WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological testing volume

  1. Eddy current testing, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This training and reference manual was assembled to provide those involved in eddy current testing with both the fundamental principles of the technique as well as the knowledge to deal with often complicated test results. A non-rigorous approach is used to simplify complex physical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on proper choice of test frequency and interpretation. Defect detection and diagnosis receive particular attention. Design and construction of probes are covered extensively since probes play a key role in eddy current testing. The advantages and limitations of various probe types are discussed. Electromagnetic theory, instrumentation, test methods and signal analysis are covered. Simplified derivations of probe response to test parameters are presented to develop a basic understanding of eddy current behaviour. Eddy current signals are presented on impedance plane diagrams throughout the manual since this is the most common display on modern, general purpose instruments. The use of 'phase leg' in signal analysis is covered in detail. To supplement theory, practical examples are presented to develop proficiency in performing inspections, and to illustrate how basic principles are applied to diagnose real signals

  2. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2-6, 1992). Volume 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve undergraduate biology laboratory experiences by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 11 papers: "A Practical Guide to the Use of Cellular Slime Molds for…

  3. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of /ital Homo sapiens/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the second part of a collection of papers submitted by the participants to the 1986 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitled Molecular Biology of /ital Homo sapiens/. The 49 papers included in this volume are grouped by subject into receptors, human cancer genes, and gene therapy. (DT)

  4. Research in drug development against viral diseases of military importance (biological testing). Volume 1. Final report, 15 November 1985-31 January 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, W.M.; Arnett, G.; Brazier, A.D.; Hollingshead, M.G.; Kirsi, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this program is to evaluate the efficacy of candidate antiviral compounds against a spectrum of viruses of military importance. This program involves (a) primary testing of chemical compounds and natural products for antiviral efficacy in vitro using standard CPE-inhibition assays, (b) primary testing of compounds for antiviral efficacy in vivo in animal model systems, and (c) secondary evaluation of the active candidate antiviral compounds. The target viruses for in vitro testing are Vaccinia Virus (VV), Adenovirus (AD2), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Punta Toro Virus (PT), Sandfly Fever Virus (SF), Yellow Fever Virus (YF), Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus (VE), Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Vaccinia Virus infections of mice. Approximately 10,000 compounds have been received for in vitro evaluation and over 66,000 assays have been performed on this contract. Compounds have been identified in nearly all virus systems that have confirmed antiviral activity equal or exceeding that of the various positive control compounds (Ribavirin, Selenazofurin, Carbocyclic-3-deaza-adenosine, Adenosine dialdehyde, Ara-A, ddC and AZT). Many of these compounds represent potent and selective new antiviral agents.

  5. Research in drug development against viral diseases of military importance (biological testing). Volume 2. Final report, 15 November 1985-31 January 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, W.M.; Arnett, G.; Brazier, A.D.; Hollingshead, M.G.; Kirsi, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this program is to evaluate the efficacy of candidate antiviral compounds against a spectrum of viruses of military importance. This program involves (a) primary testing of chemical compounds and natural products for antiviral efficacy in vitro using standard CPE-inhibition assays, (b) primary testing of compounds for antiviral efficacy in vivo in animal model systems, and (c) secondary evaluation of the active candidate antiviral compounds. The target viruses for in vitro testing are Vaccinia Virus (VV), Adenovirus (AD2), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Punta Toro Virus (PT), Sandfly fever Virus (SF), Yellow Fever Virus (YF), Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus (VE), Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Pichinde Virus (PIC), Hantaan Virus (HTN), and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The in vivo systems are Pichinde Virus infection of hamsters, Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Vaccinia virus infections of mice. Approximately 10,000 compounds have been received for in vitro evaluation and over 66,000 assays have been performed on this contract. Compounds have been identified in nearly all virus systems that have confirmed antiviral activity equal or exceeding that of the various positive control compounds (ribavirin, selenazofurin, carbocyclic-3-aza-adenosine, adenosine dialdehyde, Ara-A, ddC and AZT). Many of these compounds represent potent and selective new antiviral agents.

  6. Testing of Biologically Inhibiting Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill Madsen, Thomas; Larsen, Erup

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this course is to examine a newly developed biologically inhibiting material with regards to galvanic corrosion and electrochemical properties. More in detail, the concern was how the material would react when exposed to cleaning agents, here under CIP cleaning (Cleaning In Pl...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1130 - Blood volume test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood volume test system. 862.1130 Section 862...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1130 Blood volume test system. (a) Identification. A blood volume test system is a device intended...

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume VII : Evaluation of the Compliance Testing Framework for RPA Improvement as Stated in the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, John R.; Ngouenet, Roger F.

    2001-05-01

    Using the pre-2000 reach survival probabilities reported in the 2000 FCRPS Biological Opinion (BO) for three selected stocks: yearling and sub-yearling chinook and steelhead, power curves were constructed for each of the two statistical hypothesis tests suggested in the BO. These power calculation results were interpreted in terms of the ability of the statistical tests to correctly identify the true states of recovery (i.e., fail or succeed in fulfilling RPA expectations). The proposed one-sided tests have a moderate to low probability of correctly assessing the true status of the recovery by the years 2005 and 2008. The relatively poor odds of making the correct decision with the BO proposed Tests 1 and 2 suggest alternative decision rules need to be investigated and developed for assessing RPA compliance. Therefore, we propose to immediately examine alternative decision rules that might maximize the likelihood of correct decisions while minimizing the prospect of incorrect decisions. The Bayesian analysis will incorporate scientific/biological knowledge/expertise.

  9. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Gopal P; Jacobs, Travis W; Watts, Mark D; Ghayoomie, S Vahid; Larson, Stephen D; Gerkin, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  10. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  11. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mark D.; Ghayoomie, S. Vahid; Larson, Stephen D.; Gerkin, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models. PMID:27635225

  12. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing

  13. Testing the universality of biology: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss whether it is possible to test the universality of biology, a quest that is of paramount relevance for one of its most recent branches, namely astrobiology. We review this topic in terms of the relative roles played on the Earth biota by contingency and evolutionary convergence. Following the seminal contribution of Darwin, it is reasonable to assume that all forms of life known to us so far are not only terrestrial, but are descendants of a common ancestor that evolved on this planet at the end of a process of chemical evolution. We also raise the related question of whether the molecular events that were precursors to the origin of life on Earth are bound to occur elsewhere in the universe, wherever the environmental conditions are similar to the terrestrial ones. We refer to 'cosmic convergence' as the possible occurrence elsewhere in the universe of Earth-like environmental conditions. We argue that cosmic convergence is already suggested by observational data. The set of hypotheses for addressing the question of the universality of biology can be tested by future experiments that are feasible with current technology. We focus on landing on Europa and the broader implications of selecting the specific example of the right landing location. We had discussed earlier the corresponding miniaturized equipment that is already in existence. The significance of these crucial points needs to be put into a wider scientific perspective, which is one of the main objectives of this review. (author)

  14. Testing the universality of biology: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss whether it is possible to test the universality of biology, a quest that is of paramount relevance for one of its most recent branches, namely astrobiology. We review this topic in terms of the relative roles played on the Earth biota by contingency and evolutionary convergence. Following the seminal contribution of Darwin, it is reasonable to assume that all forms of life known to us so far are not only terrestrial, but are descendants of a common ancestor that evolved on this planet at the end of a process of chemical evolution. We also raise the related question of whether the molecular events that were precursors to the origin of life on Earth are bound to occur elsewhere in the universe, wherever the environmental conditions are similar to the terrestrial ones. We refer to 'cosmic convergence' as the possible occurrence elsewhere in the universe of Earth-like environmental conditions. We argue that cosmic convergence is already suggested by observational data. The set of hypotheses for addressing the question of the universality of biology can be tested by future experiments that are feasible with current technology. We focus on landing on Europe and the broader implications of selecting the specific example of the right landing location. We had discussed earlier the corresponding miniaturized equipment that is already in existence. The significance of these crucial points needs to be put into a wider scientific perspective, which is one of the main objectives of this review. (author)

  15. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. G. Loomis (INEEL); A. P. Zdinak (MSE); M. A. Ewanic (MSE); J. J. Jessmore (INEEL)

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity

  16. Performance testing of a large volume calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, D. S. (David S.)

    2004-01-01

    Calorimetry is used as a nondestructive assay technique for determining the power output of heat-producing nuclear materials. Calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing and tritium items routinely obtains the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques, and the power calibration can be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology through certified electrical standards. Because the heat-measurement result is completely independent of material and matrix type, it can be reliably used on any material form or item matrix. The calorimetry measurement is combined with isotopic composition information to determine the correct plutonium content of an item. When an item is unsuitable for neutron or gamma-ray NDA, calorimetric assay is used. Currently, the largest calorimeter capable of measuring plutonium-bearing or tritium items is 36 cm in diameter and 61 cm long. Fabrication of a high-sensitivity large volume calorimeter (LVC) capable of measuring tritium and plutonium-bearing items in 208-1 (55-gal) shipping or storage containers has provided a reliable NDA method to measure many difficult to measure forms of plutonium and tritium more accurately. This large calo rimeter can also be used to make secondary working standards from process material for the calibration of faster NDA assay techniques. The footprint of the calorimeter is 104 cm wide by 157 cm deep and 196 cm high in the closed position. The space for a standard electronics rack is also necessary for the operation of the calo rimeter. The maximum item size that can be measured in the LVC is 62 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The extensive use of heat-flow calorimeters for safeguards-related measurements at DOE facilities makes it important to extend the capability of calorimetric assay of plutonium and tritium items to larger container sizes. Measurement times, precision, measurement threshold, and position sensitivity of the instrument will be discussed.

  17. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  18. Pad-weighing test performed with standardized bladder volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lose, G; Rosenkilde, P; Gammelgaard, J;

    1988-01-01

    with a standardized bladder volume (50% of the cystometric bladder capacity). Twenty-five female patients with stress or mixed incontinence underwent two separate tests. Test-retest results were highly correlated (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001). Nonetheless, analysis of test-retest differences revealed a variation up...... to +/- 24 g between two tests. It is concluded that this setup (i.e., standardized bladder volume) of the one-hour pad-weighing test allows for a more reliable assessment of urinary incontinence for quantitative purposes.......The result of the one-hour pad-weighing test proposed by the International Continence Society has been demonstrated to depend on the urine load during the test. To increase reproducibility of the pad-weighing test by minimizing the influence of variation in urine load the test was done...

  19. Raise Test Scores: Integrate Biology and Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Jeffrey D.; Feinstein, Sheryl

    This paper presents the results of research that compared the academic achievement of high school students enrolled in an integrated Advanced Placement Biology/Advanced Placement Calculus course with students enrolled in traditional Advanced Placement Biology and Advanced Placement Calculus courses. Study subjects included high school students…

  20. The detection and subsequent volume optimization of biological nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Luft

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and then optimizing initial crystallization conditions is a prerequisite for macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. Improved technologies enable data collection on crystals that are difficult if not impossible to detect using visible imaging. The application of second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals and ultraviolet two-photon excited fluorescence detection is shown to be applicable in a high-throughput manner to rapidly verify the presence of nanocrystals in crystallization screening conditions. It is noted that the nanocrystals are rarely seen without also producing microcrystals from other chemical conditions. A crystal volume optimization method is described and associated with a phase diagram for crystallization.

  1. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  2. Volume and activity reduction by biological treatment and ultrafiltration of laundry effluent waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan Rosenberger; Bernhard Christ [RWE NUKEM GmbH (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    crossflow filtration for nuclear applications in the U.S.A. and developed the answer to virtually eliminate the generation and treatment of large concentrate volumes coming from Ultrafiltration or Micro-filtration systems. This extensive, nuclear specific knowledge base made it a natural development to test this patented process as an alternative and potential replacement for a separator. In 2002 RWE NUKEM took over the responsibility from RWE Power and E-ON to economically decommission the Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl (Experimental Reactor Kahl) VAK to green field. VAK was the second German NPP that had successfully installed a fully functional biological treatment including separator. Since this NPP was under decommissioning it was the perfect location to test both technologies for benchmarking and direct comparison with real wastes without colliding with operational needs of large power reactors. Meanwhile the new separation technology was successfully tested and benchmarked. Though further testing is continued the following results have already been demonstrated: the patented ultrafiltration system can economically replace the centrifuge; the for nuclear applications engineered system has robust operational characteristics; the throughput of the pilot system is approximately 200 l/h; the ultrafiltration system showed equal or better decontamination factors than the centrifuge; the permeate activity was constantly at or below the detection limit (< 2,4 Bq/m{sup 3} for {sup 60}Co); the concentrates can be conditioned to meet German disposal regulations.

  3. PULSE COMBUSTOR DESIGN QUALIFICATION TEST AND CLEAN COAL FEEDSTOCK TEST - VOLUME I AND VOLUME II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-08

    For this Cooperative Agreement, the pulse heater module is the technology envelope for an indirectly heated steam reformer. The field of use of the steam reformer pursuant to this Cooperative Agreement with DOE is for the processing of sub-bituminous coals and lignite. The main focus is the mild gasification of such coals for the generation of both fuel gas and char--for the steel industry is the main focus. An alternate market application for the substitution of metallurgical coke is also presented. This project was devoted to qualification of a 253-tube pulse heater module. This module was designed, fabricated, installed, instrumented and tested in a fluidized bed test facility. Several test campaigns were conducted. This larger heater is a 3.5 times scale-up of the previous pulse heaters that had 72 tubes each. The smaller heater has been part of previous pilot field testing of the steam reformer at New Bern, North Carolina. The project also included collection and reduction of mild gasification process data from operation of the process development unit (PDU). The operation of the PDU was aimed at conditions required to produce char (and gas) for the Northshore Steel Operations. Northshore Steel supplied the coal for the process unit tests.

  4. The micronucleus test in biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of micronuclei in lymphocytes on the basis of the Cytochalasine B method may already be regarded as a most useful tool following short-term wholebody exposure to doses in the range between approx. 0.3 and 7 Gy and thus offers a genuine alternative to the conventional analysis of chromosomes. Further efforts in the research on micronuclei as a biological system of dosimetry should primarily be made in the field of radiosensitive subpopulations and, additionally, the field of automated evaluation procedures. It is to be expected that this will permit the limit of detection to be lowered to doses of even less than approx. 0.2 - 0.3 Gy. (orig.)

  5. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R;

    2015-01-01

    -1,000 μL), and long-term storage in LN2 or VN2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Optimal TV volume, prediction of cryosurvival (CS) in ART procedure vials (ARTVs) with pre-freeze semen parameters and TV CS, post-thaw motility after two- or three-step semen cryopreservation and cryostorage in VN2 and LN2. RESULT......(S): Test vial volume of 50 μL yielded lower CS than other volumes tested. Cryosurvival of 100 μL was similar to that of larger volumes tested. An intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C for 20 minutes) during cryopreservation did not affect post-thaw motility. Cryosurvival of TVs and ARTVs from...... not affect CS. CONCLUSION(S): This study provides experimental evidence for use of a single 100 μL TV per patient to predict CS when freezing multiple ejaculates over a short period of time (

  6. Trading Volume and Stock Indices: A Test of Technical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Abbondante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Technical analysis and its emphasis on trading volume has been used to analyze movements in individual stock prices and make investment recommendations to either buy or sell that stock. Little attention has been paid to investigating the relationship between trading volume and various stock indices. Approach: Since stock indices track overall stock market movements, trends in trading volume could be used to forecast future stock market trends. Instead of focusing only on individual stocks, this study will examine movements in major stock markets as a whole. Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between trading volume and five popular stock indices using daily data from January, 2000 to June, 2010. A lag of 5 days was used because this represents the prior week of trading volume. The total sample size ranges from 1,534-2,638 to observations. Smaller samples were used to test the investment horizon that explains movements of the indices more completely. Results: The F statistics were significant for samples using 6 and 16 months of data. The F statistic was not significant using a sample of 1 month of data. This is surprising given the short term focus of technical analysis. The results indicate that above-average returns can be achieved using futures, options and exchange traded funds which track these indices. Conclusion: Future research efforts will include out-of-sample forecasting to determine if above-average returns can be achieved. Additional research can be conducted to determine the optimal number of lags for each index.

  7. Using synthetic biology to make cells tomorrow's test tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hernan G; Brewster, Robert C; Phillips, Rob

    2016-04-18

    The main tenet of physical biology is that biological phenomena can be subject to the same quantitative and predictive understanding that physics has afforded in the context of inanimate matter. However, the inherent complexity of many of these biological processes often leads to the derivation of complex theoretical descriptions containing a plethora of unknown parameters. Such complex descriptions pose a conceptual challenge to the establishment of a solid basis for predictive biology. In this article, we present various exciting examples of how synthetic biology can be used to simplify biological systems and distill these phenomena down to their essential features as a means to enable their theoretical description. Here, synthetic biology goes beyond previous efforts to engineer nature and becomes a tool to bend nature to understand it. We discuss various recent and classic experiments featuring applications of this synthetic approach to the elucidation of problems ranging from bacteriophage infection, to transcriptional regulation in bacteria and in developing embryos, to evolution. In all of these examples, synthetic biology provides the opportunity to turn cells into the equivalent of a test tube, where biological phenomena can be reconstituted and our theoretical understanding put to test with the same ease that these same phenomena can be studied in the in vitro setting. PMID:26952708

  8. Biologic concentration testing in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2015-06-01

    Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically performed only when a patient presents with active inflammatory bowel disease symptoms or during a potential immune-mediated reaction to anti-TNF ("reactive" setting). However, proactive monitoring of anti-TNF concentrations with titration to a therapeutic window (i.e., therapeutic concentration monitoring) represents a new strategy with many potential clinical benefits including prevention of immunogenicity, less need for IFX rescue therapy, and greater durability of IFX treatment. This review will cover the salient features of anti-TNF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and provide a rational approach for the use of anti-TNF concentration testing in both the reactive and proactive settings. PMID:25590953

  9. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

  10. Testing of homogenity and volume density of massive concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are stated of development of a method for performing measurements in the process of construction with the purpose to control the volume density and homogenity of already layed concrete without its distruction. It has become possible to obtain reliable and reproducible results of measurements by means of application of standard depth-probe, permitting to measure scattered gamma-radiation in the material being tested or by means of application of the gamma-rays examination method, principle of which consists of attenuation of gamma rays. It is noted that the described nondestructive method of testing is suitable for examination of the massive concrete with thickness more than 1000 mm and there are possibilities for automation of this method

  11. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  12. Comparison of breast sequential and simultaneous integrated boost using the biologically effective dose volume histogram (BEDVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented to radiobiologically compare sequential (SEQ) and simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast radiotherapy. The method is based on identically prescribed biologically effective dose (iso-BED) which was achieved by different prescribed doses due to different fractionation schemes. It is performed by converting the calculated three-dimensional dose distribution to the corresponding BED distribution taking into consideration the different number of fractions for generic α/β ratios. A cumulative BED volume histogram (BEDVH) is then derived from the BED distribution and is compared for the two delivery schemes. Ten breast cancer patients (4 right-sided and 6 left-sided) were investigated. Two tangential intensity modulated whole breast beams with two other oblique (with different gantry angles) beams for the boost volume were used. The boost and the breast target volumes with either α/β = 10 or 3 Gy, and ipsi-lateral and contra-lateral lungs, heart, and contra-lateral breast as organs at risk (OARs) with α/β = 3 Gy were compared. Based on the BEDVH comparisons, the use of SIB reduced the biological breast mean dose by about 3 %, the ipsi-lateral lung and heart by about 10 %, and contra-lateral breast and lung by about 7 %. BED based comparisons should always be used in comparing plans that have different fraction sizes. SIB schemes are dosimetrically more advantageous than SEQ in breast target volume and OARs for equal prescribed BEDs for breast and boost

  13. Translating biological parameters into clinically useful diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Carney, Stuart; Boutros, Nash N

    2009-08-01

    Psychiatry has lagged behind other specialties in developing diagnostic laboratory tests for the purpose of confirming or ruling out a diagnosis. Biological research into the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has, however, yielded some highly replicable abnormalities that have the potential for development into clinically useful diagnostic tests. To achieve this goal, a process for systematic translation must be developed and implemented. Building on our previous work, we review a proposed process using four clearly defined steps. We conclude that biological parameters currently face challenges in their pathways to becoming diagnostic tests because of both the premature release and premature abandonment of tests. Attention to a systematic translation process aided by these principles may help to avoid these problems.

  14. Biological variation in 32 clinical laboratory routine tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈政君

    2012-01-01

    Objective To set quality goals of conventional biochemical tests through the research of biological variation of the 32 routine items in Chinese population to provide the basis for Chinese clinical and laboratory standards. Methods According to the experimental designs and computing methods

  15. Biological testing of a digested sewage sludge and derived composts

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, R.; Sousa, J.P.; Canhoto, C.

    2008-01-01

    Aiming to evaluate a possible loss of soil habitat function after amendment with organic wastes, a digested sewage sludge and derived composts produced with green residues, where biologically tested in the laboratory using soil animals (Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida) and plants (Brassica rapa and Avena sativa). Each waste was tested mimicking a field application of 6 ton/ha or 12 ton/ha. Avoidance tests did not reveal any impact of sludge and composts to soil biota. Germination and grow...

  16. A new biological test of water toxicity-yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae conductometric test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezalova, Jaroslava; Rumlova, Lubomira

    2014-11-01

    This new biological test of water toxicity is based on monitoring of specific conductivity changes of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspension as a result of yeast fermentation activity inhibition in toxic conditions. The test was verified on ten substances with various mechanisms of toxic effect and the results were compared with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2) and with the results of the S. cerevisiae lethal test (Rumlova and Dolezalova, 2012). The new biological test - S. cerevisiae conductometric test - is an express method developed primarily for field conditions. It is applicable in case of need of immediate information about water toxicity. Fast completion is an advantage of this test (time necessary for test completion is about 60min), the test is simple and the test organism - dried instant yeast - belongs among its biggest advantages because of its long-term storage life and broad availability.

  17. Testing of Synthetic Biological Membranes for Forward Osmosis Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Mancinelli, Rocco; Kawashima, Brian; Trieu, Serena; Brozell, Adrian; Rosenberg, Kevan

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available forward osmosis membranes have been extensively tested for human space flight wastewater treatment. Despite the improvements achieved in the last decades, there is still a challenge to produce reliable membranes with anti-fouling properties, chemical resistance, and high flux and selectivity. Synthetic biological membranes that mimic the ones present in nature, which underwent millions of years of evolution, represent a potential solution for further development and progress in membrane technology. Biomimetic forward osmosis membranes based on a polymeric support filter and coated with surfactant multilayers have been engineered to investigate how different manufacturing processes impact the performance and structure of the membrane. However, initial results of the first generation prototype membranes tests reveal a high scatter in the data, due to the current testing apparatus set up. The testing apparatus has been upgraded to improve data collection, reduce errors, and to allow higher control of the testing process.

  18. Biological intrusion barriers for large-volume waste-disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    intrusion of plants and animals into shallow land burial sites with subsequent mobilization of toxic and radiotoxic materials has occured. Based on recent pathway modeling studies, such intrusions can contribute to the dose received by man. This paper describes past work on developing biological intrusion barrier systems for application to large volume waste site stabilization. State-of-the-art concepts employing rock and chemical barriers are discussed relative to long term serviceability and cost of application. The interaction of bio-intrusion barrier systems with other processes affecting trench cover stability are discussed to ensure that trench cover designs minimize the potential dose to man. 3 figures, 6 tables

  19. Diffusion on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume: Application to cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at http://www.vcell.org.

  20. Heater test planning for the Near Surface Test Facility at the Hanford reservation. Volume II. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II contains the following information: theoretical support for radioactive waste storage projects - development of data analysis methods and numerical models; injectivity temperature profiling as a means of permeability characterization; geophysical holes at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), Hanford; proposed geophysical and hydrological measurements at NSTF; suggestions for characterization of the discontinuity system at NSTF; monitoring rock property changes caused by radioactive waste storage using the electrical resistivity method; microseismic detection system for heated rock; Pasco Basin groundwater contamination study; a letter to Mark Board on Gable Mountain Faulting; report on hydrofracturing tests for in-situ stress measurement, NSTF, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation; and borehole instrumentation layout for Hanford Near Surface Test Facility

  1. Support for the revocation of general safety test regulations in biologics license applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dana M; Thorn, Jennifer M; Arch-Douglas, Katherine; Sperry, Justin B; Thompson, Bruce; Davis, Heather L; McCluskie, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently removed the requirement for a General Safety Test (GST) for biologics in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.11). The GST, as well as abnormal toxicity (European Pharmacopeia) and innocuity tests (World Health Organization), were designed to test for extraneous toxic contaminants on each product lot intended for human use. Tests require one-week observations for general health and weight following injection of specified volumes of product batches into guinea pigs and mice. At the volumes specified, dose-related toxicity may result when the product is pharmacologically active in rodents. With vaccines, required doses may be > 3 logs higher than intended human dose on a weight-adjusted basis and if an immune modulatory adjuvant is included, systemic immune hyperactivation may cause toxicity. Herein, using the CpG/alum adjuvant combination we evaluated the different test protocols and showed their unsuitability for this adjuvant combination. PMID:26996102

  2. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  3. Temperature-dependent phase transitions in zeptoliter volumes of a complex biological membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim P; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hohlbauch, Sophia; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); King, William P [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Voitchovsky, Kislon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Contera, Sonia Antoranz [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-04

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50-60 deg. C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 {+-} 5 deg. C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  4. Temperature-dependent phase transitions of a complex biological membrane in zeptoliter volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Hohlbauch, Sophia [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; King, William P [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Voitchovsky, K [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Contera, S Antoranz [University of Oxford; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50 60 C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 5 C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  5. Space Biology and Medicine. Volume 4; Health, Performance, and Safety of Space Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietlein, Lawrence F. (Editor); Pestov, Igor D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Volume IV is devoted to examining the medical and associated organizational measures used to maintain the health of space crews and to support their performance before, during, and after space flight. These measures, collectively known as the medical flight support system, are important contributors to the safety and success of space flight. The contributions of space hardware and the spacecraft environment to flight safety and mission success are covered in previous volumes of the Space Biology and Medicine series. In Volume IV, we address means of improving the reliability of people who are required to function in the unfamiliar environment of space flight as well as the importance of those who support the crew. Please note that the extensive collaboration between Russian and American teams for this volume of work resulted in a timeframe of publication longer than originally anticipated. Therefore, new research or insights may have emerged since the authors composed their chapters and references. This volume includes a list of authors' names and addresses should readers seek specifics on new information. At least three groups of factors act to perturb human physiological homeostasis during space flight. All have significant influence on health, psychological, and emotional status, tolerance, and work capacity. The first and most important of these factors is weightlessness, the most specific and radical change in the ambient environment; it causes a variety of functional and structural changes in human physiology. The second group of factors precludes the constraints associated with living in the sealed, confined environment of spacecraft. Although these factors are not unique to space flight, the limitations they entail in terms of an uncomfortable environment can diminish the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. The third group of factors includes the occupational and social factors associated with the difficult, critical nature of the

  6. Textiles and Design Library of Test Items. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jan, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection is reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test…

  7. Test methods and design allowables for fibrous composites. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics discussed include extreme/hostile environment testing, establishing design allowables, and property/behavior specific testing. Papers are presented on environmental effects on the high strain rate properties of graphite/epoxy composite, the low-temperature performance of short-fiber reinforced thermoplastics, the abrasive wear behavior of unidirectional and woven graphite fiber/PEEK, test methods for determining design allowables for fiber reinforced composites, and statistical methods for calculating material allowables for MIL-HDBK-17. Attention is also given to a test method to measure the response of composite materials under reversed cyclic loads, a through-the-thickness strength specimen for composites, the use of torsion tubes to measure in-plane shear properties of filament-wound composites, the influlence of test fixture design on the Iosipescu shear test for fiber composite materials, and a method for monitoring in-plane shear modulus in fatigue testing of composites.

  8. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  9. Trends in Laboratory Test Volumes for Medicare Part B Reimbursements, 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahangian, Shahram; Alspach, Todd D.; Astles, J. Rex; Yesupriya, Ajay; Dettwyler, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Context Changes in reimbursements for clinical laboratory testing may help us assess the effect of various variables, such as testing recommendations, market forces, changes in testing technology, and changes in clinical or laboratory practices, and provide information that can influence health care and public health policy decisions. To date, however, there has been no report, to our knowledge, of longitudinal trends in national laboratory test use. Objective To evaluate Medicare Part B–reimbursed volumes of selected laboratory tests per 10 000 enrollees from 2000 through 2010. Design Laboratory test reimbursement volumes per 10 000 enrollees in Medicare Part B were obtained from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (Baltimore, Maryland). The ratio of the most recent (2010) reimbursed test volume per 10 000 Medicare enrollees, divided by the oldest data (usually 2000) during this decade, called the volume ratio, was used to measure trends in test reimbursement. Laboratory tests with a reimbursement claim frequency of at least 10 per 10 000 Medicare enrollees in 2010 were selected, provided there was more than a 50% change in test reimbursement volume during the 2000–2010 decade. We combined the reimbursed test volumes for the few tests that were listed under more than one code in the Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Illinois). A 2-sided Poisson regression, adjusted for potential overdispersion, was used to determine P values for the trend; trends were considered significant at P meprobamate, opiates, methadone, phencyclidine, amphetamines, cocaine, and vitamin D, with volume ratios ranging from 83 to 1510 (P < .001). Conclusions Although reimbursement volumes increased for most of the selected tests, other tests exhibited statistically significant downward trends in annual reimbursement volumes. The observed changes in reimbursement volumes may be explained by disease prevalence and severity, patterns of drug use

  10. Breakdown Tests of Composite Materials, and the Importance of the Volume Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens;

    2005-01-01

    High voltage testing of inhomogeneous composite materials often shows that the stressed volume has a great influence on the result. This paper tries to develop methods of estimating the stressed volume by calculating the theoretical extent of streamer propagation along insulating surfaces...

  11. Transonic Wind Tunnel Test of the NASA CRM: Volume 1

    OpenAIRE

    上野, 真; 香西, 政孝; 古賀, 星吾; Ueno, Makoto; Kohzai, Masataka; Koga, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a 80% scale copy of the NASA Common Research Model (CRM) was performed in the 2m×2m transonic wind tunnel of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). JAXA consulted with NASA Langley Research Center and committee members of the Drag Prediction Workshop during the wind tunnel model fabrication. The test was conducted at the relatively low Reynolds number of 2.27×10(exp 6) due to limitations in the tunnel's capability, and boundary layer transition was simulated with...

  12. Condition-dependent cell volume and concentration of Escherichia coli to facilitate data conversion for systems biology modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkmer, Benjamin; Heinemann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology modeling typically requires quantitative experimental data such as intracellular concentrations or copy numbers per cell. In order to convert population-averaging omics measurement data to intracellular concentrations or cellular copy numbers, the total cell volume and number of cell

  13. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  14. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes, in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the US Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Operations Office awarded Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation, of Boston Massachusetts and its sub-contractor MODAR, Inc. of Natick Massachusetts a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program was contracted through a Cooperative Agreement that was co-funded by the US Department of Energy and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. The SCWODAT testing scope outlined by the DOE in the original Cooperative Agreement and amendments thereto was initiated in June 1994 and successfully completed in December 1995. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the MODAR SCWO technology

  15. Changes of gamut volume during long-term tests

    OpenAIRE

    Káčerová, Silvia; Veselý, Michal; Dzik, Petr; Štěpánková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The stability of inkjet prints and photographs is influenced by the factors of the surrounding environment. The most harmful factors of environment are the light and the pollutants like ozone. Durability of inkjet prints is besides the ink composition, affected by the type of receiving layer. In this paper will be discussed the lightfastness of inkjet prints and photographs during the long-term ageing tests. Inkjet prints were prepared using both dye-based and pigment-based inks. The sampl...

  16. Repetitive Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization Scan Results for Reduced Sample Volume Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMothe, Margaret E. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    This report is the compilation of data gathered after repetitively testing simulated tank waste and a radioactive tank waste sample using a cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) test method to determine corrosion resistance of metal samples. Electrochemistry testing of radioactive tank samples is often used to assess the corrosion susceptibility and material integrity of waste tank steel. Repetitive testing of radiological tank waste is occasionally requested at 222-S Laboratory due to the limited volume of radiological tank sample received for testing.

  17. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Ten. Mastery Testing Programme. [Mastery Tests Series 2.] Tests M14-M26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, copies of tests 14 through 26 include: (14) calculating an average; (15) identifying parts of the scientific method; (16) reading a geological map; (17) identifying elements, mixtures and compounds; (18) using Ohm's law in calculation; (19) interpreting…

  18. Separate effects test matrix for thermal-hydraulic code validation. Volume 1 - phenomena characterisation and selection of facilities and tests. Volume 2 - facility and experiment characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An internationally agreed Separate Effects Test (SET) Validation Matrix for thermal-hydraulic system codes has been established, as requested by OECD/NEA CSNI Principal Group n.2 on Coolant System Behaviour. The construction of such a matrix is an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data for code validation, assessment and improvement, including quantitative assessment of uncertainties in the modelling of individual phenomena by the codes. The first volume of the SETM report provides cross references between test facilities and thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and lists tests classified by phenomena (67 phenomena were identified for inclusion in the SET matrix and, in all, about 2094 tests were included). Information received on the facility and experiment characteristics of 187 test facilities as potential sources of separate effects data, has been consolidated in Volume II; it contains a set of information sheets which briefly describe the capabilities of each test facility and the range of its associated test programmes

  19. Testing of Dependencies between Stock Returns and Trading Volume by High Frequency Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gurgul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with a dependence analysis of returns, return volatility and trading volume for five companies listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange and five from theWarsaw Stock Exchange. Taking into account high frequency data for these companies, tests based on a comparison of Bernstein copula densities using the Hellinger distance were conducted. The paper presents some patterns of causal and other relationships between stock returns, realized volatility and expected and unexpected trading volume. There is a linear causality running from realized volatility to expected trading volume, and a lack of nonlinear dependence in the opposite direction. The authors detected strong linear and nonlinear causality from stock returns to expected trading volume. They did not find causality running in the opposite direction. In addition, the existence of fractional cointegration was examined. Despite the equality of the long memory parameters of realized volatility and trading volumes, they do not move together in the long term horizon.

  20. A Review of External Pressure Testing Techniques for Shells including a Novel Volume-Control Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackay, J.R.; Van Keulen, F.

    2009-01-01

    A review of conventional testing methods for applying external hydrostatic pressure to buckling-critical shells is presented. A new “volume-control” pressure testing method, aimed at preventing catastrophic specimen failures and improving control of specimen deformation near the critical load, is al

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  2. Particulate matter test in small volume parenterals: critical aspects in sampling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanetto, F; Conti, B; Genta, I; Ponci, R; Montanari, L; Grassi, M

    1989-06-01

    The following critical steps of the particulate matter test sampling methodology for small volume parenteral products (SVPs), conduct by light blockage method, were considered: 1) reliability of the small volume aspirator sampler for different sample volumes; 2) particulate matter distribution inside each ampoule in liquid products (8 liquid SVPs tested); 3) influence of the sample preparation method on the evaluation of the final contamination of the sample. Nine liquid SVPs were tested by preparing samples following the three U.S.P. XXI methods: 1) unit as it is (direct analysis), II) unit diluted, III) sample obtained by combining several units. Particles counts were performed by a HIAC/ROYCO model 3000 counter fitted with a small volume sampler. The validation of the sampler shows that it should be improved. A more accurate and strict validation than the one stated by U.S.P. XXI is suggested. The particulate matter distribution in liquid products is found to be uniform inside the ampoule in the size range greater than or equal to 2 microns-greater than or equal to 10 microns; the analysis can be performed examining only a portion of the whole content. The three sample preparation methods lead to significantly different contamination results. The particulate control test should be conduct by direct analysis, as it is carried out under the same conditions as for product use. The combining method (III) is suggested for products of less than 2 ml volume that cannot be examined by direct analysis. PMID:2803449

  3. Estimation of soil properties and free product volume from baildown tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baildown tests, involving measurement of water and free product levels in a monitoring well after bailing, are often performed at spill sites to estimate the oil volume per unit area -- which the authors refer to as ''oil specific volume.'' Spill volume is estimated by integrating oil specific volume over the areal domain of the spill. Existing methods for interpreting baildown tests are based on grossly simplistic approximations of soil capillary properties that cannot accurately describe the transient well response. A model for vertical equilibrium oil distributions based on the van Genuchten capillary model has been documented and verified in the laboratory and in the field by various authors. The model enables oil specific volume and oil transmissivity to be determined as functions of well product thickness. This paper describes a method for estimating van Genuchten capillary parameters, as well as aquifer hydraulic conductivity, from baildown tests. The results yield the relationships of oil specific volume and oil transmissivity to apparent product thickness, which may be used, in turn, to compute spill volume and to model free product plume movement and free product recovery. The method couples a finite element model for radial flow of oil and water to a well with a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. Effects of the filter pack around the well in the fluid level response are considered explicitly by the model. The method, which is implemented in the program BAILTEST, is applied to field data from baildown tests. The results indicate that hydrographs of water and oil levels are accurately described by the model

  4. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  5. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  6. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  7. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  8. Data Mining Foundations and Intelligent Paradigms Volume 3 Medical, Health, Social, Biological and other Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is one of the most rapidly growing research areas in computer science and statistics. In Volume 3 of this three volume series, we have brought together contributions from some of the most prestigious researchers in applied data mining. Areas of application covered are diverse and include healthcare and finance. Each of the chapters is self contained. Statisticians, applied scientists/ engineers and researchers in bioinformatics will find this volume valuable. Additionally, it provides a sourcebook for graduate students interested in the current direction of research in applied data mining.

  9. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. PMID:26657268

  10. Fabrication, testing, and analysis of anisotropic carbon/glass hybrid composites: volume 1: technical report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Kyle K. (Wetzel Engineering, Inc. Lawrence, Kansas); Hermann, Thomas M. (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas); Locke, James (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas)

    2005-11-01

    Anisotropic carbon/glass hybrid composite laminates have been fabricated, tested, and analyzed. The laminates have been fabricated using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Five fiber complexes and a two-part epoxy resin system have been used in the study to fabricate panels of twenty different laminate constructions. These panels have been subjected to physical testing to measure density, fiber volume fraction, and void fraction. Coupons machined from these panels have also been subjected to mechanical testing to measure elastic properties and strength of the laminates using tensile, compressive, transverse tensile, and in-plane shear tests. Interlaminar shear strength has also been measured. Out-of-plane displacement, axial strain, transverse strain, and inplane shear strain have also been measured using photogrammetry data obtained during edgewise compression tests. The test data have been reduced to characterize the elastic properties and strength of the laminates. Constraints imposed by test fixtures might be expected to affect measurements of the moduli of anisotropic materials; classical lamination theory has been used to assess the magnitude of such effects and correct the experimental data for the same. The tensile moduli generally correlate well with experiment without correction and indicate that factors other than end constraints dominate. The results suggest that shear moduli of the anisotropic materials are affected by end constraints. Classical lamination theory has also been used to characterize the level of extension-shear coupling in the anisotropic laminates. Three factors affecting the coupling have been examined: the volume fraction of unbalanced off-axis layers, the angle of the off-axis layers, and the composition of the fibers (i.e., carbon or glass) used as the axial reinforcement. The results indicate that extension/shear coupling is maximized with the least loss in axial tensile stiffness by using carbon fibers oriented 15{sup

  11. Reducing test-data volume and test-power simultaneously in LFSR reseeding-based compression environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weizheng; Kuang Jishun; You Zhiqiang; Liu Peng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new test scheme based on scan block encoding in a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) reseeding-based compression environment.Meanwhile,our paper also introduces a novel algorithm of scan-block clustering.The main contribution of this paper is a flexible test-application framework that achieves significant reductions in switching activity during scan shift and the number of specified bits that need to be generated via LFSR reseeding.Thus,it can significantly reduce the test power and test data volume.Experimental results using Mintest test set on the larger ISCAS'89 benchmarks show that the proposed method reduces the switching activity significantly by 72%-94% and provides a best possible test compression of 74%-94% with little hardware overhead.

  12. Direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel. Handling tests for gallery storage. Final report. Main volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains the results of above ground simulated handling experiments for gallery storage in POLLUX containers: (1) design and testing of the track system for gallery storage; (2) fault behaviour of the disposal facility; (3) control programme of the disposal facility; (4) elimination of operational incidents in case of defects of the plateau wagon or of the disposal facility - radiological exposure of personnel; (5) simulation tests of operational failure of the plateau wagon or the disposal facility. (HP)

  13. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 3, In vivo test phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard describes the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay performance-testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of test phantoms used for calibration of measurement systems for direct bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented

  14. Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles

  15. A New DFT Architecture to Reduce Test Data Volume and Test Application Time

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Zhang; Jishun, Kuang; Junjin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new DFT Architecture that contains three test scan modes. The test data could be interval broadcast to scan chains whenever the data in corresponding locations are compatible. Compared with the conventional broadcast scan architecture, the proposed architecture achieves better compression ratio in all cases, and the test application time is also induced. The hardware overhead is very low. Both theoretical and experimental results prove efficacy and versatility of the pro...

  16. The use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in radiation therapy: a phantom study for setting internal target volume of biological target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important method for detecting tumours, planning radiotherapy treatment, and evaluating treatment responses. However, using the standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold with PET imaging may be suitable not to determine gross tumour volume but to determine biological target volume (BTV). The aim of this study was to extract internal target volume of BTV from PET images. Three spherical densities of 18F-FDG were employed in a phantom with an air or water background with repetitive motion amplitudes of 0–30 mm. The PET data were reconstructed with attenuation correction (AC) based on CT images obtained by slow CT scanning (SCS) or helical CT scanning (HCS). The errors in measured SUVmax and volumes calculated using SUV threshold values based on SUVmax (THmax) in experiments performed with varying extents of respiratory motion and AC were analysed. A partial volume effect (PVE) was not observed in spheres with diameters of ≥ 28 mm. When calculating SUVmax and THmax, using SCS for AC yielded smaller variance than using HCS (p < 0.05). For spheres of 37- and 28-mm diameters in the phantom with either an air or water background, significant differences were observed when mean THmax of 30-, 20-, or 10-mm amplitude were compared with the stationary conditions (p < 0.05). The average THmax values for 37-mm and 28-mm spheres with an air background were 0.362 and 0.352 in non-motion, respectively, and the mean THmax values for 37-mm and 28-mm spheres with a water background were 0.404 and 0.387 in non-motion and 0.244 and 0.263 in motion, respectively. When the phantom background was air, regardless of sphere concentration or size, THmax was dependent only on motion amplitude. We found that there was no PVE for spheres with ≥ 28-mm diameters, and differences between SUVmax and THmax were reduced by using SCS for AC. In the head-and-neck and the abdomen, the standard values of

  17. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-02-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: "conservative" IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; "radical" IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. "Conservative" IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. "Radical" plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning.

  18. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 3; Validation and Test Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the third volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by validation studies that were done on three fan rigs. It concludes with recommended improvements and additional studies for BFaNS.

  19. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  20. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  1. Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the seabed. Volume 6: Deep-sea biology, biological processes and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the options suggested for disposal of high-level radioactive waste resulting from the generation of nuclear power is burial beneath the deep ocean floor in geologically stable sediment formations which have no economic value. The 8-volume series provides an assessment of the technical feasibility and radiological safety of this disposal concept based on the results obtained by ten years of co-operation and information exchange among the Member countries participating in the NEA Seabed Working Group. This report summarizes the biological description of selected sites, the means by which radionuclides could result in human exposure via seafood pathways, and the doses likely to be received by, and effects on, the deep-sea fauna

  2. Cosmo Cassette: A Microfluidic Microgravity Microbial System For Synthetic Biology Unit Tests and Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Although methods in the design-build-test life cycle of the synthetic biology field have grown rapidly, the expansion has been non-uniform. The design and build stages in development have seen innovations in the form of biological CAD and more efficient means for building DNA, RNA, and other biological constructs. The testing phase of the cycle remains in need of innovation. Presented will be both a theoretical abstraction of biological measurement and a practical demonstration of a microfluidics-based platform for characterizing synthetic biological phenomena. Such a platform demonstrates a design of additive manufacturing (3D printing) for construction of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to be used in experiments carried out in space. First, the biocompatibility of the polypropylene chassis will be demonstrated. The novel MFCs will be cheaper, and faster to make and iterate through designs. The novel design will contain a manifold switchingdistribution system and an integrated in-chip set of reagent reservoirs fabricated via 3D printing. The automated nature of the 3D printing yields itself to higher resolution switching valves and leads to smaller sized payloads, lower cost, reduced power and a standardized platform for synthetic biology unit tests on Earth and in space. It will be demonstrated that the application of unit testing in synthetic biology will lead to the automatic construction and validation of desired constructs. Unit testing methodologies offer benefits of preemptive problem identification, change of facility, simplicity of integration, ease of documentation, and separation of interface from implementation, and automated design.

  3. 'DRF-G - Grenoble Department of Fundamental Research. Activity report 1985, Nr 20. Volume II: 'Chemical Physics' 'Biology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains synthetic reports of researches performed in chemistry, in the field of biological and medical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance, and in biology during the 1981-1983 period or only during 1983. As far as chemistry is concerned, the following topics have been addressed: conducting organic polymers, organic and analytic electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, molecular dynamics, vegetal macromolecules, nucleic acids. As far as biology is concerned, the following topics have been addressed: systems associated with membranes, metalloproteins, cell biology and differentiation, immuno-chemistry, haematology, vegetal physiology, structural studies of proteins. Staff lists of researchers are provided for chemistry laboratories and biology laboratories, as well a list of publications

  4. Modeling the Drug Discovery Process: The Isolation and Biological Testing of Eugenol from Clove Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, William H.; Smiley, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This experiment describes the isolation and biological testing of eugenol and neutral compounds from commercially available clove oil. By coupling the chemical separation of the components of clove oil (an experiment described in many introductory organic laboratory textbooks) with a simple antibiotic test, the students "discover" the biologically active compound in clove oil. This experiment models one of the primary methods used in the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents.

  5. Final report of the Buffer Mass Test - Volume I: Scope, preparative field work and test arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer Mass Test was conducted in a 30 m long drift at 340 m depth in the Stripa mine, The main objective being to check the predicted functions of certain bentonite-based buffer materials in rock environment. These materials were blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite placed in large boreholes simulating deposition holes for canisters, and on-site compacted sand/bentonite mixtures used as tunnel backfill. The blocks of bentonite embedded electrical heaters which served to produce heat so as to create conditions similar to those in a repository. The temperature in the initially non-saturated buffer materials was expected to be a function of the water uptake from the rock, which was also assumed to lead to rather high swelling pressures. The recording of these processes and of the moistening of the buffer materials , as well as of the associated build-up of piezometric heads at rock/buffer interfaces, was the major item of the field test. For this purpose the buffer materials and the rock were equipped with a large number of thermal elements, pressure and piezometric cells as well as moisture sensors. The choise of positions and properties of these gauges, which were connected to an effective data acquisition system, was based on predictions that required a careful site documentation with respect to the fracture characteristics and hydrological properties of the surrounding rock. (author)

  6. Small Volume Dissolution Testing as a Powerful Method during Pharmaceutical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Beyssac

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Standard compendia dissolution apparatus are the first choice for development of new dissolution methods. Nevertheless, limitations coming from the amount of material available, analytical sensitivity, lack of discrimination or biorelevance may warrant the use of non compendial methods. In this regard, the use of small volume dissolution methods offers strong advantages. The present study aims primarily to evaluate the dissolution performance of various drug products having different release mechanisms, using commercially available small volume USP2 dissolution equipment. The present series of tests indicate that the small volume dissolution is a useful tool for the characterization of immediate release drug product. Depending on the release mechanism, different speed factors are proposed to mimic common one liter vessel performance. In addition, by increasing the discriminating power of the dissolution method, it potentially improves know how about formulations and on typical events which are evaluated during pharmaceutical development such as ageing or scale–up. In this regard, small volume dissolution is a method of choice in case of screening for critical quality attributes of rapidly dissolving tablets, where it is often difficult to detect differences using standard working conditions.

  7. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  8. Using biological data to test climate change refugia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, T. L.; Maher, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of refugia has been discussed from theoretical and paleontological perspectives to address how populations persisted during periods of unfavorable climate. Recently, several studies have applied the idea to contemporary landscapes to identify locations that are buffered from climate change effects so as to favor greater persistence of valued resources relative to other areas. Refugia are now being discussed among natural resource agencies as a potential adaptation option in the face of anthropogenic climate change. Using downscaled climate data, we identified hypothetical refugial meadows in the Sierra Nevada and then tested them using survey and genetic data from Belding's ground squirrel (Urocitellus beldingi) populations. We predicted that refugial meadows would show higher genetic diversity, higher rates of occupancy and lower rates of extirpation over time. At each step of the research, we worked with managers to ensure the largest impact. Although no panacea, identifying climate change refugia could be an important strategy for prioritizing habitats for management intervention in order to conserve populations. This research was supported by the California LCC, the Northeast Climate Science Center, and NSF.

  9. Low energy prompt gamma-ray tests of a large volume BGO detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A., E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Kalakada, Zameer [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Al-Anezi, M.S.; Raashid, M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-01-15

    Tests of a large volume Bismuth Germinate (BGO) detector were carried out to detect low energy prompt gamma-rays from boron and cadmium-contaminated water samples using a portable neutron generator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. Inspite of strong interference between the sample- and the detector-associated prompt gamma-rays, an excellent agreement has been observed between the experimental and calculated yields of the prompt gamma-rays, indicating successful application of the large volume BGO detector in the PGNAA analysis of bulk samples using low energy prompt gamma-rays. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance tests of a portable neutron generator based PGNAA setup for field measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of large volume BGO detector in prompt gamma analysis of bulk samples utilizing low energy prompt-gamma rays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of interference of boron and cadmium prompt gamma-rays from bulk samples with BGO detector background spectrum.

  10. Testing with Feedback Yields Potent, but Piecewise, Learning of History and Biology Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Steven C.; Gopal, Arpita; Rickard, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Does correctly answering a test question about a multiterm fact enhance memory for the entire fact? We explored that issue in 4 experiments. Subjects first studied Advanced Placement History or Biology facts. Half of those facts were then restudied, whereas the remainder were tested using "5 W" (i.e., "who, what, when, where",…

  11. A Computer-Aided Self-Testing System for Biological Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiblum, M. D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the production of a computer-aided, self-testing system for university students enrolled in a first-year course in biological psychology. Project aspects described include selection, acquisition and description of software; question banks and test structures; modes of use (computer or printed version); evaluation; and future plans. (11…

  12. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, Harry J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland)]. E-mail: Harry_J.Whitlow@phys.jyu.fi; Ren, Minqin [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Kan, Jeroen A. van [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore); White, Dan [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Nanoscience Centre, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2007-07-15

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  13. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  14. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, R; Gervorgian, V; Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E

    1998-07-01

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  15. Multivariate imaging-genetics study of MRI gray matter volume and SNPs reveals biological pathways correlated with brain structural differences in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Khadka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder affecting children, adolescents, and adults. Its etiology is not well-understood, but it is increasingly believed to result from diverse pathophysiologies that affect the structure and function of specific brain circuits. Although one of the best-studied neurobiological abnormalities in ADHD is reduced fronto-striatal-cerebellar gray matter volume, its specific genetic correlates are largely unknown. Methods: In this study, T1-weighted MR images of brain structure were collected from 198 adolescents (63 ADHD-diagnosed. A multivariate parallel independent component analysis technique (Para-ICA identified imaging-genetic relationships between regional gray matter volume and single nucleotide polymorphism data. Results: Para-ICA analyses extracted 14 components from genetic data and 9 from MR data. An iterative cross-validation using randomly-chosen sub-samples indicated acceptable stability of these ICA solutions. A series of partial correlation analyses controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity revealed two genotype-phenotype component pairs significantly differed between ADHD and non-ADHD groups, after a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The brain phenotype component not only included structures frequently found to have abnormally low volume in previous ADHD studies, but was also significantly associated with ADHD differences in symptom severity and performance on cognitive tests frequently found to be impaired in patients diagnosed with the disorder. Pathway analysis of the genotype component identified several different biological pathways linked to these structural abnormalities in ADHD. Conclusions: Some of these pathways implicate well-known dopaminergic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment hypothesized to be abnormal in ADHD. Other more recently implicated pathways included glutamatergic and GABA-eric physiological systems

  16. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  17. 77 FR 28281 - Withdrawal of Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... issue of March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15609) (FRL-9335-6). If you have questions regarding the applicability of... One High Production Volume Chemical Substance AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... production volume chemicals (HPV1). * * * * * (j) * * * Table 2--Chemical Substances and Testing...

  18. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of such a situated learning approach. What content knowledge do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This study describes the required content knowledge by exploring the educational practice and clinical genetic practices. Nine experienced teachers and 12 respondents representing the clinical genetic practices (clients, medical professionals, and medical ethicists) were interviewed about the biological concepts and ethical, legal, and social aspects (ELSA) of testing they considered relevant to empowering students as future health care clients. The ELSA suggested by the respondents were complemented by suggestions found in the literature on genetic counselling. The findings revealed that the required teacher knowledge consists of multiple layers that are embedded in specific genetic test situations: on the one hand, the knowledge of concepts represented by the curricular framework and some additional concepts (e.g. multifactorial and polygenic disorder) and, on the other hand, more knowledge of ELSA and generic characteristics of genetic test practice (uncertainty, complexity, probability, and morality). Suggestions regarding how to translate these characteristics, concepts, and ELSA into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  19. An investigation on impacts of scheduling configurations on Mississippi biology subject area testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchette, Frances Lenora

    The purpose of this mixed modal study was to compare the results of Biology Subject Area mean scores of students on a 4 x 4 block schedule, A/B block schedule, and traditional year-long schedule for 1A to 5A size schools. This study also reviewed the data to determine if minority or gender issues might influence the test results. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted about the type of schedule configuration they use and the influence that the schedule has on student academic performance on the Biology Subject Area Test. Additionally, this research further explored whether schedule configurations allow sufficient time for students to construct knowledge. This study is important to schools, teachers, and administrators because it can assist them in considering the impacts that different types of class schedules have on student performance and if ethnic or gender issues are influencing testing results. This study used the causal-comparative method for the quantitative portion of the study and constant comparative method for the qualitative portion to explore the relationship of school schedules on student academic achievement on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test. The aggregate means of selected student scores indicate that the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test as a measure of student performance reveals no significant difference on student achievement for the three school schedule configurations. The data were adjusted for initial differences of gender, minority, and school size on the three schedule configurations. The results suggest that schools may employ various schedule configurations and expect student performance on the Mississippi Biology Subject Area Test to be unaffected. However, many areas of concern were identified in the interviews that might impact on school learning environments. These concerns relate to effective classroom management, the active involvement of students in learning, the adequacy of teacher education

  20. Problems of space biology. Volume 50: Nystagmometry for evaulation of the status of the vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, M. M.; Kislyakov, V. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of nystagmometry are studied, primarily those in which the study of hystagmus serves as a means to learn about the vestibular apparatus. Along with exhaustive published material, the monograph presents data from many years of research on the physioloigical mechanisms of nystagmus, the features of nystagmus when vestibular stimulation is combined with optokinetic, the pole of vertibular afferentation asymmetry in the asymmetry of reactions to optokinetic stimulus, a nystagmometric approach to studying the hydrodynamic interaction among semicircular canals, as well as several other questions. A great deal of attention is given to methods of recording nystagmus, calibrating nystagmograms, quantitative evaluation of nystagmographic material, new nystagmometric characteristics and diagnostic techniques. A diagnostic model is proposed which makes it possible to obtain important information on the condition of the vestibular system from results of vestibular testing.

  1. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design-Build-Test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-08-27

    Covering: 2000 to 2016Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  2. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design–Build–Test cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2016 Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  3. Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

    2004-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

  4. Evaluation of gas volumes evolved during vacuum stability testing of HNS. Period covered: October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, J.

    1976-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of dipicrylethane, a common impurity in HNS, on the volume of volatiles evolved during HNS vacuum stability measurements, and to evaluate the repeatability of results obtained during this testing.

  5. Temporal lobe volume predicts Wada memory test performance in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kan; Gong, Yunhua; Modur, Pradeep N; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Agostini, Mark; Gupta, Puneet; McColl, Roderick; Hays, Ryan; Van Ness, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Wada test is widely used in the presurgical evaluation of potential temporal lobectomy patients to predict postoperative memory function. Expected asymmetry (EA), defined as Wada memory lateralized to the nonsurgical hemisphere, or a higher score after injection of the surgical hemisphere would be considered favorable in terms of postoperative memory outcome. However, in some cases, nonlateralized memory (NM) results, with no appreciable asymmetry, may occur because of impaired scores after both injections, often leading to denial of surgery. The reason for such nonlateralized Wada memory in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains unclear. Given that quantitative morphometric magnetic resonance imaging studies in TLE patients have shown bilateral regional atrophy in temporal and extratemporal structures, we hypothesized that the volume loss in contralateral temporal structures could contribute to nonlateralized Wada memory performance. To investigate this, we examined the relationship between the volume changes of temporal structures and Wada memory scores in patients with intractable TLE with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) using an age- and gender-matched control group. Memory was considered nonlateralized if the absolute difference in the total correct recall scores between ipsilateral and contralateral injections was memory was lateralized in 15 and nonlateralized in 6 patients, with all the nonlateralized scores being observed in left TLE. The recall scores after ipsilateral injection were significantly lower in patients with an NM profile than an EA profile (23 ± 14% vs. 59 ± 18% correct recall, p ≤ 0.001). However, the recall scores after contralateral injection were low but similar between the two groups (25 ± 17% vs. 25 ± 15% correct recall, p=0.97). Compared to controls, all the patients showed greater volume loss in the temporal regions. However, patients with a NM profile showed significantly more volume loss than those

  6. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  7. Software Mutational Robustness: Bridging The Gap Between Mutation Testing and Evolutionary Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Eric; Fast, Ethan; Forrest, Stephanie; Weimer, Westley

    2012-01-01

    In the mutation testing paradigm, test suite quality is measured by its ability to detect variant programs generated through application of random changes to an original program. In evolutionary biology however, neutral mutations that leave fitness unchanged are considered to be beneficial---improving the system's robustness and ability to discover evolutionary improvements. In this paper, we generate a population of variant programs from an original program by applying lightweight random mutations. We adopt biological terminology and refer to undetected variants as neutral, and the percentage of all variants that are neutral as mutational robustness. Although they are related to equivalent mutants in mutation testing, which are viewed as problematic, we show positive properties of neutral variants which are easily generated and can be used to protect software against unknown defects. Even when mutations are restricted to statements executed by the test suit, we find that mutational robustness is high: 36.75%...

  8. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for adverse environmental impact at the proposed disposal site, a comparison of the biological... evaluation and testing. 230.61 Section 230.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... environmental effects. If the General Evaluation indicates the presence of a sufficiently large number...

  9. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  10. Causal attributions of obese men and women in genetic testing: implications of genetic/biological attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Dierk, Jan-Michael; Conradt, Matthias; Schlumberger, Pia; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Rief, Winfried

    2009-09-01

    The present study sought to investigate genetic/biological attributions of obesity, their associations with a predisposition to obesity and their crossectional and longitudinal implications for weight regulation in obese individuals presenting for genetic testing and counselling. A total of 421 obese men and women underwent psychological and anthropometric assessment and a mutation screen of the melanocortin-4 receptor gene. At study entry, women revealed more genetic/biological attributions than men on the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted to obesity (86.2% versus 59.7%). Genetic/biological attributions of obesity were associated in both sexes with a family history of obesity, assessed through Stunkard's Figure Rating Scale. In both sexes, genetic/biological attributions were unrelated to weight regulation beliefs and behaviour (i.e. self-efficacy, controllability beliefs, restrained eating and physical activity), assessed through standardised questionnaires or interview at baseline and at six-month follow-up. In addition, causal attributions and weight regulation beliefs and behaviour were not predictive of body mass index at six-month follow-up. Overall, the results indicate that causal attributions of obesity to genetic/biological factors in obese individuals presenting for genetic screening and counselling are crossectionally and longitudinally unrelated to weight regulation and longer-term weight outcome. Those who attribute their obesity to genetic/biological factors likely have a familial obesity risk. PMID:20205024

  11. Fuel combustion test in constant volume combustion chamber with built-in adaptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JEONG; DongSoo; CHO; GyuBack; CHOI; SuJin; LEE; JinSoo

    2010-01-01

    Combustion tests of pre-mixture of methane and air in constant volume combustion chamber(CVCC) have been carried out by means of flame propagation photo and gas pressure measurement,the effects of CVCC body temperature,intake pressure of pre-mixture of methane and air,equivalence ratio and location of the built-in adaptor have been investigated.The whole combustion chamber can be divided into two parts,i.e.the upper combustion chamber and the lower combustion chamber,by the built-in adaptor with through hole.Owing to the built-in adaptor with through hole,jet ignition or compression ignition(auto-ignition) phenomena may occur in the lower combustion chamber,which is helpful to getting higher flame propagation velocity,higher combustion peak pressure,low cycle-to-cycle variation and more stable combustion process.

  12. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 3: Launch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configuration as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle, including contractor data for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. The test data have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration. Basic components include booster, orbiter, and launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configurations include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. The digital database consists of 220 files containing basic tunnel data. Database structure is documented in a series of reports which include configuration sketches for the various planforms tested. This is Volume 3 -- launch configurations.

  13. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  14. The measurement of peripheral blood volume reactions to tilt test by the electrical impedance technique after exercise in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the distribution of peripheral blood volumes in different regions of the body in response to the tilt-test in endurance trained athletes after aerobic exercise. Distribution of peripheral blood volumes (ml/beat) simultaneously in six regions of the body (two legs, two hands, abdomen, neck and ECG) was assessed in response to the tilt-test using the impedance method (the impedance change rate (dZ/dT). Before and after exercise session cardiac stroke (CSV) and blood volumes in legs, arms and neck were higher in athletes both in lying and standing positions. Before exercise the increase of heart rate and the decrease of a neck blood volume in response to tilting was lower (p <0.05) but the decrease of leg blood volumes was higher (p<0.001) in athletes. The reactions in arms and abdomen blood volumes were similar. Also, the neck blood volumes as percentage of CSV (%/CSV) did not change in the control but increased in athletes (p <0.05) in response to the tilt test. After (10 min recovery) the aerobic bicycle exercise (mean HR = 156±8 beat/min, duration 30 min) blood volumes in neck and arms in response to the tilting were reduced equally, but abdomen (p<0.05) and leg blood volumes (p <0.001) were lowered more significantly in athletes. The neck blood flow (%/CSV) did not change in athletes but decreased in control (p<0.01), which was offset by higher tachycardia in response to tilt-test in controls after exercise. The data demonstrate greater orthostatic tolerance in athletes both before and after exercise during fatigue which is due to effective distribution of blood flows aimed at maintaining cerebral blood flow.

  15. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain. PMID:20128446

  16. Tests of biological activity of metabolites from Penicillium expansum (Link Thom various isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Borecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aqrobacterium tumefaciens and cucumber, mustard and linseeds were compared as test organisms for evaluation of the biological activity of patulin. It was found that the reaction of cucumber seeds and linseed to the patulin concentrations was more pronounced than that of mustard and Aqrobacterium tumefaciens. The activity of metabolites produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated with the use of cucumber seeds. As measure of activity served the percentage of radicule growth inhibition was compared with the growth in control seeds. The biological activity of the metabolites was specific for the isolates, those from apples being more active. Thirty two isolates from pears and 34 from apples were examined.

  17. Science Teacher Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy as Predictors of Students' End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Julie; Moseley, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the statewide End-of-Instruction (EOI) Biology I test met or exceeded the state academic proficiency level (Proficient Group) to teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary Biology I teachers whose students' mean scores on the…

  18. Volume magnetization for system-level testing of magnetic materials within small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David T.; Palo, Scott E.

    2016-10-01

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is a popular among small satellites due to its low resource cost and simplicity of installation. However, predicting the performance of these systems can be a challenge, chiefly due to the difficulty of measurement and simulation of hysteresis materials. We present a low-cost method of magnetic measurement allowing for characterization of both hard and soft magnetic materials. A Helmholtz cage uniformly magnetizes a 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm test volume. The addition of a thin sense coil allows this system to characterize individual hysteresis rod performance when in close proximity to other hard and/or soft magnetic materials. This test setup is applied to hard and soft magnetic materials used aboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE), a 3U CubeSat for space weather investigation which used a PMAC system. The measured hard magnet dipole of 0.80±0.017 A m2 is in good agreement with the dynamics-based satellite dipole moment fits. Five hysteresis rods from the same set as the CSSWE flight rods are tested; significant differences in dampening abilities are found. In addition, a limitation of the widely-used Flatley model is described. The interaction of two hysteresis rods in a variety of relative geometries are tested; perpendicular rods are found to have no significant interaction while parallel rods could have their dampening ability reduced by half, depending on the rod separation distance. Finally, the performance of the hysteresis rods are measured in their flight configuration, with hard and soft magnetic material dispersed as it is on CSSWE itself. For the CSSWE PMAC system design, interactions between rods have a greater affect than the magnetic flux density offset due to the onboard bar magnet.

  19. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of an educational approach based on situated learning. What expertise do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This article describes the required expertise by exploring the educational practice. Nine experienced teachers were interviewed about the pedagogical content, moral and interpersonal expertise areas concerning how to teach genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing, and the lessons of five of them were observed. The findings showed that the required teacher expertise encompasses specific pedagogical content expertise, interpersonal expertise and a preference for teacher roles and teaching approaches for the moral aspects of teaching in this context. A need for further development of teaching and learning activities for (reflection on) moral reasoning came to the fore. Suggestions regarding how to apply this expertise into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  20. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 1: Booster configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. This is Volume 1 (Part 1) of the report -- Booster Configuration.

  1. BEO-Life, a Test and Refurbishment Support for Biological Research Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeln, I.; Hueser, D.; Reese, C.; Schoenfeld, R.

    Since the ISS commenced its operational phase, the need of ground based test and refurbishment support, facilitating the utilisation of the station and especially its facilities for biological research, becomes increasingly important.. The onboard biological research facilities (e.g. BIOLAB) are designed and built for a life time of 10 years, requiring the regular exchange of the integrated life support systems. The exact conditioning of the atmosphere in these systems plays an important role for the scientific outcome. The composition of the air (O2, N2 and CO2) as well as the humidity and the temperature inside the experiment chambers containing the plants and cell-cultures needs to be adjustable for various types of experiments. Since the various ingredients for a life support system are consumables, which consumption depends on the number of performed experiments, the life support systems needs to be refurbished from time to time. Our contribution to this challenge is BEO- Life, which offers a unique test, refurbishment and qualification environment for maintenance and re-supply for life support systems of the ISS onboard biological facilities. BEO-Life provides the ground support for all these tasks, such as tests, maintenance, verification and procedures. To fulfil the demanding requirements for the automatic and stable conditioning of the life support system, a complex arrangement of pumps, valves, sensors and an electronic system including software with exact control algorithms is provided. Beside the refurbishment activities, BEO-Life will support preliminary ground-based investigations of scientists before utilisation of the ISS biological research facilities, too. In conclusion, we offer a novel service element for the ground-based maintenance of biological research facilities onboard the ISS. This service can be easily adapted to the needs of users for preparatory work.

  2. High-Volume Non-Destructive Test Applications at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and efficiency of critical Hanford processes are assured with rapid, reliable, and automatic non-destructive tests. High-sensitive eddy-current and ultrasonic inspection systems are in routine use in the field and in manufacturing production processes to provide maximum quality assurance of large volumes of material in minimum inspection time. This paper describes inspection systems being used to ensure quality of Hanford's production nuclear-fuel manufacturing processes. Operated as regular in-line manufacturing equipment, these systems employ ultrasonic attenuation measurements to monitor grain structure of bare uranium fuel cores, ultrasonic and eddy- current techniques to ensure adequate bonding and thickness of 0.040 in aluminium cladding on canned elements, and novel wide-band, high-resolution ultrasonic inspection techniques to detect defects in the fuel end-weld closures. Combined eddy-current and ultrasonic tests are applied simultaneously to perform a complete fuel- element inspection on a nine-second cycle; defective elements are automatically segregated from the process stream. Emphasis is given to advanced ultrasonic test methods of inspecting thin-walled, fuel-sheath tubing. Special highly focused transducers are used with wide-band circuitry to generate pure shear waves in 0.015-in-thick wall tubing. Lamb and other complicated wave motions are excluded so that tests results are readily interpreted and reproduced. Novel, economical methods of producing defect standards have been developed, as have critically important methods of ensuring uniform operating characteristics of the transducers themselves. Automatic tubing inspection equipment has been developed, and results of its routine use in testing some 30 000 ft of tubing are summarized. Finally, eddy-current techniques developed specifically for inspecting installed heat-exchanger tubing are reviewed. The technique employs novel read-out features which plot defect indications as oscilloscope

  3. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Castro Dias Cuyabano, Beatriz;

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited...... power to detect genetic markers with small effects. Instead, aggregating genetic markers based on biological information might increase the power to identify sets of genetic markers of etiological significance. Several set test methods have been proposed: Here we propose a new set test derived from...... genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP), the covariance association test (CVAT). We compared the performance of CVAT to other commonly used set tests. The comparison was conducted using a simulated study population having the same genetic parameters as for schizophrenia. We found that CVAT...

  4. Construction and biological testing of artificial implants for peripheral nerve repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kriebel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I documented the development of an artificial nerve conduit and subsequent biological testing within an animal model of peripheral nerve injury. The focus for the development of the conduit lied in the utilization of electrospun microfibers to serve as a guidance structure for Schwann cells and axons during regeneration. Through the incorporation of such a guidance structure into the lumen of a conventional hollow nerve conduit, Schwann cell migration and axonal elongation acro...

  5. Tests of biological activity of metabolites from Penicillium expansum (Link) Thom various isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Halina Borecka; Mariola Pytel; Marie Fenney

    2013-01-01

    Aqrobacterium tumefaciens and cucumber, mustard and linseeds were compared as test organisms for evaluation of the biological activity of patulin. It was found that the reaction of cucumber seeds and linseed to the patulin concentrations was more pronounced than that of mustard and Aqrobacterium tumefaciens. The activity of metabolites produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated with the use of cucumber seeds. As measure of activity served the percentage of radicule growth inhibition wa...

  6. S-2 stage 1/25 scale model base region thermal environment test. Volume 1: Test results, comparison with theory and flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadunas, J. A.; French, E. P.; Sexton, H.

    1973-01-01

    A 1/25 scale model S-2 stage base region thermal environment test is presented. Analytical results are included which reflect the effect of engine operating conditions, model scale, turbo-pump exhaust gas injection on base region thermal environment. Comparisons are made between full scale flight data, model test data, and analytical results. The report is prepared in two volumes. The description of analytical predictions and comparisons with flight data are presented. Tabulation of the test data is provided.

  7. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge. PMID:26786893

  8. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal P. Sarma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  9. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  10. Treatment of discharge water from hydrostatic testing of natural gas pipelines. Volume 4. Topical report, January 1989-June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents results developed from bench- and full-scale treatment testing conducted on discharge water from hydrostatic testing of natural gas pipelines. Bench-scale testing examined sedimentation with and without chemical coagulants for reducing iron and total suspended solids, aeration for removal of volatile organics, and activated carbon adsorption for removal of organic constituents. Treatment results are provided for a full-scale treatment process, which utilized a hay bale structure and adsorbent booms for removing suspended solids and oil from the discharge water. Detailed characterization results are presented for test water collected before and after treatment. Results developed from an economic analysis of other potential treatment/disposal alternatives are also presented. A total of eight approaches that may be applied for managing constituents present in hydrostatic test waters are examined. The report is Volume 4 of a five-volume report series

  11. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  12. Maximum tolerated volume in drinking tests with water and a nutritional beverage for the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aldo Monta(n)o-Loza; Max Schmulson; Sergio Zepeda-Gómez; Jose Maria Remes-Troche; Miguel Angel Valdovinos-Diaz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Recently, drinking load tests with water or nutritional beverages have been proposed as diagnostic tools for functional dyspepsia (FD), therefore we sought to reproduce if these tests can discriminate between FD patients and controls in a Mexican population. METHODS: Twenty FD-Rome Ⅱ patients were matched by age and gender with 20 healthy controls. All underwent both drinking tests at a 15 mL/min rate, randomly, 7 d apart. Every 5 min within each test, four symptoms were evaluated (satiety, bloating, nausea and pain) by Likert scales. Maximum tolerated volume (MTV) was defined as the ingested volume when a score of 5 was reached for any symptom or when the test had to be stopped because the patients could not tolerate more volume. Sensitivity and specificity were analyzed. RESULTS: FD patients had higher symptom scores for both tests compared to controls (water: t= 4.1, P= 0.001 <0.01; Nutren(R): t= 5.2, P= 0.001<0.01). The MTV forwater and Nutren(R) were significantly lower in FD (water: 1014±288 vs 1749±275 mL; t = 7.9, P = 0.001<0.01;Nutren(R): 652±168 vs 1278±286 mL; t= 6.7, P = 0.001<0.01). With the volume tolerated by the controls, the percentile 10 was determined as the lower limit fortolerance. Sensitivity and specificity were 0.90, 0.95 for water and 0.95, 0.95 for Nutren(R) tests.CONCLUSION: A drinking test with water or a nutritional beverage can discriminate between FD patients and healthy subjects in Mexico, with high sensitivity and specificity. These tests could be used as objective, noninvasive, and safe diagnostic approaches for FD patients.

  13. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  15. Test functions for three-dimensional control-volume mixed finite-element methods on irregular grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2000-01-01

    Numerical methods based on unstructured grids, with irregular cells, usually require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element methods, vector shape functions are used to approximate the distribution of velocities across cells and vector test functions are used to minimize the error associated with the numerical approximation scheme. For a logically cubic mesh, the lowest-order shape functions are chosen in a natural way to conserve intercell fluxes that vary linearly in logical space. Vector test functions, while somewhat restricted by the mapping into the logical reference cube, admit a wider class of possibilities. Ideally, an error minimization procedure to select the test function from an acceptable class of candidates would be the best procedure. Lacking such a procedure, we first investigate the effect of possible test functions on the pressure distribution over the control volume; specifically, we look for test functions that allow for the elimination of intermediate pressures on cell faces. From these results, we select three forms for the test function for use in a control-volume mixed method code and subject them to an error analysis for different forms of grid irregularity; errors are reported in terms of the discrete L2 norm of the velocity error. Of these three forms, one appears to produce optimal results for most forms of grid irregularity.

  16. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  17. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions

  18. L\\"uscher's finite volume test for two-baryon systems with attractive interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya; Iritani, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    For the attractive interaction, the L\\"uscher's finite volume formula gives the phase shift at negative squared moment $k^2<0$ for the ground state in the finite volume, which corresponds to the analytic continuation of the phase shift at $k^2<0$ in the infinite volume. Using this fact, we reexamine behaviors of phase shifts at $k^2 <0$ obtained directly from plateaux of effective energy shifts in previous lattice studies for two nucleon systems on various volumes. We have found that data, based on which existences of the bound states are claimed, show singular behaviors of the phase shift at $k^2<0$, which seem incompatible with smooth behaviors predicted by the effective range expansion. This, together with the fake plateau problem for the determination of the energy shift, brings a serious doubt on existences of the $NN$ bound states claimed in previous lattice studies at pion masses heavier than 300 MeV.

  19. On the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor the work of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorić Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor influent and effluent wastewaters of wastewater treatment plants. The information obtained through these tests is used to prevent toxic pollutants from entering wastewater treatment plants and discharge of toxic pollutants into the recipient. Samples of wastewaters from the wastewater treatment plants of Kragujevac and Gornji Milanovac, as well as from the Lepenica and Despotovica Rivers immediately before and after the influx of wastewaters from the plants, were collected between October 2004 and June 2005. Used as the test organism in these tests was the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio Hamilton - Buchanon (Cyprinidae. The acute toxicity test of 96/h duration showed that the tested samples had a slight acutely toxic effect on B. rerio, except for the sample of influent wastewater into the Cvetojevac wastewater treatment plant, which had moderately acute toxicity, indicating that such water should be prevented from entering the system in order to eliminate its detrimental effect on the purification process.

  20. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

  1. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating

  3. Chaste: A test-driven approach to software development for biological modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Pitt-Francis, Joe

    2009-12-01

    Chaste (\\'Cancer, heart and soft-tissue environment\\') is a software library and a set of test suites for computational simulations in the domain of biology. Current functionality has arisen from modelling in the fields of cancer, cardiac physiology and soft-tissue mechanics. It is released under the LGPL 2.1 licence. Chaste has been developed using agile programming methods. The project began in 2005 when it was reasoned that the modelling of a variety of physiological phenomena required both a generic mathematical modelling framework, and a generic computational/simulation framework. The Chaste project evolved from the Integrative Biology (IB) e-Science Project, an inter-institutional project aimed at developing a suitable IT infrastructure to support physiome-level computational modelling, with a primary focus on cardiac and cancer modelling. Program summary: Program title: Chaste. Catalogue identifier: AEFD_v1_0. Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFD_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen\\'s University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: LGPL 2.1. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 407 321. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 004 554. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming language: C++. Operating system: Unix. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI. RAM:< 90   Megabytes for two of the scenarios described in Section 6 of the manuscript (Monodomain re-entry on a slab or Cylindrical crypt simulation). Up to 16 Gigabytes (distributed across processors) for full resolution bidomain cardiac simulation. Classification: 3. External routines: Boost, CodeSynthesis XSD, CxxTest, HDF5, METIS, MPI, PETSc, Triangle, Xerces. Nature of problem: Chaste may be used for solving coupled ODE and PDE systems arising from modelling biological systems. Use of Chaste in two application areas are described in this paper: cardiac

  4. Challenges in using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-CT to define a biological radiotherapy boost volume in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best method of identifying regions within pancreatic tumours that might benefit from an increased radiotherapy dose is not known. We investigated the utility of pre-treatment FDG-PET in predicting the spatial distribution of residual metabolic activity following chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). 17 patients had FDG-PET/CT scans at baseline and six weeks post-CRT. Tumour segmentation was performed at 40% and 50% of SUVmax at baseline and 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% post-CRT. FDG-PET scans were non-rigidly registered to the radiotherapy planning CT using the CT component of the FDG-PET/CT. Percentage overlap of the post-CRT volumes with the pre-CRT volumes with one another and the gross tumour volume (GTV) was calculated. SUVmax decreased during CRT (median pre- 8.0 and post- 3.6, p < 0.0001). For spatial correlation analysis, 9 pairs of scans were included (Four were excluded following complete metabolic response, one patient had a non-FDG avid tumour, one had no post-CRT imaging, one had diffuse FDG uptake that could not be separated from normal tissues and one had an elevated blood glucose). The Pre40% and 50% of SUVmax volumes covered a mean of 50.8% and 30.3% of the GTV respectively. The mean% overlap of the 90%, 80%, 70%, 60% of SUVmax post-CRT with the Pre40% and Pre50% volumes were 83.3%, 84.0%, 83.7%, 77.9% and 77.8%, 69.9%, 74.5%, 64.8% respectively. Regions of residual metabolic activity following CRT can be predicted from the baseline FDG-PET and could aid definition of a biological target volume for non-uniform dose prescriptions

  5. Biology-inspired microphysiological system approaches to solve the prediction dilemma of substance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Uwe; Andersson, Tommy B; Bahinski, Anthony; Beilmann, Mario; Beken, Sonja; Cassee, Flemming R; Cirit, Murat; Daneshian, Mardas; Fitzpatrick, Susan; Frey, Olivier; Gaertner, Claudia; Giese, Christoph; Griffith, Linda; Hartung, Thomas; Heringa, Minne B; Hoeng, Julia; de Jong, Wim H; Kojima, Hajime; Kuehnl, Jochen; Leist, Marcel; Luch, Andreas; Maschmeyer, Ilka; Sakharov, Dmitry; Sips, Adrienne J A M; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Tagle, Danilo A; Tonevitsky, Alexander; Tralau, Tewes; Tsyb, Sergej; van de Stolpe, Anja; Vandebriel, Rob; Vulto, Paul; Wang, Jufeng; Wiest, Joachim; Rodenburg, Marleen; Roth, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of microphysiological systems - microfluidic biomimetic devices that aspire to emulate the biology of human tissues, organs and circulation in vitro - is envisaged to enable a global paradigm shift in drug development. An extraordinary US governmental initiative and various dedicated research programs in Europe and Asia have led recently to the first cutting-edge achievements of human single-organ and multi-organ engineering based on microphysiological systems. The expectation is that test systems established on this basis would model various disease stages, and predict toxicity, immunogenicity, ADME profiles and treatment efficacy prior to clinical testing. Consequently, this technology could significantly affect the way drug substances are developed in the future. Furthermore, microphysiological system-based assays may revolutionize our current global programs of prioritization of hazard characterization for any new substances to be used, for example, in agriculture, food, ecosystems or cosmetics, thus, replacing laboratory animal models used currently. Thirty-six experts from academia, industry and regulatory bodies present here the results of an intensive workshop (held in June 2015, Berlin, Germany). They review the status quo of microphysiological systems available today against industry needs, and assess the broad variety of approaches with fit-for-purpose potential in the drug development cycle. Feasible technical solutions to reach the next levels of human biology in vitro are proposed. Furthermore, key organ-on-a-chip case studies, as well as various national and international programs are highlighted. Finally, a roadmap into the future is outlined, to allow for more predictive and regulatory-accepted substance testing on a global scale. PMID:27180100

  6. Atlas based brain volumetry: How to distinguish regional volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfer, Roland; Suppa, Per; Kepp, Timo; Spies, Lothar; Schippling, Sven; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Fully-automated regional brain volumetry based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in quantitative neuroimaging. In clinical trials as well as in clinical routine multiple MRIs of individual patients at different time points need to be assessed longitudinally. Measures of inter- and intrascanner variability are crucial to understand the intrinsic variability of the method and to distinguish volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology. To measure regional brain volumes an atlas based volumetry (ABV) approach was deployed using a highly elastic registration framework and an anatomical atlas in a well-defined template space. We assessed inter- and intrascanner variability of the method in 51 cognitively normal subjects and 27 Alzheimer dementia (AD) patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative by studying volumetric results of repeated scans for 17 compartments and brain regions. Median percentage volume differences of scan-rescans from the same scanner ranged from 0.24% (whole brain parenchyma in healthy subjects) to 1.73% (occipital lobe white matter in AD), with generally higher differences in AD patients as compared to normal subjects (e.g., 1.01% vs. 0.78% for the hippocampus). Minimum percentage volume differences detectable with an error probability of 5% were in the one-digit percentage range for almost all structures investigated, with most of them being below 5%. Intrascanner variability was independent of magnetic field strength. The median interscanner variability was up to ten times higher than the intrascanner variability.

  7. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Cosmetology. Volume I: Skills. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Linda Maxwell; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of cosmetology consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and developing performance testing…

  8. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  9. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, T.A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  10. Monitoring of air radioactivity at the Jungfraujoch research station: Test of a new high volume aerosol sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Flury, Thomas; Völkle, Hansruedi

    2008-01-01

    The Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) is responsible for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Switzerland and for the protection of the public from ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In order to improve the Swiss radioactivity monitoring network, a new high volume air sampler (DIGITEL DHA-80) was tested in Fribourg and at the Jungfraujoch High Altitude Research Station at 3454 m. The filters are analyzed in the laboratory by a high purity coaxial germanium detector...

  11. A test of biological trait analysis with nematodes and an anthropogenic stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitwally, Hanan M; Fleeger, John W

    2016-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fundamentally altered by nutrient enrichment, and effective monitoring tools are needed to detect biological responses especially in the early stages of eutrophication. We tested the utility of biological trait analysis (BTA) to quantify the temporal responses of nematodes inhabiting salt marsh creeks that were experimentally enriched with nutrients for 6 years. Feeding, body shape, and tail shape traits were characterized on >6000 nematodes from annual samples from enriched and non-enriched sites. Here, we ask if trait combinations are more effective than single traits in detecting the magnitude and rate of change. We also sought to identify combinations of traits that best distinguish natural from nutrient-induced variation. BTA revealed that feeding, body shape, and all traits combined equally detected the response to nutrient enrichment. Compared to single traits however, BTAs were more sensitive to temporal trends and better distinguished natural variation from the response to nutrient enrichment. Tail shape traits (that might respond to altered sediment texture or geochemistry) were not affected by enrichment, and feeding traits yielded the greatest difference between enriched and reference communities indicating that changes in food resources drove responses. Feeding traits provided the highest quality information content in our study, and the use of feeding traits alone may adequately identify anthropogenic effects in many studies. However, we caution that body shape, tail shape, and feeding traits were strongly interrelated at our study site, and a diversity of trait groups may increase the information content of BTAs in more diverse habitats.

  12. A test of biological trait analysis with nematodes and an anthropogenic stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitwally, Hanan M; Fleeger, John W

    2016-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fundamentally altered by nutrient enrichment, and effective monitoring tools are needed to detect biological responses especially in the early stages of eutrophication. We tested the utility of biological trait analysis (BTA) to quantify the temporal responses of nematodes inhabiting salt marsh creeks that were experimentally enriched with nutrients for 6 years. Feeding, body shape, and tail shape traits were characterized on >6000 nematodes from annual samples from enriched and non-enriched sites. Here, we ask if trait combinations are more effective than single traits in detecting the magnitude and rate of change. We also sought to identify combinations of traits that best distinguish natural from nutrient-induced variation. BTA revealed that feeding, body shape, and all traits combined equally detected the response to nutrient enrichment. Compared to single traits however, BTAs were more sensitive to temporal trends and better distinguished natural variation from the response to nutrient enrichment. Tail shape traits (that might respond to altered sediment texture or geochemistry) were not affected by enrichment, and feeding traits yielded the greatest difference between enriched and reference communities indicating that changes in food resources drove responses. Feeding traits provided the highest quality information content in our study, and the use of feeding traits alone may adequately identify anthropogenic effects in many studies. However, we caution that body shape, tail shape, and feeding traits were strongly interrelated at our study site, and a diversity of trait groups may increase the information content of BTAs in more diverse habitats. PMID:26846290

  13. Design and testing of biological scaffolds for delivering reparative cells to target sites in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, Edward P; Sen, Elif; Tsai, Larry W; Murthy, Shankar; Hoffman, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    This study summarizes the development and testing of a scaffold to promote engraftment of cells in the distal lung. A fibrinogen-fibronectin-vitronectin hydrogel (FFVH) was developed and optimized with respect to its mechanical and biological properties for this application. In vitro, FFVH scaffolds promoted attachment, histiotypic growth and expression of basement membrane proteins by primary ovine lung mesenchymal cells derived from lung biopsies. In vivo testing was then performed to assess the ability of FFVHs to promote cell engraftment in the sheep lung. Treatment with autologous cells delivered using FFVH was clinically well tolerated. Cells labelled with a fluorescent dye (PKH-26) were detected at treatment sites after 1 month. Tissue mass (assessed by CT imaging) and lung perfusion (assessed by nuclear scintigraphy) were increased at emphysema test sites. Post-treatment histology demonstrated cell proliferation and increased elastin expression without scarring or collapse. No treatment-related pathology was observed at healthy control sites. FFVH scaffolds promote cell attachment, spreading and extracellular matrix expression in vitro and apparent engraftment in vivo, with evidence of trophic effects on the surrounding tissue. Scaffolds of this type may contribute to the development of cell-based therapies for patients with end-stage pulmonary diseases. PMID:20020503

  14. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume I. Organization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan and the accompanying MFTF-B Integrated Operations Plan are submitted in response to UC/LLNL Purchase Order 3883801, dated July 1981. The organization plan also addresses the specific tasks and trade studies directed by the scope of work. The Integrated Operations Plan, which includes a reliability, quality assurance, and safety plan and an integrated logistics plan, comprises the burden of the report. In the first section of this volume, certain underlying assumptions and observations are discussed setting the requirements and limits for organization. Section B presents the recommended structure itself. Section C Device Availability vs Maintenance and Support Efforts and Section D Staffing Levels and Skills provide backup detail and justification. Section E is a trade study on maintenance and support by LLNL staff vs subcontract and Section F is a plan for transitioning from the construction phase into operation. A brief summary of schedules and estimated costs concludes the volume

  15. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  16. Non-perturbative tests of HQET in small-volume quenched QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We quantitatively investigate the quark mass dependence of current matrix elements and energies, calculated over a wide range of quark masses in the continuum limit of small-volume quenched lattice QCD. By a precise comparison of these observables as functions of the heavy quark mass with the predictions of HQET we are able to verify that their large quark mass behaviour is described by the effective theory. (orig.)

  17. Learner-Centered Instruction (LCI). Volume 5. Description of the Job Performance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, William J.; And Others

    An account is presented of the development of a job performance test for the Learner Centered Instruction (LCI) weapon control systems mechanic/technician Air Force course. The performance test was administered to the LCI experimental course subjects as well as the control course subjects upon graduation. Test items are, for the most part, based…

  18. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  19. Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, H; Perley, R

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

  20. Novel biological approaches for testing the contributions of single-DSBs and DSB-clusters to the biological effects of high-LET-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika eMladenova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs. IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides and frequently comprise base damages and single strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB complexity. The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear-energy-transfer (LET, and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE. Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB-clusters comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then tested by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e. the a-priori prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling – including the role of DSB-clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and

  1. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics (1/10th scale model test results). Volume 1: Technical discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.; Demchak, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle propellant dynamics during ET/Orbiter separation in the RTLS (return to launch site) mission abort sequence were investigated in a test program conducted in the NASA KC-135 "Zero G" aircraft using a 1/10th-scale model of the ET LOX Tank. Low-g parabolas were flown from which thirty tests were selected for evaluation. Data on the nature of low-g propellant reorientation in the ET LOX tank, and measurements of the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellent will provide a basis for correlation with an analytical model of the slosh phenomenon.

  2. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

  3. Characterization of biological activity of cigarette smoke using in vitro tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to characterize the influence of exposure mode (whole-body continuous, nose only intermittent, nose-only continuous) on biological activity of cigarette smoke condensates. The mutagenic potency of the extracts was determined using Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA-98 with and without the addition of S-9. The cytotoxicity of the cigarette smoke with and without the addition of S-9 was also determined using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames test only after the addition of S-9. The optimum mutagenic activity was observed following addition of between 3 and 6% S-9. The average mutagenic potency, when cells were tested at the optimum level of S-9, was 1.5 revertants/mg extract. Cell killing by cigarette smoke extracts was the same for extracts derived from all three exposure modes. There was about 20% cell killing at concentrations of 300 mg extract/mL culture media. No differences were observed in either mutagenic or cytotoxic potency among the smoke extracts produced under different exposure conditions. (author)

  4. Testing surrogacy assumptions: can threatened and endangered plants be grouped by biological similarity and abundances?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy P Che-Castaldo

    Full Text Available There is renewed interest in implementing surrogate species approaches in conservation planning due to the large number of species in need of management but limited resources and data. One type of surrogate approach involves selection of one or a few species to represent a larger group of species requiring similar management actions, so that protection and persistence of the selected species would result in conservation of the group of species. However, among the criticisms of surrogate approaches is the need to test underlying assumptions, which remain rarely examined. In this study, we tested one of the fundamental assumptions underlying use of surrogate species in recovery planning: that there exist groups of threatened and endangered species that are sufficiently similar to warrant similar management or recovery criteria. Using a comprehensive database of all plant species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and tree-based random forest analysis, we found no evidence of species groups based on a set of distributional and biological traits or by abundances and patterns of decline. Our results suggested that application of surrogate approaches for endangered species recovery would be unjustified. Thus, conservation planning focused on individual species and their patterns of decline will likely be required to recover listed species.

  5. Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

  6. 40 CFR 799.5085 - Chemical testing requirements for certain high production volume chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Aberration Test (40 CFR 799.9537) to generate the needed data unless known chemical properties (e.g., physical/chemical properties, chemical class characteristics) preclude its use. A subject person who uses...). PETN cannot be tested at 99% purity because of its explosive properties. It must be diluted in water...

  7. Full-scale borehole sealing test in salt under simulated downhole conditions. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full-scale borehole sealing test was conducted in Avery Island diapiric salt. The test was performed under simulated in situ stress (15.86 MPa [2300 psi]) and temperature (300C) of a theoretical salt nuclear waste repository. To evaluate the sealing performance and the effect of the grout on the salt, temperature and pressure versus time histories of the grout were measured during the 28-day curing period and subsequent full-scale flow tests. Post-test microscopic tests, physical properties tests, and laboratory permeability tests were conducted on the grout and host rock. Data indicate the grout exothermic reaction was low (0C) with the expansive stresses in the grout exceeding 11.0 MPa (1595 psi) near the center and 24.8 MPa (3600 psi) at the grout/salt interface. The full-scale flow test conducted over 91 hours resulted in a non-steady-state flow, decreasing with time to approximately 10-6 darcys. Megascopic and microscopic examinations revealed fluid flow along a small area of the grout/salt interface and through adjacent salt. Laboratory data show a salt permeability in the order of 10-3 and grout at 10-6 darcys. Physical and permeability data indicate the salt has anisotropic properties

  8. Test Bank. NetNews. Volume 8, Number 1, Winter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    LDA of Minnesota, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Minnesota Adult Basic Education (ABE) providers are mandated to use CASAS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System) Reading or Math or TABE (Tests for Adult Basic Education) Reading or Math. This issue of "NetNews" introduces the Test Bank: a variety of informal reading, spelling, and writing assessments available for Minnesota ABE providers…

  9. Cell biology is different in small volumes: endogenous signals shape phenotype of primary hepatocytes cultured in microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Amranul; Gheibi, Pantea; Gao, Yandong; Foster, Elena; Son, Kyung Jin; You, Jungmok; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Patel, Dipali; Revzin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The approaches for maintaining hepatocytes in vitro are aimed at recapitulating aspects of the native liver microenvironment through the use of co-cultures, surface coatings and 3D spheroids. This study highlights the effects of spatial confinement-a less studied component of the in vivo microenvironment. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured in low-volume microfluidic channels (microchambers) retain differentiated hepatic phenotype for 21 days whereas cells cultured in regular culture plates under identical conditions de-differentiate after 7 days. Careful consideration of nutrient delivery and oxygen tension suggested that these factors could not solely account for enhanced cell function in microchambers. Through a series of experiments involving microfluidic chambers of various heights and inhibition of key molecular pathways, we confirmed that phenotype of hepatocytes in small volumes was shaped by endogenous signals, both hepato-inductive growth factors (GFs) such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hepato-disruptive GFs such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Hepatocytes are not generally thought of as significant producers of GFs–this role is typically assigned to nonparenchymal cells of the liver. Our study demonstrates that, in an appropriate microenvironment, hepatocytes produce hepato-inductive and pro-fibrogenic signals at the levels sufficient to shape their phenotype and function. PMID:27681582

  10. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ''like-new'' condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ''like-new'' condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report

  11. Testing of high-volume sampler inlets for the sampling of atmospheric radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Hammad; Su, Wei-Chung; Cheng, Yung S; Medici, Fausto

    2006-09-01

    Sampling of air for radioactive particles is one of the most important techniques used to determine the nuclear debris from a nuclear weapon test in the Earth's atmosphere or those particles vented from underground or underwater tests. Massive-flow air samplers are used to sample air for any indication of radionuclides that are a signature of nuclear tests. The International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization includes seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound, and gaseous xenon isotopes sampling technologies, in addition to radionuclide sampling, to monitor for any violation of the treaty. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute has developed a large wind tunnel to test the outdoor radionuclide samplers for the International Monitoring System. The inlets for these samplers are tested for their collection efficiencies for different particle sizes at various wind speeds. This paper describes the results from the testing of two radionuclide sampling units used in the International Monitoring System. The possible areas of depositional wall losses are identified and the losses in these areas are determined. Sampling inlet type 1 was tested at 2.2 m s wind speed for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles. The global collection efficiency was about 87.6% for 10-microm particles for sampling inlet type 1. Sampling inlet type 2 was tested for three wind speeds at 0.56, 2.2, and 6.6 m s for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles in two different configurations (sampling head lowered and raised). The global collection efficiencies for these configurations for 10-microm particles at 2.2 m s wind speed were 77.4% and 82.5%, respectively. The sampling flow rate was 600 m h for both sampling inlets.

  12. Hearing Tests on Mobile Devices: Evaluation of the Reference Sound Level by Means of Biological Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiński, Lech; Grysiński, Tomasz; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Hearing tests carried out in home setting by means of mobile devices require previous calibration of the reference sound level. Mobile devices with bundled headphones create a possibility of applying the predefined level for a particular model as an alternative to calibrating each device separately. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the reference sound level for sets composed of a mobile device and bundled headphones. Methods Reference sound levels for Android-based mobile devices were determined using an open access mobile phone app by means of biological calibration, that is, in relation to the normal-hearing threshold. The examinations were conducted in 2 groups: an uncontrolled and a controlled one. In the uncontrolled group, the fully automated self-measurements were carried out in home conditions by 18- to 35-year-old subjects, without prior hearing problems, recruited online. Calibration was conducted as a preliminary step in preparation for further examination. In the controlled group, audiologist-assisted examinations were performed in a sound booth, on normal-hearing subjects verified through pure-tone audiometry, recruited offline from among the workers and patients of the clinic. In both the groups, the reference sound levels were determined on a subject’s mobile device using the Bekesy audiometry. The reference sound levels were compared between the groups. Intramodel and intermodel analyses were carried out as well. Results In the uncontrolled group, 8988 calibrations were conducted on 8620 different devices representing 2040 models. In the controlled group, 158 calibrations (test and retest) were conducted on 79 devices representing 50 models. Result analysis was performed for 10 most frequently used models in both the groups. The difference in reference sound levels between uncontrolled and controlled groups was 1.50 dB (SD 4.42). The mean SD of the reference sound level determined for devices within the same model

  13. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr. [Vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves.

  14. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves

  15. 75 FR 8575 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    .../chemical properties and biodegradation), ecotoxicity (in fish, Daphnia, and algae), acute toxicity, genetic..., Daphnia, and algae). Environmental fate (including physical/chemical properties (melting point, boiling... (tests in fish, Daphnia, and algae); acute toxicity; genetic toxicity (gene mutations and...

  16. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

  17. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  18. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  19. Advances in design and testing of limited angle optical diffraction tomographysystem for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuś, A.; Makowski, P.; Kujawińska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography has been steadily proving its potential to study one of the hot topics in modern cell biology -- 3D dynamic changes in cells' morphology represented with refractive index values. In this technique digital holography is combined with tomographic reconstruction and thus it is necessary to provide projections acquired at different viewing directions. Usually the Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is used and while the object beam performs scanning, the reference beam is in most cases stationary. This approach either limits possible scanning strategies or requires additional mechanical movement to be introduced in the reference beam. On the other hand, spiral or grid scanning is possible in alternative common-path or Michelson configurations. However, in this case there is no guarantee that a specimen is sparse enough for the object to interfere with an object-free part of the beam. In this paper we present a modified version of Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based tomographic microscope, in which both object and reference beam are subject to scanning using one scanning device only thus making any scanning scenario possible. This concept is realized with a custom-built optical system in the reference beam and is appropriate for mechanical as well as optical scanning. Usually, the tomographic reconstruction setups and algorithms are verified using a microsphere phantom, which is not enough to test the influence of the distribution of the projections. In this work we propose a more complex calibration object created using two-photon polymerization.

  20. Performance tests of a large volume cerium tribromide (CeBr3) scintillation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Khiari, F Z; Liadi, F A; Khateeb-Ur-Rehman; Isab, A A

    2016-08-01

    The response of a large cylindrical 76mm×76mm (height×diameter) cerium tribromide (CeBr3) detector was measured for prompt gamma rays. The total intrinsic activity of the CeBr3 detector, which was measured over 0.33-3.33MeV range, was found to be 0.022±0.001 counts/s/cm(3). The partial intrinsic activity ( due to (227)Ac contamination), was measured over a energy range of 1.22-2.20MeV energy, was found to be 0.007±0.001 counts/s/cm(3). Compared to intrinsic activities of LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce detectors of equivalent volume, the CeBr3 detector has 7-8 times less total intrinsic activity. The detector response for low energy prompt gamma rays was measured over 0.3-0.6MeVgamma energy range using a portable neutron generator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. The experimental yield of boron, cadmium and mercury prompt gamma-rays was measured from water samples contaminated with 0.75-2.5wt% mercury, 0.31-2.50wt% boron, and 0.0625-0.500wt% cadmium, respectively. An excellent agreement has been observed between the calculated and experimental yields of the gamma rays. Also minimum detection limit (MDC) of the CeBr3 detector was measured for boron, cadmium and mercury samples. The CeBr3 detector has 23% smaller value of MDCB and 18% larger value of MDCCd than those of a LaBr3:Ce detector of equivalent size. This study has shown that CeBr3 detector has an excellent response for the low energy prompt gamma-rays with almost an order of magnitude low intrinsic activity as compared to LaCl3:Ce and LaBr3:Ce detectors of equivalent volume. PMID:27180221

  1. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders.

  2. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders

  3. Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

  4. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Volume phase holographic grating performance testing and discussion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shaojie; Wright, Shelley A; Moore, Anna M; Larkin, James E; Maire, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Simard, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the grating efficiency is a key goal for the first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) currently being designed to sample the diffraction limit of the TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope). Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings have been shown to offer extremely high efficiencies that approach 100% for high line frequencies (i.e., 600 to 6000l/mm), which has been applicable for astronomical optical spectrographs. However, VPH gratings have been less exploited in the near-infrared, particularly for gratings that have lower line frequencies. Given their potential to offer high throughputs and low scattered light, VPH gratings are being explored for IRIS as a potential dispersing element in the spectrograph. Our team has procured near-infrared gratings from two separate vendors. We have two gratings with the specifications needed for IRIS current design: 1.51-1.82{\\mu}m (H-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 4000 and 1.19- 1.37 {\\mu}m (J-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 8000....

  5. Biological test methods for the ecotoxicological characterization of wastes. Final report; Biologische Testerverfahren zur oekotoxikologischen Charakterisierung von Abfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Roland [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany); Donnevert, Gerhild [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany). FB MNI; Roembke, Joerg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Floersheim am Main (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The ecotoxicological characterization of waste is part of their assessment as hazardous or non-hazardous according to the European Waste List. Despite its transfer into national law in the waste list ordnance 2001 no methodological recommendations have been provided to cover the hazard criterion (H14 ''ecotoxicity'') which was taken over from the legislation on dangerous substances. Based on the recommendations of CEN guideline 14735 (2005), an international ring test was organised by BAM, FH Giessen-Friedberg and ECT GmbH. In total, 67 laboratories from 15 countries participated in the ring test. It was performed with three representative waste types: an ash from an incineration plant mainly contaminated with heavy metals, a soil containing high concentrations of organic contaminants (PAHs) and a preserved wood waste contaminated with copper and other heavy metals. Samples were prepared by BAM (e.g. inter alia dried, sieved and homogenised) and distributed. Parallel to the biological testing the eluates and solid samples were chemically characterized. The basic test battery used in the ring test consisted of three aquatic (Algae test, Daphnia acute test and Microtox test) and three terrestrial (earthworm acute and plant test with two species (oat, rape)) tests. In addition, data were submitted for ten additional tests (five aquatic (including a genotoxicity test) and five terrestrial ones). Almost all tests were performed according to ISO guidelines, providing EC50 values as measurement of toxicity. Data evaluation was done following recent recommendations made by ISO (2002) and Environment Canada (2005). Besides a high number of reference test data, 634 data sets were produced in the basic test battery and 204 data sets in the additional tests. Only few data sets were not acceptable (e.g. due to lack of reference data) and even less results were identified as statistical or biological outliers. For example, in the case of the basic test

  6. Giromill wind tunnel test and analysis. Volume II. Technical discussion. Final report, June 1976--October 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, W.A.

    1977-10-01

    A wind tunnel test of a Giromill rotor was conducted. The objective of this test was to substantiate the performance computed by the Larsen cyclogiro vortex theory. Additional objectives were to obtain performance comparison data between the Giromill, a sinusoidal blade modulation Giromill, a Darrieus rotor, and a modified Darrieus rotor that flips the blades a few degrees. A three bladed Giromill rotor having a diameter of 2.13 m (7 ft) and a span of 1.52 m (5 ft) was tested in the McDonnell Aircraft Company 15 x 20 ft Mini Speed Wind Tunnel. The blade modulations were accomplished through use of a cam and push rod arrangement. Replaceable cams provided the desired blade modulation at the various operating points. Various operating conditions were achieved by adjusting the rotor RPM and tunnel speed. The results show that the Giromill has good performance, equal to or much better than that predicted by theory, and outperforms the other types of vertical axis wind turbines tested.

  7. Observations from using models to fit the gas production of varying volume test cells and landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborn, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Landfill operators are looking for more accurate models to predict waste degradation and landfill gas production. The simple microbial growth and decay models, whilst being easy to use, have been shown to be inaccurate. Many of the newer and more complex (component) models are highly parameter hungry and many of the required parameters have not been collected or measured at full-scale landfills. This paper compares the results of using different models (LANDGEM, HBM, and two Monod models developed by the author) to fit the gas production of laboratory scale, field test cell and full-scale landfills and discusses some observations that can be made regarding the scalability of gas generation rates. The comparison of these results show that the fast degradation rate that occurs at laboratory scale is not replicated at field-test cell and full-scale landfills. At small scale, all the models predict a slower rate of gas generation than actually occurs. At field test cell and full-scale a number of models predict a faster gas generation than actually occurs. Areas for future work have been identified, which include investigations into the capture efficiency of gas extraction systems and into the parameter sensitivity and identification of the critical parameters for field-test cell and full-scale landfill predication.

  8. Talking and Testing: Discourse Approaches to the Assessment of Oral Proficiency. Studies in Bilingualism, Volume 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard, Ed.; He, Agnes Weiyun, Ed.

    Papers on second language oral proficiency testing include: "Language Proficiency Interviews: A Discourse Approach" (Agnes Weiyun He, Richard Young); "Re-Analyzing the OPI: How Much Does It Look Like Natural Conversation?" (Marysia Johnson, Andrea Tyler); "Evaluating Learner Interactional Skills: Conversation at the Micro Level" (Heidi…

  9. 77 FR 15609 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for Certain High Production Volume Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... identification, pass through a metal detector, and sign the EPA visitor log. All visitor bags are processed... tests because of the extreme reactivity in water of methane, isocyanato-. Bayer CropScience also asked... Register (71 FR 13708, March 16, 2006) (FRL-7335-2). (Document ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-0033-0001)....

  10. Interpretation methods test report for NURE aerial radiometric and geochemical data. Volume 1. Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods to be used in processing and interpreting Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance (AAR) and Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment (HSSR) survey data for the 116 priority ''A'' quadrangles under Texas Instruments Interpretation Services subcontract of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program were tested on selected quadrangles. Examples of the data products to be prepared and presented to the quadrangle evaluators for each of the quadrangles are included in this report along with an outline of the rationale for their creation. Quadrangles selected for testing are: Rawlins, Denver, Spokane, and Ritzville for AAR tests; and Seguin, Pueblo, and Austin for HSSR tests. Processing methods and data products for ARR data were selected to facilitate the identification of possible uranium source-rock areas and potential host rocks based on the measured abundances of U, Th, and K. Ground-water and stream-sediment data processing concentrated on removing the anomaly-masking effects of differences in drainage area and wide fluctuations of geochemically dead matrix constituents such as quartz, feldspar, and mica in stream sediments or pure water in the case of water samples. In general, both approaches are seeking significant enrichments or depletions of uranium relative to geochemically related elements as a supplement to the conventional anomaly hunting

  11. High-sulfur spray dryer Shawnee test program. Volume VI. R-C/TVA spray dryer/ESP evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    TVA's continued investigations of FGD systems led to evaluating the spray drying technology on high-sulfur coal. Initial successful testing of a spraydryer/baghouse combination (see Volume II of this report series) led to the use of an ESP as the particulate collection device. This report describes the spray dryer/ESP testing and results. The goal of the spray dryer/ESP evaluation was to provide a proof-of-concept for this FGD technology. Data collected will be used for further scaleup and to help establish control strategies for TVA facilities. The major objectives were to determine spray dryer and ESP performance (SO/sub 2/ and particulate removal, operating characteristics) when treating flue gas generated from burning high-sulfur coal, and to determine spray-dried particulate characteristics under various spray dryer conditions.

  12. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  13. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  14. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 1. Integrated report. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    This burn test program was conducted during the period of August 1982 to February 1983 to demonstrate that Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) products can displace petroleum as a boiler fuel in oil- and gas-designed boilers. The test program was performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Three forms of SRC (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) and No. 6 Fuel Oil were evaluated in the 700-hp (30 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour) watertube, oil-designed boiler facility at PETC. The test program was managed by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and sponsored by the Department of Energy. Other organizations were involved as necessary to provide the expertise required to execute the test program. This final report represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at PETC. More detailed information with preliminary data can be obtained from separate reports prepared by PETC, Southern Research Institute, Wheelabrator-Frye, Babcock and Wilcox, and Combustion Engineering. These are presented as Annex Volumes A-F. 25 references, 41 figures, 15 tables.

  15. A knowledge base for teaching biology situated in the context of genetic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zande, P.A.M.; Waarlo, A.J.; Brekelmans, M.; Akkerman, S.F.; Vermunt, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testin

  16. Using Middle School Test Scores to Predict Success in Ninth Grade Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Lorrie D.

    2013-01-01

    Success in ninth grade is essential to a student's success throughout high school. Many high schools retain the traditional science course sequence of teaching biology first to ninth graders who may or may not be cognitively ready for today's biology content. A few school districts in Georgia are offering a flexible science course sequence in the…

  17. RSRA sixth scale wind tunnel test. Tabulated balance data, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, A.; Flemming, R.

    1974-01-01

    Summaries are presented of all the force and moment data acquired during the RSRA Sixth Scale Wind Tunnel Test. These data include and supplement the data presented in curve form in previous reports. Each summary includes the model configuration, wing and empennage incidences and deflections, and recorded balance data. The first group of data in each summary presents the force and moment data in full scale parametric form, the dynamic pressure and velocity in the test section, and the powered nacelle fan speed. The second and third groups of data are the balance data in nondimensional coefficient form. The wind axis coefficient data corresponds to the parametric data divided by the wing area for forces and divided by the product of the wing area and wing span or mean aerodynamic chord for moments. The stability axis data resolves the wind axis data with respect to the angle of yaw.

  18. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  19. Multiple IMU system test plan, volume 4. [subroutines for space shuttle requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landey, M.; Vincent, K. T., Jr.; Whittredge, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Operating procedures for this redundant system are described. A test plan is developed with two objectives. First, performance of the hardware and software delivered is demonstrated. Second, applicability of multiple IMU systems to the space shuttle mission is shown through detailed experiments with FDI algorithms and other multiple IMU software: gyrocompassing, calibration, and navigation. Gimbal flip is examined in light of its possible detrimental effects on FDI and navigation. For Vol. 3, see N74-10296.

  20. Importance of the test volume on the lag phase in biodegradation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, F.; Torang, Lars; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    ranging from 1.8 ml to 100 L using two 14C-labeled model chemicals, 2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and p-nitrophenol (PNP), both of which are known to be readily degradable after variable lag phases. The TL ranged from 2.1 to 30.4 d for PNP and from 16 to 37 d for 2,4-D. Decreasing the test...

  1. Systematic two-dimensional cascade tests. Volume 3: Slotted double circular-arc hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbo, R. M.; Murrin, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    Performance parameters are presented for cascades of slotted double circular-arc hydrofoils tested over a range of systematically introduced variables in a rectilinear cascade tunnel which uses water as the test medium. Cascade configurations included various combinations of an inlet flow angle of 50, 60 and 70 deg; a cascade solidity of 0.75, 1.00 and 1.50; a hydrofoil camber angle of 20, 30, 40 and 45 deg; and angles of incidence between positive and negative stall. The slot was positioned at the 45 percent chord station and the slot exit width was 0.047-in. Tests were also performed with the slot positioned at the 35 percent chord station and with slot widths of 0.63 and 0.094-in. These data were correlated to indicate the effects of slot location and slot width on minimum loss incidence and deviation angles. In addition, a comparison is presented of the performance parameters for cascades of slotted and unslotted hydrofoils.

  2. Biological implications of possible unattainability of comprehensive, molecular-resolution, real-time, volume imaging of the living cell

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the impressive advances in biological imaging, no imaging modality today generates, in a comprehensive manner, high-resolution images of crowded molecules working deep inside the living cell in real time. In this paper, instead of tackling this engineering problem in the hope of solving it, we ask a converse question: What if such imaging is \\emph{fundamentally} impossible? We argue that certain decoherence processes could be suppressed because the internal workings of the cell are not being closely "observed" in the quantum mechanical sense, as implied by the assumed impossibility of imaging. It is certainly true that the "wet and warm" living cell should not exhibit quantum behavior merely because of the lack of observation. Despite this, we plow ahead to see what \\emph{might} result from such absence of the outward flow of information. We suggest that chaotic dynamics in the cell could be quantum mechanically suppressed --- a known phenomenon in quantum chaology, which is potentially resistant to v...

  3. 1999 Annual meeting on non-destructive testing. 10. Anniversary of DGZfP in Germany. Volumes 1 and 2. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two proceedings volumes contain the 92 papers presented at the meeting, dealing with the following key subjects: Ultrasonic testing; industrial radiography and other testing methods using radiation; acoustic emission testing; materials charcaterization; training and certification; standards and other technical codes and regulations. (orig./CB)

  4. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  5. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations

  6. Results of temperature test 6 in the Asse salt mine. Volume 1 - Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the year 1985 a heater test with a mean heat load of 50 kW was carried out in the Asse salt mine for 78 days. Its main aims were to investigate possible fracturing of the rock; investigations on the transport of brine and gases; comparison of the measured mechanical stresses and temperatures, as compared to those determined by numerical methods. The evaluation of the measurement results was impeded by premature failure of some of the heaters, which proved to be a handicap to the symmetry of the experiment. It was possible, nevertheless, to find a good agreement between the measured and the numerically calculated temperatures. The mechanical stress measurements showed, as compared to the 2D-FE-calculations, that the measured stresses lay within the expected range. Fracturing was detected by means of seismic observations, especially after termination of the heating. Brine transport was ascertained using geoelectric four point -and self-potential measurements. The staining test showed no sharp fracturing of the rock salt, but a loosened-up zone at the grain boundaries impregnated with staining oil

  7. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 2: Orbiter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a data base and are available for applying to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Data Base is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retro-glide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configuration types include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations.

  8. Local fallout from nuclear test detonations. Volume 2. Compilation of fallout patterns and related test data. Supplement. Foreign nuclear tests. Sanitized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthau, M.; Showers, R.L.

    1964-10-01

    The available fallout patterns and related test data for nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United Kingdom, the Republic of France, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, are included in this supplement to NDL-TR-34. The related test data for the British and French tests include: date and time of detonation, location of test site, total yield, fission yield, type of burst and placement, height of burst, cloud-top and -bottom heights, crater data, and wind information up to nuclear cloud-top height. No fallout patterns are available for any of the Soviet detonations. The list of Soviet detonations, which is as comprehensive as possible, contains the chronological order of the detonations, date, yield, type of burst and location of test site.

  9. Impact Properties of Engineered Cementitious Composites with High Volume Fly Ash Using SHPB Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhitao; YANG Yingzi; YAO Yan

    2012-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing with diameter 40 mm was used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs) with different fly ash content.The basic properties including deformation,energy absorption capacity,strain-stress relationship and failure patterns were discussed.The ECCs showed strain-rate dependency and kept better plastic flow during impact process compared with reactive powder concrete (RPC) and concrete,but the critical compressive strength was lower than that of R-PC and concrete.The bridging effect of PVA fiber and addition of fly ash can significantly improve the deformation and energy absorption capacities of ECCs.With the increase of fly ash content in ECCs,the static and dynamic compressive strength lowered and the dynamic increase factor enhanced,Therefore,to meet different engineering needs,the content of fly ash can be an important index to control the static and dynamic mechanical properties of ECCs.

  10. Species detection and abundance using a biosensor - Development and Testing of in-situ Biological Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), http://www.mbari.org/ESP/, is an autonomous biological sensing system that conducts in situ collection and molecular...

  11. Miniaturized droplets-based microarray of chemical and biological high-throughput tests

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Ana I.; Correia, Clara R.; Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, J.F

    2013-01-01

    Publicado em "Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, vol. 7, supp. 1 (2013) The development of high-throughput and combinatorial technologies is helping to speed up research that is applicable in many areas of chemistry, engineering and biology. We propose a simple, versatile high-efficient and new superhydrophobic platform, which permits to arrange of quasi-spherical aqueous-based droplets with the capability to support and monitor a series of chemical/biolog...

  12. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  13. Tidal volume single breath washout of two tracer gases--a practical and promising lung function test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Singer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI, which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6 and helium (He using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM. METHODS: The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF(6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC, were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. RESULTS: USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60. MM from USFM reflected SF(6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. CONCLUSION: The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF(6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF(6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing.

  14. Testing biological effects of hand-washing grey water for reuse in irrigation on an urban farm: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Zain; Sim, Yei Lin; Lin, Yang Jian; Lai, Ka Man

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of reusing hand-washing grey water contaminated with antibacterial hand-washing liquid for irrigation purposes in an urban farm is explored in this case study. Experiments are carried out to investigate if the quality of this grey water allows for its reuse in agriculture as per the guidelines established by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, there is no guideline to test the biological effect of grey water prior to agricultural use. It is plausible that the antibacterial property of the grey water can harm the soil microbial system and plants when applied to land, even if all other water quality parameters satisfy the WHO limit. We use algae (Chlorella vulgaris) and indigenous soil bacteria as initial plant and soil bacteria indicators, respectively, to test the potential inhibition of the water on plants and soil bacteria. Results show that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the grey water is 10% higher than the WHO permissible level, while all other water quality parameters are within the limits after four days of our experimental period. An inhibitory effect is observed in all of the biological tests. However, the inhibitory effect on algae and soil bacteria is not observed after the four-day period. The case study demonstrates a new approach for testing the biological effect of grey water, which can be used in conjunction with the WHO guideline, and provides data for this urban farm to set up a future water treatment system for grey-water reuse in irrigation. PMID:23530370

  15. Critical tests for determination of microbiological quality and biological activity in commercial vermicompost samples of different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantina-Ievina, Lelde; Andersone, Una; Berkolde-Pīre, Dace; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to show that differences in biological activity among commercially produced vermicompost samples can be found by using a relatively simple test system consisting of microorganism tests on six microbiological media and soilless seedling growth tests with four vegetable crop species. Significant differences in biological properties among analyzed samples were evident both at the level of microbial load as well as plant growth-affecting activity. These differences were mostly manufacturer- and feedstock-associated, but also resulted from storage conditions of vermicompost samples. A mature vermicompost sample that was produced from sewage sludge still contained considerable number of Escherichia coli. Samples from all producers contained several potentially pathogenic fungal species such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudallescheria boidii, Pseudallescheria fimeti, Pseudallescheria minutispora, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium prolificans, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Stachybotrys chartarum, Geotrichum spp., Aphanoascus terreus, and Doratomyces columnaris. In addition, samples from all producers contained plant growth-promoting fungi from the genera Trichoderma and Mortierella. The described system can be useful both for functional studies aiming at understanding of factors affecting quality characteristics of vermicompost preparations and for routine testing of microbiological quality and biological activity of organic waste-derived composts and vermicomposts. PMID:23504062

  16. 76 FR 36019 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... or other material (e.g., bulk material or active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), in-process material... November 20, 1973 (38 FR 32048), we reorganized and republished the biologics regulations, which included... requirements. On March 11, 1976 (41 FR 10427) and March 2, 1979 (44 FR 11754), we updated Sec. 610.12...

  17. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  18. Preparation of two biological reference materials for QUASIMEME inter-laboratory testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohman, M.; Korytar, P.

    2007-01-01

    Two biological materials have been prepared for the Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Free University, Amsterdam to be used in QUASIMEME interlaboratory studies. The materials prepared are: 300 tins of homogenized blue mussels from the Waddenzee (QO07-1) and 300 tins of homogenized shrimps

  19. Preparation of three biological reference material for QUASIMEME inter-laboratory testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohman, M.; Korytar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Three biological materials have been prepared for IVM, Free University, Amsterdam to be used in QUASIMEME interlaboratory studies. The materials prepared are: 300 glass jars of homogenized Mediterranean mussels (QM06-1), 280 tins of homogenized blue mussels from German Bight (QM06-3) and 300 tins of

  20. The stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests on stored horse blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, P; Sullivan, M; Evans, D

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in the role of oxidative stress (OS) in equine medicine has highlighted the need to develop reliable methods to quantify it. In this study we describe the effect of refrigeration (at 4 degrees C) on the stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests carried out on 15 healthy horses. Blood samples, collected from the jugular vein, were immediately placed on ice and analysed using both the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Samples were also refrigerated at 4 degrees C and tested after 3, 7 and 24 h. The average results were similar for up to 24 h and minimal variations were found for each horse. The findings suggest that refrigeration is suitable for preserving equine blood samples for these assays and this approach will provide veterinarians with a technically simple, reliable test to measure OS under field conditions.

  1. Experimental proposal for testing the Emergence of Environment Induced (EIN) Classical Selection rules with Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Durt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    According to the so-called Quantum Darwinist approach, the emergence of "classical islands" from a quantum background is assumed to obey a (selection) principle of maximal information. We illustrate this idea by considering the coupling of two oscillators (modes). As our approach suggests that the classical limit could have emerged throughout a long and progressive Evolution mechanism, it is likely that primitive living organisms behave in a "more quantum", "less classical" way than more evolved ones. This brings us to seriously consider the possibility to measure departures from classicality exhibited by biological systems. We describe an experimental proposal the aimed at revealing the presence of entanglement in the biophotonic radiation emitted by biological sources.

  2. The UV-irradiated mouse as a model for testing biological response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to inducing primary cancers of the skin, ultraviolet (UV) radiation produces specific impairments in the immune system that contribute to the growth and pathogenesis of these skin cancers. The cellular basis for the immunological alterations induced in mice by UV radiation has been studied and characterized over the past ten years. It is now possible to make use of this system to study the activity and mode of action of biological response modifiers. The advantages of this system are that it employs primary hosts, which may respond quite differently from normal animals bearing a transplanted tumor, it closely parallels several specific situations relevant to human cancer, and it may be useful in establishing the mechanism of action of certain agents. Studies in which biological response modifiers have been used in conjunction with the UV carcinogenesis model are reviewed. (Auth.)

  3. Polynomial-Time Algorithm for Controllability Test of a Class of Boolean Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Boolean-network-model-based approaches to dynamical analysis of complex biological networks such as gene regulatory networks have been extensively studied. One of the fundamental problems in control theory of such networks is the problem of determining whether a given substance quantity can be arbitrarily controlled by operating the other substance quantities, which we call the controllability problem. This paper proposes a polynomial-time algorithm for solving this problem. Although the algorithm is based on a sufficient condition for controllability, it is easily computable for a wider class of large-scale biological networks compared with the existing approaches. A key to this success in our approach is to give up computing Boolean operations in a rigorous way and to exploit an adjacency matrix of a directed graph induced by a Boolean network. By applying the proposed approach to a neurotransmitter signaling pathway, it is shown that it is effective.

  4. Tracer tests and image analysis of biological clogging in a two-dimentsional sandbox experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildsgaard, J.; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional flow experiment on biological clogging was carried out by biostimulating a sandbox packed with sand inoculated with bacteria. Biostimulation. consisted of continuously injecting nutrients (acetate and nitrate). Clogging was visualized by frequently carrying out colored tracer...... the main clogged area. Fingers were asymmetric and their dominant direction changed over time. Although the flow field was complex around the main clogged area, the effect on the bulk hydraulic conductivity at the scale of the sandbox was very small....

  5. Test-retest reliability of automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume measurements on a wide bore 3T MR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Marianna S.; Newman, David; Kasmai, Bahman; Greenwood, Richard; Malcolm, Paul N. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Karlsson, Anette; Borga, Magnus [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoeping (Sweden); Rosander, Johannes [Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    To measure the test-retest reproducibility of an automated system for quantifying whole body and compartmental muscle volumes using wide bore 3 T MRI. Thirty volunteers stratified by body mass index underwent whole body 3 T MRI, two-point Dixon sequences, on two separate occasions. Water-fat separation was performed, with automated segmentation of whole body, torso, upper and lower leg volumes, and manually segmented lower leg muscle volumes. Mean automated total body muscle volume was 19.32 L (SD9.1) and 19.28 L (SD9.12) for first and second acquisitions (Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 1.0, 95 % level of agreement -0.32-0.2 L). ICC for all automated test-retest muscle volumes were almost perfect (0.99-1.0) with 95 % levels of agreement 1.8-6.6 % of mean volume. Automated muscle volume measurements correlate closely with manual quantification (right lower leg: manual 1.68 L (2SD0.6) compared to automated 1.64 L (2SD 0.6), left lower leg: manual 1.69 L (2SD 0.64) compared to automated 1.63 L (SD0.61), correlation coefficients for automated and manual segmentation were 0.94-0.96). Fully automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume quantification can be achieved rapidly on a 3 T wide bore system with very low margins of error, excellent test-retest reliability and excellent correlation to manual segmentation in the lower leg. (orig.)

  6. Test-retest reliability of automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume measurements on a wide bore 3T MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the test-retest reproducibility of an automated system for quantifying whole body and compartmental muscle volumes using wide bore 3 T MRI. Thirty volunteers stratified by body mass index underwent whole body 3 T MRI, two-point Dixon sequences, on two separate occasions. Water-fat separation was performed, with automated segmentation of whole body, torso, upper and lower leg volumes, and manually segmented lower leg muscle volumes. Mean automated total body muscle volume was 19.32 L (SD9.1) and 19.28 L (SD9.12) for first and second acquisitions (Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 1.0, 95 % level of agreement -0.32-0.2 L). ICC for all automated test-retest muscle volumes were almost perfect (0.99-1.0) with 95 % levels of agreement 1.8-6.6 % of mean volume. Automated muscle volume measurements correlate closely with manual quantification (right lower leg: manual 1.68 L (2SD0.6) compared to automated 1.64 L (2SD 0.6), left lower leg: manual 1.69 L (2SD 0.64) compared to automated 1.63 L (SD0.61), correlation coefficients for automated and manual segmentation were 0.94-0.96). Fully automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume quantification can be achieved rapidly on a 3 T wide bore system with very low margins of error, excellent test-retest reliability and excellent correlation to manual segmentation in the lower leg. (orig.)

  7. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analogs featuring aromatic and heteroaromatic rings: design, synthesis, and preliminary biological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, G H; Li, Z; White, M C; Vinader, V; Takeuchi, K; Guggino, S E; Dolan, P; Kensler, T W

    1995-10-27

    Aromatic compounds 2a-c, analogs of 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin (calcitriol, 1), and heteroaromatic compounds 4a-c and 5a-c, analogs of 19-nor-1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (3), were designed to simulate the topology of their biologically potent parent compounds while avoiding previtamin D equilibrium. Convergent and facile total syntheses of the analogs (+)-2b, (+)-2c, (-)-4b, and (-)-5b were achieved via carbonyl addition of regiospecifically formed organolithium nucleophiles to the enantiomerically pure C,D-ring ketone (+)-17, characteristic of natural calcitriol (1). Likewise, hybrid analogs 20a-c were prepared to determine whether incorporation of a known potentiating side chain would lead to increased biological activity. Preliminary in vitro biological testing showed that aromatic analogs (+)-2b, (+)-2c, and 20a-c as well as heteroaromatic analogs (-)-4b and (-)-5b have very low affinities for the calf thymus vitamin D receptor but considerable antiproliferative activities in murine keratinocytes at micromolar concentration. No biological advantage was observed in this keratinocyte assay for the doubly modified hybrid analogs 20a-c over the singly modified parent (+)-2b. Analog (+)-2b, but surprisingly not the corresponding analog 20b differing from (+)-2b only in the side chain, showed considerable activity in nongenomic opening of calcium channels in rat osteosarcoma cells. PMID:7473581

  8. Activation Volume in the Density Scaling Regime: Equation of State and Its Test by Using Experimental and Simulation Data

    OpenAIRE

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Koperwas, Kajetan; Swiety-Pospiech, Alicja; Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Paluch, Marian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a formalism for the activation volume of glass forming materials is suggested. An isothermal equation of state for the activation volume is formulated, which is extended to a generalized equation of state that describes the activation volume as a function of temperature and pressure. Both the equations of state are very successfully validated by using experimental and simulation data collected for supercooled Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid and materials from various m...

  9. Biological testing of sediment for the Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, 1988: Geoduck, amphipod, and echinoderm bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Antrim, L.D.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project requires the dredging of approximately 330,000 cubic yards (cy) of sediment from the harbor entrance channel and 205,185 cy from the turning basin. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) partial characterization studies were used to plan a full sediment characterization in which chemical analyses and biological testing of sediments evaluated the suitability of the dredged material for unconfined, open-water disposal. The US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Seattle District, contracted with NOAA/NMFS, Environmental Conservation Division, to perform the chemical analysis and Microtox bioassay tests, and with the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim to perform flow-through solid-phase bioassays utilizing juvenile (8 to 10 mm) geoduck clams, Panopea generosa, and static solid phase bioassays using the phoxocephalid amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, developing embryos and gametes of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. When the results of the biological tests were evaluated under PSDDA guidelines, it was found that all the tested sediment treatments from Olympia Harbor are suitable for unconfined open-water disposal. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Putting the biological species concept to the test: using mating networks to delimit species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lélia Lagache

    Full Text Available Although interfertility is the key criterion upon which Mayr's biological species concept is based, it has never been applied directly to delimit species under natural conditions. Our study fills this gap. We used the interfertility criterion to delimit two closely related oak species in a forest stand by analyzing the network of natural mating events between individuals. The results reveal two groups of interfertile individuals connected by only few mating events. These two groups were largely congruent with those determined using other criteria (morphological similarity, genotypic similarity and individual relatedness. Our study, therefore, shows that the analysis of mating networks is an effective method to delimit species based on the interfertility criterion, provided that adequate network data can be assembled. Our study also shows that although species boundaries are highly congruent across methods of species delimitation, they are not exactly the same. Most of the differences stem from assignment of individuals to an intermediate category. The discrepancies between methods may reflect a biological reality. Indeed, the interfertility criterion is an environment-dependant criterion as species abundances typically affect rates of hybridization under natural conditions. Thus, the methods of species delimitation based on the interfertility criterion are expected to give results slightly different from those based on environment-independent criteria (such as the genotypic similarity criteria. However, whatever the criterion chosen, the challenge we face when delimiting species is to summarize continuous but non-uniform variations in biological diversity. The grade of membership model that we use in this study appears as an appropriate tool.

  11. Alignment between High School Biology Curriculum Standard and the Standardised Tests of Four Provinces in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qun; Liu, Enshan

    2012-01-01

    With the development and implementation of new curriculum standards, the field tests of education reform in senior high schools began in 2004 in four pilot provinces in mainland China. After five years of the reform, it is necessary to know how and to what extent the curriculum standard guides test classroom instruction. The present study was…

  12. Evaluation of the cardiac performance in patients with coronary arterty disease by the pulmonary blood volume change in exercise testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the cardiac performance was studied by the change of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) during the exercise testing in 17 normal subjects (group N), 18 patients with angina pectoris (group A) and 25 with both old myocardial infarction and angina pectoris (group M). The exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometer in supine position. Blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output measured by dye dilution method, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) by multi-gate method, pulmonary artery pressure by Swan-Ganz catheter and PBV was measured during exercise. PBV was estimated by the radioactivity of the systemically administered Tc-99m labeled RBC in the lung field. ROI was adjusted over the right upper and lower lung field. And also the effect of the nitroglycerin was examined. In the result, (1) EF at the peak exercise increased in group N but decreased in Groups A and M. (2) Increased pulmonary artery diastolic pressure at the peak exercise (PAd at exercise) was remarkably higher in groups A and M than group M. (3) PBV was unchanged in group N; however, increased 9.6% in group A and 10.9% in group M. (4) Increased rate of PBV revealed good correlation with ΔEF (r=-0.68, p<0.01) and PAd at exercise (r=0.83, p<0.01), and was considered as the pulmonary congestion due to left ventricular dysfunction. (5) After the sublingual administration of nitroglycerin, the increased PAd and PBV at the peak exercise was suppressed. Particularly, it was remarkable in group A. Thus it was concluded that the noninvasive measurement of PBV during exercise could suggest the extent of the pulmonary congestion and was very useful for evaluation of the cardiac performance in coronary artery disease. (author)

  13. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-08-01

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs.

  14. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs

  15. MODELLING OF RING-SHAPED ULTRASONIC WAVEGUIDES FOR TESTING OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND THERAPEUTIC TREATMENT OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Minchenya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of modelling of ring-shaped waveguide tool for ultrasonic treatment of biological materials, particularly malignant tumours, and testing of their mechanical properties. Harmonic analysis of forced flexural vibration of the waveguide using ANSYS software and APDL programming language was implemented for determination of waveguide geometric parameters providing its resonance for the given excitation frequency. The developed finite element model accounts for interaction between the waveguide and tumour tissue as well as initial prestressing of tissue radially compressed by the waveguide. Resonant curves of the waveguide in terms of its thickness and diameter are calculated and presented. Principle of application of the developed modeling technique for extraction of diagnostic data on mechanical properties of biological tissues is described.

  16. Pilot tests for dismantling by blasting of the biological shield of a shut down nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following free-field tests on concrete blocks the feasibility of explosive dismantling of the biological shield of nuclear power stations has been succesfully tested at the former hotsteam reaction in Karlstein/Main Germany. For this purpose a model shield of scale 1:2 was embedded into the reactor structure at which bore-hole blasting tests employing up to about 15 kg of explosive were performed. An elaborate measurement system allowed to receive detailed information on the blast side-effects: Special emphasis was focussed on the quantitative registration of the dynamic blast loads; data for the transfer of the dismantling method to the removal of real ractor structures were obtained. (orig.)

  17. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  18. Application of biological feedback for estimation of anaerobic performance in jumping test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko S.O.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : - To determine the effect of biofeedback to determine the level of anaerobic performance of healthy young men. Material: The characteristics of physical performance in 60-seconds jumping test without and with visual and audible biofeedback (BFB are determined at 23 healthy young men. Results : Significant individual peculiarities are found in performance features of 60-seconds jumping test both without and with BFB. The groups of performance indexes are maximum jumping height; jumping frequency and achieved performance level; correlation of jumping phases and achieved capacity of a separate jump; jumping dynamics during the test. The positive effect mostly on performance in BFB regime is found in the group of persons with low level of physical performance. Conclusion : The application of BFB in 60-seconds jumping test is proved to increase the objective character of measuring anaerobic performance.

  19. Pollen tube growth test (PTGT) in environmental biomonitoring and predictive radiation biology studies: problem and prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Environmental and Human Bio monitoring studies of Hazardous xenobiotics over living system particularly at cell level, it is desirable to have easy and sensitive test system like Cell Viability assay, MNT, Cell Culture photo toxicity Test, PTGT etc. Out of these the PTGT quite better than other because the in vitro culture of pollen grain can provides a sensitive indication of toxicity at cellular level, since germination and growth of pollen tube will inhibited in presence of toxic substance like DDT, Heavy metal, even Radionuclide's. This test system is easy, economical and widely accepted through out world. In PTGT pollen tube never containing Chloroplast or other plastids so pollen tube resembles animals more than a plant organ and is therefore also a suitable as model for Genotoxicity Assessment of compounds harmful to animal and humans. Lack of plastids in PT, PTGT will not identify the toxic effect of compounds that targets Non cyclic and cyclic photoposphorylation of photosynthesis. This test system valid in International Toxicity Testing Protocol. But this method is time consuming and problem in measurement of pollen tube growing in a culture medium became usually bent and make measurement difficult. Other disadvantage of this method is requirement of DMSO to dissolve test substance of low water suitability in culture medium. DMSO shown to have no effect on PTG at Concentration not more than 1% but some extent interfere with results. Values of PTG are quantified in ED50/IC50 that is the concentration of test compounds that reduces pollen tube growth to 50% of control. So PTGT could be very sensitive and easy to assess in common lab in International way. (author)

  20. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel: Phase 3 -- biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Karle, L.M.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; White, P.J.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The John F. Baldwin Ship Channel is a 28-mile-long portion of the San Francisco Bay to Stockton Ship Channel, the primary shipping lane through San Francisco Bay and Delta. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for construction of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel, which is authorized to be deepened to a project depth of {minus}45 ft relative to mean lower low water (MLLW). Approximately 8.5 million cubic yards (mcy) of sediment will be removed from the channel to reach this project depth. The USACE requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct testing for ocean disposal under the guidelines in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal-Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1991). This testing manual contains a tiered evaluation approach developed specifically for ocean disposal of dredged material at a selected site. In this study, John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediments were evaluated under the Tier III (biological) testing guidance, which is considered to be highly stringent and protective of the environment. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects, (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material).

  1. Solubilization of poorly soluble lichen metabolites for biological testing on cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristmundsdóttir, Thórdís; Jónsdóttir, Elsa; Ogmundsdóttir, Helga M; Ingólfsdóttir, Kristín

    2005-04-01

    The depside atranorin and depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid, isolated from the lichens Stereocaulon alpinum and Cetraria islandica, respectively, were chosen as prototypes for poorly soluble natural compounds in an effort to facilitate testing in pharmacological models. Solubilizing agents previously identified as being non-toxic towards a malignant leukemic (K-562) cell line and suitable for testing of anti-proliferative activity of the dibenzofuran lichen metabolite (+)-usnic acid were used in solubilization studies of the depside and depsidone. Cyclodextrin derivatives were found to be most suitable for solubilizing the lichen compounds, the greatest rise in solubility being witnessed for fumarprotocetraric acid, increasing almost 300-fold from 0.03 mg/ml in water to 8.98 mg/ml in 10% 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD). Subsequently, the lichen compounds, including (+)-usnic acid, were solubilized in 10% HPbetaCD and tested for effects on three malignant human cell lines; T-47D (breast), Panc-1 (pancreas) and PC-3 (prostate) in a standard proliferation assay. Atranorin and fumarprotocetraric acid did not exhibit anti-proliferative effects but usnic acid was active against all test cell lines with EC50 values of 4.3-8.2 microg/ml. The non-toxic solubilizing agents used in this study could prove useful for pharmacological testing of other poorly soluble natural products. PMID:15784343

  2. A bioreactor test system to mimic the biological and mechanical environment of oral soft tissues and to evaluate substitutes for connective tissue grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Stephanie H; Wohlwend, Lorenz; Uebersax, Lorenz; von Mentlen, Roger; Thoma, Daniel S; Jung, Ronald E; Görlach, Christoph; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2010-12-15

    Gingival cells of the oral connective tissue are exposed to complex mechanical forces during mastication, speech, tooth movement and orthodontic treatments. Especially during wound healing following surgical procedures, internal and external forces may occur, creating pressure upon the newly formed tissue. This clinical situation has to be considered when developing biomaterials to augment soft tissue in the oral cavity. In order to pre-evaluate a collagen sponge intended to serve as a substitute for autogenous connective tissue grafts (CTGs), a dynamic bioreactor system was developed. Pressure and shear forces can be applied in this bioreactor in addition to a constant medium perfusion to cell-material constructs. Three-dimensional volume changes and stiffness of the matrices were analyzed. In addition, cell responses such as cell vitality and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were investigated. The number of metabolic active cells constantly increased under fully dynamic culture conditions. The sponges remained elastic even after mechanical forces were applied for 14 days. Analysis of collagen type I and fibronectin revealed a statistically significant accumulation of these ECM molecules (P tissue remodeling processes, was observed under dynamic conditions only. The results indicate that the tested in vitro cell culture system was able to mimic both the biological and mechanical environments of the clinical situation in a healing wound.

  3. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-06-01

    Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity

  4. Some biological aspects of Mysidopsis juniae (Crustacea:Mysidacea) and its use in chronic toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badaro-Pedroso, C. [USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] Nipper, M.G. [NIWA, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1995-12-31

    As part of the joint effort to develop marine toxicity tests with organisms abundant at the Brazilian coast, some aspects for the laboratory culture of M. juniae and its sensitivity to single chemicals were studied. Organisms fed a mixture of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) nauplii and the microalgae Isochrysis galbana reached sexual maturity 10 days before animals fed brine shrimp nauplii only. Under best conditions, sexual maturity was reached on the 9th--11th day and newborn mysids hatched on the 16th--18th day, Short-term chronic toxicity tests were initiated with 7-day old mysids and exposure time was 11 days, with growth (length and dry weight) as test endpoints. Experiments were undertaken with zinc, copper, and ammonia. Zinc did not affect the organisms at concentrations between 0.018 and 0.1 mg/L, which were one order of magnitude lower than the average 96-h; LC50 value. The NOEC and LOEC values were the same for length and weight in some tests with copper and ammonia (Cu: 0.006 and 0.015 mg/L; NH{sub 3}: 0.32 and 0.87 mg/L, respectively), but revealed length as a more sensitive endpoint than weight in others (length NOEC and LOEC: 0.23 and 0.53 mgNH{sub 3}/L; weight: 0.53 and 0.99 mgNH{sub 3}/L, respectively). The authors speculate that this could be caused by time-dependent variations in the lipid content of the organisms. Length would be a steadier and more reliable endpoint for chronic toxicity tests with M. juniae. The results show that the method has potential applications for the evaluation and monitoring of contaminated marine systems along the Brazilian coast.

  5. Office of Technology Development's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, Volume 2, presents brief summaries of programs being investigated at USDOE sites for waste processing, remedial action, underground storage tank remediation, and robotic applications in waste management

  6. Office of Technology Development`s Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents brief summaries of programs being investigated at USDOE sites for waste processing, remedial action, underground storage tank remediation, and robotic applications in waste management.

  7. The Acid Test for Biological Science: STAP Cells, Trust, and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Cheryl

    2016-02-01

    In January 2014, a letter and original research article were published in Nature describing a process whereby somatic mouse cells could be converted into stem cells by subjecting them to stress. These "stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency" (STAP) cells were shown to be capable of contributing to all cell types of a developing embryo, and extra-embryonic tissues. The lead author of the publications, Haruko Obokata, became an overnight celebrity in Japan, where she was dubbed the new face of Japanese science. However, in the weeks that followed publication of the research, issues arose. Other laboratories and researchers (including authors on the original papers) found that they were unable to replicate Obokata et al.'s work. Closer scrutiny of the papers by the scientific community also suggested that there was manipulation of images that had been published, and Obokata was accused of misconduct. Those who should have been supervising her work (also her co-authors on the publications) were also heavily criticised. The STAP cell saga of 2014 is used as an example to highlight the importance of trust and replication in twenty-first century biological science. The role of trust in the scientific community is highlighted, and the effects on interactions between science and the public examined. Similarly, this essay aims to highlight the importance of replication, and how this is understood by researchers, the media, and the public. The expected behaviour of scientists in the twenty-first century is now more closely scrutinised. PMID:25649070

  8. 1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

  9. Synthesis and Biological Testing of Novel Glucosylated Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is the most abundant component of green tea catechins and has strong physiological activities. In this study, two novel EGCG glycosides (EGCG-G1 and EGCG-G2 were chemoselectively synthesized by a chemical modification strategy. Each of these EGCG glycosides underwent structure identification, and the structures were assigned as follows: epigallocatechin gallate-4′′-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (EGCG-G1, 2 and epigallocatechin gallate-4′,4′′-O-β-d-gluco-pyranoside (EGCG-G2, 3. The EGCG glycosides were evaluated for their anticancer activity in vitro against two human breast cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 using MTT assays. The inhibition rate of EGCG glycosides (EGCG-G1 and EGCG-G2 is not obvious. The EGCG glycosides are more stable than EGCG in aqueous solutions, but exhibited decreasing antioxidant activity in the DPPH radical-scavenging assay (EGCG > EGCG-G2 > EGCG-G1. Additionally, the EGCG glycosides exhibited increased water solubility: EGCG-G2 and EGCG-G1 were 15 and 31 times as soluble EGCG, respectively. The EGCG glycosides appear to be useful, and further studies regarding their biological activity are in progress.

  10. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  11. Engineering aspects of the experiment and results of animal tests. [Apollo 17 Biological Cosmic Ray Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, B. C.; Tremor, J. W.; Barrows, W. F.; Zabower, H. R.; Suri, K.; Park, E. G., Jr.; Durso, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Haymaker, W.; Lindberg, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A closed passive system independent of support from the spacecraft or its crew was developed to house five pocket mice for their flight on Apollo XVII. The reaction of potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor to produce oxygen provided a habitable atmosphere within the experiment package. The performance of the system and the ability of the mice to survive the key preflight tests gave reasonable assurance that the mice would also withstand the Apollo flight.-

  12. Mean corpuscular volume of control red blood cells determines the interpretation of eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) test result in infants aged less than 6 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepiela, Olga; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Bystrzycka, Weronika; Łukasik, Jan; Kotuła, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    Eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test is a flow cytometric test used to detect hereditary spherocytosis (HS). To perform the test sample from patients, 5-6 reference samples of red blood are needed. Our aim was to investigate how the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of red blood cells influences on the value of fluorescence of bounded EMA dye and how the choice of reference samples affects the test result. EMA test was performed in peripheral blood from 404 individuals, including 31 children suffering from HS. Mean fluorescence channel of EMA-RBCs was measured with Cytomics FC500 flow cytometer. Mean corpuscular volume of RBCs was assessed with LH750 Beckman Coulter. Statistical analysis was performed using Graph Pad Prism. The correlation Spearman coefficient between mean channel of fluorescence of EMA-RBCs and MCV was r = 0.39, p < 0.0001. Interpretation of EMA test depends on MCV of the reference samples. If reference blood samples have lower MCV than the patients MCV, EMA test result might be negative. Due to different MCV values of RBCs in infancy and ca. Three months later, EMA test in neonates might be interpreted falsely negative. Samples from children younger than 3 months old had EMA test result 86.1 ± 11.7 %, whereas same samples that analyzed 4.1 ± 2.1 later had results of 75.4 ± 4.5 %, p < 0.05. Mean fluorescence of EMA-bound RBC depends on RBC's volume. MCV of reference samples affects EMA test results; thus, we recommend selection of reference samples with MCV in range of ±2 fL compared to MCV of patient RBC's.

  13. Trait-based representation of biological nitrification: Model development, testing, and predicted community composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick eBouskill

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Trait-based microbial models show clear promise as tools to represent the diversity and activity of microorganisms across ecosystem gradients. These models parameterize specific traits that determine the relative fitness of an ‘organism’ in a given environment, and represent the complexity of biological systems across temporal and spatial scales. In this study we introduce a microbial community trait-based modeling framework (MicroTrait focused on nitrification (MicroTrait-N that represents the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB using traits related to enzyme kinetics and physiological properties. We used this model to predict nitrifier diversity, ammonia (NH3 oxidation rates and nitrous oxide (N2O production across pH, temperature and substrate gradients. Predicted nitrifier diversity was predominantly determined by temperature and substrate availability, the latter was strongly influenced by pH. The model predicted that transient N2O production rates are maximized by a decoupling of the AOB and NOB communities, resulting in an accumulation and detoxification of nitrite to N2O by AOB. However, cumulative N2O production (over six month simulations is maximized in a system where the relationship between AOB and NOB is maintained. When the reactions uncouple, the AOB become unstable and biomass declines rapidly, resulting in decreased NH3 oxidation and N2O production. We evaluated this model against site level chemical datasets from the interior of Alaska and accurately simulated NH3 oxidation rates and the relative ratio of AOA:AOB biomass. The predicted community structure and activity indicate (a parameterization of a small number of traits may be sufficient to broadly characterize nitrifying community structure and (b changing decadal trends in climate and edaphic conditions could impact nitrification rates in ways that are not captured by extant biogeochemical models.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions.

  15. Non-specific biological markers as a screening test for diagnostic of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanovic G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum concentrations of adenosine deaminase were determined in 223 febrile patients. In 62, we discovered extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Serum levels of immunoglobulin G were monitored in 287 febrile patients, and 68 had extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Serum concentrations of adenosine deaminase were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis compared to other patients with fever of unknown origin. Serum concentrations declined during antituberculosis therapy. A correlation with the localization of infection was not found. Levels of immunoglobulin G were higher in patients with tuberculosis. Both tests had high sensitivity and specificity and could therefore be used for screening extrapulmonary tuberculosis; however, they can only be interpreted adequately following a full clinical investigation.

  16. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  17. Life habitability in the solar system: testing the universality of biology on Europa with microprobes or lander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss whether it is possible to test the universality of biology, a quest that is of paramount relevance for one of its most recent branches, namely astrobiology. We review this topic in terms of the relative roles played on the Earth biota by contingency and evolutionary convergence. We raise the related question of whether the molecular events that were precursors to the origin of life on Earth are bound to occur elsewhere in the solar system, wherever the environmental conditions are similar to the terrestrial ones. The set of hypotheses for addressing the question of the universality of biology can be tested by future experiments that are feasible with current technology. We focus on landing on the Jovian satellite Europa and its broader implications, including selecting a landing site. We also discuss the corresponding miniaturized equipment that is already in existence. The second objective is to discuss in more detail whether sulphur traces on Jupiter's moon Europa could be of biogenic origin, and could be tested with the present level of technology readiness. To achieve reliable biosignatures in the solar system in the foreseeable future, it seems essential to go back to Europa, in addition to continuing the multiple well-funded Mars programmes. Our work highlights the type of biogenic signatures that can be searched, when probing Europa's icy and patchy surface. Definite answers can be retrieved in situ on the icy surface with instrumentation for the corresponding biogeochemistry. The measurements can be performed by, for instance, microprobes, or by landers (of the type of the original JPL studies that sadly have been suspended). Such on-site measurements could make a modest contribution to the overall question of settling one of the most significant problems in astrobiology, namely the origin of the surficial sulphur on Europa. (author)

  18. Biological impact tests on complex hydrides used as hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H.; Kiyobayashi, T.; Kuriyama, N. [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Tokoyoda, K. [R and D Center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, 2-4-2 Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Matsumoto, M. [Materials Department, Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The mutagenicity of a series of the light element hydrides (containing NaAlH{sub 4}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiBH{sub 4}, etc.) was examined by evaluating the frequency of mutation in bacterial DNAs. Although some materials were suspected to be slightly mutagenic, their effect was much less malignant than that of well-known potent mutagens. The hydrides exhibited high cytotoxicity, rather than mutagenicity. A Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-related material was also subjected to a series of toxicity tests on aqueous organisms, i.e., algae, water fleas and fish. The result suggests that the material is as toxic as alkaline metal hydroxides, such as NaOH and KOH. (author)

  19. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 3: Near- and far-field plots for the JPL feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-03-01

    Technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are discussed. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed system radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 3) gives the detailed patterns measured with the JPL feed (2.225 GHz). Volume 1 covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns for the LaRC feeds (7.3, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz) are given in Volume 2 of this report.

  20. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 2: Near- and far-field plots for the LaRC feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-03-01

    The technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are described. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15-meter hoop, stiffened by cable into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume II) gives the detailed patterns measured with the LaRC feeds (7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz). Volume I covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns are provided for the 2.225 Ghz feed in Volume III of this report.

  1. Application of SLIM-MAUD: A test of an interactive computer-based method for organizing expert assessment of human performance and reliability: Volume 2, Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been conducting a multiyear research program to investigate different methods for using expert judgments to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) in nuclear power plants. One of the methods investigated, derived from multi-attribute utility theory, is the Success Likelihood Index Methodolocy implemented through Multi-Attribute Utility Decomposition (SLIM-MAUD). This report describes a systematic test application of the SLIM-MAUD methodology. The test application is evaluated on the basis of three criteria: practicality, acceptability, and usefulness. Volume I of this report represents an overview of SLIM-MAUD, describes the procedures followed in the test application, and provides a summary of the results obtained. Volume II consists of technical appendices to support in detail the materials contained in Volume I, and the users' package of explicit procedures to be followed in implementing SLIM-MAUD. The results obtained in the test application provide support for the application of SLIM-MAUD to a wide variety of applications requiring estimates of human errors

  2. Structure property relationship of biological nano composites studies by combination of in-situ synchrotron scattering and mechanical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological materials represent hierarchical nano fibre composites with complicated morphology and architecture varying on the nm level. The mechanical response of those materials is influenced by many parameters like chemical composition and crystal structure of constituents, preferred orientation, internal morphology with specific sizes of features etc. In-situ wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) combined with mechanical tests provide a unique means to evaluate structural changes in biological materials at specific stages of tensile experiments. In this way it is possible to identify distinct architectural/compositional elements responsible for specific mechanical characteristics of the biological materials. In this thesis, structure-property relationship is analyzed using in-situ WAXS in the tissues of Picea abies, coir fibre, bacterial cellulose and cellulose II based composites. The experiments were performed at the beamline ID01 of European synchrotron radiation facility in Grenoble, France. The tissues were strained in a tensile stage, while the structural changes were monitored using WAXS. Complex straining procedures were applied including cyclic straining. One of the main goals was to understand the stiffness recovery and strain hardening effects in the tissues. The results demonstrate that, in all cellulosics, the orientation of the cellulose crystallites is only the function of the external strain while the stiffness depends on the specific stage of the tensile experiment. Whenever the strain is increased, the tissues exhibit stiffness equal or larger than the initial one. The recovery of the mechanical function is attributed to the molecular mechanistic effects operating between the crystalline domains of the cellulose. (author)

  3. Test and standardization of a radiometric method for free testosterone assay in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of equilibrium dialysis technique using semi-permeable cellulose membranes were analysed and a modification was presented for the calculation of the unbound or free fraction of plasma steroids. The results were compared with those from the classical way of calculation used in the equilibrium dialysis technique in which it is necessary to include the change in weight of the dialysis bags. Technical aspects of the method were studied such as weight variation of the dialysis bags during dialysis, comparison of the results obtained using multiple plasma dilutions or one dilution only and comparing serum and plasma. The results obtained with the multiple dilutions technique were similar to those with non-diluted plasma while significantly different from those using one dilution only. The operational characteristics of the method were evaluated showing its specificity at least by the dilution test, besides being precise considering intra and interassay reproductibility. The mean + - s.d. of the percent free testosterone levels were 2.57 + - 0.45% and 1.67 + - 0.30% for males and females at the mid-follicular phase respectively. (Author)

  4. Determination of MBT-waste reactivity - An infrared spectroscopic and multivariate statistical approach to identify and avoid failures of biological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, K; Smidt, E; Binner, E; Schwanninger, M; Tintner, J; Lechner, P

    2010-04-01

    The Austrian Landfill Ordinance provides limit values regarding the reactivity for the disposal of mechanically biologically treated (MBT) waste before landfilling. The potential reactivity determined by biological tests according to the Austrian Standards (OENORM S 2027 1-2) can be underestimated if the microbial community is affected by environmental conditions. New analytical tools have been developed as an alternative to error-prone and time-consuming biological tests. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in association with Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS-R) was used to predict the reactivity parameters respiration activity (RA(4)) and gas generation sum (GS(21)) as well as to detect errors resulting from inhibiting effects on biological tests. For this purpose 250 MBT-waste samples from different Austrian MBT-plants were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy in the mid (MIR) and near infrared (NIR) area and biological tests. Spectroscopic results were compared with those from biological tests. Arising problems caused by interferences of RA(4) and GS(21) are discussed. It is shown that FT-IR spectroscopy predicts RA(4) and GS(21) reliably to assess stability of MBT-waste materials and to detect errors. PMID:19854633

  5. Biologic overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project study area includes five major vegetation associations characteristic of the transition between the northern extent of the Mojave Desert and the southern extent of the Great Basin Desert. A total of 32 species of reptiles, 66 species of birds, and 46 species of mammals are known to occur within these associations elsewhere on the Nevada Test Site. Ten species of plants, and the mule deer, wild horse, feral burro, and desert tortoise were defined as possible sensitive species because they are protected by federal and state regulations, or are being considered for such protection. The major agricultural resources of southern Nye County included 737,000 acres of public grazing land managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and 9500 acres of irrigated crop land located in the Beatty/Oasis valleys, the Amargosa Valley, and Ash Meadows. Range lands are of poor quality. Alfalfa and cotton are the major crops along with small amounts of grains, Sudan grass, turf, fruits, and melons. The largest impacts to known ecosystems are expected to result from: extensive disturbances associated with construction of roads, seismic lines, drilling pads, and surface facilities; storage and leaching of mined spoils; disposal of water; off-road vehicle travel; and, over several hundred years, elevated soil temperatures. Significant impacts to off-site areas such as Ash Meadows are anticipated if new residential developments are built there to accommodate an increased work force. Several species of concern and their essential habitats are located at Ash Meadows. Available literature contained sufficient baseline information to assess potential impacts of the proposed project on an area-wide basis. It was inadequate to support analysis of potential impacts on specific locations selected for site characterization studies, mining an exploratory shaft, or the siting and operation of a repository

  6. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 2. PILOT SCALE TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  7. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 1. LABORATORY SCALE TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  8. High Voltage Test Apparatus for a Neutron EDM Experiment and Lower Limit on the Dielectric Strength of Liquid Helium at Large Volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Long, J C; Boissevain, J G; Clark, D J; Cooper, M D; Gómez, J J; Lamoreaux, S K; Mischke, R E; Penttila, S I

    2006-01-01

    A new search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is underway using ultracold neutrons produced and held in a bath of superfluid helium. Attaining the target sensitivity requires maintaining an electric field of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter across the experimental cell, which is nominally 7.5 cm wide and will contain about 4 liters of superfluid. The electrical properties of liquid helium are expected to be sufficient to meet the design goals, but little is known about these properties for volumes and electrode spacings appropriate to the EDM experiment. Furthermore, direct application of the necessary voltages from an external source to the experimental test cell is impractical. An apparatus to amplify voltages in the liquid helium environment and to test the electrical properties of the liquid for large volumes and electrode spacings has been constructed. The device consists of a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter liquid helium dewar. Preliminary r...

  9. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Session 1A--Session 2C: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume 1, covers sessions 1A through session 2C. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Session 1A--Session 2C: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume 1, covers sessions 1A through session 2C. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  11. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  12. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 2 - Biological atlas of the Arctic Seas 2000 - Plankton of the Barents and Kara Seas (1 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Presented in this CD-ROM are physical and biological data for the region extending from the Barents Sea to the Kara Sea during 158 scientific cruises for the period...

  13. A Comparison of the Hypothetical and Operational Objectives of the Nelson Biology Test, Form E 1965 and the New York State Regents Examination in Biology, June 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary Frances

    The investigator of this study, using a sample that included 382 boys from the City of New York, 366 girls from the City, and 379 boys and 368 girls from the suburban areas of the county of Westchester, attempted to ascertain the operational, cognitive objectives of the two biology achievement instruments. The method used to analyze objectives was…

  14. Epistemological Predictors of "Self Efficacy on Learning Biology" and "Test Anxiety Related to Evaluation of Learning on Biology" for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2011-01-01

    The degree to which pre-service teachers learn biology is related to both motivational factors of self-regulation and factors regarding epistemological beliefs. At the same time, self-regulation and epistemological beliefs are also associated with one another. Based on this relationship, the purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  15. A Study of the Biology Questions in the 6th Grade Science and Technology Test of the Level Assessment Examination Based on the Revised Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    KESKİN, Melike ÖZER; AYDIN, Solmaz

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to study and compare the biology questions in the sixth grade Science and Technology Tests of the Level Assessment Examinations (SBS) administered in 2008 and 2009 based on the knowledge and cognitive process dimensions of the Revised Taxonomy. The study looked at a total of ten biology questions, five in 2008 and five in 2009. Three doctoral and three master's students worked independently on the classification of the questions according to the Revised Taxonomy, as required b...

  16. Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume II. Procurement package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, R.O.

    1976-10-15

    Procurement packages of technical specifications and construction drawings for eleven test facility additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are presented. Each of the specifications includes all of the technical requirements needed for procurement and construction starting with Division 2. The information is presented under the following subject headings: injection pump system: 52-2 injection pipeline; control and instrumentation spools; calibration test bench; test pad modifications; test pad piping headers; production and injection wells; well 5-2 modifications; well 8-1 down-hole pump; well 6-1 down-hole pump; and well 8-1 booster pump. (JGB)

  17. Pilot Scale Test to Treat High Concentration Gasification Wastewater Using Catalytic Oxidation and Aerobic Biological Fluid-Bed Combination Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Na; HUANG Jun-li; WANG Wei; ZHAO Jian-wei; WANG Cui-lin; CUI Chong-wei

    2008-01-01

    The gasitication wastewatet is a kind of typical ocgauic industrial wastewatet with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia uitrogen,which could not be completely degraded by the traditional physical,chimical and bidogical method.So it is very important to find an effective treatment process.A combination process of catalytic oxidation with noble metal catalysts and aerobic biological fluid-bed packed with the new uitrastructure biological carriers,which was devdoped by ourselves,was investigated to treat the gasification wastcwater.The pilot scale test with 0.5m3/h influent flow was carried out to investigate the performance of this new combination process.The results showed that the effluent COD was 84.02 mg/L,ananonia nitrogen was 14.15 mg/L,and total phenol was 0.20 mg/L,which could completely meet the Grade I of Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996),when the influent average COD was 5564 mg/L,anunonia nitrogen was 237 mg/L,and total phenol was 1100 mg/L.The two catalytic reactors could evidently improve the wastewater biodegradability,and the value of BOD5/COD(B/C) increased from 0.23 to 0.413 in the one-stage catalytic reactor and from 0.273 to 0.421 in two-stage catalytic reactor.The further experiment results showed that the effluent quality of this new combination progess could still meet the discharge standard,aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were degraded effectively in this combination process.

  18. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  19. Solid-waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions. Volume 1, Batch leach and adsorption tests and sediment characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Cantrell, K.J.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Campbell, J.A.; Amonette, J.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development of conceptual-release models for Hanford Site defense solid-waste forms; (2) optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release from contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments; and (3) creation of empirical data for use as provisional source term and retardation factors that become input parameters for performance assessment analyses for future Hanford disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing disposal units.

  20. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior

  1. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior.

  2. Manned remote work station development article. Volume 3: Development test plan. Appendix A: Manufacturing requirements/schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The tests and procedures for the manned remote work station (MRWS) open cherry picker (OCP) development test article (DTA) are described to validate systems requirements and performance specifications. A development test program is outlined to evaluate key design issues and man/machine interfaces when the MRWS OCP is used in a shuttle support role of satellite servicing and in orbit construction of large structures.

  3. DETERMINATION OF ENDOTOXIN IN SMALL-VOLUME PARENTERALS (SVPs: A COMPARISON OF LAL GEL-CLOT METHOD WITH U.S.P. RABBIT PYROGEN TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Rafiee-Tehrani M.H. Djamshidi

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The simplicity and sensitivity of the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL gel-clot method in detection of endotoxin in Small Volume Parenterals (SVPs were studied and compared with rabbit pyrogen test."nAll formulations were artificially spiked with 0.25, 0.5 and 5EU/ml of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 endotoxin (Iambda=0.5EU/ml. The Threshold Pyrogenic Dose (TPD for E.coli 0111 :B4 endotoxin was found to be more than lng per kg of body weight (0.5EU/ml. However, the sensitivity of LAL test was found to be 0.25 Eu/ml for water for injection and 0.5 EU/ml for other formulations. The observed inhibitory effect of electrolyte containing solutions was deleted by some degree of dilution prior to test. However, none of the samples showed inhibitory at the Maximum Valid Dilution (MVD. The U.S.P. rabbit pyrogen test was insignificant for all the solutions tested. These results suggest, LAL gel-clot test to be useful for determination of bacterial endotoxin as final release test in SVPs. A comparison of the pyrogenicity assays also indicates, that LAL is more sensitive and simple and less time-consuming than the conventional rabbit test.

  4. Low contrast volume run-off CT angiography with optimized scan time based on double-level test bolus technique – feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To verify the technical feasibility of low contrast volume (40 mL) run-off CT angiography (run-off CTA) with the individual scan time optimization based on double-level test bolus technique. Materials and methods: A prospective study of 92 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA performed with 40 mL of contrast medium (injection rate of 6 mL/s) and optimized scan times on a second generation of dual-source CT. Individual optimized scan times were calculated from aortopopliteal transit times obtained on the basis of double-level test bolus technique – the single injection of 10 mL test bolus and dynamic acquisitions in two levels (abdominal aorta and popliteal arteries). Intraluminal attenuation (HU) was measured in 6 levels (aorta, iliac, femoral and popliteal arteries, middle and distal lower-legs) and subjective quality (3-point score) was assessed. Relations of image quality, test bolus parameters and arterial circulation involvement were analyzed. Results: High mean attenuation (HU) values (468; 437; 442; 440; 342; 274) and quality score in all monitored levels was achieved. In 91 patients (0.99) the sufficient diagnostic quality (score 1–2) in aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was determined. A total of 6 patients (0.07) were not evaluable in distal lower-legs. Only the weak indirect correlation of image quality and test-bolus parameters was proved in iliac, femoral and popliteal levels (r values: −0.263, −0.298 and −0.254). The statistically significant difference of the test-bolus parameters and image quality was proved in patients with occlusive and aneurysmal disease. Conclusion: We proved the technical feasibility and sufficient quality of run-off CTA with low volume of contrast medium and optimized scan time according to aortopopliteal transit time calculated from double-level test bolus

  5. Low contrast volume run-off CT angiography with optimized scan time based on double-level test bolus technique – feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, Jan, E-mail: baxaj@fnplzen.cz [Department of Imaging Methods, University Hospital and Charles University Medical School in Pilsen (Czech Republic); Vendiš, Tomáš [Department of Imaging Methods, University Hospital and Charles University Medical School in Pilsen (Czech Republic); Moláček, Jiří [Department of Surgery, University Hospital and Charles University Medical School in Pilsen (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Lucie [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital and Charles University Medical School in Pilsen (Czech Republic); Flohr, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Korporaal, Johannes G. [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Ferda, Jiří [Department of Imaging Methods, University Hospital and Charles University Medical School in Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To verify the technical feasibility of low contrast volume (40 mL) run-off CT angiography (run-off CTA) with the individual scan time optimization based on double-level test bolus technique. Materials and methods: A prospective study of 92 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA performed with 40 mL of contrast medium (injection rate of 6 mL/s) and optimized scan times on a second generation of dual-source CT. Individual optimized scan times were calculated from aortopopliteal transit times obtained on the basis of double-level test bolus technique – the single injection of 10 mL test bolus and dynamic acquisitions in two levels (abdominal aorta and popliteal arteries). Intraluminal attenuation (HU) was measured in 6 levels (aorta, iliac, femoral and popliteal arteries, middle and distal lower-legs) and subjective quality (3-point score) was assessed. Relations of image quality, test bolus parameters and arterial circulation involvement were analyzed. Results: High mean attenuation (HU) values (468; 437; 442; 440; 342; 274) and quality score in all monitored levels was achieved. In 91 patients (0.99) the sufficient diagnostic quality (score 1–2) in aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was determined. A total of 6 patients (0.07) were not evaluable in distal lower-legs. Only the weak indirect correlation of image quality and test-bolus parameters was proved in iliac, femoral and popliteal levels (r values: −0.263, −0.298 and −0.254). The statistically significant difference of the test-bolus parameters and image quality was proved in patients with occlusive and aneurysmal disease. Conclusion: We proved the technical feasibility and sufficient quality of run-off CTA with low volume of contrast medium and optimized scan time according to aortopopliteal transit time calculated from double-level test bolus.

  6. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 3: Ground tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Refan Program included full-scale performance and noise ground tests of both a current production (JT8D-15) and a refanned (JT8D-115) engine. A description of the two ground tests including detailed propulsion, noise, and structural test results is presented. The primary objectives of the total test program were comparison of JT8D-15 and JT8D-115 overall propulsion system performance and noise characteristics and determination of incremental component noise levels. Other objectives of the test program included: (1) determination of acoustic treatment effectiveness; (2) measurement of internal sound pressure levels; (3) measurement of inlet and exhaust hardware performance; (4) determination of center-engine surge margin; and (5) evaluation of certain structural characteristics associated with the 727 refan center-engine inlet duct and JT8D refan engine exhaust system. The JT8D-15 and -115 tests were conducted during September 1974 and January to March 1975, respectively. Analyses of the test data indicated that the JT8D-115, as compared to the JT8D-15, demonstrates a 12.5 percent to 13.2 percent reduction in static specific fuel consumption, and a reduction of 6 to 7 PNdB in a weighted average value of static tone corrected perceived noise level. Separated into noise components, a significant reduction was shown for the inlet fan, aft fan, exhaust duct flow, turbine, and jet noises. However, core noise was increased. Photographs of test stands and test equipment are shown.

  7. Proof test criteria for thin-walled 2219 aluminum pressure vessels. Volume 1: Program summary and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to investigate the crack growth behavior of deep surface flaws in 2219 aluminum. The program included tests of uniaxially loaded surface flaw and center crack panels at temperatures ranging from 20K (-423 F) to ambient. The tests were conducted on both the base metal and as-welded weld metal material. The program was designed to provide data on the mechanisms of failure by ligament penetration, and the residual cyclic life, after proof-testing, of a vessel which has been subjected to incipient penetration by the proof test. The results were compared and analyzed with previously developed data to develop guidelines for the proof testing of thin walled 2219 pressure vessels.

  8. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

  9. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-07

    The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

  10. Application of SLIM-MAUD: a test of an interactive computer-based method for organizing expert assessment of human performance and reliability. Volume 1. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been conducting a multiyear research program to investigate different methods for using expert judgments to estimate human error probabilities in nuclear power plants. One of the methods investigated, derived from multi-attribute utility theory, is the Success Likelihood Index Methodology implemented through Multi-Attribute Utility Decomposition (SLIM-MAUD). This report describes a systematic test application of the SLIM-MAUD methodology. The test application is evaluated on the basis of three criteria: practicality, acceptability, and usefulness. Volume I of this report presents an overview of SLIM-MAUD, describes the procedures followed in the test application, and provides a summary of the results obtained. 14 refs

  11. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Paulo Autran Leite; Resende, Cristiane Xavier [Departamento de Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon, s/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, Sergipe CEP 49000-100 (Brazil); Dulce de Almeida Soares, Glória [Departamento de Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Brigadeiro Trompowisk, s/n. Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro CEP 21900-000 (Brazil); Anselme, Karine [Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), CNRS LRC7228, 15, Jean Starcky Street, BP 2488, 68054 Mulhouse cedex (France); Almeida, Luís Eduardo, E-mail: lealmeida2009@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon, s/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, Sergipe CEP 49000-100 (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2 ± 0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7 ± 2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of 3D-scaffolds based on CHI, with or without addition of SF and HA. • Scaffolds exhibited interconnected porous structure (pore size superior to 50 μm). • The tripolyphosphate did not induce any significant cytotoxic response. • The CHI/SF/HA composite showed a higher cell growth and ALP activity.

  12. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2 ± 0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7 ± 2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of 3D-scaffolds based on CHI, with or without addition of SF and HA. • Scaffolds exhibited interconnected porous structure (pore size superior to 50 μm). • The tripolyphosphate did not induce any significant cytotoxic response. • The CHI/SF/HA composite showed a higher cell growth and ALP activity

  13. Fabrication techniques for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices and their applications for biological testing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yanyan; Si, Jin; Li, Zhiyang

    2016-03-15

    Paper is increasingly recognized as a user-friendly and ubiquitous substrate for construction of microfluidic devices. Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) provide an alternative technology for development of affordable, portable, disposable and low-cost diagnostic tools for improving point of care testing (POCT) and disease screening in the developing world, especially in those countries with no- or low-infrastructure and limited trained medical and health professionals. We in this review present fabrication techniques for microfluidic devices and their respective applications for biological detection as reported to date. These include: (i) fabrication techniques: examples of devices fabricated by using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) methods; (ii) detection application: biochemical, immunological and molecular detection by incorporating efficient detection methods such as, colorimetric detection, electrochemical detection, fluorescence detection, chemiluminescence (CL) detection, electrochemiluninescence (ECL) detection, photoelectrochemi (PEC) detection and so on. In addition, main advantages, disadvantages and future trends for the devices are also discussed in this review.

  14. Apollo-Soyuz test project. Volume 1: Astronomy, earth atmosphere and gravity field, life sciences, and materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The joint U.S.-USSR experiments and the U.S. conducted unilateral experiments performed during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project are described. Scientific concepts and experiment design and operation are discussed along with scientific results of postflight analysis.

  15. Full-scale testing, production and cost analysis data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parson, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The development, testing, production activities, and associated costs that were required to produce five-and-one-half advanced-composite stabilizer shipsets for Boeing 737 aircraft are defined and discussed.

  16. Wind tunnel test on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor model, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, J. P.; Alexander, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Wing tunnel test data on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor mode are reported for all potential flight conditions through hover and a wide envelope of transitions. A mathematical model was used to describe the rotor system in real time simulation by means of regression analyses. Details of the model, test program and data system are provided together with four data files for hover and transition.

  17. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team . Volume 2; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage (horizontal and vertical tail). This report contains the Appendices to Volume I.

  18. Factors in seventh grade academics associated with performance levels on the tenth grade biology end of course test in selected middle and high schools in northwest Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer Henry

    This study attempted to identify factors in seventh grade academics that are associated with overall success in tenth grade biology. The study addressed the following research questions: Are there significant differences in performance levels in seventh grade Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores in science, math, reading, and language arts associated with performance categories in tenth grade biology End of Course Test (EOCT) and the following demographic variables : gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability category, and English language proficiency level? Is there a relationship among the categorical variables on the tenth grade biology EOCT and the same five demographic variables? Retrospective causal comparative research was used on a representative sample from the middle schools in three North Georgia counties who took the four CRCTs in the 2006-2007 school year, and took the biology EOCT in the 2009-2010 school year. Chi square was used to determine the relationships of the various demographic variables on three biology EOCT performance categories. Twoway ANOVA determined relationships between the seventh grade CRCT scores of students in the various demographic groups and their performance levels on the biology EOCT. Students' performance levels on the biology EOCT matched their performance levels on the seventh grade CRCTs consistently. Females performed better than males on all seventh grade CRCTs. Black and Hispanic students did worse than White and Asian/Asian Indian students on the math CRCT. Students living in poverty did worse on reading and language arts CRCTs than students who were better off. Special education students did worse on science, reading, and language arts CRCTs than students not receiving special education services. English language learners did worse than native English speakers on all seventh grade CRCTs. These findings suggest that remedial measures may be taken in the seventh grade that could impact

  19. Assessing Students' Abilities in Processes of Scientific Inquiry in Biology Using a Paper-and-Pencil Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Kathrin Helena; Nehring, Andreas; Tiemann, Rüdiger; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe, categorise and analyse students' (aged 14-16) processes of scientific inquiry in biology and chemistry education. Therefore, a theoretical structure for scientific inquiry for both biology and chemistry, the VerE model, was developed. This model consists of nine epistemological acts, which combine…

  20. Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Optimum operating parameters for zinc ferrite such as temperatures, gas compositions, and space velocities are discussed. From the test results, salient features of zinc ferrite were derived and discussed in regard to system implications, issues raised, and technical requirements. 47 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

  1. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.; Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  2. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drollinger, Harold [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Jones, Robert C. [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Bullard, Thomas F. [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Ashbaugh, Laurence J. [Southern Nevada Courier Service, NV (United States); Griffin, Wayne R. [Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S.A. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a 3 year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year 3 of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic temperature fluctuations.

  4. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  5. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  6. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  7. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  8. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  9. Evaluation of HFC-245ca for commercial use in low pressure chillers. Final report, Volume II: Chiller test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keuper, E.F. [Trane Co., LaCrosse, WI (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The data presented here were taken under Trane Laboratory Test Order 23127 between May and October 1995. The chiller was a 200 nominal ton three stage direct drive centrifugal chiller with two economizers. Three sets of impellers, three refrigerants and two oils were tested in the chiller according to the following matrix. Trane 22 is a mineral oil and Solest 68 is a polyolester oil. Runs 1 through 6 were to optimize the refrigerant charge using CFC-11. This was determined to be 360 lbm (163.3 Kg) and this value was used for all three refrigerants. The chiller takes a charge of six gallons of oil (22.7 liters). These data which follow are divided into Large Impeller, Medium Impeller and Small Impeller sets further subdivided by Imperial and Metric presentation. The data were taken in Imperial Units. These data are presented in four-page sets. Page 1 shows the reduced chiller test data. Page 2 shows some supporting calculations by curve fit, such as motor efficiency and motor speed. Pages 3 and 4 show the raw data as delivered by the laboratory. All following four-page sets are repetition of the form but for successive test runs.

  10. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  11. Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

  12. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  13. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The following data from the reopening of an abandoned well are presented: reservoir pressure drawdown and buildup data, Institute of Gas Technology test data, Insitute of Gas Technology sample log, reservoir fluid analysis, produced gas/water ratio, chemical analysis procedures, surface flow data, third party sampling and reports, sand detectors charts, and Horner-type buildup data. (MHR)

  14. Direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel. Handling tests for gallery storage. Final report. Main volume; Direkte Endlagerung ausgedienter Brennelemente DEAB. Handhabungsversuche zur Streckenlagerung. Abschlussbericht. Hauptband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filbert, W. [comp.] [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Engelmann, H.J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Heda, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Hedemann, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Hubert, R. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Neydek, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany); Werthenbach, H.J. [Siemag Transplan GmbH, Netphen (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    The volume contains the results of above ground simulated handling experiments for gallery storage in POLLUX containers: (1) design and testing of the track system for gallery storage; (2) fault behaviour of the disposal facility; (3) control programme of the disposal facility; (4) elimination of operational incidents in case of defects of the plateau wagon or of the disposal facility - radiological exposure of personnel; (5) simulation tests of operational failure of the plateau wagon or the disposal facility. (HP) [Deutsch] Der Band enthaelt die Ergebnisse der oberirdischen, simulierten Handhabungsversuche zur Streckenlagerung in POLLUX-Behaeltern: (1) Auslegung und Erprobung des Gleissystems fuer die Streckenlagerung; (2) Stoerverhalten der Einlagerungsvorrichtung; (3) Steuerprogramm der Einlagerungsvorrichtung; (4) Behebung von Betriebstoerungen bei Defekten am Plateauwagen oder an der Einlagerungsvorrichtung - radiologische Belastung des Pengrals; (5) Simulationsversuche zu Betriebsstoerungen am Plateauwagen oder an der Einlagerungsvorrichtung. (HP)

  15. Design, Construction and Performance Tests of a Prototype MicroMegas Chamber with Two Readout Planes in a Common Gas Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Brickwedde, Bernard; Schott, Matthias; Yildirim, Eda

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design and the performance of a prototype detector based on MicroMegas technology with two detection planes in a common gas volume is discussed. The detector is suited for the forward region of LHC detectors, addressing the high-rate environment and limited available space. Each detection plane has an active area of 9x9 cm^2 with a two-dimensional strip readout and is separated by a common gas region with a height of 14 mm. A micro-mesh, working as a cathode, is placed in the middle of the common gas volume separating it into two individual cells. This setup allows for an angle reconstruction of incoming particles with a precision of 2 mrad. Since this design reduces the impact of multiple scattering effects by the reduced material budget, possible applications for low energy beam experiments can be envisioned. The performance of the prototype detector has been tested with a 4.4 GeV electron beam, provided by the test beam facility at DESY.

  16. Relation Between Pressure and Volume Unloading During Ramp Testing in Patients Supported with a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Hassager, Christian; Balling, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    (ramp-base) and then went from 8,000 RPM (ramp-low) increasing by 400 RPM/5 minutes until reaching 12,000 RPM or suction/arrhythmic event (ramp-high). The study was finalized by a 25-Watt exercise test at two ramp steps. Ten patients with ramp-base of 9,300 ± 241 RPM (at which 3/10 had aortic valve......Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is the key to describing left ventricular (LV) unloading, however, the relation between pressure and the echocardiography-derived surrogate of LV volume (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD)) as a function of pump speed (RPM) in continuous-flow...... left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients is unknown. In this study the pressure-volume relationship as a function of RPM during ramp testing was investigated by simultaneously measuring PCWP by Swan-Ganz catheter and LVEDD by echocardiography. The ramp protocol started at usual pump setting...

  17. FARO test L-14 on fuel coolant interaction and quenching. Comparison report, volume 1 + 2, analysis of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a comparative analysis of the results from the ISP-39 exercise promoted by OECD-CSNI in the frame of the NEA activities. ISP-39 has been conceived to benchmark the predictive capabilities of computer codes used in the evaluation of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) and quenching phenomenologies of relevance in water cooled reactors severe accidents safety analysis. The ISP-39 reference case is FARO test L-14, a non-energetic FCI test performed under realistic melt composition and prototypical accident conditions in the FARO experimental installation (Ispra, Italy). Thirteen research organizations from ten countries participated in the exercise submitting 15 prediction calculations with 8 different codes or code versions (COMETA, MC3D, IVA, IFCI, JASMINE, TEXAS, THIRMAL, VAPEX). ISP-39 was conducted as an open exercise. Conclusions are given concerning code capabilities, users effect and sensitivity analyses, numerical accuracy quantification of the predictions, code improvements, general considerations

  18. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  19. Design, ancillary testing, analysis and fabrication data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parsons, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The horizontal stabilizer of the 737 transport was redesigned. Five shipsets were fabricated using composite materials. Weight reduction greater than the 20% goal was achieved. Parts and assemblies were readily produced on production-type tooling. Quality assurance methods were demonstrated. Repair methods were developed and demonstrated. Strength and stiffness analytical methods were substantiated by comparison with test results. Cost data was accumulated in a semiproduction environment. FAA certification was obtained.

  20. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 2; CFD RSRM Full-Scale Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the full-scale analyses of the CFD RSRM. The RSRM model was developed with a 20 second burn time. The following are presented as part of the full-scale analyses: (1) RSRM embedded inclusion analysis; (2) RSRM igniter nozzle design analysis; (3) Nozzle Joint 4 erosion anomaly; (4) RSRM full motor port slag accumulation analysis; (5) RSRM motor analysis of two-phase flow in the aft segment/submerged nozzle region; (6) Completion of 3-D Analysis of the hot air nozzle manifold; (7) Bates Motor distributed combustion test case; and (8) Three Dimensional Polysulfide Bump Analysis.

  1. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  2. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs

  3. Deoxygenation and the blood volume signals in the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles obtained during the execution of the Mirallas's test of judo athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Mirallas, Jaume A.

    1996-12-01

    The technique of execution of any movement in Judo is extremely important. The coaches want tests and tools easy to use and cheaper, to evaluate the progress of a judoist in the tatame. In this paper we present a test developed by Mirallas, which has his name 'Test of Mirallas' to evaluate the maximal power capacity of the judoist. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals were obtained to have a measurement of the metabolic work of the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles, during the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement, allowing this measurement to assess by NIRS the maximal oxygen uptake. Also obtained were tympanic, skin forehead, and biceps brachii temperatures during the test time and recovery phase to study the effects of ambient conditions and the post-exercise oxygen consumption. The deoxygenation and blood volume signals obtained gave different results, demonstrating the hypothesis of the coaches that some judoist do the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement correctly and the rest didn't. The heart rate frequency obtained in the group of judoist was between 190-207 bpm, and in the minute five of post-exercise was 114-137 bpm; the time employed in the MIrallas's test were from 7 feet 14 inches to 13 feet 49 inches, and the total of movements were from 199 to 409. The data obtained in the skin forehead, and skin biceps brachii confirms previous works that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied. According to the results, the test developed by Mirallas is a good tool to evaluate the performance of judoist any time, giving better results compared with standard tests.

  4. Standard guide for measuring the wear volumes of piston ring segments run against flat coupons in reciprocating wear tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers and describes a profiling method for use accurately measuring the wear loss of compound-curved (crowned) piston ring specimens that run against flat counterfaces. It does not assume that the wear scars are ideally flat, as do some alternative measurement methods. Laboratory-scale wear tests have been used to evaluate the wear of materials, coatings, and surface treatments that are candidates for piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel engines or spark ignition engines. Various loads, temperatures, speeds, lubricants, and durations are used for such tests, but some of them use a curved piston ring segment as one sliding partner and a flat or curved specimen (simulating the cylinder liner) as its counterface. The goal of this guide is to provide more accurate wear measurements than alternative approaches involving weight loss or simply measuring the length and width of the wear marks. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its ...

  5. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Volume 1, Appendices A-F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sitewide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of four possible land-use alternatives being considered for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range, and the formerly operated DOE sites in the state of Nevada: the Project Shoal Area, the Central Nevada Test Area, and portions of the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. Three additional sites in Nevada-Eldorado Valley, Dry Lake Valley, and Coyote Spring Valley-are evaluated for collocation of solar energy production facilities. The four alternatives include Continue Current Operations (No Action, continue to operate at the level maintained for the past 3 to 5 years); Discontinue Operations 1 (discontinue operations and interagency programs); Expanded Use (increased use of NTS and its resources to support defense and nondefense programs); and Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands (discontinue all defense-related activities at NTS; continue waste management operations in support of NTS environmental restoration efforts; expand nondefense research). Environmental impacts were assessed for each alternative by analyzing, to the extent possible, the discrete and cumulative environmental impacts associated with Defense Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Nondefense Research and Development, and Work for Others Programs. A framework for a Resource Management Plan is included as Volume 2 of this EIS and represents the development of an ecosystem based planning process closely integrated with the National Environmental Policy Act process. This EIS, among other things, analyzed the impacts of transportation of low level waste, and site characterization activities related to the Yucca Mountain Project but did not analyze the suitability of the site as a repository. This EIS does not analyze the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site as a repository as this is an action beyond the scope of the EIS. Volume 3 of this EIS contains the public comments and the responses to the comments

  6. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Volume 1, Chapters 1-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sitewide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of four possible land-use alternatives being considered for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range, and the formerly operated DOE sites in the state of Nevada: the Project Shoal Area, the Central Nevada Test Area, and portions of the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. Three additional sites in Nevada-Eldorado Valley, Dry Lake Valley, and Coyote Spring Valley-are evaluated for collocation of solar energy production facilities. The four alternatives include Continue Current Operations (No Action, continue to operate at the level maintained for the past 3 to 5 years); Discontinue Operations 1 (discontinue operations and interagency programs); Expanded Use (increased use of NTS and its resources to support defense and nondefense programs); and Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands (discontinue all defense-related activities at NTS; continue waste management operations in support of NTS environmental restoration efforts; expand nondefense research). Environmental impacts were assessed for each alternative by analyzing, to the extent possible, the discrete and cumulative environmental impacts associated with Defense Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Nondefense Research and Development, and Work for Others Programs. A framework for a Resource Management Plan is included as Volume 2 of this EIS and represents the development of an ecosystem based planning process closely integrated with the National Environmental Policy Act process. This EIS, among other things, analyzed the impacts of transportation of low level waste, and site characterization activities related to the Yucca Mountain Project but did not analyze the suitability of the site as a repository. This EIS does not analyze the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site as a repository as this is an action beyond the scope of the EIS. Volume 3 of this EIS contains the public comments and the responses to the comments

  7. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  8. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report

  9. Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Paul E; Anscher, Mitchell S; Barker, Christopher A; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G; Cha, Yong I; Dicker, Adam P; Formenti, Silvia C; Graves, Edward E; Hahn, Stephen M; Hei, Tom K; Kimmelman, Alec C; Kirsch, David G; Kozak, Kevin R; Lawrence, Theodore S; Marples, Brian; McBride, William H; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Park, Catherine C; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Zietman, Anthony L; Steinberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  10. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  11. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  12. 1995 NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop. Volume 2; Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop on September 12-13, 1995. The workshop was designed to bring together NASAs scientists and engineers and their counterparts in industry, other Government agencies, and academia working together in the sonic boom element of NASAs High-Speed Research Program. Specific objectives of this workshop were to: (1) report the progress and status of research in sonic boom propagation, acceptability, and design; (2) promote and disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; (3) help promote synergy among the scientists working in the Program; and (4) identify technology pacing, the development C, of viable reduced-boom High-Speed Civil Transport concepts. The Workshop was organized in four sessions: Sessions 1 Sonic Boom Propagation (Theoretical); Session 2 Sonic Boom Propagation (Experimental); Session 3 Acceptability Studies-Human and Animal; and Session 4 - Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing.

  13. Final report of the Buffer Mass Test - Volume 3: Chemical and physical stability of the buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer Mass Test offered a possibility to investigate whether chemical changes took place in the smectite component at heating to 125 degrees C for about one year. The alterations that could possibly take place were a slight charge change in the crystal lattice with an associated precipitation of silica compounds, and a tendency of illite formation. The analysis showed that there were indications of both but to such a slight extent that the processes could not have affected the physical properties, which was also demonstrated by determining the swelling pressure and the hydraulic conductivity. The BMT also showed that the erodibility of bentonite-based buffer materials is less than or about equal to what can be expected on theoretical grounds. (author)

  14. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Hands-on equals minds-on? A test of linkage between laboratory experience and measured achievement in an introductory college biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racich, Leo Peter 3rd

    This study investigated the specific contribution of laboratory experience to student performance on achievement tests in an introductory college biology course. This required pre-medical student course (900 students) was separated by the biology department into a lecture course and a laboratory course, creating the study groups. The topics selected for treatment were in the field of molecular biology, including restriction enzyme manipulation and plasmid mapping of DNA sequences. Random samples (30 per group) of students enrolled in the lecture course and laboratory course, lecture course only, or laboratory course only were post-tested and second post-tested for objective test achievement in the topical field after laboratory participation. Student self-reported essays on topical concept gains from laboratory experience were categorized and analyzed in relation to achievement outcomes. A significant difference (F = 5.47, df = 2,87, alpha = .05) was present within the group by test achievement scores. Analysis showed no significant difference in test scores over time for the laboratory and lecture and laboratory only groups. There was a significant decline in test scores for the lecture only group over time. Analysis of 509 student self-reported essays showed approximately 18.5% reporting no abstract comprehension gain from the specific laboratory experience they chose to report. Approximately 8.3% of the essays reported increased confusion of topical concepts after participating in the laboratory exercise. The balance of the students (73.3%) reported increased topical concept understanding after laboratory exercise participation. The results suggest the importance of laboratory participation for long-term concept retention and the benefit of post-laboratory experience reflection time before objective testing. Direct instruction without laboratory experience appears to yield gains which are short term in nature. Student self-reports suggested cognitive gains from

  16. The biological basis of anger: associations with the gene coding for DARPP-32 (PPP1R1B) and with amygdala volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Martin; Weber, Bernd; Fiebach, Christian J; Elger, Christian; Montag, Christian

    2009-09-14

    Recent findings have highlighted the importance of DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa), a key regulatory molecule in the dopaminergic signalling pathway for dopamine related phenotypes like antisocial-behavior, drug addiction and schizophrenia. This is the first study investigating the role of the DARPP-32 gene for personality. In a sample of n=838 healthy German Caucasian subjects we found a significant association between rs907094 and ANGER. Carriers of the T-allele showed significantly higher ANGER scores than participants without a T-allele (F((1,837))=9.52, p=0.002). In a second step we validated self-report data of ANGER by investigating their relation to structural brain differences in anger-related brain regions using voxel-based morphometry. A negative association between ANGER scores and the volume of the left amygdala could be detected. The present findings yield genetic evidence for the importance of dopaminergic signal transduction for the personality trait of ANGER. In addition volumetric MRI data support the role of the amygdala for the processing of anger.

  17. Testing a model of science process skills acquisition: An interaction with parents' education, preferred language, gender, science attitude, cognitive development, academic ability, and biology knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Paul J.

    Path analysis techniques were used to test a hypothesized structural model of direct and indirect causal effects of student variables on science process skills. The model was tested twice using data collected at the beginning and end of the school year from 67 9th- and 10th-grade biology students who lived in a rural Franco-American community in New England. Each student variable was found to have significant effects, accounting for approximately 80% of the variance in science process skills achievement. Academic ability, biology knowledge, and language preference had significant direct effects. There were significant mediated effects by cognitive development, parents' education, and attitude toward science in school. The variables of cognitive development and academic ability had the greatest total effects on science process skills. Implications for practitioners and researchers are discussed.

  18. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  19. Effect of chaotic mixing on enhanced biological growth and implications for wastewater treatment: A test case with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixing patterns and modes have a great influence on the efficiency of biological treatment systems. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a controlled, small-scale analog of a pilot wastewater aeration tank, consisting of two eccentrically placed cylinders. By controlling the rotation direction and speed of the two cylinders, it has been possible to develop chaotic flow fields in the space between the walls of the cylinders. Our experiments utilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the biological oxidation organism and air bubbles as the mixing agent supplied by a large fine pore diffuser to the cells in their exponential growth phase. The effect of various mixing patterns on cell growth was studied at different cylinder eccentricities, rotation directions and speeds. It was found that chaotic advection flow patterns: (a) enhanced growth, and (b) sped up the onset of maximal growth of the organism by 15-18% and 14-20%, respectively

  20. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  1. Prova broncodilatadora na espirometria: efeito do uso de espaçador de grande volume com tratamento antiestático na resposta ao broncodilatador Spirometry with bronchodilator test: effect that the use of large-volume spacers with antistatic treatment has on test response

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia de Barros Araújo; Ricardo de Amorim Corrêa; Luis Fernando Ferreira Pereira; Carla Discacciati Silveira; Eliane Viana Mancuso; Nilton Alves de Rezende

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar se o uso de salbutamol inalatório através de inalador dosimetrado acoplado a espaçadores de grande volume com tratamento antiestático na espirometria com prova broncodilatadora modifica os resultados do teste quando comparado à técnica usual (sem espaçador). MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo envolvendo 24 pacientes, com idades entre 18 e 45 anos e suspeita clínica de asma, atendidos no Ambulatório de Pneumologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, em ...

  2. Testing for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  3. Performance Testing and Quality Control of Biological Safety Cabinets%生物安全柜的性能检测与质量控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective Through performance testing of biological safety cabinet,to understand its performance,so as to improve its safety.Methods Six required items are tested according to the standard of Biological Safety Cabinets.Results The six required items can meet the technical requirements,the biological safety cabinet is qualified.Conclusion Quality control of medical equipment is of great significance.%目的 通过对生物安全柜的性能检测,以掌握其性能现状,提高使用的安全性.方法 依据《生物安全柜》标准,对生物安全性等6个必检项目进行性能检测.结果 6个检测项目符合技术要求,生物安全柜性能合格.结论 加强医疗设备质量控制关系重大,不容忽视.

  4. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  5. Prova broncodilatadora na espirometria: efeito do uso de espaçador de grande volume com tratamento antiestático na resposta ao broncodilatador Spirometry with bronchodilator test: effect that the use of large-volume spacers with antistatic treatment has on test response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Barros Araújo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se o uso de salbutamol inalatório através de inalador dosimetrado acoplado a espaçadores de grande volume com tratamento antiestático na espirometria com prova broncodilatadora modifica os resultados do teste quando comparado à técnica usual (sem espaçador. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo envolvendo 24 pacientes, com idades entre 18 e 45 anos e suspeita clínica de asma, atendidos no Ambulatório de Pneumologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, em Belo Horizonte (MG. Os pacientes foram submetidos a duas espirometrias com prova broncodilatadora realizadas com e sem o uso de espaçador de grande volume. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa na variação do VEF1 antes e após o uso de broncodilatador entre as duas técnicas (ΔVEF1 média = 0,01 L; IC95%: -0,05 a 0,06; p = 0,824. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as duas técnicas em relação ao resultado qualitativo da prova broncodilatadora (p = 1,00. Houve concordância dos resultados da prova broncodilatadora entre as técnicas (coeficiente kappa = 0,909; p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the use of inhaled albuterol via a metered-dose inhaler with a large-volume spacer with antistatic treatment modifies the bronchodilator test results when compared with the usual technique (no spacer. METHODS: A prospective study involving 24 patients, 18-45 years of age, clinically suspected of having asthma, and under treatment at the Outpatient Pulmonary Clinic of the Federal University of Minas Gerais Hospital das Clínicas, located in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. All of the patients underwent two bronchodilator tests: one with and one without the use of a large-volume spacer. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the variation of FEV1 prior to and after bronchodilator use between the two techniques (mean ΔFEV1 = 0.01 L; 95% CI: -0.05 to 0.06; p = 0.824. No statistically significant difference was

  6. A note on stereological estimation of the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that for a variety of biological particle shapes, the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume can be estimated stereologically using only the areas of particle transects, which can be estimated manually by point-counting....

  7. The use of mathematical modeling and pilot plant testing to develop a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolasco, D.A.; Daigger, G.T.; Stafford, D.R.; Kaupp, D.M.; Stephenson, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for carbon oxidation, nitrogen removal, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal was used to develop the Step Bio-P process, a new biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal process with a step-feed configuration. A 9,000-L pilot plant with diurnally varying influent process loading rates was operated to verify the model results and to optimize the Step Bio-P process for application at the lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, wastewater treatment plant. The pilot plant was operated for 10 months. An automatic on-line data acquisition system with multiple sampling and metering points for dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, ortho-phosphate, and flow rates was used. A sampling program to obtain off-line data was carried out to verify the information from the on-line system and monitor additional parameters. The on-line and off-line data were used to recalibrate the model, which was used as an experimental design and process optimization tool.

  8. Frontiers in mathematical biology

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Volume 100, which is the final volume of the LNBM series serves to commemorate the acievements in two decades of this influential collection of books in mathematical biology. The contributions, by the leading mathematical biologists, survey the state of the art in the subject, and offer speculative, philosophical and critical analyses of the key issues confronting the field. The papers address fundamental issues in cell and molecular biology, organismal biology, evolutionary biology, population ecology, community and ecosystem ecology, and applied biology, plus the explicit and implicit mathematical challenges. Cross-cuttting issues involve the problem of variation among units in nonlinear systems, and the related problems of the interactions among phenomena across scales of space, time and organizational complexity.

  9. [Possibilities of testing the biological acceptability of composite filling materials, with special reference to the microscopic test for pulp vitality. Review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyárasdy, I

    1990-08-01

    The main problem of microscopically observing the living pulpa consists in that it lies embedded into hard tissue. The haemodynamics of the pulpa may be defined by studying the physical parameters by examining the characteristics of blood flow and by the factors determining them. By comparison with other tissues little work is dealing with regulating the blood flow. The vital microscopic model of the rat incisor pulpa was first employed by Gängler to testing dental filling materials. The results thereof well complete the findings of standardized tests. On basis of the foregoing the sublining in case of clinical employment of composite filling materials is unconditionally suggested. PMID:2401373

  10. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  11. The use of Sphagnum recurvum Pal. Beauv. as biological tests for determination of the level of pollution with fluorine compounds and sulphur dioxide in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Świeboda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The green parts of the peat moss Sphagnum recurvum Pal. Beauv. were used as a biological test to evaluate the pollution level of the natural environment in the region of the aluminium works "Skawina" (Southern Poland with fluorine compounds and sulphur dioxide. The moss samples were placed in nylon nets and exposed to the polluted air for 6 weeks, then the fluorine and sulphur content in them was determined. The results demonstrated the usefulness of this method for the purpose of establishing the range of influence of the emitted industrial pollution.

  12. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3.07.9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers

  13. Estimation of beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume from arterial pressure: A comparison of two pressure wave analysis techniques during head- up tilt testing in young, healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Oosting, H.; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume (SV) estimated by two different pressure wave analysis techniques during orthostatic stress testing: pulse contour analysis and Modelflow, ie, simulation of a three-element model of aortic input impedance. Methods:

  14. Regioselective synthesis of α-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid derivatives and biological test against bacterial Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella agona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CASSIDY; Seamas

    2010-01-01

    α-D-Glucopyranosiduronides were stereoselectively synthesized from D-glucopyranosiduronic acid via the intermediate 1,6-lactone. Fatty acid esters were regioselectively introduced at the 2-O-position of α-D-glucopyranosiduronides using dibutyltin dimethoxide as the stannylating agent. Antibacterial tests show that methyl 2-O-lauroyl-O-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid and azido 2-O-lauroyl-O-D-glucopyranosid-uronic acid are effective inhibitors against Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Insecticidal and biological effects of three plant extracts tested against the dengue vector, Stegomyia agyptii (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kokila

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of resistant in vectors especially vector mosquitoes are becoming a challenge for the scientific community for management and control mosquito population. Vector mosquitoes are likely to withstand toxicity and develop resistant mechanism to single active compound hence, combining medicinal plants with rich active compounds stops resistant development and proliferation of mosquitoes. In this study we put effort to evaluate the effect of methanol extract of Tagetes patula, Clerodentron phillomedis, and Catharanthus roseus in individual and in combination against the dengue vector, Stegomyia agyptii. Lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC90 were calculated to find out the effect of the test plants in individual and in combination. T. patula extract showed vaguely higher mortality rate when compared to C. phillomedis, and C. roseus but there was no significant variation among the three test plants. The median LC of combined treatment showed a significant difference between the combined (2.25 µg/mL/3rd instar and individual treatment (6.41 µg/mL/3rd instar for T. patula, 6.85 µg/mL/3rd instar for C. phillomedis and 6.59 µg/mL/3rd instar for C. roseus. The combined efficacy of three test plants was also effective in controlling vector mosquitoes at fields with different agro-climatic conditions. The study proves that the combination of T. patula, C. phillomedis, and C. roseus is effective in different field conditions at lower concentrations.

  16. Characterization of the classical biological false-positive reaction in the serological test for syphilis in the modern era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Liu, Li-Li; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Xi, Ya; Lin, Li-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Huang, Song-Jie; Chen, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Qiao; Huang, Ge-Ling; Tong, Man-Li; Jiang, Jie; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the CBFP reaction in the modern era, we analyzed the results of parallel rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) tests from a total of 63,765 blood samples obtained at Zhongshan Hospital in the Medical College of Xiamen University from May 2008 to February 2013. Among the 63,765 tested blood samples, 206 (0.32%) had the CBFP reaction. In multivariate analysis, an increased likelihood of the CBFP reaction was associated with female subjects, subjects ≥80years old, and subjects between 16 and 35years old (PRPR test, including false labor, megaloblastic anemias, aplastic anemias, redundant prepuce, congenital malformation of heart, and salpingitis. Among the 206 patients with the CBFP reaction, 35 patients were subjected to follow-up for five years. 26 out of 35 these patients were at a 1:1 initial RPR titer, 8 out of 35 patients were at a 1:2 initial RPR titer, and 1 out of 35 patients were at a 1:4 initial RPR titer. 30 subjects had their RPR seroreverted. In our opinion, additional CBFP research using a large sample population will contribute to the identification of additional underlying serious disorders that are not related to syphilis. Such results could be useful for the prediction and diagnosis of these diseases. PMID:24690532

  17. Radioiodination and preliminary biological tests of aniline-mustard and its glucuronide conjugate as a potential anticancer prodrug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniline-mustard and its glucuronide conjugate were radioiodinated with 131I. The preliminary dynamic tests were carried out on rabbits. The scintigrams showed clearly that the glucuronide conjugate of aniline-mustard was very quickly cleared from the metabolism, accumulating in the bladder in about 15 minutes. The clearance time of radioiodinated aniline-mustard-glucuronide was considerably longer (about 45 min.). The results obtained from the biodistributional studies have represented interesting differences between the metabolic details of radioiodinated compounds, and indicated that the glucuronide conjugate of aniline-mustard may be a promising radioiodinated prodrug, if verification of its selective accumulation in some kinds of tumor cells can be obtained. (author)

  18. A Roadmap for Hazard Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Marine Biotoxins on the Basis of Chemical and Biological Test Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Daneshian, Mardas; Botana, Luis M.; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie-Yasmine; Buckland, Gemma; Campàs, Mònica; Dennison, Ngaire; Dickey, Robert W.; Diogène, Jorge; Fessard, Valérie; Hartung, Thomas; Humpage, Andrew; Leist, Marcel; Molgó, Jordi; Michael A. Quilliam; Rovida, Costanza

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic food accounts for over 40% of global animal food products, and the potential contamination with toxins of algal origin – marine biotoxins – poses a health threat for consumers. The gold standards to assess toxins in aquatic food have traditionally been in vivo methods, i.e., the mouse as well as the rat bioassay. Besides ethical concerns, there is also a need for more reliable test methods because of low inter-species comparability, high intra-species variability, the high number of f...

  19. A roadmap for hazard monitoring and risk assessment of marine biotoxins on the basis of chemical and biological test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Botana, Luis M; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie-Yasmine; Buckland, Gemma; Campàs, Mònica; Dennison, Ngaire; Dickey, Robert W; Diogène, Jorge; Fessard, Valérie; Hartung, Thomas; Humpage, Andrew; Leist, Marcel; Molgó, Jordi; Quilliam, Michael A; Rovida, Costanza; Suarez-Isla, Benjamin A; Tubaro, Aurelia; Wagner, Kristina; Zoller, Otmar; Dietrich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic food accounts for over 40% of global animal food products, and the potential contamination with toxins of algal origin--marine biotoxins--poses a health threat for consumers. The gold standards to assess toxins in aquatic food have traditionally been in vivo methods, i.e., the mouse as well as the rat bioassay. Besides ethical concerns, there is also a need for more reliable test methods because of low inter-species comparability, high intra-species variability, the high number of false positive and negative results as well as questionable extrapolation of quantitative risk to humans. For this reason, a transatlantic group of experts in the field of marine biotoxins was convened from academia and regulatory safety authorities to discuss future approaches to marine biotoxin testing. In this report they provide a background on the toxin classes, on their chemical characterization, the epidemiology, on risk assessment and management, as well as on their assumed mode of action. Most importantly, physiological functional assays such as in vitro bioassays and also analytical techniques, e.g., liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (LC-MS), as substitutes for the rodent bioassay are reviewed. This forms the basis for recommendations on methodologies for hazard monitoring and risk assessment, establishment of causality of intoxications in human cases, a roadmap for research and development of human-relevant functional assays, as well as new approaches for a consumer directed safety concept.

  20. Problems in stability test of biological products%生物制品稳定性研究相关问题的考虑

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦薇

    2013-01-01

    稳定性研究是贯穿于整个药物研究阶段和支持药物上市及上市后研究的重要试验依据,是产品贮藏条件、有效期的确定和生产工艺、产品制剂处方、包装材料选择的合理性及产品质量标准制定的研究基础.因此,如何设计、开展稳定性研究是研发需要重视的内容.本文拟以生物制品为例,提出有关稳定性研究的探讨意见.%Stability test always goes through the whole process of drug research and development, also it is the important data to support drug on marketing and after marketing. Data from the stability test should lay the foundation for determination of drug storage condition, expiry date, production process, formulation, packaging and quality standard. Therefore, how to design and carry out the stability test is the focus. Here reviewer's comments regarding to stability test of biological products was presented.

  1. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  2. Biological Races in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two m...

  3. A de novo germline MLH1 mutation in a Lynch syndrome patient with discordant immunohistochemical and molecular biology test results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Airaud; Sébastien Küry; Isabelle Valo; Ingrid Maury; Dominique Bonneau; Olivier Ingster; Stéphane Bezieau

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with a Homo sapiens mutL homolog 1 (MLH1)-associated Lynch syndrome with previous diagnoses of two distinct primary cancers:a sigmoid colon cancer at the age of 39 years,and a right colon cancer at the age of 50 years.The mutation identified in his blood and buccal cells,c.1771delG,p.Asp591Ilefs*25,appears to be a de novo event,as it was not transmitted by either of his parents.This type of de novo event is rare in MLH1 as only three cases have been reported in the literature so far.Furthermore,the discordant results observed between replication error phenotyping and immunohistochemistry highlight the importance of the systematic use of both pre-screening tests in the molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  4. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  5. Testing biological hypotheses with embodied robots: adaptations, accidents, and by-products in the evolution of vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia F Roberts

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary robotics allows biologists to test hypotheses about extinct animals. We modeled some of the first vertebrates, jawless fishes, in order to study the evolution of the trait after which vertebrates are named: vertebrae. We tested the hypothesis that vertebrae are an adaptation for enhanced feeding and fleeing performance. We created a population of autonomous embodied robots, Preyro, in which the number of vertebrae, N, were free to evolve. In addition, two other traits, the span of the caudal fin, b, and the predator detection threshold, ζ, a proxy for the lateral line sensory system, were also allowed to evolve. These three traits were chosen because they evolved early in vertebrates, are all potentially important in feeding and fleeing, and vary in form among species. Preyro took on individual identities in a given generation as defined by the population’s six diploid genotypes, Gi. Each Gi was a 3-tuple, with each element an integer specifying N, b, and, ζ. The small size of the population allowed for genetic drift to operate in concert with random mutation and mating; the presence of these mechanisms of chance provided an opportunity for N to evolve by accident. The presence of three evolvable traits provided an opportunity for direct selection on b and/or ζ to evolve N as a by-product linked trait correlation. In selection trials, different Gi embodied in Preyro attempted to feed at a light source and then flee to avoid a predator robot in pursuit. The fitness of each Gi was calculated from five different types of performance: speed, acceleration, distance to the light, distance to the predator, and the number of predator escapes initiated. In each generation, we measured the selection differential, the selection gradient, the strength of chance, and the indirect correlation selection gradient. These metrics allowed us to understand the relative contributions of the three mechanisms: direct selection, chance, and indirect

  6. Programme Biology - Health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific results for 1975, of the five-year Biology-Health Protection programme adopted in 1971, are presented in two volumes. In volume one, Research in Radiation Protection are developed exclusively, including the following topics: measurement and interpretation of radiation (dosimetry); transfer of radioactive nuclides in the constituents of the environment; hereditary effects of radiation; short-term effects (acute irradiation syndrome and its treatment); long-term effects and toxicology of radioactive elements. In volume, two Research on applications in Agriculture and Medicine are developed. It includes: mutagenesis; soil-plant relations; radiation analysis; food conservation; cell culture; radioentomology. Research on applications in Medicine include: Nuclear Medicine and Neutron Dosimetry

  7. Does morality have a biological basis? An empirical test of the factors governing moral sentiments relating to incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra; Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2003-04-22

    Kin-recognition systems have been hypothesized to exist in humans, and adaptively to regulate altruism and incest avoidance among close genetic kin. This latter function allows the architecture of the kin recognition system to be mapped by quantitatively matching individual variation in opposition to incest to individual variation in developmental parameters, such as family structure and co-residence patterns. Methodological difficulties that appear when subjects are asked to disclose incestuous inclinations can be circumvented by measuring their opposition to incest in third parties, i.e. morality. This method allows a direct test of Westermarck's original hypothesis that childhood co-residence with an opposite-sex individual predicts the strength of moral sentiments regarding third-party sibling incest. Results support Westermarck's hypothesis and the model of kin recognition that it implies. Co-residence duration objectively predicts genetic relatedness, making it a reliable cue to kinship. Co-residence duration predicts the strength of opposition to incest, even after controlling for relatedness and even when co-residing individuals are genetically unrelated. This undercuts kin-recognition models requiring matching to self (through, for example, major histocompatibility complex or phenotypic markers). Subjects' beliefs about relatedness had no effect after controlling for co-residence, indicating that systems regulating kin-relevant behaviours are non-conscious, and calibrated by co-residence, not belief.

  8. Action of silver nanoparticles towards biological systems: cytotoxicity evaluation using hen's egg test and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Priscila L L; Stamford, Thayza C M; Albuquerque, Allan J R; Sampaio, Fabio C; Cavalcante, Horacinna M M; Macedo, Rui O; Galembeck, André; Flores, Miguel A P; Rosenblatt, Aronita

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of four silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloids and their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel. The cytotoxicity of AgNPs was evaluated based on signs of vascular change on the chorioallantoic membrane using the hen's egg test (HET-CAM). Bactericidal properties and inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation were determined using a parallel-flow cell system and a dichromatic fluorescent stain. The percentage of viable cells was calculated from regression data generated from a viability standard. AgNP colloids proved to be non-irritating, as they were unable to promote vasoconstriction, haemorrhage or coagulation. AgNP colloids inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel, and cell viability measured by fluorescence was 0% for samples S1, S2, S3 and S4 and 36.5% for the positive control (diluted 30% silver diamine fluoride). AgNPs are new products with a low production cost because they have a lower concentration of silver, with low toxicity and an effective bactericidal effect against a cariogenic oral bacterium. Moreover, they do not promote colour change in dental enamel, which is an aesthetic advantage compared with traditional silver products.

  9. Optical high-resolution analysis of rotational movement: testing circular spatial filter velocimetry (CSFV) with rotating biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeper, M.; Schmidt, R.; Kostbade, R.; Damaschke, N.; Gimsa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Circular spatial filtering velocimetry (CSFV) was tested during the microscopic registration of the individual rotations of baker’s yeast cells. Their frequency-dependent rotation (electrorotation; ER) was induced in rotating electric fields, which were generated in a glass chip chamber with four electrodes (600 μm tip-to-tip distance). The electrodes were driven with sinusoidal quadrature signals of 5 or 8 V PP with frequencies up to 3 MHz. The observed cell rotation was of the order of 1-100 s per revolution. At each measuring frequency, the independent rotations of up to 20 cells were simultaneously recorded with a high-speed camera. CSFV was software-implemented using circular spatial filters with harmonic gratings. ER was proportional to the phase shift between the values of the spatial filtering signal of consecutive frames. ER spectra obtained by CSFV from the rotation velocities at different ER-field frequencies agreed well with manual measurements and theoretical spectra. Oscillations in the rotation velocity of a single cell in the elliptically polarized field near an electrode, which were resolved by CSFV, could not be visually discerned. ER step responses after field-on were recorded at 2500 frames per second. Analysis proved the high temporal resolution of CSFV and revealed a largely linear torque-friction relation during the acceleration phase of ER. Future applications of CSFV will allow for the simple and cheap automated high-resolution analysis of rotational movements where mechanical detection has too low a resolution or is not possible, e.g. in polluted environments or for gas and fluid vortices, microscopic objects, etc.

  10. Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for Use in Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistline-East, Allison; Pandey, Raju; Kececi, Mehmet; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Host range tests for Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from Punjab Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species representing four psyllid families were exposed to mated D. aligarhensis females in four different treatment types: 1) short sequential no-choice treatments, 2) prolonged sequential no-choice treatments, 3) prolonged no-choice static treatments, and 4) choice treatments. Selection of nontarget psyllid species was based on phylogenetic proximity to D. citri, likelihood of being encountered by D. aligarhensis in the prospective release areas in California, and psyllid species in biological control of invasive weeds. D. aligarhensis exhibited high host affinity to D. citri, and only parasitized one nontarget species, the pestiferous potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), at low levels (citri. Results presented here suggest D. aligarhensis poses minimal risk to nontarget psyllid species in California. PMID:26470214

  11. Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for Use in Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistline-East, Allison; Pandey, Raju; Kececi, Mehmet; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Host range tests for Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from Punjab Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species representing four psyllid families were exposed to mated D. aligarhensis females in four different treatment types: 1) short sequential no-choice treatments, 2) prolonged sequential no-choice treatments, 3) prolonged no-choice static treatments, and 4) choice treatments. Selection of nontarget psyllid species was based on phylogenetic proximity to D. citri, likelihood of being encountered by D. aligarhensis in the prospective release areas in California, and psyllid species in biological control of invasive weeds. D. aligarhensis exhibited high host affinity to D. citri, and only parasitized one nontarget species, the pestiferous potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), at low levels (citri. Results presented here suggest D. aligarhensis poses minimal risk to nontarget psyllid species in California.

  12. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples of blood, urine, or other tissues or ...

  13. Optics of Biological Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, Alfons; Videen, Gorden

    2007-01-01

    This book covers the optics of single biological particles, both theory and experiment, with emphasis on Elastic Light Scattering and Fluorescence. It deals with the optics of bacteria (bio-aerosols), marine particles (selected phytoplankton communities) and red and white blood cells. Moreover, there are dedicated chapters on a general theory for scattering by a cell, and modelling and simulation of scattering by inhomogeneous biological cells. Finally, one chapter is dedicated to astro-biological signatures, discussing the possibilities for detecting non-terrestrial biological material. The volume has up-to-date discussions on new experimental and numerical techniques, and many examples of applications of these techniques in real-life systems, as used to detect and characterize e.g. biological warfare agents or human blood cells.

  14. 生物有机肥在铜薯2号上的应用肥效试验%Biological organic fertilizer applied application in copper chips 2 test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨通华

    2015-01-01

    2010年进行了生物有机肥在红薯上的应用肥效试验.结果表明,参试生物有机肥和生物液肥施用后对红薯均有不同程度的增产效果,以生物有机肥+生物液肥处理增产效果最为显著.%the 2010 applied application test of biological organic fertilizer on the sweet potato.The results show that the volunteers' biological organic fertilizer and biological effects of fertilizer on sweet potatoes all have varying degrees of increase yield,to biological organic fertilizer + biological effects of dealing with the most significant effect to increase production.

  15. Synthetic biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics. (review article)

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  17. Human procollagen type I surface-modified PHB-based non-woven textile scaffolds for cell growth: preparation and short-term biological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D fine porous structures obtained by electrospinning a poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (aPHB)/ poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) (85/15 w/w) blend were successfully modified with human procollagen type I by simple immersion of the polyester scaffold in an aqueous solution of the protein. Effective modification of the scaffold with human procollagen I was confirmed by an immunodetection test, which revealed the presence of the procollagen type I as an outer layer even on inner structures of the porous matrixes. Biological tests of 3D fabrics made of the PHB blend provide support for the adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts, while their modification with procollagen type I increased the biocompatibility of the final scaffolds significantly, as shown by the notable increase in the number of attached cells during the early hours of their incubation. Based on these findings, human procollagen type I surface-modified aPHB/PHB scaffolds should be considered a promising material in regenerative medicine. (paper)

  18. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author)

  19. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  20. Tri-State Synfuels Project Commercial Scale Coal Test: Volume 6A. Export sample program/wastewater treatability study summary report. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; waste water from Lugri Mark IV test at Sasol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-11-01

    The following can be concluded from the research conducted on the treatment of Lurgi process wastewaters from the sample sent to Sasol: Biooxidation of pretreated gas liquors and synthesized Mobil MTG process wastewater components as feasible and a high degree of treatment efficiency could be attained when the process was controlled by optimizing the growth of thiocyanate bacteria. Sludge settleability was satisfactory. Partial removal of complexed cyanide was consistently maintained during steady-state operation of the bioreactor, probably by sorption on the biofloc. Seed sludges from a coke oven activated sludge process can be successfully used to develop biocultures for the treatment of Lurgi process wastewaters. GAC treatment was effective for the removal of residual organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand from bioreactor treated effluents. Untreated gas liquor was extremely toxic to fathead minnows at effluent concentrations of only five percent (19 parts water to one part gas liquor). However, bioreactor effluent showed a greatly reduced toxicity, with significant mortalities between 40 and 60 percent (approximately one part water to one part effluent). Treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC) reduced toxicity to negligible levels, even with relatively high unionized ammonia levels present in the effluent. No toxic effects were observed with GAC effluents when the pH was adjusted to reduce unionized ammonia levels. Bioassay test results demonstrated that the treated effluents after activated carbon adsorption would be relatively nontoxic to fathead minnows. Biological wastewater treatment facilities installed to meet BPT for Lurgi wastewater should provide sufficient removal of most toxic organic pollutants which would be designated as BAT.

  1. Development, manufacturing and testing of micromechanical pressure and volume-flow transducers for pneumatic applications; Entwicklung, Herstellung und Erprobung mikromechanischer Druck- und Durchflusssensoren fuer pneumatische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.

    1998-12-01

    The present dissertation deals with novel micromechanical pressure and volume-flow transducers. They consist of a circular plastic transducer element which is elastically beared on a carrier membrane in the transducer case. A strain gauge rosette is embedded into the transducer element. This rosette consists of four active strain gauges that form a Wheatstone measuring bridge. The strain gauges are produced by wet-chemical etching from a 0.1 {mu}m thin gold layer. The nominal structural width of the measurement wires amounts to 12 {mu}m. The measuring bridge is operated at a constant supply voltage of 1 V. The pressure-induced deformations of the transducer element are detected by the strain gauges and transformed into a measurement voltage which is directly proportional to the acting differential pressure. The transducer element and the carrier membrane are made of polyimide. Both parts of the transducer case, between which the carrier membrane is located, are made of polysulfone by injection molding. The pressure transducers are manufactured and tested for the differential pressure ranges of 20, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 hPa. The diameter of the transducer element is about 1300 {mu}m for a pressure transducer with a measuring range of 20 hPa. With an increasing measuring range, the diameter decreases continuously such that a transducer with a measuring range of 1000 hPa has a transducer element diameter of 580 {mu}m. The flow transducer is obtained by the installation of a fine-pressure transducer (measuring range 20 hPa) into a case with integrated measuring capillaries. Three variants have been developed for the measuring ranges of 0.1, 1 and 10 sccm. The measuring capillary is dimensioned such that a laminar flow is generated inside. Hence, the pressure loss measured is directly proportional to the flow according to Hagen-Poiseuille`s law. The three different measuring ranges are obtained by using measuring capillaries of variable cross-section. (orig

  2. Testicular volume is inversely correlated with nurturing-related brain activity in human fathers

    OpenAIRE

    Mascaro, Jennifer S.; Hackett, Patrick D.; Rilling, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Life History Theory posits a trade-off between mating and parenting effort, which may explain some of the observed variance in human fathers’ parenting behavior. The current study tested this hypothesis by measuring aspects of reproductive biology related to mating effort, as well as paternal nurturing behavior and the brain activity related to it. Both testosterone levels and testes volume were negatively correlated with paternal caregiving. In response to viewing pictures of one’s own child...

  3. Full-scale testing, production and cost analysis data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parsons, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The full scale ground test, ground vibration test, and flight tests conducted to demonstrate a composite structure stabilizer for the Boeing 737 aircraft and obtain FAA certification are described. Detail tools, assembly tools, and overall production are discussed. Cost analyses aspects covered include production costs, composite material usage factors, and cost comparisons.

  4. MICRO TEST1血沉仪量值溯源性的建立及生物参考区间调查%Establishment of Measurement Traceability and Investigation of Biological Reference Interval for MICRO TEST1 ESR Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春平; 刘红萍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish measurement traceability and investigate biological reference interval for MICRO TEST1 ESR analyzer calibrated by reference method of ICSH ( International committee for standardization in hematology). Methods 50 EDTAK2 anticoagulated blood samples were deteced by MICRO TESTI ESR analyzer and westergren method. The reference method for measuring the ESR proposed by ICSH. Data obrained by this two merhods were used to calibrate the instrument and to establish measurement traceability. 663 healthy cases were divided into differ ent groups according to sex and age. Statistical analysis were used to determined how to group and establish biological ref erence interval. Results Linear regression analysis comparing MICRO TEST1 and ICSH reference method yielded satis factory correlations(r= 0. 982). Paired student t test showed that there wasnot significant different between this two methods. The cases were divided intodifferent groups according to sex and age and biological reference interval were established using percentiles. In male.there were two groups which were 18~50 years(≤23. l mm/h) and >50 years (≤38. 8 mm/h). In female ,there were three groups which were 18~ 50 years (≤25. 4 mm/h) , 41~50 years (≤37. 5 mm/ h) and >50 years(≤45. 3 mm/h). Conclusion Calibrated by ICSH reference method .MICRO TEST1 ESR analyzer established mea surement traceability and promoted clinical laboratory results mutual accreditation. Biological reference interval of ESR were affected by sex and age. The establishment of reliable reference interval could be consulted by clinic and play a betterrole in clinical diagnosis.%目的 应用国际参考方法对MICRO TEST1自动血沉仪进行校准,建立其量值溯源性,同时调查不同性别和年龄生物参考区间.方法 选取50例抗凝血标本,分别用MICRO TEST1 自动血沉仪和国际血液学标准化委员会(ICSH)推荐的参考方法魏氏法进

  5. Multilevel correlations in the biological phosphorus removal process: From bacterial enrichment to conductivity-based metabolic batch tests and polyphosphatase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbrodt, David G; Maillard, Julien; Brovelli, Alessandro; Chabrelie, Alexandre; May, Jonathan; Holliger, Christof

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater relies on the preferential selection of active polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in the underlying bacterial community continuum. Efficient management of the bacterial resource requires understanding of population dynamics as well as availability of bioanalytical methods for rapid and regular assessment of relative abundances of active PAOs and their glycogen-accumulating competitors (GAO). A systems approach was adopted here toward the investigation of multilevel correlations from the EBPR bioprocess to the bacterial community, metabolic, and enzymatic levels. Two anaerobic-aerobic sequencing-batch reactors were operated to enrich activated sludge in PAOs and GAOs affiliating with "Candidati Accumulibacter and Competibacter phosphates", respectively. Bacterial selection was optimized by dynamic control of the organic loading rate and the anaerobic contact time. The distinct core bacteriomes mainly comprised populations related to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, and Chloroflexi in the PAO enrichment and of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Sphingobacteria in the GAO enrichment. An anaerobic metabolic batch test based on electrical conductivity evolution and a polyphosphatase enzymatic assay were developed for rapid and low-cost assessment of the active PAO fraction and dephosphatation potential of activated sludge. Linear correlations were obtained between the PAO fraction, biomass specific rate of conductivity increase under anaerobic conditions, and polyphosphate-hydrolyzing activity of PAO/GAO mixtures. The correlations between PAO/GAO ratios, metabolic activities, and conductivity profiles were confirmed by simulations with a mathematical model developed in the aqueous geochemistry software PHREEQC. PMID:24975745

  6. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

  7. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  8. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Three of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on embryology, the body systems,…

  9. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Volume 2, Session 3A--Session 4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Electron Microscopy Methods and Protocols (Volume 17 of the Series on Methods in Molecular Biology), Edited by M.A. Nasser Hajibagheri 1999. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. xi + 281 pages. ($89.50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, Moise

    1999-10-01

    At first glance, this book seems to come up short with regard to the application of electron microscopy in biological sciences. However, one has to consider that it is part of a series on molecular biology. The purpose here was not to collect a large variety of techniques related to electron microscopy but rather to focus on methods in molecular morphology. In this context, the book offers 15 short (some very short) chapters dealing with morphological approaches related to and used in molecular biology.

  11. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  12. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  13. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  14. Airside HVAC BESTEST. Adaptation of ASHRAE RP 865 Airside HVAC Equipment Modeling Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140. Volume 1, Cases AE101-AE445

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J. [J. Neymark & Associates, Golden, CO (United States); Kennedy, M. [Mike D. Kennedy, Inc., Townsend, WA (United States); Judkoff, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gall, J. [AAON, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States); Knebel, D. [AAON, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States); Henninger, R. [GARD Analytics, Inc., Arlington Heights, IL (United States); Witte, M. [GARD Analytics, Inc., Arlington Heights, IL (United States); Hong, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McDowell, T. [Thermal Energy System Specialists, Madison, WI (United States); Yan, D. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Zhou, X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    2016-03-01

    This report documents a set of diagnostic analytical verification cases for testing the ability of whole building simulation software to model the air distribution side of typical heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. These cases complement the unitary equipment cases included in American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs, which test the ability to model the heat-transfer fluid side of HVAC equipment.

  15. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

  16. Practice and Thinking of the Occupation Skill Testing of Veterinary Biological Products Manufacturing Worker in China%我国兽用生物制品制造工职业技能鉴定实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晔; 顾进华; 王峰; 张广川; 王彬; 李倩

    2016-01-01

    The current conditions of the industry of veterinary biological products of human resources and the occupational skill testing system were introduced,the characteristics of veterinary biologics production workers occupational skill testing work processes and its role during the manufacturing of veterinary biological production were analyzed,and the direction and future of the occupational skills testing in the field of veterinary biological products industry was thought about,in order to provide a reference for the industry of veterinary occupational skill testing work.%介绍了我国兽用生物制品行业人力资源、职业技能鉴定体系工作情况,分析了兽用生物制品制造工职业技能鉴定工作开展的特点及其在兽用生物制品生产中的作用,对兽用生物制品行业职业技能鉴定工作的方向及未来进行了思考,以期为兽药行业职业技能鉴定工作提供参考。

  17. Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

  18. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Four - Appendix G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix G. Appendix G is a presentation of VOC chromatography data collected during the study. Information on the calibration curves and calibration checks used as well as the sample GC reports themselves are included here. The concentration values presented on the GC reports are calculation using the data from the applicable calibration curve and any necessary dilutions which were made.

  19. 超限游离氧化钙混凝土的体积安定性试验%Volume Stability Test of Over-Limit Free-CaO Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾家民; 曾琦芳; 林煌斌

    2014-01-01

    Under the test conditions,free-CaO reaction was induced,the concrete volume stability was inspected.The experimental results show that over-limit free-CaO is the main factor causing the cement volume stability.After the strict heat-moisture treatment for core sample,both the line change rate and compressive strength were within the permitted range.Consequently,the engineering needs not to be demolished,the construction continued as usual,under observation lasting for 13 years,no abnormal structure damage due to f-CaO volume stability has been found.%通过试验条件诱发游离氧化钙(f-CaO)发生反应,以检验混凝土的体积安定。试验结果表明:f-CaO 超限是可能引起混凝土体积安定性的影响因素;对芯样进行严格的湿热工艺处理后,芯样线变化率和抗压强度均在允许的范围内,该工程项目不用拆除可继续施工;经过持续13 a 的观测,未发现由于 f-CaO 安定性引起的工程质量异常。

  20. 下肢屈曲挤压实验对容量反应性评估%A new method for the assessment of volume responsiveness:the bending and pressing the lower extremities test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向; 黄慧; 方金东; 方莉; 周兆杰; 张劲琼

    2016-01-01

    This study introduced a new method for the assessment of volume responsiveness:the bending and pressing the lower extremities test(BPLE-T). The BPLE-T can produce hemodynamic changes. Various hemodynamic parameters, such as systolic blood pressure( SBP) ,diastolic blood pressure( DBP) ,mean arterial pressure( MAP) ,central venous pres-sure(CVP),heart rate(HR),respiratory frequency(R),stroke volume(SV),and cardiac output(CO),can be determined via invasive or non-invasive monitoring techniques,and volume responsiveness can be evaluated based on changes in these parameters during the BPLE-T procedure. Moreover,this test relates to another concept:pressure reactivity. Evaluations of pressure reactivity can reveal the resistance status of the peripheral arterial system and thereby indicate whether a patient re-quires vasoactive drugs and/or how these drugs should be selectively administered. Thus,relative to other methods for asses-sing volume responsiveness,the BPLE-T is not only simple to utilize,non-invasive,and repeatable but also capable of simul-taneously evaluating both volume responsiveness and pressure reactivity.%介绍一种评估容量反应性的新方法:下肢屈曲挤压实验。通过有创或无创监测技术得到实验时血液动力学变化的参数,如收缩压( SBP)、舒张压( DBP)、平均动脉压( MAP)、中心静脉压( CVP)、心率( HR)、每搏输出量( SV)、心排血量( CO)等。根据这些参数在实验过程中的变量评估容量反应性。该实验得出另一个概念:压力反应性。对压力反应性的评估,可以了解外周动脉系统阻力状态,并据此评估患者是否需要或选择性地给予血管活性药物。下肢屈曲挤压实验简单、无创,评估容量反应性的同时可评估压力反应性。

  1. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

    1979-12-01

    The Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, located in the East Franklin area of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is the first successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Well-of-Opportunity program. The section tested was the MA-6 sand of lower Miocene age which has produced large quantities of gas from the adjacent but structurally separated Garden City field. In the subject well the observed temperature was 270{sup 0}F (132{sup 0}C) and the measured gradient was 0.77 psi/ft. The gross sand thickness was 270 feet, the net sand thickness 190 feet, and the tested interval 58 net feet. The temperatures and pressures encountered approached the limits of the surface-recording bottomhole pressure gauge and particularly the single-conductor cables on which the gauges were run. The objectives of the tests were all accomplished, and data were obtained which will contribute to the overall assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource of the Upper Gulf of Mexico basin. In general, the gas solubility (22.8 scf/bbl) was as expected for the temperature, pressure, and salinity of the brine. The produced water was more saline than expected (160,000 mg/l). The high concentrations of dissolved solids, coupled with the evolution of CO{sub 2} from these waters during production, created a scaling problem in the tubular goods and surface equipment that will have to be addressed in future tests.

  2. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Volume 1, Appendix F, Nevada Test Site and Oak Ridge Reservation Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    This volume addresses the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at two US Department of Energy sites, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These sites are being considered to provide a reasonable range of alternative settings at which future SNF management activities could be conducted. These locations are not currently involved in management of large quantities of SNF; NTS has none, and ORR has only small quantities. But NTS and ORR do offer experience and infrastructure for the handling, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and they do exemplify a broad spectrum of environmental parameters. This broad spectrum of environmental parameters will provide, a perspective on whether and how such location attributes may relate to potential environmental impacts. Consideration of these two sites will permit a programmatic decision to be based upon an assessment of the feasible options without bias, to the current storage sites. This volume is divided into four parts. Part One is the volume introduction. Part Two contains chapters one through five for the NTS, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Three contains chapters one through five for the ORR, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Four is summary information including the list of preparers, organizations contacted, acronyms, and abbreviations for both the NTS and the ORR. A Table of Contents, List of Figures, and List of Tables are included in parts Two, Three, and Four. This approach permitted the inclusion of both sites in one volume while maintaining consistent chapter numbering.

  3. Flow excursion experiments with a Savannah River Mark 22 fuel assembly mockup. Volume 2, Test program and results: Appendix B, Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-01

    On the subject of the transmittal of the Complete Quick Plot Set for Test 867{underscore}30, 4.75 MW Hard Pressure Transient LOCA at 80 F, SRP-1,141: Attached for your information is the subject plot set containing data plots for the complete test spanning from about {minus}320 to 90 seconds, time scale enhancements at {minus}1 to 5 seconds and a few custom plots. The time scale is set up so that 0 seconds corresponds to the start of the LOCA transient. The power supply safety temperature trips for the METRAscope and HP oscillograph were set a 400 F, consistent with previous tests. Flow trip setpoints (total flow from the venturi (IPD04) and channel pitot measurements) were configured for a power trip at an 80% reduction in flow from the post-LOCA expected flow value.

  4. Monopropellant engine investigation for space shuttle reaction control. Volume 2: Design, fabrication, and demonstration test of a catalytic gas generator for the space shuttle APU

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The capability of a catalytic gas generator to meet the requirement specified for the space shuttle APU is established. A full-scale gas generator, designed to operate at a chamber pressure of 750 psia and a flow rate of 0.36 lbm/sec, was fabricated and subjected to three separate life test series. The nickel foam metal used for catalyst retention was investigated. Inspection of the foam metal following the first life test revealed significant degradation. Consequently an investigation was conducted to determine the mechanism of degradation and to provide an improved foam metal.

  5. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100 kW application. Volume 1: Design, analysis and development tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system capable of delivering multihundred kilowatts (300 kW to 1000 kW range) in low earth orbit is described. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of .25 sq. m. The structural analysis and design trades leading to the baseline design are discussed. It describes the configuration, as well as optical, thermal and electrical performance analyses that support the design and overall performance estimates for the array are described.

  6. HGP-A Wellhead Generator Proof-of-Feasibility Project (Well Test) at HGP-A Site Puna, Hawaii. Volume II. Technical Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide and secure the well test system complete and ready for use. The project comprises the construction of a chemical treatment system (including caustic and hydrogen peroxide handling systems), new condensate piping, wellhead steam piping modifications, ancillary electrical systems and equipment, instrumentation, site improvements and utilities distribution.

  7. Integration and testing of hot desulfurization and entrained-flow gasification for power generation systems. Phase 2, Process optimization: Volume 1, Program summary and PDU operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, A.M.; Kassman, J.S.; Leininger, T.F.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Wu, C.M.; Yang, P.P.

    1991-09-01

    This second Topical Report describes the work that was completed between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1990 in a Cooperative Agreement between Texaco and the US Department of Energy that began on September 30, 1987. During the period that is covered in this report, the development and optimization of in-situ and external desulfurization processes were pursued. The research effort included bench scale testing, PDU scoping tests, process economic studies and advanced instrument testing. Two bench scale studies were performed at the Research Triangle Institute with zinc titanate sorbent to obtain data on its cycle life, sulfur capacity, durability and the effect of chlorides. These studies quantify sulfur capture during simulated air and oxygen-blown gasification for two zinc titanate formulations. Eight PDU runs for a total of 20 days of operation were conducted to evaluate the performance of candidate sorbents for both in-situ and external desulfurization. A total of 47 tests were completed with oxygen and air-blown gasification. Candidate sorbents included iron oxide for in-situ desulfurization and calcium based and mixed metal oxides for external desulfurization. Gasifier performance and sorbent sulfur capture are compared for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation.

  8. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION MULTIPOLLUTANT STUDY EMISSION TEST REPORT, MAINE ENERGY RECOVERY COMPANY, REFUSE DERIVED FUEL FACILITY, BIDDEFORD, MAINE - VOLUME III: APPENDICES G-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an emission test of a new municipal solid waste combustor, in Biddeford, ME, that burns refuse-derived fuel and is equipped with a lime spray dryer fabric filter (SD/FF) emission control system. Control efficiency of the SD/FF emission control system ...

  9. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION MULTIPOLLUTANT STUDY EMISSION TEST REPORT, MAINE ENERGY RECOVERY COMPANY, REFUSE DERIVED FUEL FACILITY, BIDDEFORD, MAINE - VOLUME II: APPENDICES A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an emission test of a new municipal solid waste combustor, in Biddeford, ME, that burns refuse-derived fuel and is equipped with a lime spray dryer fabric filter (SD/FF) emission control system. Control efficiency of the SD/FF emission control system ...

  10. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION MULTIPOLLUTANT STUDY EMISSION TEST REPORT, MAINE ENERGY RECOVERY COMPANY, RE- FUSE DERIVED FUEL FACILITY, BIDDEFORD, MAINE - VOLUME I: SUMMARY OF RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an emission test of a new municipal solid waste combustor, in Biddeford, ME, that burns refuse-derived fuel and is equipped with a lime spray dryer fabric filter (SD/FF) emission control system. ontrol efficiency of the SD/FF emission control system wa...

  11. METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperatation with Shell Synthetic Fuels, Incorporated to obtain data relevent to the design and operation of dry particulate solids filters, and Nahcolite as a chloride removal sorbent. Shell Synthetic Fuels Incorporated provided 60 mm O.D. {times} 40 mm I.D. {times} O.5 m long silicon carbide, LayCer{trademark} 70/3 candle filters for use in filtering coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the filters in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) are found in CRADA 93-011. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 93-011. Seven gasifier runs were conducted over an eighteen month period to accumulate 868 hours of operation. During this time, 3 filters were used 2 at a time to give individual candle usage of 254 hours, 525 hours, and 868 hours, respectively. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

  12. Flow Rate Calculation in the Auto Air Leakage Volume Test System Based on Constant Pressure Method%基于恒压法的汽车整车漏风量测试系统流量计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚; 赵鑫; 李振亮; 许玮

    2013-01-01

    An auto air leakage volume test system based on constant pressure method was designed. Using standard orifice plate as throttle device,after testing some original data such as the differential pressure between both sides of the throttle device,temperature of the dry-bulb and the wet-bulb,and so on,the auto air leakage volume can be calculated. The formulas and methods involved were demonstrated in detail and the experiment was designed based on an analysis of the measurement theory. According to the result of the experiment,this method proved stable and reliable and can satisfy the requirement of the measurement.%  设计了基于恒压法的汽车整车漏风量测试系统。采用标准孔板作为节流件,通过测量节流件上下游的压力差、干球温度和湿球温度等基础数据,经过计算可得到整车漏风量。在分析测量原理的基础上,详细给出了计算漏风量的公式和方法,并进行了实验。实验结果表明,该计算方法稳定可靠,可满足测量要求。

  13. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  14. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  15. Eddy current manual, volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report on eddy current testing is divided into three sections: (a) Demonstration of Basic Principles, (b) Practical (Laboratory) Tests and, (c) Typical Certification Questions. It is intended to be used as a supplement to ΣEddy Current Manual, Volume 1Σ (AECL-7523) during CSNDT Foundation Level II and III courses

  16. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  17. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data

  18. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heathman, J.H.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data.

  19. Sealed source and device design safety testing. Volume 5: Technical report on the findings of Task 4, Investigation of failed radioactive stainless steel troxler gauges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benac, D.J.; Schick, W.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report covers the Task 4 activities for the Sealed Source and Device Safety testing program. SwRI was contracted to investigate failed radioactive stainless steel troxler gauges. SwRI`s task was to determine the cause of failure of the rods and the extent of the problem. SwRI concluded that the broken rod failed in a brittle manner due to a hard zone in the heat affected zone.

  20. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The propulsion performance, acoustic, structural, and systems changes to a 727-200 airplane retrofitted with a refan modification of the JT8D turbofan engine are evaluated. Model tests, design of certifiable airplane retrofit kit hardware, manufacture of test hardware, ground test of a current production JT8D engine, followed by test of the same engine modified to the refan configuration, detailed analyses of the retrofit impact on airplane airworthiness, performance, and noise, and a preliminary analysis of retrofit costs are included. Results indicate that the refan retrofit of the 727-200 would be certifiable and would result in a 6-to 8 EPNdb reduction in effective perceived noise level (EPNL) at the FAR 36 measuring points and an annoyance-weighted footprint area reduction of 68% to 83%. The installed refan engine is estimated to provide 14% greater takeoff thrust at zero velocity and 10% greater thrust at 100 kn (51.4 m/s). There would be an approximate 0.6% increase in cruise specific fuel consumption (SFC). The refan engine performance in conjunction with the increase in stalled weight results in a range reduction of approximately 15% over the unmodified airplane at the same brake release gross weight (BRGW), with a block fuel increase of 1.5% to 3%. With the particular model 727 that was studied, however, it is possible to operate the airplane (with minor structural modifications) at a higher BRGW and increase the range up to approximately 15% relative to the nonrefanned airplane (with equal or slightly increased noise levels). The JT8D refan engine also improves the limited-field range of the airplane.

  1. A Novel Technology for Measurements of Dielectric Properties of Extremely Small Volumes of Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Na Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high sensitivity sensor for measurement radio frequency (RF dielectric permittivity of liquids is described. Interference is used and parasitic effects are cancellation, which makes the sensor can catch weak signals caused by liquids with extremely small volumes. In addition, we present the relationship between transmission coefficient and permittivity of liquids under test (LUT. Using this sensor, quantitative measurements of the dielectric properties at 5.8 GHz are demonstrated of LUTs. Experiments show that the proposed method only requires the volume of 160 nanoliters for liquids. Therefore, the technology can be used for RF spectroscopic analysis of biological samples and extremely precious liquids.

  2. Sealed source and device design safety testing: Technical report on the findings of task 4 -- Investigation of failed Nitinol brachytherapy wire. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benac, D.J.; Burghard, H.C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This report covers an investigation of the nature and cause of failure in Nitinol brachytherapy sourcewires. The investigation was initiated after two clinical incidents in which sourcewires failed during or immediately after a treatment. The investigation determined that the two clinical Nitinol sourcewires failed in a brittle manner, which is atypical for Nitinol. There were no material anomalies or subcritical flaws to explain the brittle failures. The bend tests also demonstrated that neither moist environment, radiation, nor low-temperature structural transformation was a likely root cause of the failures. However, degradation of the PTFE was consistently evident, and those sourcewires shipped or stored with PTFE sleeves consistently failed in laboratory bend tests. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the root cause of the in-service failures of the sourcewires was environmentally induced embrittlement due to the breakdown of the PTFE protective sleeves in the presence of the high-radiation field and subsequent reaction or interaction of the breakdown products with the Nitinol alloy.

  3. Industrial application of fluidized bed combustion. Phase I, task 4: sub-scale unit testing and data analysis. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstine, S.L.; Accortt, J.I.; Harris, R.D.; Kantersaria, P.P.; Matthews, F.T.; Jones, B.C.; Jukkola, G.D.

    1979-12-01

    Combustion Engineering, under contract with the Department of Energy, has developed, designed, and is constructing a 50,000 lbs steam/hr Industrial FBC Demonstration Plant. The plant will provide steam for space heating at the Great Lakes Naval Base in North Chicago, Illinois. Its operation will enable industry to objectively appraise the performance, reliability, and economics of FBC technology. A hot sub-scale unit (SSU), simulating the operating conditions of the demonstration plant, has been constructed and operated at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. The SSU facility has served as a valuable developmental tool in establishing the performance characteristics of the FBC process and equipment as used in the larger Demonstration Plant. Experience gained during more than 2000 hours of operation, including the analytical results derived from an extensive test program of 1500 hours operation, has defined problems and identified solutions in engineering the larger FBC Demonstration Plant. This report presents documentation of the results of the SSU test program.

  4. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Framework for the resource management plan, Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to publicize how the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) proposes to develop and use a Resource Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) so the public could comment on and assist in the following activities: (1) Developing the methods for creating and using the plan; (2) Identifying the values people place on manmade and natural resources found on the NTS; (3) Developing the goals the DOE/NV will use to guide the conservation and use of those resources; (4) Identifying the management actions needed to meet constraints and resource management goals; and (5) Incorporating the principles of ecosystem management into land and resource management on the NTS. This framework for the Resource Management Plan was developed in conjunction with the Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the state of Nevada (NTS EIS) to take advantage of the extensive data collection and public participation activities associated with the National Environmental Policy Act. After public input was received during the comment period for the Draft NTS EIS, DOE/NV revised this description of the Resource Management Plan and published it with the NTS Final EIS. This revision includes the goals DOE/NV has developed for managing resources and land-use constraints. It also includes the final plans for developing the Resource Management Plan. These plans will guide DOE/NV as it develops a Resource Management Plan in the coming years

  5. Biotreatment of produced waters for volume reduction and contaminant removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negri, M.C.; Hinchman, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mollock, J. [Devon Energy Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Produced water is wastewater that is brought to the surface from natural gas wells during natural gas production. Its constituents, mostly salt, with traces of hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are a significant disposal problem. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in partnership with the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has developed a low-cost, low-tech method, in which green plants are used to reduce the volume of produced water. The authors have designed an engineered bioreactor system, which is modeled after natural saline wetland ecosystems. The plant bioreactor system maximizes plant evapotranspiration to reduce wastewater volume and, concurrently, may function as a biological filter to enhance contaminant degradation and immobilization in the root/rhizosphere zone. Halophyte plant species having high salt tolerance and high transpiration rates were selected after they tested them in greenhouse experiments. Models obtained by using their greenhouse findings reduced the volume of the wastewater (up to 6% salt) by 75% in about 8 days. A field demonstration of the bioreactor, designed on the basis of the results from the greenhouse study, is successfully under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma. The process could offer the petroleum industry a low-cost biological alternative to existing expensive options.

  6. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada test site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Public comment and response document, Volume 3, Part B responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sitewide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of four possible land-use alternatives being considered for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range, and the formerly operated DOE sites in the state of Nevada: the Project Shoal Area, the Central Nevada Test Area, and portions of the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. Three additional sites in Nevada-Eldorado Valley, Dry Lake Valley, and Coyote Spring Valley-are evaluated for collocation of solar energy production facilities. The four alternatives include Continue Current Operations (No Action, continue to operate at the level maintained for the past 3 to 5 years); Discontinue Operations 1 (discontinue operations and interagency programs); Expanded Use (increased use of NTS and its resources to support defense and nondefense programs); and Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands (discontinue all defense-related activities at NTS; continue waste management operations in support of NTS environmental restoration efforts; expand nondefense research). Environmental impacts were assessed for each alternative by analyzing, to the extent possible, the discrete and cumulative environmental impacts associated with Defense Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Nondefense Research and Development, and Work for Others Programs. A framework for a Resource Management Plan is included as Volume 2 of this EIS and represents the development of an ecosystem based planning process closely integrated with the National Environmental Policy Act process. This EIS, among other things, analyzed the impacts of transportation of low level waste, and site characterization activities related to the Yucca Mountain Project but did not analyze the suitability of the site as a repository. This EIS does not analyze the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site as a repository as this is an action beyond the scope of the EIS. Volume 3 of this EIS contains the public comments and the responses to the comments

  7. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  8. ICONE-4: Proceedings. Volume 2: Advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for this conference are contained in 5 volumes. This volume is divided into the following areas: advanced reactor requirements; advanced reactor design and analysis; arrangement and construction; specific reactor designs; demonstration testing; safety systems and analysis; component demonstration testing; advanced reactor containment design; licensing topics and updates; accelerator applications and spallation sources; and advanced reactor development. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  9. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Transportation study, Volume 1, Appendix I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been prepared to address local transportation issues concerning current and potential operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), to document the results of the NTS transportation risk analysis, and to provide information and supporting documentation for the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the NTS and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. Four alternatives are evaluated in the NTS EIS: Alternative 1, Continue Current Operations, (No Action); Alternative 2, Discontinue Operations; Alternative 3, Expanded Use; and Alternative 4, Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands. The transportation risk analysis estimated the health risk from highway transportation of DOE-generated low-level waste, mixed waste, and defense-related nuclear materials for each of the four alternatives

  10. Neutron Scattering in Biology Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fitter, Jörg; Katsaras, John

    2006-01-01

    The advent of new neutron facilities and the improvement of existing sources and instruments world wide supply the biological community with many new opportunities in the areas of structural biology and biological physics. The present volume offers a clear description of the various neutron-scattering techniques currently being used to answer biologically relevant questions. Their utility is illustrated through examples by some of the leading researchers in the field of neutron scattering. This volume will be a reference for researchers and a step-by-step guide for young scientists entering the field and the advanced graduate student.

  11. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  12. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  13. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. American Indian Assessments. Volume 1, Appendix G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Native American Resource Document is a summary of opinions expressed by the Consolidated Group of Tribes and Organizations (CGTO) regarding the Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Other Off-Site Locations within the State of Nevada (NTS EIS). The document contains (a) general concerns regarding long-term impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) operations on the NTS and (b) a synopsis of specific comments made by the American Indian Writers Subgroup (AIWS) for various chapters of the NTS EIS. The Native American Resource Document was produced in response to consultation required for the NTS EIS, in accordance with DOE Order 1230.2, American Indian Tribal Government Policy. The consultation focused specifically on four alternative management decisions concerning the future mission of the NTS and related off-site locations in Nevada. However, the present CGTO's response to this consultation is not limited to EIS alternatives, but also integrates relevant recommendations made by Indian people for previous DOE projects in which American Indians participated

  14. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 4: Airplane evaluation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The retrofit of JT8D-109 (refan) engines are evaluated on a 727-200 airplane in terms of airworthiness, performance, and noise. Design of certifiable hardware, manufacture, and ground testing of the essential nacelle components is included along with analysis of the certifiable airplane design to ensure airworthiness compliance and to predict the in-flight performance and noise characteristics of the modified airplane. The analyses confirm that the 727 refan airplane is certifiable. The refan airplane range would be 15% less that of the baseline airplane and block fuel would be increased by 1.5% to 3%. However, with this particular 727-200 model, with a brake release gross weight of 172,500 lb (78,245 kg), it is possible to operate the airplane (with minor structural modifications) at higher gross weights and increase the range up to 15% over the 727-200 (baseline) airplane. The refan airplane FAR Part 36 noise levels would be 6 to 8 EPNdB (effective perceived noise in decibels) below the baseline. Noise footprint studies showed that approach noise contour areas are small compared to takeoff areas. The 727 refan realizes a 68% to 83% reduction in annoyance-weighted area when compared to the 727-200 over a range of gross weights and operational procedures.

  15. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, B., E-mail: babak_sharifi88@yahoo.com [Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani Zeinali, H. [Application of Radiation Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A. [Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahvar, A. [Application of Radiation Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-11

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm{sup 3} dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  16. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  17. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

  18. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  19. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  20. Determinação da segurança biológica do xampu de cetoconazol: teste de irritação ocular e avaliação do potencial de citotoxicidade in vitro Determination of the biological reactivity of ketoconazole in shampoo: draize eye test and cytotoxity test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inara Staub

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cetoconazol é um agente antifúngico, que pode ser incorporado em diferentes formas farmacêuticas, como, por exemplo, xampus e cremes. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a segurança biológica in vivo (teste de irritação ocular e in vitro (teste de citotoxicidade do xampu de cetoconazol degradado sob ação da luz. Para tanto, a formulação foi exposta à radiação UV-C (254 nm e foram empregados dois métodos para a determinação quantitativa do cetoconazol: CLAE e ensaio microbiológico. Os resultados demonstraram alteração do cetoconazol em presença da luz - presença de picos secundários no cromatograma e diminuição da atividade antifúngica - entretanto, não demonstraram alteração na segurança biológica entre xampu de cetoconazol e xampu de cetoconazol contendo produtos de degradação.Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent and can be incorporated into several dosage forms, as an example it could be mentioned shampoos and creams. The aim of this work was to assess the biological reactivity in vivo (Draize eye test and in vitro (cytotoxity test of ketoconazole in shampoo degradeted under action of light. The formulation was exposed to UV-C (254 nm radiation and two methods were used for the quantitative determination of ketoconazole: HPLC and microbiological assay. The results showed alteration in ketoconazole in presence of light - secondary peaks in chromatogram and decrease in antifungal activity - however, no alteration on the biological reactivity between ketoconazole shampoo and ketoconazole shampoo containing degradation products was observed.

  1. Blunted autonomic response to volume expansion in formerly preeclamptic women with low plasma volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, I.; Courtar, D.A.; Janssen, B.J.; Aardenburg, R.; Peeters, L.L.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that low plasma volume in normotensive formerly preeclamptic women reflects reduced venous storage capacity. To test this hypothesis, we compared circulatory and autonomic responses to acute volume loading between women with low and those with normal plasma volume. METHODS:

  2. Acid test of joint technical and biological measures in slope stabilisation - Impact analysis of the heavy rainstorm event in August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, F.; Böll, A.

    2009-04-01

    The persisting and heavy rainstorms from 20th to 22nd August in 2005 resulted in loss of human lives and tremendous damage on infrastructure all over Switzerland. Many of the measures taken hitherto to protect against such natural hazards were stressed to their limits or even beyond due to water saturation of the soils and extreme discharges of the torrents. This particular configuration offered the possibility to investigate the reliability of technical and biological measures taken within the scope of slope stabilisation, torrent and gully control. In the context of a joint project the ancient sliding area "Schwandrübi" in Dallenwil (Switzerland) providing joint technical and biological measures was chosen to address aspects concerning the reliability of technical supporting structures, the development of biological measures in the course of time and their performance under the extreme impact as well as the effects of biological measures on the stability of slopes. During 1981 and 1982 joint technical and biological measures had been taken on a large scale with minor follow-ups shortly after to stabilise the "Schwandrübi". The underlying strategy was based on several pilot surveys as thorough soil analysis, e.g. grain size distribution and determination of the angle of internal friction (Φ') related to the porosity (n) and the dry unit weight (γ), respectively. Basically, the spatial arrangement of the gabions was in accordance with the theoretical guidelines. However, based on the angle of internal friction (Φ') determined on the loose moraine soil material, it was not possible to meet the soil mechanical criterion of inclination between the constructions in all cases. Regardless of the extreme impact during the rainstorm (~100-year event), no serious damage occurred neither on the roughly 25-year old gabions nor on the torrent control structures. The recalculated peak discharge in the outlet channel was ~60 m3s-1 superimposed by high bed load

  3. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  4. 生物珊瑚人工骨支架材料生物相容性检测%Biocompatibility test of biological coral artificial bone as scaffold materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄涛; 孟志斌; 金大地; 付昆; 刘建航; 宋策; 贾丙申

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价生物珊瑚人工骨( BCAB)材料作为骨组织工程支架材料与小鼠胚胎干细胞(MESCs)构建组织工程骨的有效性及材料生物相容性.方法 设MESCs与BCAB支架材料混合黏附培养为实验组,单纯MESCs培养为对照组,分别于第2、4、6、8天进行MTT法检测细胞增殖活性,特异性胚胎抗原-1检测细胞对材料的黏附性.于第8日对接种细胞材料片行成骨诱导,诱导培养10d后行茜素红染色及电镜扫描检测成骨诱导及体外组织工程骨构建情况.取12只大鼠,脊柱左侧皮下植入空白BCAB支架片状材料,右侧植入黏附细胞BCAB片状材料,随机分4、8、12周3组行影像学检查,并取双侧标本行病理切片观察局部炎症反应,四环素标记下荧光显微镜观察成骨情况.第12周组取心、肝、肾病理切片及评估心、肝、肾毒性反应.结果 MTT法检测细胞增殖活性结果显示,在培养2d和4d时实验组与对照组间MTT值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),在6d及8d时实验组MTT值明显高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).特异性胚胎抗原-1检测证实MESCs对BCAB支架材料具有良好的黏附性,在其三维微孔隙内能较快增殖.茜素红染色及电镜扫描检测证实黏附细胞材料成骨诱导有效,体外组织工程骨构建成功.材料植入局部组织炎症反应轻,空白支架材料于第8周开始降解,12周达初步降解,无异位成骨;黏附细胞支架材料则有明显异位成骨现象,且较对侧空白支架材料降解时效延长.第12周组实验动物心、肝、肾标本病理切片未见异常损害.结论 BCAB支架材料具有良好的生物相容性,其降解周期与新骨重建周期大致相当,是一种良好的骨组织工程支架材料.%[Objective] To test the biocompatibility of biological coral artificial bone (BCAB) and the efrect of tissue engineered bone construction using BCAB scaffolds with mouse embryonic stem cells (MESCs

  5. The biological and ethical basis of the use of human embryonic stem cells for in vitro test systems or cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Leist, Marcel; Bremer, Susanne; Brundin, Patrik; Hescheler, Jürgen; Kirkeby, Agnete; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Pörzgen, Peter; Pucéat, Michel; Schmidt, Mathias; Schrattenholz, André; Zak, Naomi B.; Hentze, Hannes

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are now routinely cultured in many laboratories, and differentiation protocols are available to generate a large variety of cell types. In an ongoing ethical debate opinions of different groups are based on varying sets of religious, historical, cultural and scientific arguments as well as on widely differing levels of general information. We here give an overview of the biological background for non-specialists, and address all is- sues of the current stem c...

  6. Inferring Biological Mechanisms by Data-Based Mathematical Modelling: Compartment-Specific Gene Activation during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis as a Test Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Iber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological functionality arises from the complex interactions of simple components. Emerging behaviour is difficult to recognize with verbal models alone, and mathematical approaches are important. Even few interacting components can give rise to a wide range of different responses, that is, sustained, transient, oscillatory, switch-like responses, depending on the values of the model parameters. A quantitative comparison of model predictions and experiments is therefore important to distinguish between competing hypotheses and to judge whether a certain regulatory behaviour is at all possible and plausible given the observed type and strengths of interactions and the speed of reactions. Here I will review a detailed model for the transcription factor , a regulator of cell differentiation during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. I will focus in particular on the type of conclusions that can be drawn from detailed, carefully validated models of biological signaling networks. For most systems, such detailed experimental information is currently not available, but accumulating biochemical data through technical advances are likely to enable the detailed modelling of an increasing number of pathways. A major challenge will be the linking of such detailed models and their integration into a multiscale framework to enable their analysis in a larger biological context.

  7. Quantum Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledge...

  8. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  9. Biological scaling and physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R P Rau

    2002-09-01

    Kleiber’s law in biology states that the specific metabolic rate (metabolic rate per unit mass) scales as -1/4 in terms of the mass of the organism. A long-standing puzzle is the (- 1/4) power in place of the usual expectation of (- 1/3) based on the surface to volume ratio in three-dimensions. While recent papers by physicists have focused exclusively on geometry in attempting to explain the puzzle, we consider here a specific law of physics that governs fluid flow to show how the (- 1/4) power arises under certain conditions. More generally, such a line of approach that identifies a specific physical law as involved and then examines the implications of a power law may illuminate better the role of physics in biology.

  10. Biological scaling and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, A R P

    2002-09-01

    Kleiber's law in biology states that the specific metabolic rate (metabolic rate per unit mass) scales as M- 1/4 in terms of the mass M of the organism. A long-standing puzzle is the (- 1/4) power in place of the usual expectation of (- 1/3) based on the surface to volume ratio in three-dimensions. While recent papers by physicists have focused exclusively on geometry in attempting to explain the puzzle, we consider here a specific law of physics that governs fluid flow to show how the (- 1/4) power arises under certain conditions. More generally, such a line of approach that identifies a specific physical law as involved and then examines the implications of a power law may illuminate better the role of physics in biology.

  11. North Carolina End-of-Course Tests: Algebra I; Biology; Economic, Legal, and Political Systems; English I; U.S. History. Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability/Testing.

    The North Carolina End-of-Course Testing Program is based on the assessment of higher level skills in the context of specific subject-area content. These tests inform students, parents, the community, and educators about the achievement of North Carolina students in given areas. This report describes the development and psychometric properties of…

  12. Biological Effects of Neutron and Proton Irradiations. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Effects of Neutron Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years the interest in biological effects caused by neutrons has been increasing steadily as a result of the rapid development of neutron technology and the great number of neutron sources being used. Neutrons, because of their specific physical characteristics and biological effects, form a special type of radiation hazard but, at the same time, are a prospective tool for applied radiobiology. This Symposium, held in Brookhaven at the invitation of the United States Government from 7-11 October 1963, provided an opportunity for scientists to discuss the experimental information at present available on the biological action of neutrons and to evaluate future possibilities. It was a sequel to the Symposium on Neutron Detection, Dosimetry and Standardization, which was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in December 1962 at Harwell. The Symposium was attended by 128 participants from 17 countries and 6 international organizations. Fifty-four papers were presented. The following subjects were discussed in various sessions: (1) Dosimetry. Estimation of absorbed dose of neutrons in biological material. (2) Biological effects of high-energy protons. (3) Cellular and genetic effects. (4) Pathology of neutron irradiation, including acute and chronic radiation syndromes (mortality, anatomical and histological changes, biochemical and metabolic disturbances) and delayed consequences. (5) Relative biological effectiveness of neutrons evaluated by different biological tests. A Panel on Biophysical Considerations in Neutron Experimentation, with special emphasis on informal discussions, was organized during the Symposium. The views of the Panel are recorded in Volume II of the Proceedings. Many reports were presented on the important subject of the relative effectiveness of the biological action of neutrons, as well as on the general pathology of neutron irradiation and the cellular and genetic effects related to it. Three survey papers considered

  13. Biological Effects of Neutron and Proton Irradiations. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Effects of Neutron Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years the interest in biological effects caused by neutrons has been increasing steadily as a result of the rapid development of neutron technology and the great number of neutron sources being used. Neutrons, because of their specific physical characteristics and biological effects, form a special type of radiation hazard but, at the same time, are a prospective tool for applied radiobiology. This Symposium, held in Brookhaven at the invitation of the United States Government from 7-11 October 1963, provided an opportunity for scientists to discuss the experimental information at present available on the biological action of neutrons and to evaluate future possibilities. It was a sequel to the Symposium on Neutron Detection, Dosimetry and Standardization, which was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in December 1962 at Harwell. The Symposium was attended by 128 participants from 17 countries and 6 international organizations. Fifty-four papers were presented. The following subjects were discussed in various sessions: (1) Dosimetry. Estimation of absorbed dose of neutrons in biological material. (2) Biological effects of high-energy protons. (3) Cellular and genetic effects. (4) Pathology of neutron irradiation, including acute and chronic radiation syndromes (mortality, anatomical and histological changes, biochemical and metabolic disturbances) and delayed consequences. (5) Relative biological effectiveness of neutrons evaluated by different biological tests. A Panel on Biophysical Considerations in Neutron Experimentation, with special emphasis on informal discussions, was organized during the Symposium. The views of the Panel are recorded in Volume II of the Proceedings. Many reports were presented on the important subject of the relative effectiveness of the biological action of neutrons, as well as on the general pathology of neutron irradiation and the cellular and genetic effects related to it. Three survey papers considered

  14. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is the first in a series of the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) curriculum which is to prepare chemical technicians. The chapters concentrate on gas chromatography, tests for purity, properties of gases, and gas measurements. Included is the appropriate content, exercises, laboratory activities, and all needed mathematics.…

  15. Data collection system. Volume 1, Overview and operators manual; Volume 2, Maintenance manual; Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudell, R.B.; Bauder, M.E.; Boyer, W.B.; French, R.E.; Isidoro, R.J.; Kaestner, P.C.; Perkins, W.G.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Instrumentation Development Department was tasked by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) to record data on Tektronix RTD720 Digitizers on the HUNTERS TROPHY field test conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on September 18, 1992. This report contains a overview and description of the computer hardware and software that was used to acquire, reduce, and display the data. The document is divided into two volumes: an overview and operators manual (Volume 1) and a maintenance manual (Volume 2).

  16. Selection and delineation of target volumes in head and neck tumors: beyond ICRU definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement in irradiation techniques, which allows dose distributions sculpting around volumes of very complex shapes, has revealed the limitations in selection and delineation of target volumes. The use of functional imaging (PET, fMRI) in addition to anatomic imaging, will probably bring an extra level of complexity to this issue. In particular, the use of specific markers to visualize biological pathways known to influence response to ionizing radiation (e.g. hypoxia, proliferation) could lead to the delineation of sub-target volumes for delivering an extra boost dose. Such concept of Image-Guided Radiation Therapy still need to be tested in experimental models and in well defined clinical situations before its use in a routine clinical set-up. (author)

  17. Update on Nonsurgical Lung Volume Reduction Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alberto Neder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR strategies for advanced COPD. Valve implants, coil implants, biological LVR (BioLVR, bronchial thermal vapour ablation, and airway stents are used to induce lung deflation with the ultimate goal of improving respiratory mechanics and chronic dyspnea. Patients presenting with severe air trapping (e.g., inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (TLC 225% predicted and thoracic hyperinflation (TLC > 150% predicted have the greatest potential to derive benefit from ELVR procedures. Pre-LVRS or ELVR assessment should ideally include cardiological evaluation, high resolution CT scan, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy, full pulmonary function tests, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. ELVR procedures are currently available in selected Canadian research centers as part of ethically approved clinical trials. If a decision is made to offer an ELVR procedure, one-way valves are the first option in the presence of complete lobar exclusion and no significant collateral ventilation. When the fissure is not complete, when collateral ventilation is evident in heterogeneous emphysema or when emphysema is homogeneous, coil implants or BioLVR (in that order are the next logical alternatives.

  18. Update on Nonsurgical Lung Volume Reduction Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2016-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) strategies for advanced COPD. Valve implants, coil implants, biological LVR (BioLVR), bronchial thermal vapour ablation, and airway stents are used to induce lung deflation with the ultimate goal of improving respiratory mechanics and chronic dyspnea. Patients presenting with severe air trapping (e.g., inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (TLC) 225% predicted) and thoracic hyperinflation (TLC > 150% predicted) have the greatest potential to derive benefit from ELVR procedures. Pre-LVRS or ELVR assessment should ideally include cardiological evaluation, high resolution CT scan, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy, full pulmonary function tests, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. ELVR procedures are currently available in selected Canadian research centers as part of ethically approved clinical trials. If a decision is made to offer an ELVR procedure, one-way valves are the first option in the presence of complete lobar exclusion and no significant collateral ventilation. When the fissure is not complete, when collateral ventilation is evident in heterogeneous emphysema or when emphysema is homogeneous, coil implants or BioLVR (in that order) are the next logical alternatives. PMID:27445557

  19. Host range testing of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) sourced from the Punjab of Pakistan for classical biological control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae: Euphyllurinae: Diaphorinini) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddle, Mark S; Pandey, Raju

    2014-02-01

    ABSTRACT Tests evaluating the host range of Tamarixia radiata (Waterson) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the pestiferous Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from the Punjab of Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species (five native and two self-introduced species) representing five families were exposed to T radiata under the following three different exposure scenarios: 1) sequential no-choice tests, 2) static no-choice tests, and 3) choice tests. Nontarget species were selected for testing based on the following criteria: 1) taxonomic relatedness to the target, D. citri; 2) native psyllids inhabiting native host plants related to citrus that could release volatiles attractive to T. radiata; 3) native psyllids with a high probability of occurrence in native vegetation surrounding commercial citrus groves that could be encountered by T. radiata emigrating from D. citri-infested citrus orchards; 4) a common native pest psyllid species; and 5) a beneficial psyllid attacking a noxious weed. The results of host range testing were unambiguous; T radiata exhibited a narrow host range and high host specificity, with just one species of nontarget psyllid, the abundant native pest Bactericera cockerelli Sulc, being parasitized at low levels (citri poses negligible environmental risk. PMID:24665694

  20. Host range testing of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) sourced from the Punjab of Pakistan for classical biological control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae: Euphyllurinae: Diaphorinini) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddle, Mark S; Pandey, Raju

    2014-02-01

    ABSTRACT Tests evaluating the host range of Tamarixia radiata (Waterson) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the pestiferous Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from the Punjab of Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species (five native and two self-introduced species) representing five families were exposed to T radiata under the following three different exposure scenarios: 1) sequential no-choice tests, 2) static no-choice tests, and 3) choice tests. Nontarget species were selected for testing based on the following criteria: 1) taxonomic relatedness to the target, D. citri; 2) native psyllids inhabiting native host plants related to citrus that could release volatiles attractive to T. radiata; 3) native psyllids with a high probability of occurrence in native vegetation surrounding commercial citrus groves that could be encountered by T. radiata emigrating from D. citri-infested citrus orchards; 4) a common native pest psyllid species; and 5) a beneficial psyllid attacking a noxious weed. The results of host range testing were unambiguous; T radiata exhibited a narrow host range and high host specificity, with just one species of nontarget psyllid, the abundant native pest Bactericera cockerelli Sulc, being parasitized at low levels (citri poses negligible environmental risk.

  1. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  2. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  3. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis

  4. Mathematical modeling of biological processes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    This book on mathematical modeling of biological processes includes a wide selection of biological topics that demonstrate the power of mathematics and computational codes in setting up biological processes with a rigorous and predictive framework. Topics include: enzyme dynamics, spread of disease, harvesting bacteria, competition among live species, neuronal oscillations, transport of neurofilaments in axon, cancer and cancer therapy, and granulomas. Complete with a description of the biological background and biological question that requires the use of mathematics, this book is developed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with only basic knowledge of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations; background in biology is not required. Students will gain knowledge on how to program with MATLAB without previous programming experience and how to use codes in order to test biological hypothesis.

  5. Biological races in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  6. Large volume cryogenic silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggio, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), via Sommarive 18, I-38100 Povo (Italy); Bressi, G. [INFN sez. di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Carugno, G.; Corti, D. [INFN sez. di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Galeazzi, G. [INFN lab. naz. Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), via Sommarive 18, I-38100 Povo (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We present preliminary measurements for the development of a large volume silicon detector to detect low energy and low rate energy depositions. The tested detector is a one cm-thick silicon PIN diode with an active volume of 31 cm{sup 3}, cooled to the liquid helium temperature to obtain depletion from thermally-generated free carriers. A thorough study has been done to show that effects of charge trapping during drift disappears at a bias field value of the order of 100V/cm.

  7. Analysis of 2013 civil servant selection examination biology test questions according to teacher content knowledge competencies and revised Bloom taxonomy2013 Kamu personeli seçme sınavı biyoloji alan bilgisi sorularının biyoloji öğretmenliği alan bilgisi yeterliklerine ve yenilenmiş Bloom taksonomisine göre analizi

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Kala; Mustafa Çakır

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze questions of 2013 biology content knowledge test in civil servant selection examination (KPSS) according to performance indicators in biology teachers’ content knowledge competencies and knowledge and cognitive processes dimensions in revised Bloom taxonomy. In this qualitative research descriptive content analysis approach is employed and data is collected through document analysis. According to results questions reflected only 50% (17 of 34) biology t...

  8. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham;

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  9. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  10. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  11. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  12. 临床生化检验项目生物参考区间适用性验证探讨%Investigation of validation for biology reference interval of clinical biochemical testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂山; 杨有业; 温冬梅; 缪丽韶; 梁锦胜

    2008-01-01

    目的 对实验室现用生化检验部分项目的生物参考区间进行验证,确保其适用于本实验室,为临床提供准确的诊断依据.方法 参照NCCLS C28-A2推荐方法,先对实验室2台生化分析系统性能进行验证;无性别生物差异项目验证选择一组(20名)健康参考个体,有性别生物差异项目选取男、女两组(各20名),验证存在疑问项目,另外选取男、女两组健康参考个体.采集符合要求健康参考个体标本,按实验室标准化操作程序(SOP)文件要求进行规范检测,拜耳ADVIA 1650生化分析系统检测标本,分析实验结果情况.结果 经验证2台生化分析系统性能符合要求;参与验证的16个项目中,健康参考个体组检测结果:γ谷氨酰转移酶(GGT)、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL.C)5%以上在现用的生物参考区间以外;总蛋白95%结果在现用的生物区间内;其余项目100%在现用的生物区间内.结论 本次验证的项目除GGT、HDL-C外,现用的生物参考区间适用于本实验室,可以继续使用;实验的验证具有科学的说服力,容易发现生物参考区间的偏离,建立完善的验证制度、程序,值得推广应用.%Objective To validate the biology reference interval of the Dartial biochemistry test items and provide accurate diagnosis basis for the clinic.Methods According to NCCLS C28-A2 recommendation method,two biochemistry analyzers'performance was validated.20 healthy persons for the asexual biological difference project and female group as well as male group (each group consist of 20 persons)for the sex biology difference project were recruited according to the laboratory SOP.If the validation had doubt,other two groups were need.The sera from these individuals were examined by the full-automatic ADVIA 1650 biochemistry analysis system.Results Two full-automatic ADVIA 1650 biochemistry analyzes conformed to the requirements.In 16 test items participating in this investigation.the analysis

  13. Body mass index and dynamic lung volumes in office workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the association of body mass index (BMI) to lung volumes assessed by spirometer. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, from February to August 2009. Methodology: Two hundred and twenty-five apparently healthy adult office workers of either gender aged > 20 years were recruited. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated as kg/m2. Subjects were categorized as normal (BMI=18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2); overweight (BMI=25 to 29.9 kg/m2); and obese Class 1 (BMI=30 to 34.9 kg/m2) on the basis of BMI. Lung volumes were measured by digital spirometer and were reported as percentage of predicted values for forced vital capacity (FVC%), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1%) and ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1:FVC). Groups were compared using t-test and ANOVA, correlation was assessed by Pearson's 'r'. Results: Significant differences in lung volumes were found in different BMI categories. Obese subjects had significantly lower FVC% (p < 0.0001), as well as significantly lower FEV1% (p = 0.003) as compared to normal subjects. There were significant linear relationships between obesity and PFTs. BMI had significant negative linear association with FVC% in overweight (r = -0.197) and obese (r = - 0.488); and with FEV1% in obese subjects (r = -0.510). Gender and age had no significant effect on mean values of PFTs. Conclusion: Obese individuals in this sample had significant decline in lung volumes. (author)

  14. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada test site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Public comment and response document, Volume 3, Part A comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On February 2, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada (NTS EIS) for review by the state of Nevada, Indian tribes, local governments, other federal agencies, groups and organizations, and the general public. The formal comment period lasted 90 days, ending May 3, 1996. As part of the comment process, the DOE held public hearings in St. George, Utah, and in Pahrump, Reno, and Las Vegas, Nevada. Community Workshops were held in Caliente, Tonopah, Boulder City, and North Las Vegas, Nevada, in conjunction with the University of Nevada Las Vegas to discuss the Draft NTS EIS. Volume 3 of the Final NTS EIS contains 3 chapters. Chapter 1 summarizes the major issues raised by the public. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the Draft NTS EIS received by the DOE; it includes public hearing transcripts, written comments, and comments received via a toll-free comment open-quotes hot line.close quotes Chapter 3 contains the DOE's responses to the public comments and describes how the comments were considered in the Final NTS EIS

  15. ``What if we were in a test tube?'' Students' gendered meaning making during a biology lesson about the basic facts of the human genitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was conducted through a series of close readings of situations where students interacted with each other and the teacher in opening up gaps about alternative ways of discussing gender. Drawing on Foucault's theories about the inclusion and exclusion of knowledge and the subsequent work of Butler and other feminist researchers, the paper illuminates what gendered relations remain tacit in the conversation. It then illustrates possible ways in which these tacit gendered meanings could be made overt and discussed with the students when making meaning about the human genitals. The paper also shows how the ways in which human genitals are transacted in the science classroom have importance for what kind of learning is made available to the students.

  16. An evaluation of the suitability of the onion test for studying the biological activity of potential antitumor drugs on the example of ledakrin

    OpenAIRE

    Danuta Antosiewicz

    2014-01-01

    The onion test was employed in this study. The effect of ledakrin on the synthesis of DNA and protein in meristematic cells of onion adventitious roots was examined. Comparison of the results revealed their similarity to data on animals and bacteria. It was found that inhibition of DNA synthesis is high and seems to precede the inhibition of protein synthesis (which is very low). Also, the difference between the lowest active concentration and lethal dose is, similarly as in mammals, slight (...

  17. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  18. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  19. Crusts: biological

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Jayne; Elias, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, a community of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, and fungi, are an essential part of dryland ecosystems. They are critical in the stabilization of soils, protecting them from wind and water erosion. Similarly, these soil surface communities also stabilized soils on early Earth, allowing vascular plants to establish. They contribute nitrogen and carbon to otherwise relatively infertile dryland soils, and have a strong influence on hydrologic cycles. Their presence can also influence vascular plant establishment and nutrition.

  20. Biological programming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Bándi, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Biology offers a tremendous set of concepts that are potentially very powerfully usable for the software engineer, but they have been barely exploited hitherto. In this position paper we propose a fresh attempt to create the building blocks of a programming technology that could be as successful as life. A key guiding principle is to develop and make use of unambiguous definitions of the essential features of life.

  1. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  2. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  3. Artful interfaces within biological materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W.C. Dunlop

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological materials have a wide range of mechanical properties matching their biological function. This is achieved via complex structural hierarchies, spanning many length scales, arising from the assembly of different sized building blocks during growth. The interfaces between these building blocks can increase resistance to fracture, join materials of different character, make them deform more easily and provide motility. While they represent only a tiny fraction of the overall volume, interfaces are essential for the integrity and function of the overall tissue. Understanding their construction principles, often based on specialized molecular assemblies, may change our current thinking about composite materials.

  4. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  5. Volume Regulation in Epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    We review studies on regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and regulatory volume increase (RVI) of major ion and water transporting vertebrate epithelia. The rate of RVD and RVI is faster in cells of high osmotic permeability like amphibian gallbladder and mammalian proximal tubule as compared...... to amphibian skin and mammalian cortical collecting tubule of low and intermediate osmotic permeability. Crosstalk between entrance and exit mechanisms interferes with volume regulation both at aniso-osmotic and iso-osmotic volume perturbations. It has been proposed that cell volume regulation is an intrinsic...

  6. A Novel Chordoma Xenograft Allows In Vivo Drug Testing and Reveals the Importance of NF-κB Signaling in Chordoma Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Matteo M.; Awad, Ola; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Goldstein, Seth D.; Huang, Ruili; Walker, Robert L.; Shah, Preeti; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Gul, Naheed; Zhu, Yuelin J.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Paz-Priel, Ido; Meltzer, Paul S.; Austin, Christopher P.; Xia, Menghang; Loeb, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy that arises in the skull base, spine and sacrum and originates from remnants of the notochord. These tumors are typically resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and to date there are no FDA-approved agents to treat chordoma. The lack of in vivo models of chordoma has impeded the development of new therapies for this tumor. Primary tumor from a sacral chordoma was xenografted into NOD/SCID/IL-2R γ-null mice. The xenograft is serially transplantable and was characterized by both gene expression analysis and whole genome SNP genotyping. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center performed high-throughput screening of 2,816 compounds using two established chordoma cell lines, U-CH1 and U-CH2B. The screen yielded several compounds that showed activity and two, sunitinib and bortezomib, were tested in the xenograft. Both agents slowed the growth of the xenograft tumor. Sensitivity to an inhibitor of IκB, as well as inhibition of an NF-κB gene expression signature demonstrated the importance of NF-κB signaling for chordoma growth. This serially transplantable chordoma xenograft is thus a practical model to study chordomas and perform in vivo preclinical drug testing. PMID:24223206

  7. A novel chordoma xenograft allows in vivo drug testing and reveals the importance of NF-κB signaling in chordoma biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo M Trucco

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy that arises in the skull base, spine and sacrum and originates from remnants of the notochord. These tumors are typically resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and to date there are no FDA-approved agents to treat chordoma. The lack of in vivo models of chordoma has impeded the development of new therapies for this tumor. Primary tumor from a sacral chordoma was xenografted into NOD/SCID/IL-2R γ-null mice. The xenograft is serially transplantable and was characterized by both gene expression analysis and whole genome SNP genotyping. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center performed high-throughput screening of 2,816 compounds using two established chordoma cell lines, U-CH1 and U-CH2B. The screen yielded several compounds that showed activity and two, sunitinib and bortezomib, were tested in the xenograft. Both agents slowed the growth of the xenograft tumor. Sensitivity to an inhibitor of IκB, as well as inhibition of an NF-κB gene expression signature demonstrated the importance of NF-κB signaling for chordoma growth. This serially transplantable chordoma xenograft is thus a practical model to study chordomas and perform in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  8. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector R. Wong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168 and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299 were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374 and test (n = 93 sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75. Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87 and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97 for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression.

  9. Smgcd: metrics for biological sequence data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the realm of bioinformatics, the key challenges are to manage, store and retrieve the biological data efficiently. It can be classified in to structured, unstructured and semi-structured contents. Typically, the semi-structured biological data comprised of biological sequences. The complex biological sequences produce huge volume of biological data which further produce much more problems for its management, storage and retrieval. This paper proposed metrics; namely, symmetry measure, molecular weight measure, similarity or diversity measure, size base measure, size gap measure, complexity measure and size complexity diversity measure to manage the raised problems in biological data sequences. These metrics measure the sequence complexity, molecular weights, length with gaps and without gaps, its symmetry and similarity through mathematical formulations. The metrics are demonstrated and validated using the proposed hybrid technique which combines empirical evidence with theoretical formulation. This research opens new horizons for efficient management to measure the functionality and quality of metadata for single and multiple biological sequences. (author)

  10. Herbicides synthesis and biological tests to determine its activity on the weeds; Sintesis de herbicidas y pruebas biologicas para determinar su actividad sobre la maleza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero M, Artemisa [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); James M, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Miramontes F, Benjamin [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Haro C, Jorge [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1995-02-01

    Four derivatives of Dicamba (2-methoxy-3, 6-dichlorobenzoic acid) were obtained: 2-methoxy-3, 6-dichlorobenzyl alcohol, 2-methoxy-3, 6-dichlorobenzaldehyde, 2-methoxy-3, 6-dichlorobenzaldoxime, tested on weed, and 2-methoxy-3, 6-dichlorobenzylamine. The weeds were Taraxacum officinale Weber, Amaranthus silvester and Sonchus oleraceus L. The oxime did not show activity on Amaranthus silvester, all the substances were active on the other two weeds. [Spanish] Se sintetizaron cuatro derivados del herbicida Dicamba (acido 2-metoxi-3, 6-diclorobenzoico), y se hicieron pruebas de la actividad de tres de ellos sobre maleza de Xochimilco. Se probaron el alcohol 2-metoxi-3, 6-diclorobencilico, 2-metoxi-3, 6-diclorobenzaldehido, 2-metoxi-3, 6-diclorobenzaldoxima. La maleza fue Taraxacum officinale Weber (Diente de leon), Amaranthus silvester (Amaranto silvestre) y Sonchus oleraceus L. (Sonchus). En amaranto, la oxima fue el unico que no presento actividad. En diente de leon y Sonchus, todas las sustancias probadas presentaron actividad.

  11. Biological wastewater treatment in brewhouses

    OpenAIRE

    Voronov Yuriy Viktorovich; Bertsun Svetlana Petrovna

    2014-01-01

    In the article the working principles of wastewater biological treatment for food companies is reviewed, including dairies and breweries, the waters of which are highly concentrated with dissolved organic contaminants and suspended solids. An example of successful implementation is anaerobic-aerobic treatment plants. Implementation of these treatment plants can achieve the required wastewater treatment at the lowest operational expenses and low volumes of secondary waste generated. Waste wate...

  12. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  13. Accuracy of self-report, biological tests, collateral reports and clinician ratings in identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Van Dorn, Richard A; Sellers, Brian G; Young, M Scott; Swartz, Marvin S

    2013-09-01

    Identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia presents unique challenges but is critical to research and practice. This study examined: (a) the accuracy of assessments completed using various approaches in identifying substance use disorders, (b) their ability to discriminate between disorders of abuse and dependence, and (c) the benefits of using multiple indicators to identify substance use disorders. Data are from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study. The sample comprised 1,460 community-based adults with schizophrenia, 15.8% (n = 230) of whom were positive for a current (past month) drug or alcohol use disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). Clinician ratings, self-report, collateral reports, and results of hair and urine tests were compared to SCID diagnoses. Congruence with SCID diagnoses was good across approaches and evidence for superiority of one approach over another was limited. No approach discriminated between abuse and dependence. There was limited benefit of using multiple indicators. Findings suggest that the decision regarding the "best" approach for identifying substance use disorders among adults with schizophrenia may be made through consideration of practical issues and assessment purpose, rather than selection of the approach that yields the most accurate diagnostic assessment.

  14. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Test Your Asthma Knowledge Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... Asthma: A Chance to Heal / Test Your Asthma Knowledge Fall 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 4 Page ...

  15. Simulating Pressure Effects of High-Flow Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic test stresses realized without high-volume pumps. Assembled in Sections in gas-flow passage, contoured mandrel restricts flow rate to valve convenient for testing and spatially varies pressure on passage walls to simulate operating-pressure profile. Realistic test pressures thereby achieved without extremely high flow volumes.

  16. Preliminary study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 1. [Development and testing of experimental protocols and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The major objective of this preliminary study is to develop and thoroughly test the experimental protocols and apparatus, which are planned for a major study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. The behavior of baboons will be observed before, during, and after exposure to 60 Hz electric fields at a maximum intensity of 60 kV/m. Both individual performance (operant conditioning) and social behavior will be examined. The preliminary study will differ from the planned major study as follows: subjects will be used as their own controls; a smaller number of subjects will be run; field intensity will not be varied; the electric field should be non-uniform; the preliminary study exposure facility will be basically an outdoor facility; to avoid deterioration of plastic materials, the high intensity fields will not be turned on during or just after rainfall; and in the preliminary study the biological work will be restricted to the clinical determination of the health of subjects before and after exposure. The present report is the first of three quarterly technical progress reports. It covers approximately the first two and one-half months of activity and, therefore, consists primarily of plans. The report addresses four major areas: the high intensity field exposure facility; the field measurement instrumentation; the operation conditioning equipment; and experimental methods including experimental design and data analysis.

  17. Spectrum '86: Proceedings: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, Volume 1 of two, contains 100 papers on various aspects of Radioactive Waste Management. Session topics include: nuclear success stories; low-level waste-grout; filtration and ion exchange, qualification, and pretreatment; solid waste treatment/endash/special grouts, and incineration; equipment design/endash/remote technology, and special equipment; high-level waste/endash/international vitrification projects, plans and system testing, product performance, meltor and product testing, off-gas behavior and processing. Individual reports were processed separately for the data bases

  18. Reference gene selection for quantitative gene expression studies during biological invasions: A test on multiple genes and tissues in a model ascidian Ciona savignyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuena; Gao, Yangchun; Jiang, Bei; Zhou, Zunchun; Zhan, Aibin

    2016-01-15

    As invasive species have successfully colonized a wide range of dramatically different local environments, they offer a good opportunity to study interactions between species and rapidly changing environments. Gene expression represents one of the primary and crucial mechanisms for rapid adaptation to local environments. Here, we aim to select reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis based on quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) for a model invasive ascidian, Ciona savignyi. We analyzed the stability of ten candidate reference genes in three tissues (siphon, pharynx and intestine) under two key environmental stresses (temperature and salinity) in the marine realm based on three programs (geNorm, NormFinder and delta Ct method). Our results demonstrated only minor difference for stability rankings among the three methods. The use of different single reference gene might influence the data interpretation, while multiple reference genes could minimize possible errors. Therefore, reference gene combinations were recommended for different tissues - the optimal reference gene combination for siphon was RPS15 and RPL17 under temperature stress, and RPL17, UBQ and TubA under salinity treatment; for pharynx, TubB, TubA and RPL17 were the most stable genes under temperature stress, while TubB, TubA and UBQ were the best under salinity stress; for intestine, UBQ, RPS15 and RPL17 were the most reliable reference genes under both treatments. Our results suggest that the necessity of selection and test of reference genes for different tissues under varying environmental stresses. The results obtained here are expected to reveal mechanisms of gene expression-mediated invasion success using C. savignyi as a model species.

  19. Predicting the effect of ionising radiation on biological populations: testing of a non-linear Leslie model applied to a small mammal population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the application of a non-linear Leslie model for predicting the effects of ionising radiation on wild populations. The model assumes that, for protracted chronic irradiation, the effect-dose relationship is linear. In particular, the effects of radiation are modelled by relating the increase in the mortality rates of the individuals to the dose rates through a proportionality factor C. The model was tested using independent data and information from a series of experiments that were aimed at assessing the response to radiation of wild populations of meadow voles and whose results were described in the international literature. The comparison of the model results with the data selected from the above mentioned experiments showed that the model overestimated the detrimental effects of radiation on the size of irradiated populations when the values of C were within the range derived from the median lethal dose (L50) for small mammals. The described non-linear model suggests that the non-expressed biotic potential of the species whose growth is limited by processes of environmental resistance, such as the competition among the individuals of the same or of different species for the exploitation of the available resources, can be a factor that determines a more effective response of population to the radiation effects. -- Highlights: • A model to assess the radiation effects on wild population is described. • The model is based on non-linear Leslie matrix. • The model is applied to small mammals living in an irradiated meadow. • Model output is conservative if effect-dose factor estimated from L50 is used. • Systemic response to stress of populations in competitive conditions may be more effective

  20. Biological imaging in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L.; Wiedenmann, N.; Molls, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to discuss the value of integrating biological imaging (PET, SPECT, MRS etc.) in radiation treatment planning and monitoring. Studies in patients with brain tumors have shown that, compared to CT and MRI alone, the image fusion of CT/MRI and amino acid SPECT or PET allows a more correct delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV). For FDG-PET, comparable results with different techniques are reported in the literature also for bronchial carcinoma, ear-nose-and-throat tumors, and cervical carcinoma, or, in the case of MRS, for prostate cancer. Imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, and gene expression leads to the identification of differently aggressive areas of a biologically inhomogeneous tumor mass that can be individually and more appropriately targeted using innovative IMRT. Thus, a biological, inhomogeneous dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. In addition, the biological imaging can play a significant role in the evaluation of the therapy response after radiochemotherapy. Clinical studies in ear-nose-and-throat tumors, bronchial carcinoma, esophagus carcinoma, and cervical carcinoma suggest that the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the therapy response are higher compared to anatomical imaging (CT and MRI). Clinical and experimental studies are required to define the real impact of these investigations in radiation treatment planning, and especially in the evaluation of therapy response. (orig.)