Buie, M. W.; Levison, H. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based Keck observations and new Keplerian orbit solutions for the mutual orbit of binary Jupiter Trojan asteroid (617) Patroclus and Menoetius, targets of NASA's Lucy mission. We predict event times for the upcoming mutual event season, which is anticipated to run from late 2017 through mid 2019.

  17. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May

    2014-06-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species.

  18. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Hecamede: Homeric nurse of the battle-wounded in the Trojan War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanika, Alexia P; Baltas, Christos S

    2014-02-01

    The Homeric epics present the 10-year lasting Trojan War, offering the description of battle wounds and medical care of injuries. Hecamede is referred by the Homer as a battlefield nurse who had knowledge of the treatment of bleeding battle wounds.

  20. Esophageal Dysfunction in Friesian Horses: Morphological Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M.; Grone, A.; Saey, V.; Bruijn, de C.M.; Back, W.; Weeren, van P.R.; Scheideman, W.; Picavet, T.; Ducro, B.J.; Wijnberg, I.; Delesalle, C.

    2015-01-01

    Megaesophagus appears to be more common in Friesian horses than in other breeds. A prevalence of approximately 2% was observed among Friesian horses presented to the Wolvega Equine Clinic and the Utrecht University Equine Clinic. In this study, morphologic changes in the esophagi of Friesian horses

  1. The Trojan-Hilda-KBO connection: An observational test of solar system evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, I.; Brown, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, many theories have been devised to explain the observed solar system architecture. The current paradigm posits that a significant reorganization of the outer Solar System occurred after the end of planet formation. Specifically, it is hypothesized that Jupiter and Saturn crossed a mutual mean motion resonance, leading to a chaotic expansion of the ice giants' orbits that disrupted the large population of planetesimals situated further out. While the majority of these bodies were ejected from the Solar System, a fraction of them were retained as the present-day Kuiper Belt, while others were scattered inward and captured into resonances with Jupiter to become the Trojans and Hildas. Dynamical instability models invariably predict that Trojans, Hildas, and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) were sourced from the same primordial body of outer solar system planetesimals. Therefore, comparison of these minor body populations serves as one of the few available observational tests of our present understanding of solar system evolution. We present the results of a series of studies aimed at synthesizing a detailed picture of Trojans and related asteroid populations. By combining analyses of archival data with new photometric surveys, we have derived the first debiased color distributions of Trojans and KBOs and extended/refined our knowledge of their respective size distributions. In addition, we have explored the peculiar color bimodality attested in the Trojans, Hildas, and KBOs, which indicates the presence of two sub-populations. As part of our continuing efforts to characterize the surface composition of these bodies, we have also obtained new near-infrared spectra of Hildas for comparison with previously published spectra of Trojans covering the same wavelength region. We have utilized the full body of observations to formulate hypotheses regarding the formation, composition, and dynamical/chemical evolution of the primordial outer solar system

  2. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF TROJAN ASTEROIDS: EVIDENCE FOR TWO COMPOSITIONAL GROUPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, J. P.; Burr, D. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Trojan asteroids, a very substantial population of primitive bodies trapped in Jupiter's stable Lagrange regions, remain quite poorly understood. Because they occupy these orbits, the physical properties of Trojans provide a unique perspective on the chemical and dynamical processes that shaped the Solar System. The current study was therefore undertaken to investigate surface compositions of these objects. We present 66 new near-infrared (NIR; 0.7-2.5 μm) spectra of 58 Trojan asteroids, including members of both the leading and trailing swarms. We also include in the analysis previously published NIR spectra of 13 Trojans (3 of which overlap with the new sample). This data set permits not only a direct search for compositional signatures, but also a search for patterns that may reveal clues to the origin of the Trojans. We do not report any confirmed absorption features in the new spectra. Analysis of the spectral slopes, however, reveals an interesting bimodality among the NIR data. The two spectral groups identified appear to be equally abundant in the leading and trailing swarms. The spectral groups are not a result of family membership; they occur in the background, non-family population. The average albedos of the two groups are the same within uncertainties (0.051 ± 0.016 and 0.055 ± 0.016). No correlations between spectral slope and any other physical or orbital parameter are detected, with the exception of a possible weak correlation with inclination among the less-red spectral group. The NIR spectral groups are consistent with a similar bimodality previously suggested among visible colors and spectra. Synthesizing the present results with previously published properties of Trojans, we conclude that the two spectral groups represent objects with different intrinsic compositions. We further suggest that whereas the less-red group originated near Jupiter or in the main asteroid belt, the redder spectral group originated farther out in the Solar System

  3. Research on the Morphological Characteristics Variability of Three Horse Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Marian Cătălin Prisacaru; Ancuţa Elena Coşuleanu; Ioan Gîlcă; Vasile Ujică

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of some morphological parameters of some horse population improvedwith stallion of Arab, Hucul and English thoroughbred breeds. The biological material was represented by thestallions belonging to the three breeds and the population improved with them. Measurements have been made inorder to determine the height at withers, oblique length of the trunk, cannon girth and weight. The height at witherspresented smaller dimensions at the Arab and Engli...

  4. Lyme neuroborreliosis in 2 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, D M; Barr, B C; Daft, B; Bertone, J J; Feng, S; Hodzic, E; Johnston, J M; Olsen, K J; Barthold, S W

    2011-11-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis--characterized as chronic, necrosuppurative to nonsuppurative, perivascular to diffuse meningoradiculoneuritis--was diagnosed in 2 horses with progressive neurologic disease. In 1 horse, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto was identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification of B burgdorferi sensu stricto-specific gene targets (ospA, ospC, flaB, dbpA, arp). Highest spirochetal burdens were in tissues with inflammation, including spinal cord, muscle, and joint capsule. Sequence analysis of ospA, ospC, and flaB revealed 99.9% sequence identity to the respective genes in B burgdorferi strain 297, an isolate from a human case of neuroborreliosis. In both horses, spirochetes were visualized in affected tissues with Steiner silver impregnation and by immunohistochemistry, predominantly within the dense collagenous tissue of the dura mater and leptomeninges.

  5. Ultraviolet anomalies of the WASP-12 and HD 189733 systems: Trojan satellites as a plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Funk, Barbara; Lammer, Helmut; Fossati, Luca; Eggl, Siegfried; Schwarz, Richard; Boudyada, Mohammed; Erkaev, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    We suggest an additional possible plasma source in the WASP-12 and HD189733b systems to explain part of the phenomena observed in ultraviolet (UV) light curves during planetary transits. In the proposed scenario, material originates from the molten surface of Trojan satellites on orbits near the Lagrange points L4 and L5. We show that the temperature at the orbital location of WASP-12b is high enough to melt the surface of rocky Trojans and to form shallow lava oceans on them. At the orbital distance of WASP-12b, this leads to the release of elements such as Mg and Ca, which are expected to surround the system. The predicted Mg and Ca outgassing rates from two Io-sized WASP-12b Trojans are ≈ 2.2 × 1027 s-1 and ≈ 2.2 × 1026 s-1, respectively. Trojan outgassing can lead to the observed lack of emission in MgII h&k and CaII H&K line cores of WASP-12. For HD 189733b, the mechanism is only marginally possible due to the lower temperature. The early ingress of HD 189733b observed in the far-UV (FUV) CII doublet couldn't be explained by this mechanism due to absence of carbon within elements outgassed by molten lava. We investigate the long-term stability region of WASP-12b and HD 189733b in case of planar and inclined motion of these satellites and show that unlike the classical exomoons orbiting the planet, Io-sized Trojans can be stable for the whole systems life time.

  6. Investigating Trojan Asteroids at the L4/L5 Sun-Earth Lagrange Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K. K.; Graham, L. D.; Abell, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of Earth's Trojan asteroids will have benefits for science, exploration, and resource utilization. By sending a small spacecraft to the Sun-Earth L4 or L5 Lagrange points to investigate near-Earth objects, Earth's Trojan population can be better understood. This could lead to future missions for larger precursor spacecraft as well as human missions. The presence of objects in the Sun-Earth L4 and L5 Lagrange points has long been suspected, and in 2010 NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detected a 300 m object. To investigate these Earth Trojan asteroid objects, it is both essential and feasible to send spacecraft to these regions. By exploring a wide field area, a small spacecraft equipped with an IR camera could hunt for Trojan asteroids and other Earth co-orbiting objects at the L4 or L5 Lagrange points in the near-term. By surveying the region, a zeroth-order approximation of the number of objects could be obtained with some rough constraints on their diameters, which may lead to the identification of potential candidates for further study. This would serve as a precursor for additional future robotic and human exploration targets. Depending on the inclination of these potential objects, they could be used as proving areas for future missions in the sense that the delta-V's to get to these targets are relatively low as compared to other rendezvous missions. They can serve as platforms for extended operations in deep space while interacting with a natural object in microgravity. Theoretically, such low inclination Earth Trojan asteroids exist. By sending a spacecraft to L4 or L5, these likely and potentially accessible targets could be identified.

  7. Reconstructing Laomedon’s Reign in Homer: Olympiomachia, Poseidon’s Wall, and the Earlier Trojan War

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Porter

    2014-01-01

    Homeric allusions to Laomedon, the walls of Troy, and the first Trojan War reflect a backstory of previous fighting among the Olympians, which helps to explain the Iliadic portrait of Zeus’s fear of insubordination among the other gods.

  8. Comparison of body conformation of Moravian warm-blooded horse and Sarvar horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šamková

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of 7 body measures and 6 indices of body conformation on 34 breeding individuals of Moravian warm-blooded horse and 19 of Sarvar horse (Leutstettener were used to analyse the effect of country of origin (Czech Republik, Germany, sire lines or breed (Furioso, Przedswit, English thoroughbred, Sarvar, Others and age (4 classes. All horses were measured by one person. Measures and indexes were analysed by GLM procedure. Significant differences were found between both Czech and German population only in index of body frame. Sarvar horses are longer to their height than Moravian warm-blooded horses. The shorter body frame have the horses by English thoroughbred, the longer by Furioso. The younger horses are higher than the older. According to results of Linear Description of Body Conformation we found out, that population of Sarvar horse is more balanced than population of Moravian warm-blooded horse.

  9. The Trojan Lifetime Champions Health Survey: Development, Validity, and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Scholefield, Robin M.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Azen, Stanley P.; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Self-report questionnaires are an important method of evaluating lifespan health, exercise, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes among elite, competitive athletes. Few instruments, however, have undergone formal characterization of their psychometric properties within this population. Objective To evaluate the validity and reliability of a novel health and exercise questionnaire, the Trojan Lifetime Champions (TLC) Health Survey. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting A large National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants A total of 63 university alumni (age range, 24 to 84 years), including former varsity collegiate athletes and a control group of nonathletes. Intervention(s) Participants completed the TLC Health Survey twice at a mean interval of 23 days with randomization to the paper or electronic version of the instrument. Main Outcome Measure(s) Content validity, feasibility of administration, test-retest reliability, parallel-form reliability between paper and electronic forms, and estimates of systematic and typical error versus differences of clinical interest were assessed across a broad range of health, exercise, and HRQL measures. Results Correlation coefficients, including intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for continuous variables and κ agreement statistics for ordinal variables, for test-retest reliability averaged 0.86, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.74 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Correlation coefficients, again ICCs and κ, for parallel-form reliability (ie, equivalence) between paper and electronic versions averaged 0.90, 0.85, 0.85, and 0.81 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Typical measurement error was less than the a priori thresholds of clinical interest, and we found minimal evidence of systematic test-retest error. We found strong evidence of content validity, convergent

  10. SEARCHING FOR TROJAN ASTEROIDS IN THE HD 209458 SYSTEM: SPACE-BASED MOST PHOTOMETRY AND DYNAMICAL MODELING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, Reka; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Gladman, Brett; Bottke, William F.; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2010-01-01

    We have searched Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite photometry obtained in 2004, 2005, and 2007 of the solar-type star HD 209458 for Trojan asteroid swarms dynamically coupled with the system's transiting 'hot Jupiter' HD 209458b. Observations of the presence and nature of asteroids around other stars would provide unique constraints on migration models of exoplanetary systems. Our results set an upper limit on the optical depth of Trojans in the HD 209458 system that can be used to guide current and future searches of similar systems by upcoming missions. Using cross-correlation methods with artificial signals implanted in the data, we find that our detection limit corresponds to a relative Trojan transit depth of 1 x10 -4 , equivalent to ∼1 lunar mass of asteroids, assuming power-law Trojan size distributions similar to Jupiter's Trojans in our solar system. We confirm with dynamical interpretations that some asteroids could have migrated inward with the planet to its current orbit at 0.045 AU, and that the Yarkovsky effect is ineffective at eliminating objects of >1 m in size. However, using numerical models of collisional evolution we find that, due to high relative speeds in this confined Trojan environment, collisions destroy the vast majority of the asteroids in -7 .

  11. Morphological evolution of Bardigiano horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Catalano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bardigiano horse is a local breed of the province of Parma. Since the institution of the Stud Book in 1977, the breed has improved its diffusion and is currently present with 110 stallions and over 1700 mares in 43 provinces in Italy and beyond that in Germany, Switzerland and Hungary.

  12. SOME SLAUGHTER-HOUSE RATES OF HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Mandić

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays horses are raised and used almost only for sport and recreation and, of course, for meat production. With the possibility of buying fresh horse meat and products based on horse meat, new eating habits have been acquired. The number of horses in the Republic of Croatia has been decreasing continually, which can result in import rather than in export of horse meat, unless a proper and a good breeding plan for horse meat production is made soon. In existing small private slaughter-houses, together with other animals, horses are slaughtered but in a very small number (just to meet the needs of the market. As those horses are of different genetic bases, (mostly cold blooded and cross-bred as well as of different age, sex and physical shape, the slaughter-house yield greatly varies. Due to some injuries, blindenss or lameness horses are killed coercively as to gain minimal profit. In distinction from other animals where the percentage of carcass yield is very high, sloughter-house yield of horse carcass is not high due to a small number of killed animals

  13. Genetic diversity of Syrian Arabian horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarzook, S; Reissmann, M; Arends, D; Brockmann, G A

    2017-08-01

    Although Arabian horses have been bred in strains for centuries and pedigrees have been recorded in studbooks, to date, little is known about the genetic diversity within and between these strains. In this study, we tested if the three main strains of Syrian Arabian horses descend from three founders as suggested by the studbook. We examined 48 horses representing Saglawi (n = 18), Kahlawi (n = 16) and Hamdani (n = 14) strains using the Equine SNP70K BeadChip. For comparison, an additional 24 Arabian horses from the USA and three Przewalski's horses as an out group were added. Observed heterozygosis (H o ) ranged between 0.30 and 0.32, expected heterozygosity (H e ) between 0.30 and 0.31 and inbreeding coefficients (F is ) between -0.02 and -0.05, indicating high genetic diversity within Syrian strains. Likewise, the genetic differentiation between the three Syrian strains was very low (F st  horses. Among Arabian horses, we found three clusters containing either horses from the USA or horses from Syria or horses from Syria and the USA together. Individuals from the same Syrian Arabian horse strain were spread across different sub-clusters. When analyzing Syrian Arabian horses alone, the best population differentiation was found with three distinct clusters. In contrast to expectations from the studbook, these clusters did not coincide with strain affiliation. Although this finding supports the hypothesis of three founders, the genetic information is not consistent with the currently used strain designation system. The information can be used to reconsider the current breeding practice. Beyond that, Syrian Arabian horses are an important reservoir for genetic diversity. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Training young horses to social separation: Effect of a companion horse on training efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, E.; Christensen, Janne Winther; Keeling, LJ

    2011-01-01

    : To investigate whether the initial presence of a familiar companion horse modifies responses to separation from the group, lowers stress levels (as measured by heart rate) and increases training efficiency. Hypothesis: Habituation to separation proceeds more quickly if the horse is first trained with a companion......Reasons for performing study: The intensity with which a horse responds to separation from its group and subsequently to being alone is relevant for both horse and handler safety. Identification of training methods that may reduce responses to separation would be useful in practice. Objectives......, and heart rate is lower when the horse is subsequently trained alone, compared to control horses trained individually from the start. Methods: Young mares (n = 32), kept in groups of 4 were exposed to social separation: 2 horses of the group were trained singly (S1, n = 16) and the remaining 2 horses (n...

  15. [Stomach ulcers in the horse--clinical and gastroscopic findings in 12 horses (1989-1990)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, M; Deegen, E

    1991-08-01

    Twelve horses with clinical symptoms of a gastric disorder were studied by gastroscopy. Symptoms of gastric disorders were periprandial colic, bruxism, ructus and reflux. Preliminary to gastroscopy the horses were fasted for 24 h. Access to water was not restricted. The gastroscopy could be conducted easily using a fiberscope 2.5 m in length and 11 mm in outer diameter. While ulcers were present in the squamous fundus of all horses only one horse showed ulceration of the glandular fundus. Solitary ulcers near the margo plicatus were found in horses with mild clinical symptoms. In contrast, diffuse gastroesophageal ulceration was accompanied by severe clinical symptoms. Four horses were affected by an acute gastroesophageal ulceration with gastric reflux and subsequent aspiration pneumonia. Two of those horses suffered from acute gastric ulceration 3-4 days following laparatomy. All horses were treated with cimetidine (5 mg/kg bwt/q.i.d.) until clinical symptoms ceased.

  16. Stochastic models for the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy of an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D

    2016-01-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we develop a Markov jump process model for this strategy, and we verify that there is a positive probability for wild-type females going extinct within a finite time. Moreover, when sex-reversed Trojan females are introduced at a constant population size, we formulate a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model as an approximation to the proposed Markov jump process model. Using the SDE model, we investigate the probability distribution and expectation of the extinction time of wild-type females by solving Kolmogorov equations associated with these statistics. The results indicate how the probability distribution and expectation of the extinction time are shaped by the initial conditions and the model parameters.

  17. Entomologic evaluation of insect hypersensitivity in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, E C

    1995-04-01

    Potential methods of incriminating insects as the cause of insect hypersensitivity are presented. A listing of the biting midges known to attack horses in North America is presented also. An example of how species may be determined to be the cause of the hypersensitivity is given using data from a recent study in Florida. Light trap collections indicated the temporal and geographic distribution of potential contributing species and collections made by vacuuming horses further delineated species by proving they feed on horses and the correct locations on the horses to match lesion distribution. Culicoides hypersensitivity in horses in Florida seems to be caused by a series of species active and feeding on the horses at different times of the year.

  18. Keeping horses in groups: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Elke; Søndergaard, Eva; Keeling, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    Although husbandry conditions for horses have improved over the last decades, many horses are still kept singly with limited or no physical contact to other horses. This is surprising, given the fact that keeping horses in groups is recognised best to fulfil their physical and behavioural needs......, especially their need for social contact with conspecifics, as well as to have a beneficial effect on horse–human interactions during training. Group housing of farm animals is widely applied in practice. As a consequence, scientists have investigated numerous aspects of group housing to help further improve...... animal welfare and human–animal interactions under these conditions. However, compared to this literature available in farm animals, and the plentiful studies conducted of feral horse populations, there is much less done when it comes to the management of horses kept in groups in the domestic environment...

  19. DNA polymorphism of Arabian, Thoroughbred and Anglo-Arab horses in Morocco. Application to identification and parentage verification of individual horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouragh, L.

    2005-01-01

    New techniques of molecular biology used in analysing DNA polymorphism give access to the whole genetic variability of a given individual, while traditional blood typing (red cell typing and biochemical polymorphisms) gives access only to the transcribed Fraction, which is then translated to protein. In addition, this fraction represents only a tiny part (5 to 10%) of the genome's coding fraction. One of the newer testing methods in identifying horses is a DNA-based test using microsatellite marker analysis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology in the identification and parentage verification of Arabian, Thoroughbred and Anglo-Arab horses in Morocco. The Anglo-Arab horse is a crossbreed between Arabian and Thoroughbred. Three samples from the three breeds were analysed for 12 microsatellites (HMS2, HMS3, HMS6, HMS7, HTG4, HTG6, HTG7, AHT4, AHTS, VHL20, HTGlO and ASB2). Blood samples were gathered from a total of 1541 horses: 804 Arabians, 559 Thoroughbreds and 178 Anglo-Arabs. Allelic frequencies of the 12 loci studied were calculated in the three groups. The results allowed the determination of intra-population genetic parameters: heterozygosity ratio (h), probability of identification (P i ) and probability of exclusion (P e ). Based on mean heterozygosity values, variability was relatively lower in Thoroughbred horse (0.7036), while it was almost the same in Arabian and Anglo-Arab horses (respectively 0.7217 and 0.7232). Probabilities of exclusion obtained with the 12 systems were greater than 99.9% for the three populations studied, and probabilities of identification of individual horses were 15.4 x 10 -12 , 3 .5 x 10 -12 and 3.2 x 10 -12 in the Thoroughbred, Arabian and Anglo-Arab breeds, respectively. These results indicate that the test using microsatellite marker analysis constitutes a highly efficient and reliable alternative for the identification and parentage verification of individual horses and so it is a

  20. Production of Sulfur Allotropes in Electron Irradiated Jupiter Trojans Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Eiler, John M.; Brown, Michael E.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Hodyss, Robert; Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate sulfur chemistry in laboratory analogs of Jupiter Trojans and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). Electron irradiation experiments of CH3OH-NH3-H2O and H2S-CH3OH-NH3-H2O ices were conducted to better understand the chemical differences between primordial planetesimals inside and outside the sublimation line of H2S. The main goal of this work is to test the chemical plausibility of the hypothesis correlating the color bimodality in Jupiter Trojans with sulfur chemistry in the incipient solar system. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the irradiated mixtures allows the detection of small sulfur allotropes (S3 and S4) after the irradiation of H2S containing ice mixtures. These small, red polymers are metastable and could polymerize further under thermal processing and irradiation, producing larger sulfur polymers (mainly S8) that are spectroscopically neutral at wavelengths above 500 nm. This transformation may affect the spectral reflectance of Jupiter Trojans in a different way compared to KBOs, thereby providing a useful framework for possibly differentiating and determining the formation and history of small bodies. Along with allotropes, we report the production of organo-sulfur molecules. Sulfur molecules produced in our experiment have been recently detected by Rosetta in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The very weak absorption of sulfur polymers in the infrared range hampers their identification on Trojans and KBOs, but these allotropes strongly absorb light at UV and Visible wavelengths. This suggests that high signal-to-noise ratio UV-Vis spectra of these objects could provide new constraints on their presence.

  1. Collisional Histories of Comets and Trojan Asteroids: Insights from Forsterite and Enstatite Impact Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer. S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Smith, D. C.; Cintala, M. J.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Impacts into forsterite and orthoenstatite at speeds typically encountered by comets demonstrate that shock imparted by collisions is detectable in the infrared signatures of their dust. The spectral signatures can be traced to physical alterations in their crystalline structures, as observed in TEM imaging and modeled using a dipole approximation. These results yield tantalizing insights into the collisional history of our solar system, as well as the history of individual comets and Trojan asteroids.

  2. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-03-03

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful.

  3. Trojan horse” malware as a mean for obtaining evidence in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caprioli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Italian code of criminal procedure doesn’t regulate investigations realized with “Trojan horse” malwares located in an electronic device like a smartphone or a tablet. This study explains in which cases, and under what conditions, investigations like these can be nevertheless considered as admissible according to the Italian procedural law, and reports the contents of the main legislative proposals concerning this matter that are currently being discussed in the Italian Parliament.

  4. Production of Sulfur Allotropes in Electron Irradiated Jupiter Trojans Ice Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Hodyss, Robert; Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert; Choukroun, Mathieu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Eiler, John M.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: Mahjoub.Ahmed@jpl.nasa.gov [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-09-10

    In this paper, we investigate sulfur chemistry in laboratory analogs of Jupiter Trojans and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). Electron irradiation experiments of CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S–CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O ices were conducted to better understand the chemical differences between primordial planetesimals inside and outside the sublimation line of H{sub 2}S. The main goal of this work is to test the chemical plausibility of the hypothesis correlating the color bimodality in Jupiter Trojans with sulfur chemistry in the incipient solar system. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the irradiated mixtures allows the detection of small sulfur allotropes (S{sub 3} and S{sub 4}) after the irradiation of H{sub 2}S containing ice mixtures. These small, red polymers are metastable and could polymerize further under thermal processing and irradiation, producing larger sulfur polymers (mainly S{sub 8}) that are spectroscopically neutral at wavelengths above 500 nm. This transformation may affect the spectral reflectance of Jupiter Trojans in a different way compared to KBOs, thereby providing a useful framework for possibly differentiating and determining the formation and history of small bodies. Along with allotropes, we report the production of organo-sulfur molecules. Sulfur molecules produced in our experiment have been recently detected by Rosetta in the coma of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The very weak absorption of sulfur polymers in the infrared range hampers their identification on Trojans and KBOs, but these allotropes strongly absorb light at UV and Visible wavelengths. This suggests that high signal-to-noise ratio UV–Vis spectra of these objects could provide new constraints on their presence.

  5. Science Experiments of a Jupiter Trojan asteroid in the Solar Power Sail Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, T.; Kebukawa, Y.; Aoki, J.; Kawai, Y.; Ito, M.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.; Matsumoto, J.; Bibring, J. P.; Ulamec, S.; Jaumann, R.; Iwata, T.; Mori, O.; Kawaguchi, J.

    2017-12-01

    A Jupiter Trojan asteroid mission using a large area solar power sail (SPS) is under study in JAXA in collaboration with DLR and CNES. The asteroid will be investigated through remote sensing, followed by in situ in-depth observations on the asteroid with a lander. A sample-return is also studied as an option. LUCY has been selected as the NASA's future Discovery class mission which aims at understanding the diversity of Jupiter Trojans by multiple flybys, complementally to the SPS mission. The SPS is a candidate of the next medium class space science mission in Japan. The 1.4-ton spacecraft will carry a 100-kg class lander and 20-kg mission payloads on it. Its launch is expected in mid 2020s, and will take at least 11 years to visit a Jupiter Trojan asteroid. During the cruise phase, science experiments will be performed such as an infrared astronomy, a very long baseline gamma ray interferometry, and dust and magnetic field measurements. A classical static model of solar system suggests that the Jupiter Trojans were formed around the Jupiter region, while a dynamical model such as Nice model indicates that they formed at the far end of the solar system and then scattered inward due to a dynamical migration of giant planets. The physical, mineralogical, organics and isotopic distribution in the heliocentric distance could solve their origin and evolution of the solar system. A global mapping of the asteroid from the mothership will be conducted such as high-resolved imaging, NIR and TIR imaging spectrometry, and radar soundings. The lander will characterize the asteroid with geological, mineralogical, and geophysical observations using a panoramic camera, an infrared hyperspectral imager, a magnetometer, and a thermal radiometer. These samples will be measured by a high resolved mass spectrometer (HRMS) to investigate isotopic ratios of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, as well as organic species.

  6. Social and economic impacts of the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant: a confirmatory technology assessment. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenk, E. Jr.; Bereano, P.L.; Douglass, J.; Watson, R.H.; Zemansky, G.M.

    1979-10-01

    The Trojan nuclear plant located 32 miles northwest of Portland, Oregon was chosen for a case study. A background of the physical, demographic, economic, and political context of the communities is provided. This is followed by an evaluation of the impacts of plant construction and operation including local taxation, employment, business activity and income, demography, public utilities and transportation, land use, housing, recreation, culture and lifestyle, public safety, education, health care, and politics and institutions

  7. Trojan War displayed as a full annihilation-diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The diffusive pair annihilation model with embedded topological domains and archaeological data is applied in an analysis of the hypothetical Trojan-Greek war during the late Bronze Age. Estimations of parameter are explicitly made for critical dynamics of the model. In particular, the 8-metre walls of Troy could be viewed as the effective shield that provided the technological difference between the two armies. Suggestively, the numbers in The Iliad are quite sound, being in accord with Lanchester's laws of warfare.

  8. Environmental Assessment for Wild Horse Gathering Inside and Outside Wild Horse Herd Management Areas

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management

    1999-01-01

    Enclosed you will find the Environmental Assessment (EA) which describes the impacts of gathering wild horses in the Rock Springs Field Office area. Gathering wild horses would take place in the Great Divide Basin, White Mountain, Little Colorado, and Salt Wells Creek Wild Horse Herd Management Areas (HMA) and in an area known as the North Baxter/Jack Morrow area (outside the HMAs).

  9. Copy Number Variation in the Horse Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Qu, Zhipeng; Das, Pranab J.; Fang, Erica; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, E. Gus; McDonell, Sue; Kenney, Daniel G.; Lear, Teri L.; Adelson, David L.; Chowdhary, Bhanu P.; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a 400K WG tiling oligoarray for the horse and applied it for the discovery of copy number variations (CNVs) in 38 normal horses of 16 diverse breeds, and the Przewalski horse. Probes on the array represented 18,763 autosomal and X-linked genes, and intergenic, sub-telomeric and chrY sequences. We identified 258 CNV regions (CNVRs) across all autosomes, chrX and chrUn, but not in chrY. CNVs comprised 1.3% of the horse genome with chr12 being most enriched. American Miniature horses had the highest and American Quarter Horses the lowest number of CNVs in relation to Thoroughbred reference. The Przewalski horse was similar to native ponies and draft breeds. The majority of CNVRs involved genes, while 20% were located in intergenic regions. Similar to previous studies in horses and other mammals, molecular functions of CNV-associated genes were predominantly in sensory perception, immunity and reproduction. The findings were integrated with previous studies to generate a composite genome-wide dataset of 1476 CNVRs. Of these, 301 CNVRs were shared between studies, while 1174 were novel and require further validation. Integrated data revealed that to date, 41 out of over 400 breeds of the domestic horse have been analyzed for CNVs, of which 11 new breeds were added in this study. Finally, the composite CNV dataset was applied in a pilot study for the discovery of CNVs in 6 horses with XY disorders of sexual development. A homozygous deletion involving AKR1C gene cluster in chr29 in two affected horses was considered possibly causative because of the known role of AKR1C genes in testicular androgen synthesis and sexual development. While the findings improve and integrate the knowledge of CNVs in horses, they also show that for effective discovery of variants of biomedical importance, more breeds and individuals need to be analyzed using comparable methodological approaches. PMID:25340504

  10. Copy number variation in the horse genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a 400K WG tiling oligoarray for the horse and applied it for the discovery of copy number variations (CNVs in 38 normal horses of 16 diverse breeds, and the Przewalski horse. Probes on the array represented 18,763 autosomal and X-linked genes, and intergenic, sub-telomeric and chrY sequences. We identified 258 CNV regions (CNVRs across all autosomes, chrX and chrUn, but not in chrY. CNVs comprised 1.3% of the horse genome with chr12 being most enriched. American Miniature horses had the highest and American Quarter Horses the lowest number of CNVs in relation to Thoroughbred reference. The Przewalski horse was similar to native ponies and draft breeds. The majority of CNVRs involved genes, while 20% were located in intergenic regions. Similar to previous studies in horses and other mammals, molecular functions of CNV-associated genes were predominantly in sensory perception, immunity and reproduction. The findings were integrated with previous studies to generate a composite genome-wide dataset of 1476 CNVRs. Of these, 301 CNVRs were shared between studies, while 1174 were novel and require further validation. Integrated data revealed that to date, 41 out of over 400 breeds of the domestic horse have been analyzed for CNVs, of which 11 new breeds were added in this study. Finally, the composite CNV dataset was applied in a pilot study for the discovery of CNVs in 6 horses with XY disorders of sexual development. A homozygous deletion involving AKR1C gene cluster in chr29 in two affected horses was considered possibly causative because of the known role of AKR1C genes in testicular androgen synthesis and sexual development. While the findings improve and integrate the knowledge of CNVs in horses, they also show that for effective discovery of variants of biomedical importance, more breeds and individuals need to be analyzed using comparable methodological approaches.

  11. The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Neil J; Jalilzadeh, Aidin; Didham, Raphael K; Soboleva, Tanya; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2013-12-22

    Humankind's ongoing battle with pest species spans millennia. Pests cause or carry disease, damage or consume food crops and other resources, and drive global environmental change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal control, but such approaches are costly, of varying efficiency and often have ethical issues. Thus, pest management via control of reproductive output is increasingly considered an optimal solution. One of the most successful such 'fertility control' strategies developed to date is the sterile male technique (SMT), in which large numbers of sterile males are released into a population each generation. However, this approach is time-consuming, labour-intensive and costly. We use mathematical models to test a new twist on the SMT, using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations that affect male, but not female reproductive fitness. 'Trojan females' carrying such mutations, and their female descendants, produce 'sterile-male'-equivalents under natural conditions over multiple generations. We find that the Trojan female technique (TFT) has the potential to be a novel humane approach for pest control. Single large releases and relatively few small repeat releases of Trojan females both provided effective and persistent control within relatively few generations. Although greatest efficacy was predicted for high-turnover species, the additive nature of multiple releases made the TFT applicable to the full range of life histories modelled. The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control.

  12. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L.; Lambert, H.E.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns

  13. The Trojan Female Technique: A Novel, Effective and Humane Approach for Pest Population Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmell, Neil J. [Centre for Reproduction and Genomics and Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Jalilzadeh, Aidin [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Didham, Raphael K. [School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia (Australia); CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Soboleva, Tanya [Science and Risk Assessment Directorate, Ministry for Primary Industries, PO Box 2526, Wellington (New Zealand); Tompkins, Daniel M. [Landcare Research, Private Bag 1930, Dunedin (New Zealand); New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2014-01-15

    Full-text: Humankind's ongoing battle with pest species spans millennia. Pests cause or carry disease, damage or consume food crops and other resources, and drive global environmental change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal control, but such approaches are costly, of varying efficiency and often have ethical issues. Thus, pest management via control of reproductive output is increasingly considered an optimal solution. One of the most successful such 'fertility control' strategies developed to date is the sterile male technique (SMT), in which large numbers of sterile males are released into a population each generation. However, this approach is time-consuming, labour- intensive and costly. We use mathematical models to test a new twist on the SMT, using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations that affect male, but not female reproductive fitness. 'Trojan females' carrying such mutations, and their female descendants, produce 'sterile-male'-equivalents under natural conditions over multiple generations. We find that the Trojan Female Technique (TFT) has the potential to be a novel humane approach for pest control. Single large releases and relatively few small repeat releases of Trojan females both provided effective and persistent control within relatively few generations. Although greatest efficacy was predicted for high-turnover species, the additive nature of multiple releases made the TFT applicable to the full range of life histories modelled. The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control. (author)

  14. Genetic analysis of the Venezuelan Criollo horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, E G; Canelon, J L; Luis, C; Conant, E; Juras, R

    2011-10-07

    Various horse populations in the Americas have an origin in Spain; they are remnants of the first livestock introduced to the continent early in the colonial period (16th and 17th centuries). We evaluated genetic variability within the Venezuelan Criollo horse and its relationship with other horse breeds. We observed high levels of genetic diversity within the Criollo breed. Significant population differentiation was observed between all South American breeds. The Venezuelan Criollo horse showed high levels of genetic diversity, and from a conservation standpoint, there is no immediate danger of losing variation unless there is a large drop in population size.

  15. Asian horses deepen the MSY phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felkel, S; Vogl, C; Rigler, D; Jagannathan, V; Leeb, T; Fries, R; Neuditschko, M; Rieder, S; Velie, B; Lindgren, G; Rubin, C-J; Schlötterer, C; Rattei, T; Brem, G; Wallner, B

    2018-02-01

    Humans have shaped the population history of the horse ever since domestication about 5500 years ago. Comparative analyses of the Y chromosome can illuminate the paternal origin of modern horse breeds. This may also reveal different breeding strategies that led to the formation of extant breeds. Recently, a horse Y-chromosomal phylogeny of modern horses based on 1.46 Mb of the male-specific Y (MSY) was generated. We extended this dataset with 52 samples from five European, two American and seven Asian breeds. As in the previous study, almost all modern European horses fall into a crown group, connected via a few autochthonous Northern European lineages to the outgroup, the Przewalski's Horse. In total, we now distinguish 42 MSY haplotypes determined by 158 variants within domestic horses. Asian horses show much higher diversity than previously found in European breeds. The Asian breeds also introduce a deep split to the phylogeny, preliminarily dated to 5527 ± 872 years. We conclude that the deep splitting Asian Y haplotypes are remnants of a far more diverse ancient horse population, whose haplotypes were lost in other lineages. © 2018 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Occurrence of Wounds in Nigerian Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agina, Onyinyechukwu A; Ihedioha, John I

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of wounds in Nigerian horses. The study population was 1,621 horses sold at the Obollo Afor horse lairage in Enugu State, Nigeria, during a 6-month period: 3 months of dry season and 3 months of rainy season (February-April and June-August 2012). A total of 207 horses were systematically sampled and subjected to a comprehensive physical examination. Those with wounds were marked, recorded, and clinically examined. Of the 207 horses sampled, 21 (10.1%) had wounds. The body distribution of the wounds was 9.5% head, 9.5% forelimbs, 19.1% hind limbs, 4.8% tail, 14.3% flank, 9.5% loin, 19.1% hip, 9.5% barrel, and 4.8% croup. The occurrence of the wounds was not significantly associated with sex or season, but the occurrence in adults was significantly (p horses. It was concluded that the occurrence of wounds is relatively high (10.1%), and mainly the hind limbs, hip, and flank of adult horses are affected. It was recommended that horse guardians and handlers should be properly educated on the care of horses.

  17. Discospondylitis in an adult horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillyer, M.H.; Innes, J.F.; Patteson, M.W.; Barr, A.R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Discospondylitis, of presumed bacterial origin, was diagnosed in an adult thoroughbred racehorse. The clinical signs were vague and associated with abnormal mobility of the neck and forelimbs. Clinical pathology showed only a non-specific inflammatory response. A scintigraphic examination revealed the site of the lesion and the diagnosis was confirmed by the identification of radiographic changes affecting two thoracic vertebrae. A prolonged course of antimicrobial agents produced a complete recovery and the horse returned to full athletic use

  18. Copper sulphate poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M

    1975-01-01

    In the archives of the Clinic for Internal Diseases of Domestic Animals at the Veterinary Faculty of Zagreb University some thirty cases of horse disease diagnosed as copper sulphate poisoning were noted. The data correspond in many respects to the clinical findings of copper sulphate poisoning in other domestic animals. A series of experimental horse poisonings were undertaken in order to determine the toxicity of copper sulphate. The research results are as follows: Horses are sensitive to copper sulphate. Even a single application of 0.125 g/kg body weight in 1% concentration by means of incubation into the stomach causes stomach and gut disturbances and other poisoning symptoms. Poisoning occurs in two types: acute and chronic. The former appears after one to three applications of copper sulphate solution and is characterized by gastroenteritis, haemolysis, jaundice and haemoglobinuria with signs of consecutive damage of kidney, liver and other organs. The disease, from the first application to death lasts for two weeks. Chronic poisoning is caused by ingestion of dry copper sulphate in food (1% solution dried on hay or clover) for two or more months. There are chronic disturbances of stomach and gut and loss of weight, and consecutive (three to four) haemolytic crises similar to those of acute poisoning. From the beginning of poisoning to death six or more months can elapse.

  19. 2011 HM{sub 102}: DISCOVERY OF A HIGH-INCLINATION L5 NEPTUNE TROJAN IN THE SEARCH FOR A POST-PLUTO NEW HORIZONS TARGET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Alex H.; Holman, Matthew J.; McLeod, Brian A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buie, Marc W.; Borncamp, David M.; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Osip, David J. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Fabbro, Sebastian; Kavelaars, J. J. [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Benecchi, Susan D.; Sheppard, Scott S. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, S San Francisco St, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Gay, Pamela L. [Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Research, Education, and Outreach, Southern Illinois University, 1220 Lincoln Dr, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Petit, Jean-Marc [CNRS, UTINAM, Universite de Franche Comte, Route de Gray, F-25030 Besancon Cedex, (France); Tholen, David J., E-mail: aparker@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15

    We present the discovery of a long-term stable L5 (trailing) Neptune Trojan in data acquired to search for candidate trans-Neptunian objects for the New Horizons spacecraft to fly by during an extended post-Pluto mission. This Neptune Trojan, 2011 HM{sub 102}, has the highest inclination (29. Degree-Sign 4) of any known member of this population. It is intrinsically brighter than any single L5 Jupiter Trojan at H{sub V} {approx} 8.18. We have determined its gri colors (a first for any L5 Neptune Trojan), which we find to be similar to the moderately red colors of the L4 Neptune Trojans, suggesting similar surface properties for members of both Trojan clouds. We also present colors derived from archival data for two L4 Neptune Trojans (2006 RJ{sub 103} and 2007 VL{sub 305}), better refining the overall color distribution of the population. In this document we describe the discovery circumstances, our physical characterization of 2011 HM{sub 102}, and this object's implications for the Neptune Trojan population overall. Finally, we discuss the prospects for detecting 2011 HM{sub 102} from the New Horizons spacecraft during its close approach in mid- to late-2013.

  20. 2011 HM102: DISCOVERY OF A HIGH-INCLINATION L5 NEPTUNE TROJAN IN THE SEARCH FOR A POST-PLUTO NEW HORIZONS TARGET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Alex H.; Holman, Matthew J.; McLeod, Brian A.; Buie, Marc W.; Borncamp, David M.; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan; Osip, David J.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Fabbro, Sébastian; Kavelaars, J. J.; Benecchi, Susan D.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.; Gay, Pamela L.; Petit, Jean-Marc; Tholen, David J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a long-term stable L5 (trailing) Neptune Trojan in data acquired to search for candidate trans-Neptunian objects for the New Horizons spacecraft to fly by during an extended post-Pluto mission. This Neptune Trojan, 2011 HM 102 , has the highest inclination (29.°4) of any known member of this population. It is intrinsically brighter than any single L5 Jupiter Trojan at H V ∼ 8.18. We have determined its gri colors (a first for any L5 Neptune Trojan), which we find to be similar to the moderately red colors of the L4 Neptune Trojans, suggesting similar surface properties for members of both Trojan clouds. We also present colors derived from archival data for two L4 Neptune Trojans (2006 RJ 103 and 2007 VL 305 ), better refining the overall color distribution of the population. In this document we describe the discovery circumstances, our physical characterization of 2011 HM 102 , and this object's implications for the Neptune Trojan population overall. Finally, we discuss the prospects for detecting 2011 HM 102 from the New Horizons spacecraft during its close approach in mid- to late-2013.

  1. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Explore the Origin and Evolution of the Early Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F., III; Olkin, C.; Castillo, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The orbital properties, compositions, and physical properties of the diverse populations of small outer solar system bodies provide a forensic map of how our solar system formed and evolved. Perhaps the most potentially diagnostic, but least explored, of those populations are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. More than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are presently known, but these are predicted to be only a small fraction of the 500,000 to 1 million Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that were scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in the 1:1 Jupiter mean motion resonance, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a much more quiescent early solar system, and then trapped at L4 and L5. The 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified important questions about the origin and evolution of the solar system that can be addressed by studying of the Trojan asteroids, including: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft? The Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) is a New Frontiers-class mission designed to answer these questions, and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of a large number of these objects,, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the first-time exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology

  2. Quantifying the role of Trojan dams in the between-herd spread of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDv) in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Fiona; Graham, David A; Clegg, Tracy A; Tratalos, Jamie A; O'Sullivan, Padraig; More, Simon J

    2018-04-01

    A compulsory national programme to eradicate bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDv) began in Ireland on 1 January, 2013. The objective of the current study was to quantify the role of Trojan dams (animal(s) not persistently infected (PI) with BVDv but carrying PI foetus(es) and introduced to the herd while pregnant with the PI foetus(es)) in the farm-to-farm spread of BVDv in Ireland, and to identify herd-level risk factors for producing or introducing a Trojan dam. The study population included all BVD+ calves born in Ireland between 1 January, 2013 and 31 December, 2015, along with their dams. BVD+ calves included all calves on the national programme database with an initial positive or inconclusive virus test, without a confirmatory re-test (status BVDPOS) and those with an initial positive or inconclusive test and a positive confirmatory test (status BVDPI). The Trojan status of dams was determined after considering their history of movement and of potential BVDV exposure, relative to a defined window of susceptibility (WOS; days 30-120 of gestation). During 2013-15, there were 29,422 BVD+ birth events to dams that were not themselves BVD+, including 2526 (8.6%) most-likely attributable to Trojan dams. The percentage of these birth events attributable to Trojan dams was significantly different (P Trojan dam. In 2014 and 2015, the percentages were 11.8% and 13.3%, respectively. In 2013, in 7.8% of herds with one or more BVD+ birth to non-BVD+ dams, all of these births were attributable to Trojan dams. In 2014 and 2015, the percentages were 9.2% and 10.7%, respectively. A logistic GEE regression identified dam parity, herd size and an interaction between herd type and season as significant predictors for the birth of a BVD+ calf to a Trojan dam. Significant predictors for the sale of a Trojan dam from BVD+ herds included those selling more than one pregnant female and those with more than 2 BVD+ animals in the herd. Introduction of pregnant adult females is a

  3. Vertebral body osteomyelitis in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markel, M.D.; Madigan, J.E.; Lichtensteiger, C.A.; Large, S.M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical signs, laboratory data, results of nuclear scintigraphy and radiographic examination of five horses with vertebral body osteomyelitis are described together with response to treatment. Three horses were less than five months of age. Four horses demonstrated hindlimb paresis and in three a focus of pain in the thoracolumbar region could be identified. An umbilical abscess, a caudal lobe lung abscess and a patent urachus were considered primary niduses of infection in each of three horses. Leucocytosis, neutrophilia, anaemia and elevated fibrinogen were the most consistent laboratory abnormalities. Nuclear scintigraphy was performed in three horses and identified the site of the vertebral lesion which was subsequently evaluated radiographically. In the other two horses radiographic examination in the region of areas of focal pain identified a lesion. Radiographic abnormalities included compression fractures of vertebral bodies (two), proliferative new bone (three) and soft tissue swelling ventral to a vertebral body (one). Two horses, including one with a compression fracture of the second lumbar vertebra, received parenteral antimicrobial therapy for 40 and 74 days, respectively. When re-examined six months later they showed no neurological abnormalities. The other three horses failed to respond to antimicrobial treatment and were humanely destroyed. The horse with a lung abscess also had an abscess cranial to the right tuber coxae which extended into the vertebral bodies of the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae from which Streptococcus zooepidemicus was cultured. A horse with proliferative new bone on the ventral aspect of the fifth and sixth thoracic vertebrae had a mediastinal mass associated with these vertebrae and fungal granulomas, from which Aspergillus species was cultured, in the heart and aorta, trachea, spleen and kidney. The horse with a patent urachus and soft tissue swelling ventral to the vertebral body of the 12th thoracic vertebra

  4. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-11-12

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general.

  5. Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program: sustainability of taking a risk with "at risk" horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Sarah L; Molnar, Anne

    2012-12-01

    In 1999, the Young Horse Teaching and Research Program (YHTRP) was initiated at Rutgers University. The unique aspect of the program was using horses generally considered "at risk" and in need of rescue, but of relatively low value. The risks of using horses from pregnant mare urine (PMU) ranches and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs were high, but, ultimately, unrealized. No students or staff members were seriously injured over the course of the next 12 yr, and the horses were sold annually as highly desirable potential athletes or pleasure horses, usually at a profit. The use of "at risk" horses generated a significant amount of positive media attention and attracted substantial funding in the form of donations and sponsorships, averaging over $60,000 (USD)per year. Despite economic downturns, public and industry support provided sustainability for the program with only basic University infrastructural support. Taking the risk of using "at risk" horses paid off, with positive outcomes for all.

  6. Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon cuniculi in horses kept under different management systems in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Buňatová, Z.; Civišová, H.; Maršálek, M.; Kváč, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 190, 3-4 (2012), s. 573-577 ISSN 0304-4017 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Horse * Enterocytozoon bieneusi * Encephalitozoon cuniculi * PCR * ITS * Natural infection Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.381, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304401712003676

  7. A survey for piroplasmids in horses and Bactrian camels in North-Eastern Mongolia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sloboda, M.; Jirků, Milan; Lukešová, D.; Qablan, M.; Batsukh, Z.; Fiala, Ivan; Horin, P.; Modrý, David; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 179, 1-3 (2011), 246-249 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/09/1972 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Piroplasmosis * Babesia * Theileria * Horse * Bactrian camel * Dog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.579, year: 2011

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in exercised thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D; McKemie, Dan S; Arthur, Rick M; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael; Thevis, Mario; Kass, Philip H

    2017-09-01

    Although developed as a therapeutic medication, meldonium has found widespread use in human sports and was recently added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. Its reported abuse potential in human sports has led to concern by regulatory authorities about the possible misuse of meldonium in equine athletics. The potential abuse in equine athletes along with the limited data available regarding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in horses necessitates further study. Eight exercised adult thoroughbred horses received a single oral dose of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 or 21.4 mg/kg of meldonium. Blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. Maximum serum concentrations ranged from 440.2 to 1147 ng/mL and the elimination half-life from 422 to 647.8 h. Serum concentrations were below the limit of quantitation by days 4, 7, 12 and 12 for doses of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 and 21.4 mg/kg, respectively. Urine concentrations were below the limit of detection by day 44 following administration of 3.5 mg/kg and day 51 for all other dose groups. No adverse effects were observed following meldonium administration. While the group numbers were small, changes in heart rate were observed in the 3.5 mg/kg dose group (n = 1). Glucose concentrations changed significantly in all dose groups studied (n = 2 per dose group). Similar to that reported for humans, the detection time of meldonium in biological samples collected from horses is prolonged, which should allow for satisfactory regulation in performance horses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Relevance of test information in horse breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducro, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to determine the role of test results of young

    horses in selection for sport performance, 2) to assess the genetic diversity

    of a closed horse breed and 3) the consequences of inbreeding for male

    reproduction. The study was

  10. Incomplete linear tibial fractures in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.J.; Allhands, R.V.; Baker, G.J.; Boero, M.J.; Foreman, J.H.; Hyyppa, T.; Huhn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Incomplete linear tibial fractures were identified in two horses with the aid of scintigraphy. Both horses were treated successfully by strict stall confinement, and both returned to normal athletic activity. Scintigraphy can be used to facilitate the generally difficult diagnosis of incomplete tibial fractures

  11. Exploring the virome of diseased horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Giannitti, Federico; Low, Jason; Keyes, Casey; Ullmann, Leila S.; Deng, Xutao; Aleman, Monica; Pesavento, Patricia A.; Pusterla, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics was used to characterize viral genomes in clinical specimens of horses with various organ-specific diseases of unknown aetiology. A novel parvovirus as well as a previously described hepacivirus closely related to human hepatitis C virus and equid herpesvirus 2 were identified in the cerebrospinal fluid of horses with neurological signs. Four co-infecting picobirnaviruses, including an unusual genome with fused RNA segments, and a divergent anellovirus were found in the plasma of two febrile horses. A novel cyclovirus genome was characterized from the nasal secretion of another febrile animal. Lastly, a small circular DNA genome with a Rep gene, from a virus we called kirkovirus, was identified in the liver and spleen of a horse with fatal idiopathic hepatopathy. This study expands the number of viruses found in horses, and characterizes their genomes to assist future epidemiological studies of their transmission and potential association with various equine diseases. PMID:26044792

  12. Culicoides species attracted to horses with and without insect hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijt, van der R.; Boom, van den R.; Jongema, Y.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine (1) which species of Culicoides is most commonly attracted to horses, (2) whether horses suffering insect hypersensitivity attract more Culicoides spp. than unaffected horses, and (3) the times when Culicoides spp. are most active. Horses affected by insect

  13. 29 CFR 780.122 - Activities relating to race horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities relating to race horses. 780.122 Section 780.122... Activities relating to race horses. Employees engaged in the breeding, raising, and training of horses on..., employees engaged in the racing, training, and care of horses and other activities performed off the farm in...

  14. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be landed...

  15. 9 CFR 93.311 - Milk from quarantined horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Milk from quarantined horses. 93.311... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.311 Milk from quarantined horses. Milk or cream from horses quarantined under the provisions of this part shall not be used by any person other...

  16. 9 CFR 11.4 - Inspection and detention of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection and detention of horses. 11... AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.4 Inspection and detention of horses. For the purpose of effective enforcement of the Act: (a) Each horse owner, exhibitor, trainer, or other person...

  17. 9 CFR 93.312 - Manure from quarantined horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manure from quarantined horses. 93.312... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.312 Manure from quarantined horses. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the horses producing same. ...

  18. 9 CFR 93.317 - Horses from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Canada. 93.317 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Canada 16 § 93.317 Horses from Canada. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, horses from Canada shall be inspected as provided in § 93.306; shall be...

  19. Effect of early training on the jumping technique of horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaría, Susana; Bobbert, Maarten F.; Back, Willem; Barneveld, Ab; van Weeren, P. Rene

    Objective - To investigate the effects of early training for jumping by comparing the jumping technique of horses that had received early training with that of horses raised conventionally. Animals - 40 Dutch Warmblood horses. Procedure - The horses were analyzed kinematically during free jumping at

  20. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry from Mexico shall be inspected as provided in §§ 93.306 and 93.323; shall be accompanied by a...

  1. Injuries in group kept horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdell, C.M.; Jorgensen, G.M.; Keeling, L.

    2014-01-01

    developed and validated a scoring system for external injuries in horses to be able to record the severity of a lesion in a standardized and simple way under field conditions. The scoring system has five categories from insignificant loss of hair to severe, life threatening injuries. It was used...... of different breeds, age and gender. Most injuries occurred the day after mixing. Injuries of the more severe categories 4 and 5, which normally would necessitate veterinary care and/or loss of function for some time, were not observed at all. The minor injuries categorized as 1-2 counted for 99% of the total...

  2. Endocrine Disease in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andy E

    2016-08-01

    Aging horses may be at particular risk of endocrine disease. Two major equine endocrinopathies, pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction and equine metabolic syndrome, are commonly encountered in an aging population and may present with several recognizable signs, including laminitis. Investigation, treatment, and management of these diseases are discussed. Additionally, aging may be associated with development of rarer endocrinopathic problems, often associated with neoplasia, including diabetes mellitus and other confounders of glucose homeostasis, as well as thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal diseases. Brief details of the recognition and management of these conditions are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of hoof diseases in horses using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, M.; Nowak, M.; Kaufels, N.; Tambur, Z.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Bergische Tierklinik), Germany, of 39 horses with hoof diseases. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses), laminitis (seven horses), keratnoma (six horses) and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses). The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnose in five horses. In four of horses no pathologic changes of the hoof were determined by computed tomography

  4. Distal phalanx fractures in horses: a survey of 274 horses with radiographic assessment of healing in 36 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honnas, C.M.; O'Brien, T.R.; Linford, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The case records of 274 horses with fractures of the distal phalanx were reviewed. Fifty-two horses had bilateral forelimb fractures, for a total of 326 distal phalanx fractures. The fractures were classified into one of five previously described types, based on the radiographic anatomic configuration of the fracture. Solar margin fractures, which have been briefly described in other reports and previously classified as type V fractures, were identified in 132 horses. This type of fracture is distinct from other distal phalanx fractures. Due to the high incidence of solar margin fractures, these fractures were classified as a separate type (type VI). Follow-up radiographic examinations to assess fracture healing were available for 36 horses. Twenty-two horses with distal phalanx fractures (three type I, nine type II, two type III, one type IV, one type V, and six type VI) had radiographic evidence of complete bony union of the fracture at a mean of 11 months after injury. Eight horses with conplete type II fractures involving the articular surface had bony union of the body and solar margin, but not the subchondral bone at the articular surface, a mean of 11 months after injury. Six horses (four type II and two type IV) had little radiographic evidence of bony healing during the follow-up period. All fractures that eventually healed had evidence of progression toward bony union by 6 months after injury

  5. Automated Design of Propellant-Optimal, End-to-End, Low-Thrust Trajectories for Trojan Asteroid Tours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jeffrey; Howell, Kathleen; Wilson, Roby

    2013-01-01

    The Sun-Jupiter Trojan asteroids are celestial bodies of great scientific interest as well as potential resources offering water and other mineral resources for longterm human exploration of the solar system. Previous investigations under this project have addressed the automated design of tours within the asteroid swarm. This investigation expands the current automation scheme by incorporating options for a complete trajectory design approach to the Trojan asteroids. Computational aspects of the design procedure are automated such that end-to-end trajectories are generated with a minimum of human interaction after key elements and constraints associated with a proposed mission concept are specified.

  6. [Comment on “The Paradigm: Thomas Kuhn and the Trojan horse”] Comment: The finer points of mythology and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Ajax L.

    In his recent write-up [Eos, February 3, 1998, p. 62], Dev L. Advocate makes an interesting case comparing aspects of scientific revolutions to the Trojan War. He comments “no one it seems has read Kuhn's book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.…” It would seem that few have read Homer's Iliad or are aware of subsequent events outlined in the now lost Nostoi. Advocate's short description of the Trojan War leaves a great deal to be desired. Western literature has its deepest (temporal) roots in the writings ascribed to Homer. Based on the English translation of Richmond Lattimore, I raise questions on two points.

  7. Horse Welfare and Natural Values on Semi-Natural and Extensive Pastures in Finland: Synergies and Trade-Offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Saastamoinen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In several regions in Europe, the horse is becoming a common grazer on semi-natural and cultivated grasslands, though the pasturing benefits for animals and biodiversity alike are not universally appreciated. The composition of ground vegetation on pastures determines the value of both the forage for grazing animals as well as the biodiversity values for species associated with the pastoral ecosystems. We studied three pastures, each representing one of the management types in southern Finland (latitudes 60–61: semi-natural, permanent and cultivated grassland. All have been grazed exclusively by horses for several decades. We aimed to evaluate feeding values and horses’ welfare, on the one hand, and impacts of horses on biodiversity in boreal conditions, on the other. Though there were differences among the pastures, the nutritional value of the vegetation in all three pastures met the energy and protein needs of most horse categories through the whole grazing season. Some mineral concentrations were low compared to the requirements, and supplementation of Cu, Zn and Na is needed to balance the mineral intake. Only minor injuries or health problems were observed. All metrics of biological values, as well as number of species eaten by horses, were particularly high in a semi-natural pasture compared to other pasture types. The highest ratio of species cover preferred by horses to the total cover was found in the permanent pasture, while at the regularly re-seeded pasture, there was a particularly high cover of species, indicating low biodiversity values on grassland. There was, therefore, a trade-off between the quantity of forage and biological values in pastures, but not in quality. The results provide clear indication both for the suitability of the studied pasture types to horses and for grazing of horses for biodiversity management. In each pasture type, specific management is needed to simultaneously achieve objectives of adequate

  8. Open Fracture of the Forearm Bones due to Horse Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Santoshi, John Ashutosh; Leshem, Lall

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures have been described mainly following falling accidents in horse-related injuries. Horse bites are uncommon accidents. We present a case of open fracture of the forearm due to horse bite. Case Report: A 35-year-old male farm-worker presented to the emergency room with alleged history of horse bite to the right forearm about 2 hours prior to presentation while feeding the horse. There was deformity of the forearm with multiple puncture wounds, deep abrasions and small...

  9. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu; Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H 2 S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H 2 S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“without H 2 S”) and H 2 S–CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“with H 2 S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H 2 S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H 2 S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H 2 S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO 2 and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs

  10. Redesign of the spent fuel storage racks at the Trojan Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stump, K.

    1987-01-01

    The spent fuel pool (SFP) at the Trojan Nuclear Plant located near Prescott, Oregon, was originally designed to hold 1.33 cores worth of spent fuel assemblies. Due to the delay in the site selection and preparation process for the spent fuel repository, the SFP storage capacity was increased in 1978 from 260 assemblies to 651 assemblies and in 1983 was increased again from 651 to 1408 assemblies to allow Trojan to continue operations through the year 2003 with a full core reserve in the SFP. Now it appears unlikely that a high level waste repository will be in operation before 2010. This indicates that a further capacity increase in the SFP is required to allow commercial operation until 2010, at which time the repository should be open to receive spent fuel. To accomplish this, an increase of seven times the original SFP capacity of 260 assemblies is needed. This paper presents a spent fuel assembly rack design that enables the required capacity increase in the SFP to be met. By the use of a boron carbide - silicon polymer inside a titanium/vanadium honeycomb as a neutron absorber between the fuel assemblies and by increasing the metal to water ratio of the spent fuel pool to harden the neutron energy spectrum the capacity of the SFP is increased to 1880 assemblies for an increase of 7.23 times the original spent fuel pool capacity. The multiplication factor for the pool with every fuel assembly slot filled in the new rack system is 0.62; well below the NRC regulatory limit of keff < 0.95. The capacity increase with allow the commercial operation of the Trojan Nuclear Plant through 2010 with a full core reserve in the spent fuel pool

  11. Lunar cycles at mating do not influence sex ratio at birth in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J J; Cuervo-Arango, J; Santa Juliana, L

    2015-02-01

    It is scientifically demonstrated that lunar cycles have important effects on several biological events. Controversy exists about the lunar influence on human and animal parturition. In addition, in the horse industry, especially in Polo Horse breeders of Argentina and around the world there is a higher demand for female offspring than for males. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between the lunar phase at the time of mating and the sex ratio at birth in horses. The Argentinean Stud Book provided information related to all matings registered for Thoroughbred and Arab horses between 2003 and 2011. Statistical associations were tested between dates of matings at different lunar phases or days and sex ratio at birth. A total of 65.535 gestations were studied. Overall, sex ratio at birth resulted in 33.396 fillies (50.96%) and 32.139 colts (49.04%). The percentages of males and females at birth were not statistically different amongst the different lunar phases or days. We can strongly conclude that managing the breeding dates in relation to lunar cycles in order to manipulate the sex ratio of the offspring is not a viable option in horses.

  12. Stress and its effects on horses reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal M. AboEl-Maaty

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 mares and horses were subjected to blood sampling for determining the effect of management (farm, reproductive condition, sex, age, breed and month of the year during breeding on circulating levels of cortisol and sex hormones. Blood samples were collected from December to the following June from four farms. Blood sera underwent testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol assaying using ELISA kits. Cortisol levels were significantly low in lactating mares during their foal heat but significantly high levels were recorded in both repeat breeder mares and horses used for racing. High and significant testosterone and estradiol levels were recorded in both stallions used for breeding especially after semen collection and early pregnant mares. Similar testosterone levels were recorded in both early pregnant mares and racing horses but high levels were recorded in stallions. Estradiol was high in both early pregnant and mares with endometritis but the highest levels were observed in stallions. Horses held in private farms had high cortisol levels compared to those of governmental farms. In contrast to mares, horses had low cortisol and high estradiol levels. Cortisol levels were high from April to June (Spring and early summer compared to its levels from December to March (Winter. Arab horses had low cortisol compared to native and imported foreign breeds. In conclusion, environmental condition, exercise, breed, management and the purpose of raising horses all are affecting its cortisol levels.

  13. Generalization of a tactile stimulus in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, D M; Lewis, P

    1993-05-01

    Using horses, we investigated the control of operant behavior by a tactile stimulus (the training stimulus) and the generalization of behavior to six other similar test stimuli. In a stall, the experimenters mounted a response panel in the doorway. Located on this panel were a response lever and a grain dispenser. The experimenters secured a tactile-stimulus belt to the horse's back. The stimulus belt was constructed by mounting seven solenoids along a piece of burlap in a manner that allowed each to provide the delivery of a tactile stimulus, a repetitive light tapping, at different locations (spaced 10.0 cm apart) along the horse's back. Two preliminary steps were necessary before generalization testing: training a measurable response (lip pressing) and training on several reinforcement schedules in the presence of a training stimulus (tapping by one of the solenoids). We then gave each horse two generalization test sessions. Results indicated that the horses' behavior was effectively controlled by the training stimulus. Horses made the greatest number of responses to the training stimulus, and the tendency to respond to the other test stimuli diminished as the stimuli became farther away from the training stimulus. These findings are discussed in the context of behavioral principles and their relevance to the training of horses.

  14. On optimal (non-Trojan) semi-Latin squares with side n and block size n: Construction procedure and admissible permutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigbu, P.E.; Ukekwe, E.C.; Ikekeonwu, G.A.M.

    2006-12-01

    There is a special family of the (n x n)/k semi-Latin squares called the Trojan squares which are optimal among semi-Latin squares of equivalent sizes. Unfortunately, Trojan squares do not exist for all k; for instance, there is no Trojan square for k ≥ n. However, the need usually arises for constructing optimal semi-Latin squares where no Trojan squares exist. Bailey made a conjecture on optimal semi-Latin squares for k ≥ n and based on this conjecture, optimal non-Trojan semi-Latin squares are here constructed for k = n, considering the inherent Trojan squares for k < n. A lemma substantiating this conjecture for k = n is given and proved. In addition, the properties for the admissible permutation sets used in constructing these optimal squares are made evident based on the systematic-group-theoretic algorithm of Bailey and Chigbu. Algorithms for identifying the admissible permutations as well as constructing the optimal non-Trojan (n x n)/k = n semi-Latin squares for odd n and n = 4 are given. (author)

  15. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Trojan and Maine Yankee nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Bruce A.; Orlando, Dominick A.

    2006-01-01

    Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in the decommissioning planning, the conduct of decommissioning operations, the volume of low-level radioactive waste, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated its 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to reduce the 10 CFR Part 50 license to only the requirements for the ISFSI. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing, there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, stakeholder and public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a citizen group and resulted in State legislation that lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 0.25 milli-Sievert/year (mSv/yr) (25 mrem/yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs) that were well below the NRC DCGL screening values. This contributed to

  16. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)-loaded Trojan microparticles for targeted aerosol delivery to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Frederic; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Targeted aerosol delivery to specific regions of the lung may improve therapeutic efficiency and minimise unwanted side effects. Targeted delivery could potentially be achieved with porous microparticles loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)-in combination with a target-directed magnetic gradient field. The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate the aerodynamic properties of SPIONs-loaded Trojan microparticles after delivery from a dry powder inhaler. Microparticles made of SPIONs, PEG and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) were formulated by spray drying and characterised by various physicochemical methods. Aerodynamic properties were evaluated using a next generation cascade impactor (NGI), with or without a magnet positioned at stage 2. Mixing appropriate proportions of SPIONs, PEG and HPβCD allowed Trojan microparticle to be formulated. These particles had a median geometric diameter of 2.8±0.3μm and were shown to be sensitive to the magnetic field induced by a magnet having a maximum energy product of 413.8kJ/m(3). However, these particles, characterised by a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 10.2±2.0μm, were considered to be not inhalable. The poor aerodynamic properties resulted from aggregation of the particles. The addition of (NH4)2CO3 and magnesium stearate (MgST) to the formulation improved the aerodynamic properties of the Trojan particles and resulted in a MMAD of 2.2±0.8μm. In the presence of a magnetic field on stage 2 of the NGI, the amount of particles deposited at this stage increased 4-fold from 4.8±0.7% to 19.5±3.3%. These Trojan particles appeared highly sensitive to the magnetic field and their deposition on most of the stages of the NGI was changed in the presence compared to the absence of the magnet. If loaded with a pharmaceutical active ingredient, these particles may be useful for treating localised lung disease such as cancer nodules or bacterial infectious foci. Copyright

  17. Olivine Composition of the Mars Trojan 5261 Eureka: Spitzer IRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L. F.; Burt, B. J.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Trilling, D.

    2011-01-01

    The largest Mars trojan, 5261 Eureka, is one of two prototype "Sa" asteroids in the Bus-Demeo taxonomy. Analysis of its visible/near-IR spectrum led to the conclusion that it might represent either an angritic analog or an olivine-rich composition such as an R chondrite. Spitzer IRS data (5-30 micrometers) have enabled us to resolve this ambiguity. The thermal-IR spectrum exhibits strong olivine reststrahlen features consistent with a composition of approximately equals Fo60-70. Laboratory spectra of R chondrites, brachinites, and chassignites are dominated by similar features.

  18. BREEDING AND UTILIZATION OF ARABIAN HORSE TODAY

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasta Mandić; Josip Ljubešić; Tomo Rastija; Živko Bošnjak

    2000-01-01

    Arab horse raising has a hundred year old tradition. A real stud farm raising started by purchasing original reproductive material from Asia in 1895, 1897 and 1899. Apart from state stud in Goražde, Arab horse was also raised in several private stud farms, especially in Slavonia and Srijem region. By the end of the II World war Arab horse raising was restricted to only 2-3 stud farms, regardless the above mentioned oldest Arab stud farm Goražde. According to reports refering to en...

  19. BREEDING AND UTILIZATION OF ARABIAN HORSE TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Mandić

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Arab horse raising has a hundred year old tradition. A real stud farm raising started by purchasing original reproductive material from Asia in 1895, 1897 and 1899. Apart from state stud in Goražde, Arab horse was also raised in several private stud farms, especially in Slavonia and Srijem region. By the end of the II World war Arab horse raising was restricted to only 2-3 stud farms, regardless the above mentioned oldest Arab stud farm Goražde. According to reports refering to end of 1940 in former Yugoslavia there were slightly more than 150 grown up thoroughbred Arab heads, stallions and mares in both private and public property. A number of well known stud farms was reduced, thus, Arab horse raising was limited only to stud farms Goražde, Inocens Dvor and Karađorđevo. Sires were mostly used in Bosnian-mountain horse breeding whereas in plain areas they were used for ceossing with heavy draft mares or raising of, in that time numerous represented, nonius breed. The year 1970 was characterized by Arab horses reduction, thereby raising stagnation. Horse raising was closed, so, 77 Sabich stallion, bought in Germany, started again Arab horse raising, firstly in Goražde. It was also attributed by raising establishment of agricultural economy Višnjica near Slatina. At the same time Arab horse raising increased slowly at individual raisers in Kutina, Vrbovsko, Istria, Čađavica and Zagreb vicinity. According to available data from 1999 there were approx. 132 stallions and mares due to horse raisers scattered throught Croatia. All male and female reproductive heads were mostly used as raising heads for thoroughbred raising or for crossing with other breeds which is justified by the data from the period 1930-1935. On the other hand one part of reproductive heads, especially males, were used as sports heads for gallop races and distance riding as Arab horses were used by their arrival to present areas and by Arab horse raising tradition.

  20. Genetic Correlations between Young Horse and Dressage Competition Results in Danish Warmblood Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Lina Johanna Maria; Christiansen, Karina; Holm, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    .13˗0.48) than the breeding goal trait of dressage competition results (0.16). Young horse results showed medium high to high genetic correlations to dressage competition results (0.32˗0.91) where most recorded young horse gait- and conformation scores contributed with considerable information to future dressage...... competition results. If considering both accuracy of each young horse trait and genetic correlation to dressage competition results, as rg×rIA, the best young horse indicator traits for future performance were capacity, trot, canter, and rideability, all under own rider. Most important conformation traits...

  1. Seismic qualification of the rotary relay for use in the Trojan and Diablo Canyon Auxiliary Safeguards Cabinets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggio, M.D.; Jarecki, S.J.

    1977-10-01

    This report presents the results of the analysis performed for the seismic qualification of the rotary relay for use in the Trojan and Diablo Canyon Auxiliary Safeguards Cabinets. A finite element model of the cabinet was developed from seismic test results. This model was analytically subjected to a simulated 3D floor acceleration time history that enveloped, simultaneously, the Trojan and the June 1969 Diablo Canyon Safe Shutdown Earthquake requirements. The dynamic response of the cabinet at the mounting location of the rotary relays was determined. The calculated acceleration time histories were converted to response spectra and these response spectra were compared to the test response spectra successfully achieved during the rotary relay seismic qualification tests. It was found that the dynamic motion levels at the rotary relays, when mounted in the Trojan or Diablo Canyon Auxiliary Safeguards Cabinets, do not exceed the levels for which they were previously seismically qualified by tests. Consequently, the rotary relays are seismically qualified for use in the Trojan or Diablo Canyon Auxiliary Safeguards Cabinets

  2. Verification of neutron pad and 17 x 7 guide tube designs by preoperational tests on the Trojan I power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloyd, C.N.; Singleton, N.R.; Ciaramitaro, W.

    1976-05-01

    The internals vibration measurement program carried out on the Trojan-1 reactor during preoperational testing is described. The flow induced response of a 17 x 17 guide tube and the neutron pad core barrel were deduced from the plant test data and compared with the expected responses. The results showed good agreement with expected vibration levels

  3. Reconstructing Laomedon’s Reign in Homer: Olympiomachia, Poseidon’s Wall, and the Earlier Trojan War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Porter

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeric allusions to Laomedon, the walls of Troy, and the first Trojan War reflect a backstory of previous fighting among the Olympians, which helps to explain the Iliadic portrait of Zeus’s fear of insubordination among the other gods.

  4. Ancient genomes revisit the ancestry of domestic and Przewalski's horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunitz, Charleen; Fages, Antoine; Hanghøj, Kristian; Albrechtsen, Anders; Khan, Naveed; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Owens, Ivy J; Felkel, Sabine; Bignon-Lau, Olivier; de Barros Damgaard, Peter; Mittnik, Alissa; Mohaseb, Azadeh F; Davoudi, Hossein; Alquraishi, Saleh; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Crubézy, Eric; Benecke, Norbert; Olsen, Sandra; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Massy, Ken; Pitulko, Vladimir; Kasparov, Aleksei; Brem, Gottfried; Hofreiter, Michael; Mukhtarova, Gulmira; Baimukhanov, Nurbol; Lõugas, Lembi; Onar, Vedat; Stockhammer, Philipp W; Krause, Johannes; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Undrakhbold, Sainbileg; Erdenebaatar, Diimaajav; Lepetz, Sébastien; Mashkour, Marjan; Ludwig, Arne; Wallner, Barbara; Merz, Victor; Merz, Ilja; Zaibert, Viktor; Willerslev, Eske; Librado, Pablo; Outram, Alan K; Orlando, Ludovic

    2018-04-06

    The Eneolithic Botai culture of the Central Asian steppes provides the earliest archaeological evidence for horse husbandry, ~5500 years ago, but the exact nature of early horse domestication remains controversial. We generated 42 ancient-horse genomes, including 20 from Botai. Compared to 46 published ancient- and modern-horse genomes, our data indicate that Przewalski's horses are the feral descendants of horses herded at Botai and not truly wild horses. All domestic horses dated from ~4000 years ago to present only show ~2.7% of Botai-related ancestry. This indicates that a massive genomic turnover underpins the expansion of the horse stock that gave rise to modern domesticates, which coincides with large-scale human population expansions during the Early Bronze Age. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. EMPIRICAL CONSTRAINTS ON TROJAN COMPANIONS AND ORBITAL ECCENTRICITIES IN 25 TRANSITING EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudhan, N.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a search for Trojan companions to 25 transiting exoplanets. We use the technique of Ford and Gaudi, in which a difference is sought between the observed transit time and the transit time that is calculated by fitting a two-body Keplerian orbit to the radial-velocity data. This technique is sensitive to the imbalance of mass at the L4/L5 points of the planet-star orbit. No companions were detected above 2σ confidence. The median 2σ upper limit is 56 M + , and the most constraining limit is 2.8 M + for the case of GJ 436. A similar survey using forthcoming data from the Kepler satellite mission, along with the radial-velocity data that will be needed to confirm transit candidates, will be sensitive to 10-50 M + Trojan companions in the habitable zones of their parent stars. As a by-product of this study, we present empirical constraints on the eccentricities of the planetary orbits, including those which have previously been assumed to be circular. The limits on eccentricity are of interest for investigations of tidal circularization and for bounding possible systematic errors in the measured planetary radii and the predicted times of secondary eclipses.

  6. Secondary resonances and the boundary of effective stability of Trojan motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2018-02-01

    One of the most interesting features in the libration domain of co-orbital motions is the existence of secondary resonances. For some combinations of physical parameters, these resonances occupy a large fraction of the domain of stability and rule the dynamics within the stable tadpole region. In this work, we present an application of a recently introduced `basic Hamiltonian model' H_b for Trojan dynamics (Páez and Efthymiopoulos in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 121(2):139, 2015; Páez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 126:519, 2016): we show that the inner border of the secondary resonance of lowermost order, as defined by H_b, provides a good estimation of the region in phase space for which the orbits remain regular regardless of the orbital parameters of the system. The computation of this boundary is straightforward by combining a resonant normal form calculation in conjunction with an `asymmetric expansion' of the Hamiltonian around the libration points, which speeds up convergence. Applications to the determination of the effective stability domain for exoplanetary Trojans (planet-sized objects or asteroids) which may accompany giant exoplanets are discussed.

  7. Whole mitochondrial genome sequencing of domestic horses reveals incorporation of extensive wild horse diversity during domestication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippold Sebastian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA target enrichment by micro-array capture combined with high throughput sequencing technologies provides the possibility to obtain large amounts of sequence data (e.g. whole mitochondrial DNA genomes from multiple individuals at relatively low costs. Previously, whole mitochondrial genome data for domestic horses (Equus caballus were limited to only a few specimens and only short parts of the mtDNA genome (especially the hypervariable region were investigated for larger sample sets. Results In this study we investigated whole mitochondrial genomes of 59 domestic horses from 44 breeds and a single Przewalski horse (Equus przewalski using a recently described multiplex micro-array capture approach. We found 473 variable positions within the domestic horses, 292 of which are parsimony-informative, providing a well resolved phylogenetic tree. Our divergence time estimate suggests that the mitochondrial genomes of modern horse breeds shared a common ancestor around 93,000 years ago and no later than 38,000 years ago. A Bayesian skyline plot (BSP reveals a significant population expansion beginning 6,000-8,000 years ago with an ongoing exponential growth until the present, similar to other domestic animal species. Our data further suggest that a large sample of wild horse diversity was incorporated into the domestic population; specifically, at least 46 of the mtDNA lineages observed in domestic horses (73% already existed before the beginning of domestication about 5,000 years ago. Conclusions Our study provides a window into the maternal origins of extant domestic horses and confirms that modern domestic breeds present a wide sample of the mtDNA diversity found in ancestral, now extinct, wild horse populations. The data obtained allow us to detect a population expansion event coinciding with the beginning of domestication and to estimate both the minimum number of female horses incorporated into the domestic gene pool and the

  8. Refractive state of the Spanish Thoroughbred horse: a comparison with the Crossbred horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull-Cotrina, Jorge; Molleda, Jose M; Gallardo, José; Martín-Suárez, Eva

    2013-01-01

    To assess the refractive state of the equine eye utilizing retinoscopy. To compare the refractive state of Spanish Thoroughbred horses with the refractive state of Crossbred horses. The refractive state of 135 horses (264 eyes) was assessed utilizing streak retinoscopy. Two perpendicular meridians were examined in order to assess astigmatism at a working distance of approximately 67 cm. A group of 81 Spanish Thoroughbred horses was compared with a group of 54 Crossbred horses. Cyclopentolate ophthalmic solution was instilled in the eyes of a group of 18 horses to determine if accommodation has any influence on the assessment of the refractive state.   Mean ± SE refractive state of all horses examined was -0.17 ± 0.04 D. The mean refractive state of the Spanish Thoroughbred was -0.28 ± 0.06 D while that of the Crossbred was -0.01 ± 0.05 D. The refractive state of the Spanish Thoroughbred was found to be statistically different to that of the Crossbred. The most prevalent refractive state was emmetropia in all cases, followed by hyperopia for the Crossbred, and myopia for the Spanish Thoroughbred. Astigmatism ≥0.50 D present in both eyes from the same individual was found in 21.7% of all horses examined. Anisometropia ≥1.00 D was diagnosed in 4 out of 129 horses with both visual eyes. Cycloplegia did not statistically affect the refractive state of the evaluated eyes. The equine eye has a refractive state close to emmetropia. Myopia is higher among Spanish Thoroughbred horses than among Crossbred horses. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  9. Miscellaneous neurologic or neuromuscular disorders in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica

    2011-12-01

    NMD is an important cause of morbidity in horses. Signs of dysfunction could be variable depending on the specific area affected. NM disease can go unrecognized if a thorough evaluation is not performed in diseased horses. Electrodiagnostic testing is an area that has the potential to document and improve our understanding of NM disease yet is uncommonly performed. Keeping an open and observant mind will enhance our ability to search and find answers.

  10. Generalization of a tactile stimulus in horses.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, D M; Lewis, P

    1993-01-01

    Using horses, we investigated the control of operant behavior by a tactile stimulus (the training stimulus) and the generalization of behavior to six other similar test stimuli. In a stall, the experimenters mounted a response panel in the doorway. Located on this panel were a response lever and a grain dispenser. The experimenters secured a tactile-stimulus belt to the horse's back. The stimulus belt was constructed by mounting seven solenoids along a piece of burlap in a manner that allowed...

  11. Horses--Haulers, Racers, and Healers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Providing healing support for everyone from an autistic child to a wounded veteran is just the latest addition to the horse's 5,000-year-old résumé. No animal has played a greater role in human history. Horses have carried us into war, pulled our loads, plowed our fields, and transported us over all kinds of terrain. Freed of such drudgery by…

  12. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A Morgan

    Full Text Available Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing's disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6 and horses with EL (n = 6 destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein and the facial skin (facial skin arteries by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10-9-10-5M and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10-9-10-5M and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10-9-10-5M was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01. In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006 and veins (P = 0.009 from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof.

  13. Spine fractures caused by horse riding

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenga, Jan; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Elzinga, Matthijs J.; Bakker, Fred C.; Haarman, Henk J. T. M.; Patka, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective study and review of literature. Objectives: Study of demographic data concerning spinal fractures caused by horse riding, classification of fractures according to the AO and Load Sharing classifications, evaluation of mid-term radiological results and long-term functional results. Methods: A review of medical reports and radiological examinations of patients presented to our hospital with horse riding-related spine fractures over a 13-year period; long-term functio...

  14. Do horses generalise between objects during habituation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Zharkikh, Tatjana; Ladevig, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Habituation to frightening stimuli plays an important role in horse training. To investigate the extent to which horses generalise between different visual objects, 2-year-old stallions were habituated to feeding from a container placed inside a test arena and assigned as TEST (n = 12) or REFERENCE...... horses (n = 12). In Experiment 1, TEST horses were habituated to six objects (ball, barrel, board, box, cone, cylinder) presented in sequence in a balanced order. The objects were of similar size but different colour. Each object was placed 0.5 m in front of the feed container, forcing the horses to pass...... the object to get to the food. TEST horses received as many 2 min exposures to each object as required to meet a habituation criterion. We recorded behavioural reactions to the object, latency to feed, total eating time, and heart rate (HR) during all exposures. There was no significant decrease in initial...

  15. The Effect of Increasing Numbers of Horses of Undefined Breed on Horse Breeding in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Bihuncová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyse the numbers and division of horses of undefined breed. At the present time this group is the most numerous in the entire population of horses. Horses of undefined breed do not come under any breeder union which would provide reports about these horses; these horses are only registered and breeders are informed only about their numbers. Our study is the first to deal with the problem of increasing numbers of horses of undefined breed. The database contained 22 211 horses not entered registered in any of the stud books. In the database we filed approved horses born between 1972 and 1 September 2012 and horses registered from 1987. The data were processed in the Excel programme and results were evaluated in graphs. The most frequent horse in this group was the warm-blood type (n = 9 303, pony type (n = 6 285, cold-blooded type (n = 2 663 and unlisted horses (n = 2 278. Since 2001 the number of registered horses of undefined breed has increased. The most numerous dams of horses of undefined breed is the Czech warm-blood with 1 912 offspring; dams of the English Thoroughbred with 552 offspring and mares of the utility Huzule horse with 492 offspring. In the group of registered horses of undefined breed the Czech warm-blood appears in the pedigree of 507 colts and the American Paint Horse in the pedigree of sires of 506 colts. Why the numbers of horses of undefined breed are increasing is the boom of leisure horsemanship and unqualified horse breeding.

  16. 77 FR 33607 - Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... substantively identical form letters submitted by individuals who commented through an animal welfare advocacy... associations, horse and animal welfare advocacy groups, participants in the horse industry, and the general... Show Report'' at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/hp/hp_pubs_reports.shtml . The list of shows...

  17. Comparison between the robo-horse and real horse movements for hippotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji H; Shurtleff, Timothy; Engsberg, Jack; Rafferty, Sandy; You, Joshua Y; You, Isaac Y; You, Sung H

    2014-01-01

    While the novel robotic hippotherapy system has gradually gained clinical application for therapeutic intervention on postural and locomotor control in individuals with neurological or musculoskeletal impairments, the system's validity and reliability for the robotic hippotherapy system has not been well established. The objective of the current study was to investigate the validity and test-retest reliability of the robotic hippotherapy system by comparing with real horse movements. The 3-axis accelerometer sensors attached on the robotic and real horse saddles were used to collect 3-dimensional acceleration data at a preferred walking velocity. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation in the time-to-peak acceleration (TPA) (R(2)=0.997), but little correlation in X-axis acceleration between the real and robotic horses (R(2)=0.177), thus confirming consistent time control and a certain degree of variability between the robotic and real horse movements. The mean resultant accelerations for a real horse and robotic horse were 3.22 m/s(2) and 0.67 m/s(2), respectively, accounting for almost five times greater acceleration in the real horse than the robotic horse.

  18. 76 FR 30864 - Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... prohibiting the showing or selling of sored horses. The regulations in 9 CFR part 11, referred to below as the... substance or device has been used by a person on any limb of a horse or a person has engaged in a practice... the regulations in Sec. 11.2 prohibit the use of devices, methods, and substances that are used to...

  19. Show Horse Welfare: Horse Show Competitors' Understanding, Awareness, and Perceptions of Equine Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Melissa A; Hiney, Kristina; Richardson, Jennifer C; Waite, Karen; Borron, Abigail; Brady, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of stock-type horse show competitors' understanding of welfare and level of concern for stock-type show horses' welfare. Data were collected through an online questionnaire that included questions relating to (a) interest and general understanding of horse welfare, (b) welfare concerns of the horse show industry and specifically the stock-type horse show industry, (c) decision-making influences, and (d) level of empathic characteristics. The majority of respondents indicated they agree or strongly agree that physical metrics should be a factor when assessing horse welfare, while fewer agreed that behavioral and mental metrics should be a factor. Respondent empathy levels were moderate to high and were positively correlated with the belief that mental and behavioral metrics should be a factor in assessing horse welfare. Respondents indicated the inhumane practices that most often occur at stock-type shows include excessive jerking on reins, excessive spurring, and induced excessive unnatural movement. Additionally, respondents indicated association rules, hired trainers, and hired riding instructors are the most influential regarding the decisions they make related to their horses' care and treatment.

  20. Severe polysaccharide storage myopathy in Belgian and Percheron draught horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B A; Credille, K M; Lavoie, J P; Fatone, S; Guard, C; Cummings, J F; Cooper, B J

    1997-05-01

    A severe myopathy leading to death or euthanasia was identified in 4 Belgian and 4 Percheron draught horses age 2-21 years. Clinical signs ranged from overt weakness and muscle atrophy in 2 horses age 2 and 3 years, to recumbency with inability to rise in 6 horses age 4-21 years. In 5 horses there was mild to severe increases in muscle enzyme levels. Clinical diagnoses included equine motor neuron disease (2 horses), post anaesthetic myopathy (2 horses), exertional myopathy (2 horses), myopathy due to unknown (one horse), and equine protozoal myelitis (one horse). Characteristic histopathology of muscle from affected horses was the presence of excessive complex polysaccharide and/or glycogen, revealed by periodic acid-Schiff staining in all cases and by electron microscopy in one case. Evaluation of frozen section histochemistry performed on 2 cases indicated that affected fibres were Type 2 glycolytic fibres. Subsarcolemmal and intracytoplasmic vacuoles were most prominent in 3 horses age 2-4 years, and excessive glycogen, with little or no complex polysaccharide, was the primary compound stored in affected muscle in these young horses. Myopathic changes, including fibre size variation, fibre hypertrophy, internal nuclei, and interstitial fat infiltration, were most prominent in 5 horses age 6-21 years, and the accumulation of complex polysaccharide appeared to increase with age. Mild to moderate segmental myofibre necrosis was present in all cases.

  1. Renal replacement therapy in healthy adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D M; Witty, D; Alcott, C J; Sponseller, B A; Wang, C; Hepworth, K

    2013-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) has been implemented extensively in people to facilitate recovery from acute renal failure (ARF). RRT has not been explored in horses, but might provide a further treatment option in horses with ARF. To investigate efficacy and safety of RRT in horses. Five healthy adult horses. A prospective study was performed on horses restrained in stocks and intravenously connected to a commercial RRT machine to allow continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration to be performed for 6 hours. The RRT machine was set at the following flow rates: blood flow rate 250 mL/min; dialysate rate 3,000 mL/h; prefilter replacement pump 3,000 mL/h; and postfilter replacement pump rate 2,000 mL/h. Balanced electrolyte solution was used as dialysate and replacement fluid. Heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, direct arterial blood pressure, urine output, and various clinicopathologic parameters were measured over the study period. Renal replacement therapy was successfully performed in horses, resulting in a mean creatinine clearance of 0.127 mL/kg/min (68.9 mL/min) and urea reduction ratio of 24%. No adverse effects were detected although a significant decrease in rectal temperature was observed (P ≤ .007). A significant increase in serum phosphorus (P ≤ .001) and decrease in BUN (P replacement therapy can safely and effectively be used in adult horses. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M., E-mail: Mahjoub.Ahmed@jpl.nasa.gov [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H{sub 2}S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H{sub 2}S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“without H{sub 2}S”) and H{sub 2}S–CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“with H{sub 2}S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H{sub 2}S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H{sub 2}S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H{sub 2}S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO{sub 2}and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs.

  3. Motivation for social contact in horses measured by operant conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Jensen, Margit Bak; Nicol, Christine J.

    2011-01-01

    and muzzle contact, respectively, to a familiar companion horse. Horses were housed individually next to their companion horse and separations between pens prevented physical contact. During daily test sessions horses were brought to a test area where they could access an arena allowing social contact. Arena......Although horses are social animals they are often housed individually with limited social contact to other horses and this may compromise their welfare. The present study included eight young female horses and investigated the strength of motivation for access to full social contact, head contact...... test session was recorded. All horses could access all three types of social contact in a cross-over design, and an empty arena was used as control. Motivational strength was assessed using elasticity of demand functions, which were estimated based on the number of rewards earned and FR. Elasticities...

  4. Behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Poulsen, Janne Møller; Luthersson, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Only little is known about behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration, despite the high prevalence of this condition. Our objectives in the present study was to (i) describe the severity of gastric ulceration in horses, housed under relatively standardised conditions, and (ii......) to investigate whether horses with severe glandular gastric ulceration have increased baseline and response concentration of stress hormones and behave differently than control horses. We investigated stomachs of 96 horses at one stud, and compared an ulcer group (n = 30; with severe lesions in the glandular...... conclude that the prevalence of gastric ulcers was high, and our results suggest different factors affecting ulceration in the glandular versus the nonglandular region of the horse stomach. Obvious external signs (e.g. poor body condition) identifying ulcer horses were absent. Horses with severe glandular...

  5. Genetic diversity in German draught horse breeds compared with a group of primitive, riding and wild horses by means of microsatellite DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, K S; Hamann, H; Drögemüller, C; Distl, O

    2004-08-01

    We compared the genetic diversity and distance among six German draught horse breeds to wild (Przewalski's Horse), primitive (Icelandic Horse, Sorraia Horse, Exmoor Pony) or riding horse breeds (Hanoverian Warmblood, Arabian) by means of genotypic information from 30 microsatellite loci. The draught horse breeds included the South German Coldblood, Rhenish German Draught Horse, Mecklenburg Coldblood, Saxon Thuringa Coldblood, Black Forest Horse and Schleswig Draught Horse. Despite large differences in population sizes, the average observed heterozygosity (H(o)) differed little among the heavy horse breeds (0.64-0.71), but was considerably lower than in the Hanoverian Warmblood or Icelandic Horse population. The mean number of alleles (N(A)) decreased more markedly with declining population sizes of German draught horse breeds (5.2-6.3) but did not reach the values of Hanoverian Warmblood (N(A) = 6.7). The coefficient of differentiation among the heavy horse breeds showed 11.6% of the diversity between the heavy horse breeds, as opposed to 21.2% between the other horse populations. The differentiation test revealed highly significant genetic differences among all draught horse breeds except the Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldbloods. The Schleswig Draught Horse was the most distinct draught horse breed. In conclusion, the study demonstrated a clear distinction among the German draught horse breeds and even among breeds with a very short history of divergence like Rhenish German Draught Horse and its East German subpopulations Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldblood.

  6. Gc globulin as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg

    can prevent development of shock and thereby increase survival chances. The in vivo toxicity of Gc-globulin infusion is currently being investigated in horses and other species. Gc-globulin has been demonstrated in horse plasma and its structure closely resembles that of human Gc-globulin. Gc......-globulin concentrations in horses under clinical conditions have never previously been investigated. The Ph.D. project focuses on Gc-globulin as a prognostic marker in horses with acute abdominal pain....

  7. Evolutionary movement of centromeres in horse, donkey, and zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Lucia; Nergadze, Solomon G; Magnani, Elisa; Misceo, Doriana; Francesca Cardone, Maria; Roberto, Roberta; Bertoni, Livia; Attolini, Carmen; Francesca Piras, Maria; de Jong, Pieter; Raudsepp, Terje; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Guérin, Gérard; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Giulotto, Elena

    2006-06-01

    Centromere repositioning (CR) is a recently discovered biological phenomenon consisting of the emergence of a new centromere along a chromosome and the inactivation of the old one. After a CR, the primary constriction and the centromeric function are localized in a new position while the order of physical markers on the chromosome remains unchanged. These events profoundly affect chromosomal architecture. Since horses, asses, and zebras, whose evolutionary divergence is relatively recent, show remarkable morphological similarity and capacity to interbreed despite their chromosomes differing considerably, we investigated the role of CR in the karyotype evolution of the genus Equus. Using appropriate panels of BAC clones in FISH experiments, we compared the centromere position and marker order arrangement among orthologous chromosomes of Burchelli's zebra (Equus burchelli), donkey (Equus asinus), and horse (Equus caballus). Surprisingly, at least eight CRs took place during the evolution of this genus. Even more surprisingly, five cases of CR have occurred in the donkey after its divergence from zebra, that is, in a very short evolutionary time (approximately 1 million years). These findings suggest that in some species the CR phenomenon could have played an important role in karyotype shaping, with potential consequences on population dynamics and speciation.

  8. Research on the Morphological Characteristics Variability of Three Horse Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Cătălin Prisacaru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the characterization of some morphological parameters of some horse population improvedwith stallion of Arab, Hucul and English thoroughbred breeds. The biological material was represented by thestallions belonging to the three breeds and the population improved with them. Measurements have been made inorder to determine the height at withers, oblique length of the trunk, cannon girth and weight. The height at witherspresented smaller dimensions at the Arab and English thoroughbred breeds and at the Hucul breed the stallions had aheight at withers of 140 cm and the improved population 143.80 cm. Oblique length of the trunk presented valuesslightly lower at the improved horses in comparison with the stallions used at mount. The English thoroughbredpresented a value of 21.50 cm of the cannon girth at the improved population in comparison with the value of 19.5cm obtained at the mount stallions. The weight has been lower at the improved populations than the one of thestallions. Most of the morphological characteristics of the improved population are close to the ones if the stallionsused at mount.

  9. [Equine dentistry: Survey on Swiss horse owners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiesser, E; Geyer, H; Kummer, M; Jackson, M

    2017-08-01

    The interest in equine dentistry has significantly increased in the last 15 years. On the part of the veterinarians as well as of the horse owners there is a strong attention to the topic. The aim of the questionnaire was to investigate amongst horse owners what their level of information and preferences about dental treatment are and how they are implemented. The questionnaire was translated into the three national languages and included 20 questions about level and sources of information, frequency of treatments and the horse owner's stance over sedation of the animals. With a return rate of 45% (1'466 of 3'250 sent questionnaires) significant conclusions could be drawn. Horse owners showed a strong demand for clarification regarding tooth problems, the causes, consequences and methods of treatment. More than half of the owners considered themselves not well informed. The treating person was in 66.7% a veterinarian with a special education. Horse owners indicated that information circulated most frequently by word of mouth recommendations and they explicitly wished information from professional and reliable sources. The questionnaire provided a clear result about current equine dental treatments. We suggest that they should be performed by veterinarians only with a special education.

  10. Life Cycle Assessment of Horse Manure Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Eriksson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Horse manure consists of feces, urine, and varying amounts of various bedding materials. The management of horse manure causes environmental problems when emissions occur during the decomposition of organic material, in addition to nutrients not being recycled. The interest in horse manure undergoing anaerobic digestion and thereby producing biogas has increased with an increasing interest in biogas as a renewable fuel. This study aims to highlight the environmental impact of different treatment options for horse manure from a system perspective. The treatment methods investigated are: (1 unmanaged composting; (2 managed composting; (3 large-scale incineration in a waste-fired combined heat and power (CHP plant; (4 drying and small-scale combustion; and (5 liquid anaerobic digestion with thermal pre-treatment. Following significant data uncertainty in the survey, the results are only indicative. No clear conclusions can be drawn regarding any preference in treatment methods, with the exception of their climate impact, for which anaerobic digestion is preferred. The overall conclusion is that more research is needed to ensure the quality of future surveys, thus an overall research effort from horse management to waste management.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of procaterol in thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, K; Nomura, M; Toju, K; Ishikawa, Y; Minamijima, Y; Yamashita, S; Nagata, S

    2016-06-01

    Procaterol (PCR) is a beta-2-adrenergic bronchodilator widely used in Japanese racehorses for treating lower respiratory disease. The pharmacokinetics of PCR following single intravenous (0.5 μg/kg) and oral (2.0 μg/kg) administrations were investigated in six thoroughbred horses. Plasma and urine concentrations of PCR were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma PCR concentration following intravenous administration showed a biphasic elimination pattern. The systemic clearance was 0.47 ± 0.16 L/h/kg, the steady-state volume of the distribution was 1.21 ± 0.23 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 2.85 ± 1.35 h. Heart rate rapidly increased after intravenous administration and gradually decreased thereafter. A strong correlation between heart rate and plasma concentration of PCR was observed. Plasma concentrations of PCR after oral administration were not quantifiable in all horses. Urine concentrations of PCR following intravenous and oral administrations were quantified in all horses until 32 h after administration. Urine PCR concentrations were not significantly different on and after 24 h between intravenous and oral administrations. These results suggest that the bioavailability of orally administrated PCR in horses is very poor, and the drug was eliminated from the body slowly based on urinary concentrations. This report is the first study to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic character of PCR in thoroughbred horses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Damian K; Tompkins, Daniel M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-10-01

    Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based control of pest species. A candidate TFT mutation was recently described in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which confers male-only sterility in the specific isogenic nuclear background in which it is maintained. However, applicability of the TFT relies on mitochondrial mutations whose male-sterilizing effects are general across nuclear genomic contexts. We test this assumption, expressing the candidate TFT-mutation bearing haplotype alongside a range of nuclear backgrounds and comparing its fertility in males, relative to that of control haplotypes. We document consistently lower fertility for males harbouring the TFT mutation, in both competitive and noncompetitive mating contexts, across all nuclear backgrounds screened. This indicates that TFT mutations conferring reduced male fertility can segregate within populations and could be harnessed to facilitate this novel form of pest control.

  13. 9 CFR 93.326 - Horses for immediate slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.326 Horses for immediate slaughter. Horses may be imported from Mexico, subject to the applicable provisions of §§ 93.321, 93.322...

  14. 9 CFR 93.322 - Declaration for horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.322 Declaration for horses. For all horses offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two...

  15. We know next to nothing about vitamin D in horses!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Very few references on vitamin D in horses exist, but the limited research available suggests that the vitamin D physiology of horses may be very different from other species. Horses can obtain vitamin D both through endogenous synthesis in the skin during sunlight exposure and through dietary so...

  16. Micro-Doppler classification of riders and riderless horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmoush, David

    2014-05-01

    Micro-range Micro-Doppler can be used to isolate particular parts of the radar signature, and in this case we demonstrate the differences in the signature between a walking horse versus a walking horse with a rider. Using micro-range micro-Doppler, we can distinguish the radar returns from the rider as separate from the radar returns of the horse.

  17. Internal Fixation of Cervical Fractures in Three Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Fabrice; Brandenberger, Olivier; Mespoulhes-Rivière, Céline

    2016-01-01

    To describe the surgical treatment outcome of cervical fractures in 3 horses. Case report. Three client-owned horses with cervical vertebral fractures. Three horses were refered for neck stiffness, pain, and ataxia after a cervical trauma because of a fall. Radiographic examination showed an oblique displaced fracture of the caudal aspect of the body of the second cervical vertebra (C2) in horse 1, an oblique displaced fracture of the caudal aspect of C4 involving the disc between C4 and C5 in horse 2, and a displaced transverse fracture of the body of the axis (C2) extending to the lateral arches and involving the vertebral canal in horse 3. In horse 1, the fracture was reduced and stabilized using a 14-hole narrow DCP plate, applied ventrally, and fixed with cancellous screws. A cervical fusion was performed. In horses 2 and 3, fracture fixation was performed using a 5-hole narrow LCP and 5 mm locking screws. All horses showed improvement and returned to full activity. The fracture healed in all horses. Internal fixation of cervical fracture in these horses was associated with minimal complications, and was associated with healing and a highly functional outcome in all horses. The LCP was preferred and would be recommended for ventral stabilization of selected cases of vertebral fractures. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Navicular bone fracture in the pelvic limb in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser-Hotz, B.; Ueltschi, G.; Hess, N.

    1991-01-01

    The case history, radiographic and scintigraphic findings of two horses with pelvic limb navicular bone fractures are presented. In both cases the fractures were of traumatic origin. One horse had a bilateral fracture of the navicular bone, distal border, the other horse had a fracture of the proximal articular border in one pelvic limb navicular bone

  19. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torfs, Sara C; Maes, An A; Delesalle, Catherine J; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M; Deprez, Piet

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI

  20. A peptidic hydrogel that may behave as a “Trojan Horse”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Castellucci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A physical hydrogel prepared with the low-molecular-weight hydrogelator (LMWHG CH2(C3H6CO-L-Phe-D-Oxd-OH2 and water/ethanol mixture was applied as a potential “Trojan Horse” carrier into cells. By SEM and XRD analysis we could demonstrate that a fibrous structure is present in the xerogel, making a complex network. The gelator is derived from α-amino acids (Thr, Phe and a fatty acid (azelaic acid and is biocompatible: it was dosed to IGROV-1 cells, which internalized it, without significantly affecting the cell proliferation. To check the internalization process by confocal microscopy, fluorescent hydrogels were prepared, introducing the fluorescent dansyl moiety into the mixture.

  1. Microencapsulation of nanoemulsions: novel Trojan particles for bioactive lipid molecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Ta, Thi Minh Chau; Zhao, Minjie; Messaddeq, Nadia; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2011-01-01

    Nanoemulsions consist of very stable nanodroplets of oil dispersed in an aqueous phase, typically below 300 nm in size. They can be used to obtain a very fine, homogeneous dispersion of lipophilic compounds in water, thus facilitating their handling and use in nanomedicine. However, the drawback is that they are suspended in an aqueous media. This study proposes a novel technique for drying lipid nanoemulsion suspensions to create so-called Trojan particles, ie, polymer microparticles (around 2 μm) which very homogeneously "entrap" the nano-oil droplets (around 150 nm) in their core. Microencapsulation of the nanoemulsions was performed using a spray-drying process and resulted in a dried powder of microparticles. By using a low-energy nanoemulsification method and relatively gentle spray-drying, the process was well suited to sensitive molecules. The model lipophilic molecule tested was vitamin E acetate, encapsulated at around 20% in dried powder. We showed that the presence of nanoemulsions in solution before spray-drying had a significant impact on microparticle size, distribution, and morphology. However, the process itself did not destroy the oil nanodroplets, which could easily be redispersed when the powder was put back in contact with water. High-performance liquid chromatography follow-up of the integrity of the vitamin E acetate showed that the molecules were intact throughout the process, as well as when conserved in their dried form. This study proposes a novel technique using a spray-drying process to microencapsulate nanoemulsions. The multiscale object formed, so-called Trojan microparticles, were shown to successfully encapsulate, protect, and release the lipid nanodroplets.

  2. Accumulation of 90Sr to cattle and horse bones in Hokkaido

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikayama, Yukio; Yagi, Yukio; Shiono, Hiroki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Toru

    1999-01-01

    Since herbivores like cattle and horse take plants contaminated by radioactive fallout, 90 Sr in their bones can be a excellent biological measure of environmental radioactive pollution. The authors continued and reported such investigations on 90 Sr accumulation from 1957 and this paper described the summary from 1987 to 1996. Samples of 225 cattle bones and 257 horse bones were treated at 900 deg C for 5-6 hr. 90 Y extracted by (2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid from the samples was measured in the low back-ground gas-flow counter and the concentrations (mBq/g·Ca) of the parent nuclide 90 Sr were estimated. Bone level of 90 Sr, after peaked at 1965-1966, had deceased thereafter and became the minimum at 1995 in the cattle and at 1996 in the horse. Horse bones contained the higher 90 Sr level than cattle's. There was a positive correlation between the age and 90 Sr concentration. In conclusion, the environmental radioactivity due to the fallout is low at present in Hokkaido. (K.H.)

  3. History of Lipizzan horse maternal lines as revealed by mtDNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovč Peter

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequencing of the mtDNA control region (385 or 695 bp of 212 Lipizzans from eight studs revealed 37 haplotypes. Distribution of haplotypes among studs was biased, including many private haplotypes but only one haplotype was present in all the studs. According to historical data, numerous Lipizzan maternal lines originating from founder mares of different breeds have been established during the breed's history, so the broad genetic base of the Lipizzan maternal lines was expected. A comparison of Lipizzan sequences with 136 sequences of domestic- and wild-horses from GenBank showed a clustering of Lipizzan haplotypes in the majority of haplotype subgroups present in other domestic horses. We assume that haplotypes identical to haplotypes of early domesticated horses can be found in several Lipizzan maternal lines as well as in other breeds. Therefore, domestic horses could arise either from a single large population or from several populations provided there were strong migrations during the early phase after domestication. A comparison of Lipizzan haplotypes with 56 maternal lines (according to the pedigrees showed a disagreement of biological parentage with pedigree data for at least 11% of the Lipizzans. A distribution of haplotype-frequencies was unequal (0.2%–26%, mainly due to pedigree errors and haplotype sharing among founder mares.

  4. Cervical myelography with iohexol in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialho, S.A.G.; Graca, D.L.; Silva, A.M. da; Pellegrine, L.C. de; Oliveira, L.S.S. de; Lopes, S.T.D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Five horses, weighing 337 to 400 kg, were used in this research, one of them being used as control. Cervical myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed on four horses tranquilized with flunitrazepan before induction of anesthesia with sodium thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained with fluothane and oxygen. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was analysed before and after an injection of ioxheol into the subarachnoid space. The animals received 25 to 50 ml of iohexol, after removal of 20 ml cerebrospinal fluid. Radiographies were taken with the horses at lateral recumbency, and the cranial, central and caudal regions of the cervical spine being focalized. No significant changes occurred in the cerebrospinal fluid after injecting the contrast medium. Pathologic changes were not found by gross or microscopic examination of the brain and the cervical spinal cord. Radiographies of good to excellent image quality were obtained. At autopsy, radiographic diagnosis of cervical vertebral instability was confirmed in the animal that had pelvic limb ataxia

  5. Cervical myelography with iohexol in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialho, S. A.G.; Graca, D. L.; Silva, A.M. da; Pellegrine, L.C. de; Oliveira, L. S.S. de; Lopes, S. T.D.A.

    1989-08-15

    Five horses, weighing 337 to 400 kg, were used in this research, one of them being used as control. Cervical myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed on four horses tranquilized with flunitrazepan before induction of anesthesia with sodium thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained with fluothane and oxygen. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was analysed before and after an injection of ioxheol into the subarachnoid space. The animals received 25 to 50 ml of iohexol, after removal of 20 ml cerebrospinal fluid. Radiographies were taken with the horses at lateral recumbency, and the cranial, central and caudal regions of the cervical spine being focalized. No significant changes occurred in the cerebrospinal fluid after injecting the contrast medium. Pathologic changes were not found by gross or microscopic examination of the brain and the cervical spinal cord. Radiographies of good to excellent image quality were obtained. At autopsy, radiographic diagnosis of cervical vertebral instability was confirmed in the animal that had pelvic limb ataxia.

  6. Genetic variability of Italian Heavy Draught Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Maretto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the genetic variability of the Italian Heavy Draught Horse (IHDH breed using a panel of 23 microsatellite markers. We also compared the population structure of the IHDH to other two unrelated breeds (Italian Haflinger, IH and Quarter Horse, QH. The IHDH showed a genetic variability comparable with other European heavy draught horse breeds and with the IH and QH breeds analyzed. Clustering analyses using a posterior Bayesian approach clearly differentiated the three breeds; it also showed a fragmentation of the IHDH in three subpopulations that need to be further investigated. These findings are an indicator of the present situation of the IHDH and will contribute to the conservation and implementation of the selection programme for this breed.

  7. 9 CFR 93.304 - Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic purposes; reservation fees for space at quarantine... POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.304 Import...

  8. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2009-08-06

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research

  9. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2008-12-22

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research

  10. Horse manure as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadin, Sa; Eriksson, Ola

    2016-10-01

    Horse keeping is of great economic, social and environmental benefit for society, but causes environmental impacts throughout the whole chain from feed production to manure treatment. According to national statistics, the number of horses in Sweden is continually increasing and is currently approximately 360,000. This in turn leads to increasing amounts of horse manure that have to be managed and treated. Current practices could cause local and global environmental impacts due to poor performance or lack of proper management. Horse manure with its content of nutrients and organic material can however contribute to fertilisation of arable land and recovery of renewable energy following anaerobic digestion. At present anaerobic digestion of horse manure is not a common treatment. In this paper the potential for producing biogas and biofertiliser from horse manure is analysed based on a thorough literature review in combination with mathematical modelling and simulations. Anaerobic digestion was chosen as it has a high degree of resource conservation, both in terms of energy (biogas) and nutrients (digestate). Important factors regarding manure characteristics and operating factors in the biogas plant are identified. Two crucial factors are the type and amount of bedding material used, which has strong implications for feedstock characteristics, and the type of digestion method applied (dry or wet process). Straw and waste paper are identified as the best materials in an energy point of view. While the specific methane yield decreases with a high amount of bedding, the bedding material still makes a positive contribution to the energy balance. Thermophilic digestion increases the methane generation rate and yield, compared with mesophilic digestion, but the total effect is negligible. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Glucocorticoids and laminitis in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip J; Slight, Simon H; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Kreeger, John M

    2002-08-01

    The administration of exogenously administered GCs and syndromes associated with GC excess are both attended by increased risk for the development of laminitis in adult horses. However, there exists substantial controversy as to whether excess GCs cause laminitis de novo. If true, the pathogenesis of laminitis arising from the effects of GC excess is probably different from that associated with diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and endotoxemia. Although a satisfactory explanation for the development of laminitis as a consequence of GC action is currently lacking, numerous possible and plausible theoretical mechanisms do exist. Veterinarians must exert caution with respect to the use of GCs in adult horses. The extent to which individual horses are predisposed to laminitis as a result of GC effect cannot be predicted based on current information. However, the administration of systemic GCs to horses that have been previously affected by laminitis should be used only with extreme caution, and should be accompanied by careful monitoring for further signs of laminitis. The risk of laminitis appears to be greater during treatment using some GCs (especially dexamethasone and triamcinalone) compared with others (prednisone and prednisolone). Whenever possible, to reduce the risk of laminitis, GCs should be administered locally. For example, the risk of GC-associated laminitis is evidently considerably reduced in horses affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if GC treatment is administered via inhalation. We have hypothesized that structural changes in the equine hoof that resemble laminitis may arise as a consequence of excess GC effect. Although these changes are not painful per se, and are not associated with inflammation, they could likely predispose affected horses to the development of bona fide laminitis for other reasons. Moreover, the gross morphological appearance of the chronically GC-affected hoof resembles that of a chronically

  12. Horse keeping in peri-urban areas

    OpenAIRE

    Elgåker, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    The number of horses in Sweden has increased from 70 000 to almost 300 000 in 30 years. Today these horses are to a large extent kept for the purpose of hobby and leisure and create a substantial land use but link a diverse and a large amount of activities in peri-urban areas in Sweden. The sector contributes with new economic, social and physical possibilities, but also with conflicts between various stakeholders and interests. The overall aim of this work was to contribute to increased unde...

  13. Water homeostasis and diabetes insipidus in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Harold C

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disorder of horses characterized by profound polyuria and polydipsia (PU/PD), which can be caused by loss of production of arginine vasopressin (AVP). This condition is termed neurogenic or central DI. DI may also develop with absence or loss of AVP receptors or activity on the basolateral membrane of collecting-duct epithelial cells. This condition is termed nephrogenic DI. Equine clinicians may differentiate true DI from more common causes of PU/PD by a systematic diagnostic approach. DI may not be a correctable disorder, and supportive care of affected horses requires an adequate water source. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dominance and Leadership: Useful Concepts in Human–Horse Interactions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Elke; Christensen, Janne Winther; McGreevy, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    of management scenarios, ranging from taking a horse out of its social group to the prospect of humans mimicking the horse's social system by taking a putative leadership role and seeking after an alpha position in the dominance hierarchy to achieve compliance. Yet, there is considerable debate about whether...... the roles horses attain in their social group are of any relevance in their reactions to humans. This article reviews the empirical data on social dynamics in horses, focusing on dominance and leadership theories and the merits of incorporating those concepts into the human–horse context. This will provide...

  15. The role of the horse in Europe. Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, D.; Davidson, N.

    1999-01-01

    The horse has a unique place in European society. Historically, it has played a major part in shaping political and agricultural advances. Today, the horse has diverse roles ranging from the companion and leisure horse, to the sporting athlete. The horse continues to work on the land in many European countries, it serves in the police and the armed forces, and in some regions is a source of food. This has resulted in a vast range of horse-human interactions and relationships. Despite the l...

  16. Leisure riding horses: research topics versus the needs of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczarek, Iwona; Wilk, Izabela

    2017-07-01

    Horses intended for leisure riding do not undergo any selection and most often retired sports horses or defective horses are chosen, as a low selling price determines their purchase by a leisure riding center. Unfortunately, horses bought at low prices usually have low utility value, are difficult to handle, require a special or individual approach and do not provide satisfaction in riding. However, neither modern horse breeding nor scientific research address the need to breed horses for leisure activities. There is no clear definition of a model leisure horse and criteria or information for its selection are not readily available in scientific publications. A wide spectrum of research methods may be used to evaluate various performance traits in horses intended for leisure activities. The fact that the population of recreational horses and their riders outnumber sporting horses should attract the special attention of scientific research. Their utility traits need to be determined with modern technology and methods in the same way they are for sporting horses. Such a system of evaluation would be very helpful for riders. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. European domestic horses originated in two holocene refugia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Warmuth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of European wild horses in horse domestication is poorly understood. While the fossil record for wild horses in Europe prior to horse domestication is scarce, there have been suggestions that wild populations from various European regions might have contributed to the gene pool of domestic horses. To distinguish between regions where domestic populations are mainly descended from local wild stock and those where horses were largely imported, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity in 24 European horse breeds typed at 12 microsatellite loci. The distribution of high levels of genetic diversity in Europe coincides with the distribution of predominantly open landscapes prior to domestication, as suggested by simulation-based vegetation reconstructions, with breeds from Iberia and the Caspian Sea region having significantly higher genetic diversity than breeds from central Europe and the UK, which were largely forested at the time the first domestic horses appear there. Our results suggest that not only the Eastern steppes, but also the Iberian Peninsula provided refugia for wild horses in the Holocene, and that the genetic contribution of these wild populations to local domestic stock may have been considerable. In contrast, the consistently low levels of diversity in central Europe and the UK suggest that domestic horses in these regions largely derive from horses that were imported from the Eastern refugium, the Iberian refugium, or both.

  18. Induction of MAGE-A3 and HPV-16 immunity by Trojan vaccines in patients with head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskens, Caroline J; Sewell, Duane; Hertzano, Ronna; DeSanto, Jennifer; Rollins, Sandra; Lee, Myounghee; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Gastman, Brian; Papadimitriou, John C; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming; Morales, Robert; Cullen, Kevin; Celis, Esteban; Mann, Dean; Strome, Scott E

    2012-12-01

    We performed a pilot study using Trojan vaccines in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). These vaccines are composed of HLA-I and HLA-II restricted melanoma antigen E (MAGE)-A3 or human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 derived peptides, joined by furin-cleavable linkers, and linked to a "penetrin" peptide sequence derived from HIV-TAT. Thirty-one patients with SCCHN were screened for the trial and 5 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were treated with 300 μg of Trojan peptide supplemented with Montanide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) at 4-week intervals for up to 4 injections. Following vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 4 of 5 patients recognized both the full Trojan constructs and constituent HLA-II peptides, whereas responses to HLA-I restricted peptides were less pronounced. This treatment regimen seems to have acceptable toxicity and elicits measurable systemic immune responses against HLA-II restricted epitopes in a subset of patients with advanced SCCHN. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Visible Near-infrared Spectral Evolution of Irradiated Mixed Ices and Application to Kuiper Belt Objects and Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Michael J.; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Brown, Michael E.; Carlson, Robert W.; Eiler, John M.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Wong, Ian

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the history of Kuiper Belt Objects and Jupiter Trojans will help to constrain models of solar system formation and dynamical evolution. Laboratory simulations of a possible thermal and irradiation history of these bodies were conducted on ice mixtures while monitoring their spectral properties. These simulations tested the hypothesis that the presence or absence of sulfur explains the two distinct visible near-infrared spectral groups observed in each population and that Trojans and KBOs share a common formation location. Mixed ices consisting of water, methanol, and ammonia, in mixtures both with and without hydrogen sulfide, were deposited and irradiated with 10 keV electrons. Deposition and initial irradiation were performed at 50 K to simulate formation at 20 au in the early solar system, then heated to Trojan-like temperatures and irradiated further. Finally, irradiation was concluded and resulting samples were observed during heating to room temperature. Results indicated that the presence of sulfur resulted in steeper spectral slopes. Heating through the 140–200 K range decreased the slopes and total reflectance for both mixtures. In addition, absorption features at 410, 620, and 900 nm appeared under irradiation, but only in the H2S-containing mixture. These features were lost with heating once irradiation was concluded. While the results reported here are consistent with the hypothesis, additional work is needed to address uncertainties and to simulate conditions not included in the present work.

  20. Effects of repeated regrouping on horse behaviour and injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Søndergaard, Eva; Thodberg, Karen

    2011-01-01

    about how repeated regrouping affect horse behaviour and welfare, and it is unknown whether horses may adapt to regrouping. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of an unstable group structure, caused by weekly regroupings, on behaviour and frequency of injuries in young horses. Forty...... after each regrouping (2 × 20 min/group/day). Injuries were scored by the end of the experimental period. The level of aggression shown by horses in Unstable groups immediately after regrouping was not affected by week (F5,35 = 0.42, P = 0.83), indicating that horses neither habituated, nor sensitized...... injuries were registered and there was no treatment effect (U = 184; P = 0.11). We conclude that the behaviour of young horses is affected by group management, and that horses appear not to adapt to weekly regroupings....

  1. Playing with fire - What is influencing horse owners' decisions to not vaccinate their horses against deadly Hendra virus infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailiea Arianna Goyen

    Full Text Available Hendra virus is a zoonotic paramyxovirus, which causes severe respiratory and neurological disease in horses and humans. Since 2012, the Hendra virus sub-unit G vaccine has been available for horse vaccination in Australia. Uptake of the vaccine has been limited and spill-over events of Hendra virus infection in horses continue to occur. We conducted an online, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of 376 horse owners belonging to a variety of different equestrian clubs in Queensland, Australia, to identify risk factors for non-vaccination against Hendra virus. A total of 43.1% (N = 162 of horse owners indicated that they currently did not vaccinate against Hendra virus infection, while 56.9% (N = 214 currently vaccinated against Hendra virus infection. A total of 52 risk factors were evaluated relating to equestrian activities, horse management, perceived risk and severity of horse and human infection with Hendra virus, side effects of Hendra vaccination, other vaccinations conducted by horse owners and horse owners' attitudes towards veterinarians. The final multivariable logistics regression model identified the following risk factors associated with increased odds of non-vaccination against Hendra virus: 1 perceived low risk (compared to high of Hendra virus infection to horses (considering the horse owners' location and management practices or horse owners were unsure about the risk of infection, 2 perceived moderate severity (compared to very severe or severe of Hendra virus infection in humans, 3 horse owners non-vaccination of their pets, 4 horse owners non-vaccination against strangles disease in horses, 5 handling of more than three horses per week (compared to one horse only and 6 perceived attitude that veterinarians had a high motivation of making money from Hendra virus vaccination (compared to veterinarians having a low motivation of making money from Hendra virus vaccination. Horse owners were more likely to vaccinate against

  2. A survey on the feeding of eventing horses during competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Wichert, B; Burger, D; von Peinen, K; Liesegang, A

    2012-10-01

    This study aims at the comparison of the actual feeding of horses with the recommendations from the literature, and it studies the effects of feeding and exercise on several blood metabolic parameters before and after exercise. Blood samples were collected from 25 horses during one-star eventing competitions and evaluated for blood glucose, insulin, lactate, free fatty acids and triglyceride levels. Questionnaires on the feeding practices of the horses were evaluated. The questionnaires revealed that during training, and on tournament days, horses received on average 4.3 kg of concentrate per day (min. 1.54 kg, max. 8 kg). The statistical analysis showed no significant effect of the amount of concentrate fed before exercise on the measured blood values. Oil was supplied as a supplementary energy source to 30% of the horses, but most of them only received very small quantities (0.02-0.4 l/day). Five horses (20%) had no access to salt supplements at all, and eleven horses (45%) had no access to salt on tournament days. Fifteen horses (60%) were supplied with mineral feed. Twenty-one horses (84%) had daily access to pasture during the training period. During competition, 55% of the horses received roughage ad libitum, compared with 37% during training. The majority of the horses received less roughage on days before the cross-country competition. It could not be ascertained whether feeding a large amounts of roughage had a beneficial effect on performance, because only a few horses in this study were fed with very restrictive roughage. Feeding of most of the horses was in agreement with the recommendations from the literature, except the need for sodium and chloride. The sodium and chloride need for sport horses may be overestimated in literature and needs to be re-evaluated. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Clinical and clinicopathological factors associated with survival in 44 horses with equine neorickettsiosis (Potomac horse Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, F R; Reising, A; Slovis, N M; Constable, P D; Taylor, S D

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of equine neorickettsiosis (EN) has been extensively studied but limited clinical and clinicopathological data are available concerning naturally infected horses. Factors predictive of survival will be identified in horses diagnosed with EN. Convenience sample of 44 horses with EN admitted to 2 referral institutions. A retrospective study was performed. A diagnosis of EN was based on the presence of positive blood or fecal PCR. The most common clinical signs included diarrhea (66%), fever (50%), anorexia (45%), depression (39%), colic (39%), and lameness (18%). The median duration of hospitalization was 6 days and 73% of horses survived to discharge. Laminitis was present in 36% of horses, 88% of which were affected in all 4 feet. Serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations, as well as RBC count, blood hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, band neutrophils, serum AST activity, serum CK activity, and anion gap, were significantly (P < .05) higher in nonsurvivors. Serum chloride and sodium, concentrations as well as duration of hospitalization were significantly lower in nonsurvivors. The results of forward stepwise logistic regression indicated that blood hemoglobin concentration on admission and antimicrobial treatment with oxytetracycline were independent factors associated with survival. Severity of colitis as reflected by electrolyte loss, hemoconcentration, and prerenal azotemia were predictors of survival in horses diagnosed with EN. Treatment with oxytetracycline was associated with increased survival. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Adapting craniosacral therapy to treat horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika Kanik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniosacral therapy is an acknowledged therapeutic method used for treating humans. It derives from osteopathy, being a manual technique which uses a very gentle touch. It consists in balancing the fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid by applying appropriate holds that make it possible for the patientŐs organism to release tensions which have formed in tissues. The aim of the present work was to depict the possibility to adapt the method of craniosacral therapy used in humans to the therapy of horses. Thirteen therapeutic holds proposed for the treatment of horses were described and interpreted graphically on the basis of therapy of 62 horses with different disorders. A total of 241 craniosacral therapy treatments were performed. The adaptation of presented craniosacral therapy holds to equine therapy was developed by the first author on the basis of relevant holds used in the biodynamic craniosacral therapy in humans and in own therapeutic practice. The effects of own practice and data available in literature suggest that craniosacral therapy seems to be an effective method of improving the state of health of horses suffering from different complaints that may cause major difficulties in sport, breeding or private use of the animals. The use of thermography made it possible to record the effects of therapy and some processes accompanying it, which had been impossible before.

  5. Assessment of back pain in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    Back pain is common in horses yet, in many cases, a definitive diagnosis remains elusive. The aim of this article is to present a systematic approach to the patient with a suspected back problem. For the present purposes, back pain is defined as pain arising from the thoracolumbar or sacral spine and associated soft tissues. Examination of the pelvis is also included

  6. Horse breed discrimination using machine learning methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burócziová, Monika; Riha, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2009), s. 375-377 ISSN 1234-1983 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Breed discrimination * Genetics diversity * Horse breeds Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.324, year: 2009

  7. Grief and Horses: Putting the Pieces Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symington, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of grief counseling may be enhanced through the utilization of equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). An experiential, solution-focused, and natural approach, EAP provides clients with the opportunity to discover solutions to challenges that exist within themselves. Counselors and equine specialists team with horses to provide a…

  8. Subluxation of the Carpus in Thirteen Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, J.V.; Barber, S.M.; Fretz, P.B.; Jacobs, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The records of 13 horses of various breeds with subluxation of the radiocarpal, intercarpal or carpometacarpal joint, or combinations of these were reviewed. Subluxation was most common at the carpometacarpal joint (n = 10) and concomitant fractures of individual carpal bones or metacarpus II and IV were seen (n = 12).

  9. General anesthesia for horses with specific problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, D.S.; Dunlop, C.I.

    1990-01-01

    We have discussed anesthetic techniques, special considerations, and expected complications involved in anesthetizing horses for abdominal, orthopedic, and head and neck surgery, and myelography and have described expected physiologic dysfunction that may require changes in anesthetic technique or supportive measures. The objective is high-quality patient care and reduction in anesthesia-related morbidity and death

  10. Ocular findings in Quarter Horses with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochal, Cathleen A; Miller, William W; Cooley, A James; Linford, Robert L; Ryan, Peter L; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M

    2010-08-01

    To compare ocular structures of Quarter Horses homozygous for hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) with those of Quarter Horses not affected by HERDA (control horses) and to determine the frequency of new corneal ulcers for horses with and without HERDA during a 4-year period. Cohort study of ocular structures and retrospective case series of horses with and without HERDA. The cohort portion of the study involved 10 Quarter Horses with HERDA and 10 Quarter Horses without HERDA; the retrospective case series involved 28 horses with HERDA and 291 horses without HERDA. Ophthalmic examinations, Schirmer tear tests, tonometry, corneal pachymetry, histologic examinations, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed in cohorts of Quarter Horses with and without HERDA. Records were reviewed to determine the incidence of corneal ulcers in horses with and without HERDA during a 4-year period. Corneal thickness of horses with HERDA was significantly less than that of control horses, but tear production of horses with HERDA was significantly greater than that of control horses. Results of SEM revealed zones of disorganized, haphazardly arranged collagen fibrils in corneas of horses with HERDA that were not evident in corneas of control horses. The incidence of corneal ulcers was significantly greater for horses with HERDA than for horses without HERDA during the 4-year period. Alterations in corneal thickness, arrangement of collagen fibers, and incidence of corneal ulcers indicated that abnormalities in horses with HERDA were not limited to the skin.

  11. Trojan Horses and Friendly Faces: Irish Gaelic Typography as Propaganda Comment former les caractères : la typographie gaélique comme instrument de propagande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew D. Staunton

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dans son livre Cinq cents ans d’imprimerie, l’historien S. H. Steinberg plaide pour l’élimination des caractères non-latin et cite le gaélique d’Irlande comme l’exemple même d’une typographie devenue désuète. Si cette critique peut être considérée comme malveillante par certains commentateurs, elle n’en fournit pas moins un cadre utile à une étude des caractères typographiques gaéliques et de leur signification.Comme Steinberg, nous pouvons envisager la typographie gaélique de trois manières.Premièrement, loin d’avoir été développées en Irlande, les fontes gaéliques furent d’abord conçues et fabriquées en Angleterre. Des formes plus tardives apparurent en Belgique, France, Italie, Australie et aux Etats-Unis. Ont-elles une identité essentiellement irlandaise ?Deuxièmement, la création de ces fontes découla, à l’origine, de la politique religieuse d’Elizabeth Ière. Elles devinrent plus tard un instrument de la Contre-réforme et plus tard encore du nationalisme irlandais. En dehors de son utilisation à des fins de propagande, la typographie gaélique a-t-elle jamais véritablement existé ?Enfin, les inventeurs des caractères typographiques gaéliques se sont toujours montrés hostiles à toute évolution susceptible de parvenir à une plus grande lisibilité. La forme de chaque caractère répond davantage à un critère d’authenticité visuelle qu’à une quelconque notion d’efficacité.  Comment l’irlandité est-elle ainsi véhiculée par la typographie ?

  12. Improvement of the high-accuracy O-17(p, alpha)N-14 reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to O-17 nucleosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Kroha, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2015), s. 065803 ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : thermonuclear reaction rates * cross section * O-17 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.146, year: 2015

  13. Internal Entrepreneurship--A Trojan Horse of the Neoliberal Governance of Education? Finnish Pre- and In-Service Teachers' Implementation of and Resistance towards Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, Katri; Naskali, Paivi; Korhonen, Maija; Keskitalo-Foley, Seija

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of neoliberal education policies, by examining how the Finnish pre- and in-service teachers engage with the discourses of "external" and "internal entrepreneurship", create related inclusions and exclusions, and implement or challenge the aim of educating enterprising and entrepreneurial…

  14. Measurement of the 20 and 90 keV Resonances in the O-18(p,alpha)N-15 Reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    La Cognata, M.; Spitareli, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Irgaziev, B.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Crucilla, V.; Goldberg, V.Z.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Trzaska, W.; Tumino, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 15 (2008), 152501/1-152501/4 ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH * O-18 * ENERGIES Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  15. Trojan horse particle invariance studied with the Li-6(d,alpha)He-4 and Li-7(p,alpha)He-4 reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Blokhintsev, L.; Burjan, Václav; Cherubini, S.; Hons, Zdeněk; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, Václav; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Piskoř, Štěpán; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2011), 045801/1-045801/7 ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050; GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CROSS-SECTIONS * ASTROPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS * NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.308, year: 2011

  16. Indirect Study of the (2)H(d,p)(3)H and (2)H(d,n)(3)He Reactions at Astrophysical Energies via the Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Typel, S.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, Václav; Del Santo, M. G.; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Pizzone, R. G.; Piskoř, Štěpán; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Sparta, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, 1-4 (2011), s. 323-325 ISSN 0177-7963. [21st European Conference on Few-Body Problems in Physics Location. Salamanca, 30.08.2010-03092010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CROSS-SECTIONS * REACTION-RATES * COMPILATION * D+D Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2011

  17. Forum: House of Cards--or--Trojan Horse?: A Response to Ralf St. Clair's House of Cards: Analyzing "Making Skills Everyone's Business"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully-Russ, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Ellen Scully-Russ responds to St. Clair's analysis (EJ1072357) of the recent policy report from the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education, "Making Skills Everyone's Business: A Call to Transform Adult Learning in the United States" (MSEB) (United States Department of Education [USDoE], 2015). While Scully-Russ…

  18. The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronqvist, Gabriella; Rogers, Chris; Gee, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The negative effects of fireworks on companion animals have been reported, but little has been documented on the impact on horses. Horse anxiety was commonly associated with fireworks, and 26% of owners reported horse injuries as a result of fireworks. Many management strategies were seen as ineffective. The majority of horse owners were in favour of a ban on the sale of fireworks for private use. Abstract Within popular press there has been much coverage of the negative effects associated with firework and horses. The effect of fireworks has been documented in companion animals, yet no studies have investigated the negative effects, or otherwise, of fireworks on horses. This study aims to document horse responses and current management strategies to fireworks via an online survey. Of the total number of horses, 39% (1987/4765) were rated as “anxious”, 40% (1816/4765) “very anxious” and only 21% (965/4765) rated as “not anxious” around fireworks. Running (82%, 912/1107) was the most common behaviour reported, with no difference between property type (p > 0.05) or location (p > 0.05). Possibly as a consequence of the high frequency of running, 35% (384/1107) of respondents reported having horses break through fences in response to fireworks and a quarter (26%, 289/1099) reported that their horse(s) had received injuries associated with fireworks. The most common management strategy was moving their horse(s) to a paddock away from the fireworks (77%) and to stable/yard them (55%). However, approximately 30% reported these management strategies to be ineffective. Of the survey participants, 90% (996/1104) were against the sale of fireworks for private use. PMID:27005667

  19. Phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and cytokine activation of circulating blood neutrophils in horses with severe equine asthma and control horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstock, Johanne M; Lecours, Marie-Pier; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Annouck; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Jean, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate in vitro phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of circulating blood neutrophils in horses with severe equine asthma and control horses and to determine whether circulating blood neutrophils in horses with severe equine asthma have an increase in expression of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 and a decrease in expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to bacteria. ANIMALS 6 horses with severe equine asthma and 6 control horses. PROCEDURES Circulating blood neutrophils were isolated from horses with severe equine asthma and control horses. Phagocytosis was evaluated by use of flow cytometry. Bactericidal activity of circulating blood neutrophils was assessed by use of Streptococcus equi and Streptococcus zooepidemicus as targets, whereas the cytokine mRNA response was assessed by use of a quantitative PCR assay. RESULTS Circulating blood neutrophils from horses with severe equine asthma had significantly lower bactericidal activity toward S zooepidemicus but not toward S equi, compared with results for control horses. Phagocytosis and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10 were not different between groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINCAL RELEVANCE Impairment of bactericidal activity of circulating blood neutrophils in horses with severe equine asthma could contribute to an increased susceptibility to infections.

  20. Surgical management of proximal splint bone fractures in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.R.; Pascoe, J.R.; Wheat, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Fractures of Metacarpal and Metatarsal II and IV (the splint bones) were treated in 283 horses over an 11 year period. In 21 cases the proximal portion of the fractured bone was stabilized with metallic implants. One or more cortical bone screws were used in 11 horses, and bone plates were applied in 11 horses. One horse received both treatments. Complications of screw fixation included bone failure, implant failure, radiographic lucency around the screws, and proliferative new bone at the ostectomy site. Only two of the horses treated with screw fixation returned to their intended use. Complications of plate fixation included partial fixation failure (backing out of screws), wound drainage, and proliferative bony response around the plate. Six of the 11 horses treated by plate fixation returned to their intended use. The authors recommend consideration of plate fixation techniques for repair of fractures in the proximal third of the splint bone