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Sample records for biological structure determination

  1. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed

  2. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.C. [CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  3. Quantification of the impact of PSI:Biology according to the annotations of the determined structures

    OpenAIRE

    DePietro, Paul J; Julfayev, Elchin S.; McLaughlin, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein Structure Initiative:Biology (PSI:Biology) is the third phase of PSI where protein structures are determined in high-throughput to characterize their biological functions. The transition to the third phase entailed the formation of PSI:Biology Partnerships which are composed of structural genomics centers and biomedical science laboratories. We present a method to examine the impact of protein structures determined under the auspices of PSI:Biology by measuring their rates ...

  4. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  5. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  6. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  7. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  8. Biological activity determination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Madronová, L.; Novák, J.; Kubíček, J.; Antošová, B.; Kozler, J.; Novák, František

    New York: Nova Science Publisher, 2011 - (Madronová, L.), s. 85-103. (Chemistry Research and Applications). ISBN 978-1-61668-965-0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : biological activity * determination * potassium humate samples Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  9. Neutron structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron structural biology will be one of the most important fields in the life sciences which will interest human beings in the 21st century because neutrons can provide not only the position of hydrogen atoms in biological macromolecules but also the dynamic molecular motion of hydrogen atoms and water molecules. However, there are only a few examples experimentally determined at present because of the lack of neutron source intensity. Next generation neutron source scheduled in JAERI (Performance of which is 100 times better than that of JRR-3M) opens the life science of the 21st century. (author)

  10. A simulation method for determining the optical response of highly complex photonic structures of biological origin

    CERN Document Server

    Dolinko, Andrés E

    2013-01-01

    We present a method based on a time domain simulation of wave propagation that allows studying the optical response of a broad range of dielectric photonic structures. This method is particularly suitable for dealing with complex biological structures. One of the main features of the proposed approach is the simple and intuitive way of defining the setup and the photonic structure to be simulated, which can be done by feeding the simulation with a digital image of the structure. We also develop a set of techniques to process the behavior of the evolving waves within the simulation. These techniques include a direction filter, that permits decoupling of waves travelling simultaneously in different directions, a dynamic differential absorber, to cancel the waves reflected at the edges of the simulation space, a multi-frequency excitation scheme based on a filter that allows decoupling waves of different wavelengths travelling simultaneously, and a near-to-far-field approach to evaluate the resulting wavefield o...

  11. Determining biological fine structure by differential absorption of soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of soft x-ray contact microscopy in examining histochemically treated human tissue embedded in plastic and exposed as unstained thin sections is demonstrated. When our preliminary data revealed that we could clearly image not only the histochemical reaction product, but the unstained biological fine structure of the surrounding tissues, we decided to test our hypothesis further and see if we could image unstained biological molecular aggregates as well. For this part of the investigation, we chose to examine hydrated proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycans are an essential component of the organic matrix of cartilage, and play a primary role in the retention and maintenance of extracellular water. To avoid any artifacts due to the introduction of exogeneous materials, and examine the proteoglycan aggregates in their hydrated, natural configuration, we made contact x-ray images of isolated proteoglycan aggregates in water

  12. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  13. Structure and function in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the history of the developments of structural chemistry in biology beginning with the work of the bacteriologist Ehrlich leading to a comprehensive examination of the influence of size and configuration on the interaction between specific antibodies and side-chain determinants. Recent developments include the recognition of a higher order of specificity in the interaction of proteins with one another

  14. Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

  15. [Classification of organisms and structuralism in biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, L I

    2001-01-01

    Structuralism in biology is the oldest trend oriented to the search for natural "laws of forms" comparable with laws of growth of crystal, was revived at the end of 20th century on the basis of structuralist thought in socio-humanitarian sciences. The development of principal ideas of the linguistic structuralism in some aspects is similar to that of biological systematics, especially concerning the relationships between "system" and "evolution". However, apart from this general similarity, biological structuralism is strongly focused on familiar problems of the origin of diversity in nature. In their striving for the renovation of existing views, biological structuralists oppose the neo-darwinism emphasizing the existence of "law of forms", that are independent on heredity and genetic "determinism". The trend to develop so-called "rational taxonomy" is also characteristic of biological structuralism but this attempt failed being connected neither with Darwin's historicism nor with Plato's typology. PMID:11605547

  16. Structural Biology Guides Antibiotic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Modern drug discovery programs require the contribution of researchers in a number of specialist areas. One of these areas is structural biology. Using X-ray crystallography, the molecular basis of how a drug binds to its biological target and exerts its mode of action can be defined. For example, a drug that binds into the active site of an…

  17. Inference problems in structural biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Simon

    The structure and dynamics of biological molecules are essential for their function. Consequently, a wealth of experimental techniques have been developed to study these features. However, while experiments yield detailed information about geometrical features of molecules, this information is of...

  18. Neutron structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in protein which play important roles in physiological functions. However, there are relatively few examples of neutron crystallography in biology since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections due to the low flux of neutrons illuminating the sample. In order to overcome the flux problem, we have successfully developed the neutron IP, where the neutron converter, {sup 6}Li or Gd, was mixed with a photostimulated luminescence material on flexible plastic support. Neutron Laue diffraction 2A data from tetragonal lysozyme were collected for 10 days with neutron imaging plates, and 960 hydrogen atoms in the molecule and 157 bound water molecules were identified. These results explain the proposed hydrolysis mechanism of the sugar by the lysozyme molecule and that lysozyme is less active at pH7.0. (author)

  19. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  20. Track structure in biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation. PMID:11537218

  1. Life, career, and structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a Chinese born and raised in central China, I came to the United States for graduate education in 1990. Eighteen years later, I resigned my tenured faculty position at Princeton University and returned to my alma mater Tsinghua University. In this review, I share my experiences and reflections as a graduate student, a postdoctoral fellow, and an independent scientist in both Princeton and Beijing. Much focus is given to my research effort in the field of programmed cell death (also known as apoptosis). Systematic structural biology, which combines x-ray crystallography with other biochemical and biophysical methods, has led to comprehensive understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation, execution, and regulation of apoptosis. (invited comment)

  2. Ice breaking in GPCR structural biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHAO; Bei-li WU

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most challenging targets in structural biology.To successfully solve a high-resolution GPCR structure,several experimental obstacles must be overcome,including expression,extraction,purification,and crystallization.As a result,there are only a handful of unique structures reported from this protein superfamily,which consists of over 800 members.In the past few years,however,there has been an increase in the amount of solved GPCR structures,and a few high-impact structures have been determined:the peptide receptor CXCR4,the agonist bound receptors,and the GPCR-G protein complex.The dramatic progress in GPCR structural studies is not due to the development of any single technique,buta combination of new techniques,new tools and new concepts.Here,we summarize the progress made for GPCR expression,purification,and crystalliza-tion,and we highlight the technical advances that will facilitate the future determination of GPCR structures.

  3. The use of anomalous scattering of uranium for the determination of biological macromolecules structures - From hard to soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to solve biological macromolecules structures, structure factor phases must be derived from the intensities diffracted by the crystal. The SAD and the MAD methods make use of variations in scattering factors measured at specific absorption edges of heavy atoms, bound to the protein. The phasing power depends on the occupancy of the binding sites and on the variations of the scattering factors at the absorption edge that is used. With uranyl, numerous sites with low occupancies are usually obtained. We used new colored uranyl complexes, which give higher occupancies, to solve de novo the lysozyme structure and an unknown structure. We have developed the use of the My absorption edge of uranium (λ = 3,5 Angstroms), where a variation of 120 electrons is observed in the scattering factors. With a helium atmosphere to limit the X-rays absorption, we have collected three data sets, on a single image. Data were processed both with 'classical' and specific programs. (author)

  4. Determining biological fine structure by differential absorption of soft x-rays. [Ultrastructural studies of nerve fibers using scanning electron microscopy without need for staining or osmication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Warren, John B.

    1979-06-01

    The use of soft x-ray contact microscopy in examining histochemically treated human tissue embedded in plastic and exposed as unstained thin sections is demonstrated. When our preliminary data revealed that we could clearly image not only the histochemical reaction product, but the unstained biological fine structure of the surrounding tissues, we decided to test our hypothesis further and see if we could image unstained biological molecular aggregates as well. For this part of the investigation, we chose to examine hydrated proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycans are an essential component of the organic matrix of cartilage, and play a primary role in the retention and maintenance of extracellular water. To avoid any artifacts due to the introduction of exogeneous materials, and examine the proteoglycan aggregates in their hydrated, natural configuration, we made contact x-ray images of isolated proteoglycan aggregates in water.

  5. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  6. Structural biology at York Structural Biology Laboratory; laboratory information management systems for structural genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 3. ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of Structural Biologists /4./. 10.03.2005-12.03.2005, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05008 Keywords : structural biology * LIMS * structural genomics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  7. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  8. Structural Systems Biology Evaluation of Metabolic Thermotolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Roger L.; Andrews, Kathleen; Kim, Donghyuk;

    2013-01-01

    Improve the System A "systems biology" approach may clarify, for example, how particular proteins determine sensitivity of bacteria to extremes of temperature. Chang et al. (p. 1220) integrated information on protein structure with a model of metabolism, thus associating the protein structure of ...

  9. Structural Biology for A-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and function of proteins is an important area in biochemistry. Pupils studying A-level Biology are introduced to the four levels of protein structure (primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary) and how these can be used to describe the progressive folding of a chain of amino acid residues to a final,…

  10. Visualizing ensembles in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Ryan L; Salsbury, Freddie R

    2016-06-01

    Displaying a single representative conformation of a biopolymer rather than an ensemble of states mistakenly conveys a static nature rather than the actual dynamic personality of biopolymers. However, there are few apparent options due to the fixed nature of print media. Here we suggest a standardized methodology for visually indicating the distribution width, standard deviation and uncertainty of ensembles of states with little loss of the visual simplicity of displaying a single representative conformation. Of particular note is that the visualization method employed clearly distinguishes between isotropic and anisotropic motion of polymer subunits. We also apply this method to ligand binding, suggesting a way to indicate the expected error in many high throughput docking programs when visualizing the structural spread of the output. We provide several examples in the context of nucleic acids and proteins with particular insights gained via this method. Such examples include investigating a therapeutic polymer of FdUMP (5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine-5-O-monophosphate) - a topoisomerase-1 (Top1), apoptosis-inducing poison - and nucleotide-binding proteins responsible for ATP hydrolysis from Bacillus subtilis. We also discuss how these methods can be extended to any macromolecular data set with an underlying distribution, including experimental data such as NMR structures. PMID:27179343

  11. [Our investigation on the chemistry of biologically active natural products. With the object of exploitation for structure determination methods, and elucidation of vital function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, T

    1993-03-01

    Our investigation on the chemistry of biologically active natural products during the last 40 years since 1953 are reviewed in this paper. The following subjects are discussed: I. photochemical relationship between rhodopsin and compounds related to areca alkaloid, II. furanoid diterpenoid constituents from dioscoreaceae plants and colombo root, III. field desorption and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of biologically active natural glycosides and glycosphingolipids, IV. investigation of biologically active marine natural products, 1) constituents of steroid glycoside sulfates from Asteroidea, 2) spine toxins from Acanthaster planci, 3) constituents of triterpenoid glycoside sulfates from Holothuroidea, 4) constituents of isoprenoids from Opisthobranchia and Octocorallia, 5) constituents of glycosphingolipids from Asteroidea. PMID:8509990

  12. Structured population models in biology and epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Shigui

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of six chapters written by leading researchers in mathematical biology. These chapters present recent and important developments in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. Topics include population models structured by age, size, and spatial position; size-structured models for metapopulations, macroparasitc diseases, and prion proliferation; models for transmission of microparasites between host populations living on non-coincident spatial domains; spatiotemporal patterns of disease spread; method of aggregation of variables in population dynamics; and biofilm models. It is suitable as a textbook for a mathematical biology course or a summer school at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. It can also serve as a reference book for researchers looking for either interesting and specific problems to work on or useful techniques and discussions of some particular problems.

  13. Structure and Associated Biological Functions of Viroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Gerhard; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mature viroids consist of a noncoding, covalently closed circular RNA that is able to autonomously infect respective host plants. Thus, they must utilize proteins of the host for most biological functions such as replication, processing, transport, and pathogenesis. Therefore, viroids can be regarded as minimal parasites of the host machinery. They have to present to the host machinery the appropriate signals based on either their sequence or their structure. Here, we summarize such sequence and structural features critical for the biological functions of viroids. PMID:26997592

  14. Eddy Current Probe for Biological Structures Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new eddy current probe for conductivity measurement of biological structures was presented. The probe operation principle is based on the differential pick-up. After theoretical analysis results of experiments have been presented. For experiments fruits and meat, have been used. (author)

  15. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  16. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  17. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin A. Stonik; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Vladimir I. Kalinin; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  18. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  19. Determination of radioactivity in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two major counting techniques in use in most laboratories today are those utilizing liquid or crystal scintillation counters. A discussion of liquid scintillation counting is inextricably linked with the problems of sample preparation and both are emphasized in this chapter. Radiochromatography and autoradiography are also discussed. Chromatography is one of the most important techniques for the separation of chemical compounds from biological material. Most of the detection mechanisms applicable to radiochromatography use x-ray film, a β-particle detector, or a luminescence detector. In biological autoradiography, labeled substances in the organism, tissue, or cell, are made visible by preparing thin sections and exposing them to a suitable photographic film. Light and electron microscope autoradiography were also discussed. 12 figures, 6 tables

  20. DNA in a Tunnel: A Comfy Spot for Recognition - or -The Structure of BsoBI Complexed with DNA. What can we Learn about Function via Structure Determination and how can this be Applied to Bone or Muscle Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The structure and function of a biologically active molecule are related. To understand its function, it is necessary (but not always sufficient) to know the structure of the molecule. There are many ways of relating the molecular function with the structure. Mutation analysis can identify pertinent amino acids of an enzyme, or alternatively structure comparison of the of two similar molecules with different function may lead to understanding which parts are responsible for a functional aspect, or a series of "structural cartoons" - enzyme structure, enzyme plus substrate, enzyme with transition state analog, and enzyme with product - may give insight in the function of a molecule. As an example we will discuss the structure and function of the restriction enzyme BsoBI from Bacillus stearothemzophilus in complex with its cognate DNA. The enzyme forms a unique complex with DNA in that it completely encircles the DNA. The structure reveals the enzyme-DNA contacts, how the DNA is distorted compared with the canonical forms, and elegantly shows how two distinct DNA sequences can be recognized with the same efficiency. Based on the structure we may also propose a hypothesis how the enzymatic mechanism works. The knowledge gained thru studies such as this one can be used to alter the function by changing the molecular structure. Usually this is done by design of inhibitors specifically active against and fitting into an active site of the enzyme of choice. In the case of BsoBI one of the objectives of the study was to alter the enzyme specificity. In bone biology there are many candidates available for molecular study in order to explain, alter, or (temporarily) suspend activity. For example, the understanding of a pathway that negatively regulates bone formation may be a good target for drug design to stimulate bone formation and have good potential as the basis for new countermeasures against bone loss. In principle the same approach may aid muscle atrophy, radiation

  1. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deyasi Krishanu; Upadhyay Shashankaditya; Banerjee Anirban

    2016-03-01

    Networks are widely used to represent interaction pattern among the components in complex systems. Structures of real networks from different domains may vary quite significantly. As there is an interplay between network architecture and dynamics, structure plays an important role in communication and spreading of information in a network. Here we investigate the underlying undirected topology of different biological networks which support faster spreading of information and are better in communication. We analyse the good expansion property by using the spectral gap and communicability between nodes. Different epidemic models are also used to study the transmission of information in terms of spreading of disease through individuals (nodes)in those networks. Moreover, we explore the structural conformation and properties which may be responsible for better communication. Among all biological networks studied here, the undirected structure of neuronal networks not only possesses the small-world property but the same is also expressed remarkably to a higher degree compared to any randomly generated network which possesses the same degree sequence. A relatively high percentage of nodes, in neuronal networks, form a higher core in their structure. Our study shows that the underlying undirected topology in neuronal networks, in a significant way, is qualitatively different from the same in other biologicalnetworks and that they may have evolved in such a way that they inherit a (undirected) structure which is excellent and robust in communication.

  2. Landscape Structure and Biological Control in Agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Thies, Carsten; Tscharntke, Teja

    1999-01-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habit...

  3. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  4. Landscape structure and biological control in agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies; Tscharntke

    1999-08-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habitats had an even greater effect. In structurally complex landscapes, parasitism was higher and crop damage was lower than in simple landscapes with a high percentage of agricultural use. PMID:10436158

  5. Developmental biology of sex determination : establishing a basis for systems approach

    OpenAIRE

    Segerståhl, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    The existence of males and females is a fundamental aspect of animal biology but the developmental mechanisms of sex determination and sexual differentiation exhibit surprising evolutionary diversity. Depending on the species, sex determination mechanisms range from genetic sex chromosome effects to environmental temperature effects and even to social cues that derive from local population structure. Many genes and molecules that play a role in sex determination biology have been identified, ...

  6. Capacitive Structures for Gas and Biological Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The semiconductor industry was benefited by the advances in technology in the last decades. This fact has an impact on the sensors field, where the simple transducer was evolved into smart miniaturized multi-functional microsystems. However, commercially available gas and biological sensors are mostly bulky, expensive, and power-hungry, which act as obstacles to mass use. The aim of this work is gas and biological sensing using capacitive structures. Capacitive sensors were selected due to its design simplicity, low fabrication cost, and no DC power consumption. In the first part, the dominant structure among interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), fractal curves (Peano and Hilbert) and Archimedean spiral was investigated from capacitance density perspective. The investigation consists of geometrical formula calculations, COMSOL Multiphysics simulations and cleanroom fabrication of the capacitors on a silicon substrate. Moreover, low-cost fabrication on flexible plastic PET substrate was conducted outside cleanroom with rapid prototyping using a maskless laser etching. The second part contains the humidity, Volatile Organic compounds (VOCs) and Ammonia sensing of polymers, Polyimide and Nafion, and metal-organic framework (MOF), Cu(bdc)2.xH2O using IDEs and tested in an automated gas setup for experiment control and data extraction. The last part includes the biological sensing of C - reactive protein (CRP) quantification, which is considered as a biomarker of being prone to cardiac diseases and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein quantification, which is used as a reference for quantifying unknown proteins.

  7. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, Victor; Genin, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Attachment of dissimilar materials in engineering and surgical practice is a perennial challenge. Bimaterial attachment sites are common locations for injury, repeated injury, and mechanical failure. Nature presents several highly effective solutions to the challenge of bimaterial attachment that differ from those found in engineering practice. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology describes the attachment of dissimilar materials from multiple perspectives. The text will simultaneously elucidate natural bimaterial attachments and outline engineering principles underlying successful attachments to the communities of tissue engineers and surgeons. Included an in-depth analysis of the biology of attachments in the body and mechanisms by which robust attachments are formed, a review of current concepts of attaching dissimilar materials in surgical practice and a discussion of bioengineering approaches that are currently being developed. This book also: Provides the first comprehensive treatment of phys...

  8. Membrane protein structure determination in membrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-09-17

    The two principal components of biological membranes, the lipid bilayer and the proteins integrated within it, have coevolved for specific functions that mediate the interactions of cells with their environment. Molecular structures can provide very significant insights about protein function. In the case of membrane proteins, the physical and chemical properties of lipids and proteins are highly interdependent; therefore structure determination should include the membrane environment. Considering the membrane alongside the protein eliminates the possibility that crystal contacts or detergent molecules could distort protein structure, dynamics, and function and enables ligand binding studies to be performed in a natural setting. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is compatible with three-dimensional structure determination of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayer membranes under physiological conditions and has played an important role in elucidating the physical and chemical properties of biological membranes, providing key information about the structure and dynamics of the phospholipid components. Recently, developments in the recombinant expression of membrane proteins, sample preparation, pulse sequences for high-resolution spectroscopy, radio frequency probes, high-field magnets, and computational methods have enabled a number of membrane protein structures to be determined in lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we illustrate solid-state NMR methods with examples from two bacterial outer membrane proteins (OmpX and Ail) that form integral membrane β-barrels. The ability to measure orientation-dependent frequencies in the solid-state NMR spectra of membrane-embedded proteins provides the foundation for a powerful approach to structure determination based primarily on orientation restraints. Orientation restraints are particularly useful for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins because they provide information about both three-dimensional structure

  9. Biological Determinism and the Ideological Roots of Student Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Steven

    1983-01-01

    Reviews works of several eugenists and student classifiers, focusing upon how earlier notions of differential biological worth were refined and reintroduced as bases for educational policy. Proposes that contemporary educators' emphasis upon student classification ignores historical relationships between biological determinism, student…

  10. The structural biology of phenazine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Parsons, James F

    2014-12-01

    The phenazines are a class of over 150 nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds of bacterial and archeal origin. Their redox properties not only explain their activity as broad-specificity antibiotics and virulence factors but also enable them to function as respiratory pigments, thus extending their importance to the primary metabolism of phenazine-producing species. Despite their discovery in the mid-19th century, the molecular mechanisms behind their biosynthesis have only been unraveled in the last decade. Here, we review the contribution of structural biology that has led to our current understanding of phenazine biosynthesis. PMID:25215885

  11. Chelation, spectroscopic characterization, biological activity and crystal structure of 2,3-butanedione isonicotinylhydrazone: Determination of Zr4+ after flotation separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fulaij, O. A.; Jeragh, B.; El-Sayed, A. E. M.; El-Defrawy, M. M.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    New metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pd(II) and Hg(II) with 2,3-butanedione isonicotinylhydrazone [BINH] have been prepared and investigated. Single crystal for BINH is grown and solved as orthorhombic with P 21 21 2 space group. The formula of the ligand was assigned based on the elemental analysis, mass spectra and conductivity measurements. The complexes assigned the formulae [M(BINH-H)Cl]ṡnH2O (Mdbnd Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II); n = 0 or 1); [Hg(BINH-H)(H2O)2Cl]; [Cd(BINH)Cl2]ṡ2H2O and [Pd(BINH)Cl2]ṡH2O. All complexes are nonelectrolytes. BINH acts as a tridentate ligand in [M(BINH-H)Cl]ṡnH2O and [Hg(BINH-H)(H2O)2Cl] coordinating through Cdbnd Oketonic, Csbnd Oamedic and Cdbnd Nhy and as a neutral bidentate through Cdbnd Oketonic and Cdbnd Nhy in [Cd(BINH)Cl2]ṡ2H2O and [Pd(BINH)Cl2]ṡH2O; the pyridine nitrogen has no rule in coordination. The data are supported by NMR (1H and 13C) spectra. The magnetic moments and electronic spectra provide a tetrahedral structure for the Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes; square-planar for the Pd(II) complex and octahedral for the Hg(II) complex. The TGA of the complexes depicted the outer and inner water molecules as well as the final residue. The cobalt and cadmium complexes ended with the metal while the Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pd(II) complexes ended with complex species. [Hg(BINH-H)(H2O)2Cl] has no residue. The ligand is inactive against all tested organisms except for Bacillus thuringiensis. The Hg(II) complex is found more active than the other complexes. The flotation technique is found applicable for the separation of micro amount (10 ppm) of Zr4+ using 10 ppm of BINH and 1 × 10-5 mol L-1 of oleic acid at pH 6 with efficiency of 98% with no interferences.

  12. Determination of Uranium Oxides Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of uranium oxides structure have been worked using XRD (X-Ray Diffractometer). Where the diffraction patterns were analyzed by Rietan method. The samples that analysis were UO2,07; UO2,06; UO2,15; UO2,27 and U3O8 compound. Rietan refinement of the diffraction patterns showed cubic structures for UO2,07 and UO2,06, with a = 5,4663 A and 5,4638 A, respectively. UO2,15 compound was found to be a mixture of cubic, a = 5,4637 A and tetragonal structures, a = 5,454 A and c = 5,409 A. The structures of UO2,27 and U3O8 were found to be tetragonal and orthorhombic, respectively with a 5,4717 A and c = 5,407 A for the tetragonal structure, while a 6,7147 A, b = 11, 9506 A and c = 4,1448 A for the orthorhombic one. It was concluded from this investigation that large amounts of x oxygen atoms in UO2+x, transforms the cubic structure gradually to tetragonal and finely to orthorhombic structure. Sample of PPNY's UO2 had cubic structure, so that the structure specification as which expected. (author)

  13. 2010 Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ana Gonzalez

    2011-03-10

    Advances in basic methodologies have played a major role in the dramatic progress in macromolecular crystallography over the past decade, both in terms of overall productivity and in the increasing complexity of the systems being successfully tackled. The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology will, as in the past, focus on the most recent developments in methodology, covering all aspects of the process from crystallization to model building and refinement, complemented by examples of structural highlights and complementary methods. Extensive discussion will be encouraged and it is hoped that all attendees will participate by giving oral or poster presentations, the latter using the excellent poster display area available at Bates College. The relatively small size and informal atmosphere of the meeting provides an excellent opportunity for all participants, especially younger scientists, to meet and exchange ideas with leading methods developers.

  14. Ultrasonic determination of steel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the research project 'Determination of steel structures by means of ultrasound' methods are developed for the non-destructive structure characterization with scattered ultrasound. Measurements were made at about 200 steel samples with frequencies between 5 and 20 Mc/sec. In the range of 0,05 <= d/lambda <= 0,5 (d=mean grain size, lambda = wavelength of the ultrasound pulse) known theories can be applied for the quantitative grain size determination and with an accuracy of +-15% the results agree with the metallographically measured values. The best method for this is the combination of two measurements with two different frequencies. Advantages are given by the measurement of the multiple scattering which is leading to the scattering coefficient and to the grain size with one measurement only and without assumptions concerning other parameters of ultrasound propagation. A structure characterization concerning the homogeneity inside the material is possible, too, because of the time (i.e. sound path-)-dependent scattering measurement. It is able to control the structure of monophasic steels with grain sizes between ASTM 1 and ASTM 11. Today problems unsolved are the martensitic steels, the multiphasic structures

  15. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popeneciu, Horea, E-mail: horea.popeneciu@itim-cj.ro; Dumitru, Ristoiu [College of Environmental Science on Engineering Babes Bolyai University, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Tripon, Carmen, E-mail: horea.popeneciu@itim-cj.ro; Borodi, Gheorghe, E-mail: horea.popeneciu@itim-cj.ro; Pop, Mihaela Maria, E-mail: mihaelapop@teracrystal.com

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  16. Computing the structural influence matrix for biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Giulia; Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Franco, Elisa; Blanchini, Franco

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of identifying structural influences of external inputs on steady-state outputs in a biological network model. We speak of a structural influence if, upon a perturbation due to a constant input, the ensuing variation of the steady-state output value has the same sign as the input (positive influence), the opposite sign (negative influence), or is zero (perfect adaptation), for any feasible choice of the model parameters. All these signs and zeros can constitute a structural influence matrix, whose (i, j) entry indicates the sign of steady-state influence of the jth system variable on the ith variable (the output caused by an external persistent input applied to the jth variable). Each entry is structurally determinate if the sign does not depend on the choice of the parameters, but is indeterminate otherwise. In principle, determining the influence matrix requires exhaustive testing of the system steady-state behaviour in the widest range of parameter values. Here we show that, in a broad class of biological networks, the influence matrix can be evaluated with an algorithm that tests the system steady-state behaviour only at a finite number of points. This algorithm also allows us to assess the structural effect of any perturbation, such as variations of relevant parameters. Our method is applied to nontrivial models of biochemical reaction networks and population dynamics drawn from the literature, providing a parameter-free insight into the system dynamics. PMID:26395779

  17. Structure factor determination by electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selection of methods for structure factor determination by electron diffraction is presented. Results obtained by the different methods are compared with regard to accuracies in structure determination

  18. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prydz, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-), from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis. PMID:26308067

  19. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Prydz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycans (PGs are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-, from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis.

  20. Cryo-focused-ion-beam applications in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigort, Alexander; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2015-09-01

    The ability to precisely control the preparation of biological samples for investigations by electron cryo-microscopy is becoming increasingly important for ultrastructural imaging in biology. Precision machining instruments such as the focused ion beam microscope (FIB) were originally developed for applications in materials science. However, today we witness a growing use of these tools in the life sciences mainly due to their versatility, since they can be used both as manipulation and as imaging devices, when complemented with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The advent of cryo-preparation equipment and accessories made it possible to pursue work on frozen-hydrated biological specimens with these two beam (FIB/SEM) instruments. In structural biology, the cryo-FIB can be used to site-specifically thin vitrified specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tomography. Having control over the specimen thickness is a decisive factor for TEM imaging, as the thickness of the object under scrutiny determines the attainable resolution. Besides its use for TEM preparation, the FIB/SEM microscope can be additionally used to obtain three-dimensional volumetric data from biological specimens. The unique combination of an imaging and precision manipulation tool allows sequentially removing material with the ion beam and imaging the milled block faces by scanning with the electron beam, an approach known as FIB/SEM tomography. This review covers both fields of cryo-FIB applications: specimen preparation for TEM cryo-tomography and volume imaging by cryo-FIB/SEM tomography. PMID:25703192

  1. Development of methods for determining aflatoxins in biological material

    OpenAIRE

    Kussak, Anders

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, it is shown how aflatoxins can be determined in biological material. The thesis is a summary of five papers. Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus moulds. Methods were developed for the determination of aflatoxins in samples of airborne dust and human urine collected at feed factories. For the dust samples from such agricultural products as copra, cotton seed and maize, methods were developed for the determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. For u...

  2. Structure and biological functions of fungal cerebrosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto-Bergter Eliana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide monohexosides (CMHs, cerebrosides are glycosphingolipids composed of a hydrophobic ceramide linked to one sugar unit. In fungal cells, CMHs are very conserved molecules consisting of a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic or 2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, and a carbohydrate portion consisting of one residue of glucose or galactose. 9-Methyl 4,8-sphingadienine-containing ceramides are usually glycosylated to form fungal cerebrosides, but the recent description of a ceramide dihexoside (CDH presenting phytosphingosine in Magnaporthe grisea suggests the existence of alternative pathways of ceramide glycosylation in fungal cells. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. In Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, A. fumigatus, and Schizophyllum commune, CMHs are apparently involved in morphological transitions and fungal growth. The elucidation of structural and functional aspects of fungal cerebrosides may therefore contribute to the design of new antifungal agents inhibiting growth and differentiation of pathogenic species.

  3. J D Bernal and the genesis of structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2007-02-01

    I was invited to participate in this Symposium a month or so before the event. At that time however, I knew little about J D Bernal. I vaguely remembered a brief conversation on the topic over a decade ago with Professor Vittorio Luzzati as we ambled around the gardens at the Palace of Varsailles. Vittorio likely knew Bernal through his friend Rosalind Franklin who worked with Bernal at Birbeck College. But beyond that I knew nothing about the man or his science. And so it was most fortunate that Andrew Brown's book J D Bernal: The Sage of Science appeared in 2005 and I was able to call on it. Indeed, much of the material included in this chapter is based on that source and on Dorothy Hodgkin's biographic memoir of J D Bernal, her postgraduate supervisor. Given that this chapter is to be published in a Physics journal I thought it appropriate to provide some background to the theme of my presentation, structural biology. Accordingly, I will begin with an introduction to proteins, one of structural biology's central characters, and to which Bernal devoted much energy and attention. How the molecular structure of a protein determines its activity and function will then be described. Bernal's major contribution in this area was to X-ray crystallography, the primary method by which a protein's structure is determined. The method, and aspects of its development, will be described. I will also make reference to some of Bernal's additional contributions in related fields. Finally, Vincent Casey, the symposium organizer, asked that I comment on how structural biology might impact on society. I will attempt to address that at the close of my presentation.

  4. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-02-20

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  5. Biomolecular Structure Determination with Divide and Concur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit

    2009-03-01

    Divide and concur (D-C) is a general computational approach, designed for the solution of highly frustrated problems. Recently applied to the problems of disk packing, the kissing number problem, and 3-SAT, it was competitive or outperformed special-purpose methods.ootnotetextS. Gravel and V. Elser, Phys. Rev. E 78, 036706 (2008) We present a method for applying the D-C framework to the problem of biomolecular structure determination. From a list of geometric constraints on groups of atoms in the molecule, we construct a deterministic iterative map that efficiently searches for structures simultaneously satisfying all constraints. As our method eschews an energy function and its minimization to focus on geometric constraints, it can very naturally integrate with the geometric constraints due to chemistry and physics, experimental constraints due to NMR data or many other experimental or biological hints. We present some results of our method.

  6. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  7. Structural Biology in the context of EGEE

    CERN Document Server

    García, D; Carazo, J M; Valverde, J R; Moscicki, J; Muraru, A

    2007-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a crucial technique, which allows Structural Biology researchers to characterize macromolecular assemblies in distinct functional states. Image processing in three dimensional EM (3D-EM) is used by a flourishing community (exemplarized by the EU funded 3D-EM NoE) and is characterized by voluminous data and large computing requirements, making this a problem well suited for Grid computing and the EGEE infrastructure. There are various steps in the 3D-EM refinement process that may benefit from Grid computing. To start with, large numbers of experimental images need to be averaged. Nowadays, typically tens of thousands of images are used, while future studies may routinely employ millions of images. Our group has been developing Xmipp, a package for single-particle 3D-EM image processing. Using Xmipp, the classification of 91,000 ribosome projections into 4 classes took more than 2500 CPU hours using the resources of the MareNostrum supercomputer at the Barcelona Supercomputing Centr...

  8. Lipids in the structure and functions of biological membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov V.I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are one of the main components of cellular membranes. Lipids make up 30-55% of the cell content depending on the types of cells. Phospholipids, sphingomyelins, cholesterol, etc. are characteristic to cellular membranes. The composition of lipids of the both sides of the membranes differs. This fact determines asymmetry of the structure of bili-pid layer. The reason for many pathologies is the changes in the properties of cellular membranes with the modification of their components. The study of structure and functioning of cellular biomembranes is essential for many researchers. The condition of membranes, their quality, their quantitative composition and modification under the influence of different factors as well as their interaction with carbohydrate and protein component are of great importance for the functioning of both membranes, cells and the body in general. Analysis and structuring of lipids and their functions in biological membranes are studied.

  9. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  10. Biology of sexuality inborn determinants of human sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, R E

    1983-09-01

    Opinions vary on the relative importance of biological and learning processes in the aetiology of sexual expression and deviance. The structure of personality, consistency of fantasy patterns, and the familial nature of homosexuality hint at a biological anlage. Research with the HY-antigen complex and X chromosome, and the elucidation of the interactions of intrauterine testosterone and its products with the foetal brain and neurotransmitters, have given us new models to understand the programming of sexuality. However, gonadotrophin feedback is not relevant as an indicator of brain feminization in primates and man. Finally, the interaction of masculinization and defeminization provides us with a model for understanding homosexual behaviour. PMID:6138111

  11. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brittany; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students' perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest…

  12. RNA triplexes: from structural principles to biological and biotech applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Gitali; Zhou, Yuan; Zhong, Zhensheng; Toh, Desiree-Faye Kaixin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The diverse biological functions of RNA are determined by the complex structures of RNA stabilized by both secondary and tertiary interactions. An RNA triplex is an important tertiary structure motif that is found in many pseudoknots and other structured RNAs. A triplex structure usually forms through tertiary interactions in the major or minor groove of a Watson-Crick base-paired stem. A major-groove RNA triplex structure is stable in isolation by forming consecutive major-groove base triples such as U·A-U and C(+) ·G-C. Minor-groove RNA triplexes, e.g., A-minor motif triplexes, are found in almost all large structured RNAs. As double-stranded RNA stem regions are often involved in biologically important tertiary triplex structure formation and protein binding, the ability to sequence specifically target any desired RNA duplexes by triplex formation would have great potential for biomedical applications. Programmable chemically modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been developed to form TFO·RNA2 and PNA·RNA2 triplexes, respectively, with enhanced binding affinity and sequence specificity at physiological conditions. Here, we (1) provide an overview of naturally occurring RNA triplexes, (2) summarize the experimental methods for studying triplexes, and (3) review the development of TFOs and triplex-forming PNAs for targeting an HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift-inducing RNA, a bacterial ribosomal A-site RNA, and a human microRNA hairpin precursor, and for inhibiting the RNA-protein interactions involving human RNA-dependent protein kinase and HIV-1 viral protein Rev. PMID:25146348

  13. Hydrological structure and biological productivity of the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, U.D.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Hydrological structure analyses of regions in the tropical Atlantic Ocean have consistently revealed the existence of a typical tropical structure characterized by a nitrate-depleted mixed layer above the thermocline. The important biological...

  14. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  15. On the Concept of "Respiration": Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structures and Alternative Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    In researches, the subject of respiration has been determined to be among subjects about whom participants from all educational levels struggle to form their cognitive structures and have many alternative conceptions. This research was carried out in order to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structures and alternative…

  16. Identification of Bacteria and Determination of Biological Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; La Duc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of planetary protection research is to develop superior strategies for inactivating resistance bearing micro-organisms like Rummeli - bacillus stabekisii. By first identifying the particular physiologic pathway and/or structural component of the cell/spore that affords it such elevated tolerance, eradication regimes can then be designed to target these resistance-conferring moieties without jeopardizing the structural integrity of spacecraft hardware. Furthermore, hospitals and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of sterilization processes. The spores of Rummelibacillus stabekisii, which are far more resistant to many of such perturbations, could likely serve as a more significant biological indicator for potential survival than those being used currently.

  17. On the Concept "Microscope": Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structures on the concept of microscope. Qualitative research methodology has been applied in the study. The data were collected from biology student teachers. Free word association test and drawing-writing test were used to collect data. The data collected…

  18. Serial femtosecond crystallography: A revolution in structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Conrad, Chelsie E; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Fromme, Petra

    2016-07-15

    Macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron sources has proven to be the most influential method within structural biology, producing thousands of structures since its inception. While its utility has been instrumental in progressing our knowledge of structures of molecules, it suffers from limitations such as the need for large, well-diffracting crystals, and radiation damage that can hamper native structural determination. The recent advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and their implementation in the emerging field of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has given rise to a remarkable expansion upon existing crystallographic constraints, allowing structural biologists access to previously restricted scientific territory. SFX relies on exceptionally brilliant, micro-focused X-ray pulses, which are femtoseconds in duration, to probe nano/micrometer sized crystals in a serial fashion. This results in data sets comprised of individual snapshots, each capturing Bragg diffraction of single crystals in random orientations prior to their subsequent destruction. Thus structural elucidation while avoiding radiation damage, even at room temperature, can now be achieved. This emerging field has cultivated new methods for nanocrystallogenesis, sample delivery, and data processing. Opportunities and challenges within SFX are reviewed herein. PMID:27143509

  19. Structure, reactivity, and biological properties of hidantoines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydantoin (imidazolidine-2,4-dione) is a 2,4-diketotetrahydroimidazole discovered by Baeyer in 1861. Thiohydantoins and derivatives were prepared, having chemical properties similar to the corresponding carbonyl compounds. Some biological activities (antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, schistosomicidal) are attributed to the chemical reactivity and consequent affinity of hydantoinic rings towards biomacromolecules. Therefore, knowledge about the chemistry of hydantoins has increased enormously. In this review, we present important aspects such as reactivity of hydantoins, acidity of hydantoins, spectroscopy and crystallographic properties, and biological activities of hydantoin and its derivatives. (author)

  20. Visualising Knowledge Structures in Biology: Discipline, Curriculum and Student Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Concept mapping is discussed as a tool for the visualisation of knowledge structures that can be exploited within biological education. Application of this tool makes it possible to relate the structure of the curriculum to the structure of the discipline, in order to support the development of robust student knowledge structures in ways that…

  1. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO2, AsO4, Bi, Cd, Co, CrO4, Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO3, TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  2. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO{sub 2}, AsO{sub 4}, Bi, Cd, Co, CrO{sub 4}, Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO{sub 3}, TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  3. Determination of Death: A Scientific Perspective on Biological Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condic, Maureen L

    2016-06-01

    Human life is operationally defined by the onset and cessation of organismal function. At postnatal stages of life, organismal integration critically and uniquely requires a functioning brain. In this article, a distinction is drawn between integrated and coordinated biologic activities. While communication between cells can provide a coordinated biologic response to specific signals, it does not support the integrated function that is characteristic of a living human being. Determining the loss of integrated function can be complicated by medical interventions (i.e., "life support") that uncouple elements of the natural biologic hierarchy underlying our intuitive understanding of death. Such medical interventions can allow living human beings who are no longer able to function in an integrated manner to be maintained in a living state. In contrast, medical intervention can also allow the cells and tissues of an individual who has died to be maintained in a living state. To distinguish between a living human being and living human cells, two criteria are proposed: either the persistence of any form of brain function or the persistence of autonomous integration of vital functions. Either of these criteria is sufficient to determine a human being is alive. PMID:27075193

  4. Neutron scattering for the analysis of biological structures. Brookhaven symposia in biology. Number 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenborn, B P [ed.

    1976-01-01

    Sessions were included on neutron scattering and biological structure analysis, protein crystallography, neutron scattering from oriented systems, solution scattering, preparation of deuterated specimens, inelastic scattering, data analysis, experimental techniques, and instrumentation. Separate entries were made for the individual papers.

  5. Automating the determination of 3D protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayl, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    The creation of an automated method for determining 3D protein structure would be invaluable to the field of biology and presents an interesting challenge to computer science. Unfortunately, given the current level of protein knowledge, a completely automated solution method is not yet feasible, therefore, our group has decided to integrate existing databases and theories to create a software system that assists X-ray crystallographers in specifying a particular protein structure. By breaking the problem of determining overall protein structure into small subproblems, we hope to come closer to solving a novel structure by solving each component. By generating necessary information for structure determination, this method provides the first step toward designing a program to determine protein conformation automatically.

  6. Probabilistic modeling and machine learning in structural and systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This supplement contains extended versions of a selected subset of papers presented at the workshop PMSB 2007, Probabilistic Modeling and Machine Learning in Structural and Systems Biology, Tuusula, Finland, from June 17 to 18, 2006.

  7. Biology content cognitive structure: From science student to science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauslein, Patricia L.; Good, Ronald G.; Cummins, Catherine L.

    The F-Sort of Biology Concepts was used to assess understanding of the relationships among 37 biology concepts by five groups: Preservice secondary science teachers, in-service biology teachers with 1-3 years of teaching experience, in-service biology teachers with 5 or more years of experience, scientists in any biological science field, and college seniors majoring in biology. Data collected from the F-sort were analyzed using latent partition analysis and alpha factor analysis with additional interpretation from multidimensional scaling. The subjects were asked to think aloud as they performed the F-sort and each session was audiotaped for later analysis. These analyses indicated that the biology major and experienced secondary science teachers were separated from the scientists by a dimension based on a deep-versus-surface structure understanding of the concepts. A second axis shows that scientists are separated from other groups by a fluid-versus-fixed cognitive structure dimension. That is, both experienced teachers and scientists were found to have well-constructed and ordered cognitive structures, but scientists were much more likely to see an item having a place in two or more categories, whereas experienced teachers tended to focus on only one aspect of an item, and therefore understanding that it rightfully belonged in only one category. It appears that teachers restructure their science knowledge as they become more experienced. There is an apparent transition from poorly organized to highly organized cognitive structures for biology concepts when comparing preservice, novice, and experienced teachers, respectively. The transition does not seem to be one achieving a deeper understanding of the biology concepts or to a greater degree of integration of the concepts, but rather a transition from a fairly large, loosely organized pool of biology concepts to one which is highly structured but limited to the expectations of the established curriculum. The

  8. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: A moving story of receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Thue W; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2008-01-01

    Animals sense light and chemical signals through proteins called G-protein-coupled receptors. The crystal structure of one such receptor in complex with a G-protein fragment shows how these receptors are activated.

  9. [Analysis of etofenamate. Particular determination in biological material (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, H D; Fiedler, J; Wäsche, B

    1977-01-01

    The determination of 2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-ethyl-N-(a,a,a-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-anthranilate (etofenamate, active principle of Rheumon gel) following its isolation from biological material is reported. Depending on the method of extraction etofenamate, free and alkali-labile conjugated flufenamic acid, total conjugates or the sum of CF3-containing compounds (sum of metabolites) are isolated. Separation is achieved by TLC, quantitative determination is made by degradation to flufenamic acid and fluorimetric measurement in CCl4/trichloracetic acid at 372/445 nm. Etofenamate can be identified by TLC, derivatisation, UV- and fluorescence spectroscopy and differentiated from its metabolites. It is demonstrated that etofenamate is the main component of fenamates in inflamed tissue. PMID:579119

  10. Spatial Structures and Regulation in Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Pernille

    other is the spatial regulation of biological systems, here related to different aspects of the inflammatory response. All systems are studied using computational modelling and mathematical analysis. The first part of the thesis explores different protein aggregation scenarios. In Chapter 1, we consider...... environmental conditions are different pH and calcium concentrations. We construct a mathematical model for the aggregation process, and fit the model to an array of experimental data. The model reproduces the dynamics of the aggregation process and predicts final size distributions of the aggregates, which...... conditions of the cell. We then construct a multicellular model of the tissue and show how coupled cells are able to function as an excitable medium and propagate waves of high cytokine concentration through the tissue. If the internal regulation in the cells is over-productive, the model predicts a...

  11. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  12. Self-Reference, Biologic and the Structure of Reproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This paper concentrates on relationships of formal systems with biology. The paper is based on previous papers by the author. We have freely used texts of those papers where the formulations are of use, and we have extended the concepts and discussions herein considerably beyond the earlier work. We concentrate on formal systems not only for the sake of showing how there is a fundamental mathematical structure to biology, but also to consider and reconsider philosophical and phenomenological points of view in relation to natural science and mathematics. The relationship with phenomenology comes about in the questions that arise about the nature of the observer in relation to the observed that arise in philosophy, but also in science in the very act of determining the context and models upon which it shall be based.We examine the schema behind the reproduction of DNA. The DNA molecule consists of two interwound strands, the Watson Strand (W) and the Crick Strand (C). The two strands are bonded to each other vi...

  13. The NIGMS X6A East Coast Structural Biology Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X6A facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a dedicated macromolecular crystallography beam line funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. The facility serves expert and non-expert crystallographers from protein purification to the determination of atomic coordinates. The X6A facility consists of an experimental station and an associated laboratory for sample preparation. The X6A beam line optics include an NSLS design Si(111) channel-cut monochromator and an Oxford Danfysik toroidal focusing mirror. The end station consists of a CrystalLogic Kappa diffractometer and an ADSC 210 CCD detector. Standard crystallographic packages are available to assist the users for data analysis. An automated sample changer will be added in the near future to the end station. The associated laboratory is fully equipped for all aspects of protein purification and crystallization. The beam line is currently available for users (http://protein.nsls.bnl.gov). The main goal of the X6A effort is to provide the basic tools to researchers who would like to use macromolecular crystallography and structural biology to address important biological questions

  14. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  15. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zev N Kronenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham, with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/. For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  16. Macromolecular structure determination in the post-genome era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in genetics, molecular biology and crystallographic instrumentation and methodology have led to a revolution in the field of Structural Molecular Biology (SMB). These combined advances have paved the way to a more complete and detailed understanding of the biological macromolecules that make up an organism, both in terms of their individual functions and also the interactions between them. In this paper we describe a large-scale, genomic approach to the three-dimensional structure determination of macromolecules and their complexes, using high-throughput methodology to streamline all aspects of the process. This task requires the development of automated high-intensity synchrotron beam lines for X-ray diffraction data collection from single crystal samples. Furthermore, these beam lines must be operated within a sophisticated software and hardware environment, which is capable of delivering a completely automated structure determination pipeline. The SMB resource at SSRL is developing a system for the structure determination steps of this process, starting with the initial characterization of the frozen sample, followed by data collection, data reduction, phase determination, and model building. This paper focuses on the data collection elements of this high-throughput system

  17. Structural Biology of Pectin Degradation by Enterobacteriaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, D. Wade; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2008-01-01

    Pectin is a structural polysaccharide that is integral for the stability of plant cell walls. During soft rot infection, secreted virulence factors from pectinolytic bacteria such as Erwinia spp. degrade pectin, resulting in characteristic plant cell necrosis and tissue maceration. Catabolism of pectin and its breakdown products by pectinolytic bacteria occurs within distinct cellular environments. This process initiates outside the cell, continues within the periplasmic space, and culminates...

  18. MOTOR: model assisted software for NMR structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieborr, Ulrich; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Elshorst, Bettina; Maurer, Marcus; Saxena, Krishna; Stehle, Tanja; Kudlinzki, Denis; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Schwalbe, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic proteins with important biological function can be partially unstructured, conformational flexible, or heterogenic. Crystallization trials often fail for such proteins. In NMR spectroscopy, parts of the polypeptide chain undergoing dynamics in unfavorable time regimes cannot be observed. De novo NMR structure determination is seriously hampered when missing signals lead to an incomplete chemical shift assignment resulting in an information content of the NOE data insufficient to determine the structure ab initio. We developed a new protein structure determination strategy for such cases based on a novel NOE assignment strategy utilizing a number of model structures but no explicit reference structure as it is used for bootstrapping like algorithms. The software distinguishes in detail between consistent and mutually exclusive pairs of possible NOE assignments on the basis of different precision levels of measured chemical shifts searching for a set of maximum number of consistent NOE assignments in agreement with 3D space. Validation of the method using the structure of the low molecular-weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase A (MptpA) showed robust results utilizing protein structures with 30-45% sequence identity and 70% of the chemical shift assignments. About 60% of the resonance assignments are sufficient to identify those structural models with highest conformational similarity to the real structure. The software was benchmarked by de novo solution structures of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and the extracellular fibroblast growth factor receptor domain FGFR4 D2, which both failed in crystallization trials and in classical NMR structure determination. PMID:23852655

  19. Optical manipulation of microparticles and biological structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahagan, Kevin Thomas

    1998-06-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of the trapping of microparticles and biological objects using radiation pressure. Part I of this thesis presents a technique for trapping both low and high index microparticles using a single, stationary focused laser beam containing an optical vortex. Advantages of this vortex trap include the ease of implementation, a lower exposure level for high-index particles compared to a standard Gaussian beam trap, and the ability to isolate individual low-index particles in concentrated dispersions. The vortex trap is modeled using ray-tracing methods and a more precise electromagnetic model, which is accurate for particles less than 10 μm in diameter. We have measured the stable equilibrium position for two low-index particle systems (e.g., hollow glass spheres (HGS) in water, and water droplets in acetophenone (W/A)). The strength of the trap was measured for the HGS system along the longitudinal and transverse directions. We also demonstrate simultaneous trapping of a low and high index particle with a vortex beam. The stability of this dual-particle trap is found to depend on the relative particle size, the divergence angle of the beam, and the depth of the particles within the trapping chamber. Part II presents results from an interdisciplinary and collaborative investigation of an all-optical genetic engineering technique whereby Agrobacterium rhizogenes were inserted through a laser-ablated hole in the cell wall of the plant, Gingko biloba. We describe a protocol which includes the control of osmotic conditions, culturing procedures, viability assays and laser microsurgery. We succeeded in placing up to twelve viable bacteria into a single plant cell using this technique. The bacteria are believed to be slightly heated by the Gaussian beam trap. A numerical model is presented predicting a temperature rise of just a few degrees. Whereas G. biloba and A. rhitogenes were chosen for this study because of Ginkgo

  20. Genetic determinism in the Finnish upper secondary school biology textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Aivelo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics is a fast-developing field and it has been argued that genetics education is lagging behind. Genetics education has, for example, been suspected of indoctrinating strong genetic determinism. As the updating of the national upper secondary school curricula is about to start, we decided to study how the current curriculum manifests in Finnish biology textbooks. We studied the main four textbooks for historical gene models and definitions of genes using content analysis. Hybrid models were pervasive in textbooks. The textbooks expressed sometimes even strong genetic determinism, which might be linked to the dominance of older historical models in the textbooks. We also found instances of determinism which we call ‘weak determinism’: genes were depicted as more important factor than environment in relation to the expressed properties. Subsequently, there were no modern gene models found. We suggest gene models should be presented explicitly to reduce misconceptions about genes. We argue that genetics education needs to take more into account than environmental effects and there needs to be more emphasis on the temporal and developmental aspect of genotype-phenotype link. Specifically in Finland this could be done by a more explicit formulation of the national curriculum.

  1. Structural biology of cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Dyneins are microtubule-based, ATP-driven motor proteins with six tandemly linked AAA+ domains, a long N-terminal tail and a coiled-coil stalk. Cytoplasmic dyneins function as individual homodimers and are responsible for minus-end-oriented transport along microtubules. Axonemal dyneins of flagella/cilia are anchored in arrays to peripheral microtubule doublets by their N-terminal tails, and generate sliding motions of adjacent microtubule doublets toward the plus end. The coiled-coil stalk is responsible for communication between the AAA+ domains and the microtubule binding domain. A number of isoforms of axonemal dyneins are integrated to generate bending motion. In this article I will review recent structural studies and address the question as to how dyneins generate force and cause bending in flagella/cilia. PMID:22664481

  2. Terpenoid Plant Metabolites - Structural Characterization and Biological Importance

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    In response to the challenges of their local environments, organisms produce of a large number of chemical diverse compounds with complex stereochemistry and reactive functional groups. These characteristics enable them to interact and bind specifically to biological target molecules and exert various biological activities, and have assured that Natural products continues to be an important source of bioactive compounds, which, for example, facilitate the search for new lead structures that c...

  3. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes che...... residues. For Rhodopsin (225 residues) a structure is found at 2.5 Å CA-RMSD from the experimental X-ray structure, and a structure is determined for the Savinase protein (269 residues) with 2.9 Å CA-RMSD from the experimental X-ray structure....

  4. Electronic structure and biological activity: Barbiturates vs. thiobarbiturates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-06-01

    The electronic structure of the derivatives of thiobarbituric acid: 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid ( I) and 1,3-dibutyl-2-thiobarbituric acid ( II) has been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss their electronic structures and compare them with barbituric acid. We also relate the difference in electronic structure between barbituric and thiobarbituric acids to difference in biological activity of their derivatives.

  5. A biological radioimmunological microassay to determine hypophysiotropic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis presented there describes a combined biological-radioimmunological assay for hypophysiotropic substances. The secretion reaction of adenohypophysial rat cells cultured by a long-term monolayer technique is used as a measure of hypophysiotropic activity. For hypophysial hormones released into the culture medium are then determined directly with the aid of specific radio immunoassay. This method can also be used for substances not yet characterized chemically or for tissue extracts, as shown here using hypothalamus stalk median eminance extract as example. The method is technically quite simple and economical. At the same time the technique is exact and reliable and offers, for TRH and LHRH determination, a degree of sensitivity in the pg range similar to that obtained by radioimmunological methods. The sensitivity towards CRH activity exceeds that obtained by other methods to date. From a morphological viewpoint and from comparisons of spontaneous secretion behaviour (or stimulation reactions following TRH, LHRH, dopamine and vasopressin application) with in-vivo findings it was shown that the long-term cell cultures were intact and that, overall, the culture model used closely approximates in its functional behaviour the physiological situation. (orig./MG)

  6. Topography and biological noise determine acoustic detectability on coral reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Cagua, Edgar F.

    2013-08-19

    Acoustic telemetry is an increasingly common tool for studying the movement patterns, behavior and site fidelity of marine organisms, but to accurately interpret acoustic data, the variability, periodicity and range of detectability between acoustic tags and receivers must be understood. The relative and interactive effects of topography with biological and environmental noise have not been quantified on coral reefs. We conduct two long-term range tests (1- and 4-month duration) on two different reef types in the central Red Sea to determine the relative effect of distance, depth, topography, time of day, wind, lunar phase, sea surface temperature and thermocline on detection probability. Detectability, as expected, declines with increasing distance between tags and receivers, and we find average detection ranges of 530 and 120 m, using V16 and V13 tags, respectively, but the topography of the reef can significantly modify this relationship, reducing the range by ~70 %, even when tags and receivers are in line-of-sight. Analyses that assume a relationship between distance and detections must therefore be used with care. Nighttime detection range was consistently reduced in both locations, and detections varied by lunar phase in the 4-month test, suggesting a strong influence of biological noise (reducing detection probability up to 30 %), notably more influential than other environmental noises, including wind-driven noise, which is normally considered important in open-water environments. Analysis of detections should be corrected in consideration of the diel patterns we find, and range tests or sentinel tags should be used for more than 1 month to quantify potential changes due to lunar phase. Some studies assume that the most usual factor limiting detection range is weather-related noise; this cannot be extrapolated to coral reefs. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  7. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.;

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at...

  8. From crystallography to structural biology, a century of discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available From crystallography, the technique mostly used to study the structure of matter, the field mutated into structural biology, has mutated in life sciences into structural biology, which has been developed as an essential and rather successful area of research to fully understand the workings of cellular pathways. The application of physical approaches to biological systems has been crucial to comprehend the structure and function of the biological components of living organisms. In this assay the author walks the reader through the last century, which has witnessed how this life sciences research area was born and moved towards larger assemblies in the core of crucial biological problems. The influence of research in physics, biochemistry and molecular biology has been key in the successes and large body of seminal results obtained by structural biologists. The author proposes that the future of this area implies the integration of its results at the cellular level apart of using more quantitative approaches to describe biological processes.La cristalografía, la técnica más ampliamente usada para estudiar la estructura de la materia, ha evolucionado en las ciencias de la vida hacia la biología estructural, una exitosa área de investigación encaminada a comprender el funcionamiento de los procesos celulares. La aplicación de aproximaciones físicas a sistemas biológicos es clave para entender la estructura y funcionamiento de los componentes de los organismos. En este artículo el autor ofrece al lector un paseo por la evolución de esta área de conocimiento durante el siglo XX, desde su nacimiento hasta el análisis de grandes complejos macromoleculares, protagonistas importantes en diversos procesos biológicos. La influencia de investigaciones en física, bioquímica y biología molecular ha sido clave para los numerosos éxitos alcanzados por biólogos estructurales. El autor sostiene que el futuro de esta disciplina pasa por la

  9. Determinants of Capital Structure in Family Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Akbarali, Ahmed; Foma, Awambeng

    2015-01-01

    Most firms are using optimal combination of equity and debt so as to maximize firms value and the wealth of the shareholders. To achieve all these, firms should be aware of the factors that influence the capital structure decisions. Previous empirical studies attempted to explain what determines the choice of capital structure in firms. The focus was on firms in general without categorizing family firms and non-family firms. The primary objective of this study is to examine what determines th...

  10. Biologic fluorescence decay characteristics: determination by Laguerre expansion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Wendy J.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescence decay characteristics are used to identify biologic fluorophores and to characterize interactions with the fluorophore environment. In many studies, fluorescence lifetimes are assessed by iterative reconvolution techniques. We investigated the use of a new approach: the Laguerre expansion of kernels technique (Marmarelis, V.Z., Ann. Biomed., Eng. 1993; 21, 573-589) which yields the fluorescence impulse response function by least- squares fitting of a discrete-time Laguerre functions expansion. Nitrogen (4 ns FWHM) and excimer (120 ns FWHM) laser pulses were used to excite the fluorescence of an anthracene and of type II collagen powder. After filtering (monochromator) and detection (MCP-PMT), the fluorescence response was digitized (digital storage oscilloscope) and transferred to a personal computer. Input and output data were deconvolved by the Laguerre expansion technique to compute the impulse response function which was then fitted to a multiexponential function for determination of the decay constants. A single exponential (time constant: 4.24 ns) best approximated the fluorescence decay of anthracene, whereas the Type II collagen response was best approximated by a double exponential (time constants: 2.24 and 9.92 ns) in agreement with previously reported data. The results of the Laguerre expansion technique were compared to the least-squares iterative reconvolution technique. The Laguerre expansion technique appeared computationally efficient and robust to experimental noise in the data. Furthermore, the proposed method does not impose a set multiexponential form to the decay.

  11. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  12. X-ray lasers for structural and dynamic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research opportunities and techniques are reviewed for the application of hard x-ray pulsed free-electron lasers (XFEL) to structural biology. These include the imaging of protein nanocrystals, single particles such as viruses, pump–probe experiments for time-resolved nanocrystallography, and snapshot wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) from molecules in solution. The use of femtosecond exposure times, rather than freezing of samples, as a means of minimizing radiation damage is shown to open up new opportunities for the molecular imaging of biochemical reactions at room temperature in solution. This is possible using a ‘diffract-and-destroy’ mode in which the incident pulse terminates before radiation damage begins. Methods for delivering hundreds of hydrated bioparticles per second (in random orientations) to a pulsed x-ray beam are described. New data analysis approaches are outlined for the correlated fluctuations in fast WAXS, for protein nanocrystals just a few molecules on a side, and for the continuous x-ray scattering from a single virus. Methods for determining the orientation of a molecule from its diffraction pattern are reviewed. Methods for the preparation of protein nanocrystals are also reviewed. New opportunities for solving the phase problem for XFEL data are outlined. A summary of the latest results is given, which now extend to atomic resolution for nanocrystals. Possibilities for time-resolved chemistry using fast WAXS (solution scattering) from mixtures is reviewed, toward the general goal of making molecular movies of biochemical processes. (key issues reviews)

  13. Analysis and Design of Biological Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Altenbach, Holm

    2012-01-01

    This collection provides researchers and scientists with advanced analyses and materials design techniques in Biomaterials and presents mechanical studies of biological structures. In 16 contributions well known experts present their research on Stress and Strain Analysis, Material Properties, Fluid and Gas mechanics and they show related problems.

  14. Sharing Structure and Function in Biological Design with SBOL 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehner, Nicholas; Beal, Jacob; Clancy, Kevin; Bartley, Bryan; Misirli, Goksel; Grünberg, Raik; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Bissell, Michael; Madsen, Curtis; Nguyen, Tramy; Zhang, Michael; Zhang, Zhen; Zundel, Zach; Densmore, Douglas; Gennari, John H; Wipat, Anil; Sauro, Herbert M; Myers, Chris J

    2016-06-17

    The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) is a standard that enables collaborative engineering of biological systems across different institutions and tools. SBOL is developed through careful consideration of recent synthetic biology trends, real use cases, and consensus among leading researchers in the field and members of commercial biotechnology enterprises. We demonstrate and discuss how a set of SBOL-enabled software tools can form an integrated, cross-organizational workflow to recapitulate the design of one of the largest published genetic circuits to date, a 4-input AND sensor. This design encompasses the structural components of the system, such as its DNA, RNA, small molecules, and proteins, as well as the interactions between these components that determine the system's behavior/function. The demonstrated workflow and resulting circuit design illustrate the utility of SBOL 2.0 in automating the exchange of structural and functional specifications for genetic parts, devices, and the biological systems in which they operate. PMID:27111421

  15. The Evolving Contribution of Mass Spectrometry to Integrative Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faini, Marco; Stengel, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes are key catalysts and regulators for the majority of cellular processes. Unveiling their assembly and structure is essential to understanding their function and mechanism of action. Although conventional structural techniques such as X-ray crystallography and NMR have solved the structure of important protein complexes, they cannot consistently deal with dynamic and heterogeneous assemblies, limiting their applications to small scale experiments. A novel methodological paradigm, integrative structural biology, aims at overcoming such limitations by combining complementary data sources into a comprehensive structural model. Recent applications have shown that a range of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are able to generate interaction and spatial restraints (cross-linking MS) information on native complexes or to study the stoichiometry and connectivity of entire assemblies (native MS) rapidly, reliably, and from small amounts of substrate. Although these techniques by themselves do not solve structures, they do provide invaluable structural information and are thus ideally suited to contribute to integrative modeling efforts. The group of Brian Chait has made seminal contributions in the use of mass spectrometric techniques to study protein complexes. In this perspective, we honor the contributions of the Chait group and discuss concepts and milestones of integrative structural biology. We also review recent examples of integration of structural MS techniques with an emphasis on cross-linking MS. We then speculate on future MS applications that would unravel the dynamic nature of protein complexes upon diverse cellular states.

  16. The Evolving Contribution of Mass Spectrometry to Integrative Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faini, Marco; Stengel, Florian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-06-01

    Protein complexes are key catalysts and regulators for the majority of cellular processes. Unveiling their assembly and structure is essential to understanding their function and mechanism of action. Although conventional structural techniques such as X-ray crystallography and NMR have solved the structure of important protein complexes, they cannot consistently deal with dynamic and heterogeneous assemblies, limiting their applications to small scale experiments. A novel methodological paradigm, integrative structural biology, aims at overcoming such limitations by combining complementary data sources into a comprehensive structural model. Recent applications have shown that a range of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques are able to generate interaction and spatial restraints (cross-linking MS) information on native complexes or to study the stoichiometry and connectivity of entire assemblies (native MS) rapidly, reliably, and from small amounts of substrate. Although these techniques by themselves do not solve structures, they do provide invaluable structural information and are thus ideally suited to contribute to integrative modeling efforts. The group of Brian Chait has made seminal contributions in the use of mass spectrometric techniques to study protein complexes. In this perspective, we honor the contributions of the Chait group and discuss concepts and milestones of integrative structural biology. We also review recent examples of integration of structural MS techniques with an emphasis on cross-linking MS. We then speculate on future MS applications that would unravel the dynamic nature of protein complexes upon diverse cellular states.

  17. Précis of "Lifelines: biology, freedom, determinism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, S

    1999-10-01

    There are many ways of describing and explaining the properties of living systems; causal, functional, and reductive accounts are necessary but no one account has primacy. The history of biology as a discipline has given excessive authority to reductionism, which collapses higher level accounts, such as social or behavioural ones, into molecular ones. Such reductionism becomes crudely ideological when applied to the human condition, with its claims for genes "for" everything from sexual orientation to compulsive shopping. The current enthusiasm for genetics and ultra-Darwinist accounts, with their selfish-gene metaphors for living processes, misunderstand both the phenomena of development and the interactive role that DNA and the fluid genome play in the cellular orchestra. DNA is not a blueprint, and the four dimensions of life (three of space, one of time) cannot be read off from its one-dimensional strand. Both developmental and evolutionary processes are more than merely instructive or selective; the organism constructs itself, a process known as autopoiesis, through a lifeline trajectory. Because organisms are thermodynamically open systems, living processes are homeodynamic, not homeostatic. The self-organising membrane-bound and energy-utilising metabolic web of the cell must have evolved prior to socalled naked replicators. Evolution is constrained by physics, chemistry, and structure; not all change is powered by natural selection, and not all phenotypes are adaptive. Finally, therefore, living processes are radically indeterminate; like all other living organisms, but to an even greater degree, we make our own future, though in circumstances not of our own choosing. PMID:11301572

  18. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1995-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides us with the most accurate picture we can get of atomic and molecular structures in crystals. It provides a hard bedrock of structural results in chemistry and in mineralogy. In biology, where the structures are not fully crystalline, it can still provide valuable results and, indeed, the impact here has been revolutionary. It is still an immense field for young workers, and no doubt will provide yet more striking develop­ ments of a major character. It does, however, require a wide range of intellectual application, and a considerable ability in many fields. This book will provide much help. It is a very straightforward and thorough guide to every aspect of the subject. The authors are experienced both as research workers themselves and as teachers of standing, and this is shown in their clarity of exposition. There are plenty of iliustrations and worked examples to aid the student to obtain a real grasp of the subject.

  19. Neutron scattering applications in structural biology: now and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Neutrons have an important role to play in structural biology. Neutron crystallography, small-angle neutron scattering and inelastic neutron scattering techniques all contribute unique information on biomolecular structures. In particular, solution scattering techniques give critical information on the conformations and dispositions of the components of complex assemblies under a wide variety of relevant conditions. The power of these methods is demonstrated here by studies of protein/DNA complexes, and Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins complexed with their regulatory targets. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a new structural approach using neutron resonance scattering. The impact of biological neutron scattering to date has been constrained principally by the available fluxes at neutron sources and the true potential of these approaches will only be realized with the development of new more powerful neutron sources. (author)

  20. Biological determinants of aldosterone-induced cardiac fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, V; Silvestre, J S; Charlemagne, D; Sabri, A; Trouvé, P; Wassef, M; Swynghedauw, B; Delcayre, C

    1995-12-01

    To determine the events leading to cardiac fibrosis in aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats, we studied protein and mRNA accumulation of procollagens I and III for 60 days. After 3 and 7 days of treatment systolic pressure was normal, and no histological or biochemical changes were seen in rat hearts. At day 15 arterial pressure was raised (+40%) and left ventricular hypertrophy was +15%. Cardiac examination after hemalun-eosin staining and immunolabeling with anticollagen I and III antibodies showed no structural alterations, but an 83% increase in right ventricular type III procollagen mRNA levels was found. At 30 and 60 days we found progressive cardiac fibrosis, with inflammatory cells, myocyte necrosis, and elevation of both types I and III procollagen mRNA levels in both ventricles. To determine whether aldosterone had effects on Na,K-ATPase that might lead to ionic disturbances and induce myocyte necrosis, we studied the major cardiac Na,K-ATPase isoform genes. Although Na,K-ATPase alpha 1- and beta 1-subunit mRNA levels were elevated in kidney at day 1, neither of these cardiac transcripts nor the specific alpha 2 isoform was altered between 1 and 15 days. These results show that accumulation of procollagen mRNAs occurs before collagen deposition. Cardiac alterations are late and not preceded by changes in Na,K-ATPase cardiac gene expression, precluding a direct modulation of cardiac collagen synthesis and Na,K-ATPase by aldosterone. PMID:7490157

  1. Distributed structure determination at the JCSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The software suite Xsolve semi-exhaustively explores key parameters of the X-ray structure-determination process to compute multiple three-dimensional protein structures independently and in parallel from a set of diffraction images. An optimal consensus model for subsequent manual refinement is computed from these structures. The Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), one of four large-scale structure-determination centers funded by the US Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) through the National Institute for General Medical Sciences, has been operating an automated distributed structure-solution pipeline, Xsolve, for well over half a decade. During PSI-2, Xsolve solved, traced and partially refined 90% of the JCSG’s nearly 770 MAD/SAD structures at an average resolution of about 2 Å without human intervention. Xsolve executes many well established publicly available crystallography software programs in parallel on a commodity Linux cluster, resulting in multiple traces for any given target. Additional software programs have been developed and integrated into Xsolve to further minimize human effort in structure refinement. ConsensusModeler exploits complementarities in traces from Xsolve to compute a single optimal model for manual refinement. Xpleo is a powerful robotics-inspired algorithm to build missing fragments and qFit automatically identifies and fits alternate conformations

  2. Key Labeling Technologies to Tackle Sizeable Problems in RNA Structural Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaku T. Dayie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adopt complex three-dimensional (3D structures that can rapidly interconvert between multiple functional states (folding and dynamics is vital for the proper functioning of RNAs. Consequently, RNA structure and dynamics necessarily determine their biological function. In the post-genomic era, it is clear that RNAs comprise a larger proportion (>50% of the transcribed genome compared to proteins (≤ 2%. Yet the determination of the 3D structures of RNAs lags considerably behind those of proteins and to date there are even fewer investigations of dynamics in RNAs compared to proteins. Site specific incorporation of various structural and dynamic probes into nucleic acids would likely transform RNA structural biology. Therefore, various methods for introducing probes for structural, functional, and biotechnological applications are critically assessed here. These probes include stable isotopes such as 2H, 13C, 15N, and 19F. Incorporation of these probes using improved RNA ligation strategies promises to change the landscape of structural biology of supramacromolecules probed by biophysical tools such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, some of the structural and dynamic problems that can be addressed using these technological advances are outlined.

  3. Depth Determination of an Abnormal Heat Source in Biological Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-Hua; LI Zhen-Hua; LAI Jian-Cheng; HE An-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    We deduce the surface temperature distribution generated by the inner point heat source in biological tissues and propose a graphic method to retrieve the depth of the point heat source. The practical surface temperature distribution can be regarded as the convolution of the temperature distribution of the inner point heat source with the heat source shape function. The depth of an abnormal heat source in biological tissues can be retrieved by using the graphic method combined with the blind deconvolution scheme.%We deduce the surface temperature distribution generated by the inner point heat source in biological tissues and propose a graphic method to retrieve the depth of the point heat source.The practical surface temperature distribution can be regarded as the convolution of the temperature distribution of the inner point heat source with the heat source shape function.The depth of an abnormal heat source in biological tissues can be retrieved by using the graphic method combined with the blind deconvolution scheme.Surface temperature distribution of the biological tissues is closely related to the neighboring metabolic heat production,blood circulation in an organism and environmental temperature.[1] The abnormal metabolic performances of a local region in biological tissue imply malignant changes occurring,which can be distinguished from the variance of surface temperature.Modern development of thermal infrared (TIR) imaging has made the surface temperature measurement of biological tissue easier.Nowadays,several types of tumors,e.g.skin or breast can be recognized with TIR imaging.[2] The diagnostics with TIR imaging require more experienced operators and can not accurately ascertain the site of pathological changes,which limits the value of this technology.Therefore ascertaining the depth of inner heat source in biological body has the extremely important clinical value.

  4. Capital Structure Determinants and Governance Structure Variety in Franchising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Jiang (Tao)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis investigates two questions: the determinants of capital structure in franchising and its subsequent impact on the franchise financing decisions; and the efficient governance structure choice in franchising. We posit that firms franchise in order to benefit from the reduced fr

  5. [Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of etofenamate/ Determination, method and use in biological material (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, H D; Fiedler, J; Jacobi, H; Kolle, J

    1981-01-01

    Etofenamate in biological specimen can be determined by gas-liquid chromatography with etofenamate benzyl ether as internal standard. Determination in urine is done directly after extraction and concentration, whereas plasma and homogenates from organs have to be prepurified by thin-layer chromatography. Unchanged etofenamate is found in small amounts in human urine (0--4, 6--6, 6--8 h p. appl.). Inflamed rat paws after local application contain up to 75 microgram etofenamate/g in comparison to only 2 microgram flufenamic acid/g tissue. Both compounds are also found in non-inflamed paws, contents being only 3--4% as compared to the inflamed tissue. Elimination of etofenamate from the inflamed area occurs with a half-life of approx. 8.5 h. These results from gas-liquid chromatography correspond to results from t.l.c./fluorescence measurements. PMID:6971109

  6. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  7. A routine chromium determination in biological materials; application to various reference materials and standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination limit under standard working conditions of chromium in biological materials is discussed. Neutron activation analysis and atomic spectrometry have been described for some analytical experiences with NBS SRM 1577 reference material. The chromium determination is a part of a larger multi-element scheme for the determination of 12 elements in biological materials

  8. A structural determinant required for RNA editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Nan; Yang, Yun; Sachsenmaier, Nora; Muggenhumer, Dominik; Bi, Jingpei; Waldsich, Christina; Jantsch, Michael F.; Jin, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs) can be both specific and non-specific, depending on the substrate. Specific editing of particular adenosines may depend on the overall sequence and structural context. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying these preferences are not fully understood. Here, we show that duplex structures mimicking an editing site in the Gabra3 pre-mRNA unexpectedly fail to support RNA editing at the Gabra3 I/M site, although phylogenetic analysis suggest an evolutionarily conserved duplex structure essential for efficient RNA editing. These unusual results led us to revisit the structural requirement for this editing by mutagenesis analysis. In vivo nuclear injection experiments of mutated editing substrates demonstrate that a non-conserved structure is a determinant for editing. This structure contains bulges either on the same or the strand opposing the edited adenosine. The position of these bulges and the distance to the edited base regulate editing. Moreover, elevated folding temperature can lead to a switch in RNA editing suggesting an RNA structural change. Our results indicate the importance of RNA tertiary structure in determining RNA editing. PMID:21427087

  9. Determinants of capital structure: UK panel data

    OpenAIRE

    Ahi, Seyed Mohammad Ali Hamze

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The paper investigates capital structure determinants of 5 important non-financial firms listed in FTSE100. The firms are chosen from oil and gas and mining industry. The period chosen for the study is 22 years from 1990 to 2012. Firms are chosen according to capitalization in market. Theories in capital structure such as the trade-off theory, pecking order theory and agency theory are described in order to find the best possible formulation to predict the choice of capital...

  10. DETERMINANTS OF BANK BOARD STRUCTURE IN GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Adusei

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the determinants of bank board structure in Ghana and finds that the Scope of Operations Hypothesis could explain the variation in board size but not board independence. On the other hand, the Board Monitoring Hypothesis could only explain the variation in board independence but not board size. The study also finds that cost-income ratio, foreign majority ownership structure and Ghana Stock Exchange listing status are positively and significantly associated with large b...

  11. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dziechciaż

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging. The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists’ assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it.

  12. Aromatic rings in chemical and biological recognition: energetics and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Laura M; Ellermann, Manuel; Diederich, François

    2011-05-16

    This review describes a multidimensional treatment of molecular recognition phenomena involving aromatic rings in chemical and biological systems. It summarizes new results reported since the appearance of an earlier review in 2003 in host-guest chemistry, biological affinity assays and biostructural analysis, data base mining in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and advanced computational studies. Topics addressed are arene-arene, perfluoroarene-arene, S⋅⋅⋅aromatic, cation-π, and anion-π interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding to π systems. The generated knowledge benefits, in particular, structure-based hit-to-lead development and lead optimization both in the pharmaceutical and in the crop protection industry. It equally facilitates the development of new advanced materials and supramolecular systems, and should inspire further utilization of interactions with aromatic rings to control the stereochemical outcome of synthetic transformations. PMID:21538733

  13. Structure and mechanics of interfaces in biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelat, Francois; Yin, Zhen; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-04-01

    Hard biological materials — for example, seashells, bone or wood — fulfil critical structural functions and display unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, owing to their intricate architectures, which are organized over several length scales. The size, shape and arrangement of the ‘building blocks’ of which these materials are made are essential for defining their properties and their exceptional performance, but there is growing evidence that their deformation and toughness are also largely governed by the interfaces that join these building blocks. These interfaces channel nonlinear deformations and deflect cracks into configurations in which propagation is more difficult. In this Review, we discuss comparatively the composition, structure and mechanics of a set of representative biological interfaces in nacre, bone and wood, and show that these interfaces possess unusual mechanical characteristics, which can encourage the development of advanced bioinspired composites. Finally, we highlight recent examples of synthetic materials inspired from the mechanics and architecture of natural interfaces.

  14. Polysaccharides of higher fungi: Biological role, structure, and antioxidative activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarski Maja S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging biological properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application in many quite distinctive areas, such as food industry, biomedicine, cosmetology, agriculture, environmental protection and waste water management. This article presents results with respect to biological properties, structure and procedures related to the isolation and activation of polysaccharides of higher fungi. It is considered and presented along with a review of the critical antioxidative activity and possible influence of the structural composition of polysaccharide extracts (isolated from these higher fungi upon their antioxidative properties.

  15. The Structural Biology of CRISPR-Cas Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas genomic loci encode RNA-mediated adaptive immune systems that bear some functional similarities with eukaryotic RNA interference. Acquired and heritable immunity against bacteriophage and plasmids begins with integration of ~30 base pair foreign DNA sequences into the host genome. CRISPR-derived transcripts assemble with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to target complementary nucleic acids for degradation. Here we review recent advances in the structural biology of the...

  16. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  17. Structural and Computational Studies of Small Organic and Biological Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Casal, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques have been widely utilised to perform structural studies in many areas of research. For example, physicists make use of these experimental techniques to investigate metals, conductor and semi-conductor compounds among others, whereas geochemists apply them to study the conditions deep within the Earth’s interior. Furthermore, pressure studies have reached an important status in chemistry, biology and planetary science, and ...

  18. Determinants of Capital Structure of UK Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Meiying

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the determinants of capital structure of UK firms and identify which existing theory of capital structure is most relevant and applicable to UK firms. The sample of this study involves 239 listed firms from 9 industries on the FTSE 350 Index in the UK from 2000 to 2009. ANOVA and panel data regression are run to analyze what factors have impact on firm’s decision of capital structure. Each test is run on long-term and short-term leverage as dependent variables. ...

  19. Determination of the neutron spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New measurements of the neutron spin structure function, g1(x), made at SLAC are reported, using longitudinally polarized electrons on a polarized 3He target. The spin structure function of the neutron has been determined from x=0.03 to x=0.6 at an average Q2 of 2 (GeV/c)2, by measuring the asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized 3He at energies from 19 to 26 GeV. The integral over the spin structure function has been calculated. (author) 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activity of novel diester cyclophanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Bingqin; Fang, Xianwen; Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Meipan, E-mail: yangbq@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Northwest University, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel diester cyclophanes was synthesized by esterification of 1,2-benzenedicarbonyl chloride with eight different diols under high dilution conditions. The structures of the compounds were verified by elemental analysis, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The crystal structures of two compounds were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffractometry (XRD). All the new cyclophanes were evaluated for biological activities and the results showed that some of these compounds have low antibacterial or antifungal activities (author)

  1. Magnetic Micro/Nano Structures for Biological Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chang, Wei-Chieh; Yeh, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Ming-Shinn; Chang, Ching-Ray; Chen, Jiann-Yeu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2016-05-01

    Biomanipulation based on micro/nano structures is an attractive approach for biotechnology. To manipulate biological systems by magnetic forces, the magnetic labeling technology utilized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a common rule. Ferrofluid, well-dispersed MNPs, can be used for magnetic modification of the surface or as molds to form organized microstructures. For magnetic-based micro/nano structures, different methods to modulate magnetic field at the microscale have been developed. Specifically, this review focused on a new strategy which uses the concept of micromagnetism of patterned magnetic thin film with specific domain walls configurations to generate stable magnetic poles for cell patterning.

  2. Representing Personal Determinants in Causal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Responds to Staddon's critique of the author's earlier article and addresses issues raised by Staddon's (1984) alternative models of causality. The author argues that it is not the formalizability of causal processes that is the issue but whether cognitive determinants of behavior are reducible to past stimulus inputs in causal structures.…

  3. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

  4. Robust structural analysis of native biological macromolecules from multi-crystal anomalous diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous diffraction signals from typical native macromolecules are very weak, frustrating their use in structure determination. Here, native SAD procedures are described for enhancing the signal to noise in anomalous diffraction by using multiple crystals are described. Five applications demonstrate that truly routine structure determination is possible without the need for heavy atoms. Structure determinations for biological macromolecules that have no known structural antecedents typically involve the incorporation of heavier atoms than those found natively in biological molecules. Currently, selenomethionyl proteins analyzed using single- or multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD or MAD) data predominate for such de novo analyses. Naturally occurring metal ions such as zinc or iron often suffice in MAD or SAD experiments, and sulfur SAD has been an option since it was first demonstrated using crambin 30 years ago; however, SAD analyses of structures containing only light atoms (Zmax ≤ 20) have not been common. Here, robust procedures for enhancing the signal to noise in measurements of anomalous diffraction by combining data collected from several crystals at a lower than usual X-ray energy are described. This multi-crystal native SAD method was applied in five structure determinations, using between five and 13 crystals to determine substructures of between four and 52 anomalous scatterers (Z ≤ 20) and then the full structures ranging from 127 to 1200 ordered residues per asymmetric unit at resolutions from 2.3 to 2.8 Å. Tests were devised to assure that all of the crystals used were statistically equivalent. Elemental identities for Ca, Cl, S, P and Mg were proven by f′′ scattering-factor refinements. The procedures are robust, indicating that truly routine structure determination of typical native macromolecules is realised. Synchrotron beamlines that are optimized for low-energy X-ray diffraction measurements will facilitate such direct

  5. Synthesis, structure and biological properties of active spirohydantoin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Anita M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirohidantoins represent an pharmacologically important class of heterocycles since many derivatives have been recognized that display interesting activities against a wide range of biological targets. First synthesis of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins was performed by Bucherer and Lieb 1934 by the reaction of cycloalkanone, potassium cyanide and ammonium-carbonate at reflux in a mixture of ethanol and water. QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship studies showed that a wide range of biological activities of spirohydantoin derivatives strongly depend upon their structure. This paper describes different methods of synthesis of spirohydantoin derivatives, their physico-chemical properties and biological activity. It emphasizes the importance of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins with anticonvulsant, antiproliferative, antipsychotic, antimicrobial and antiinflammatory properties as well as their importance in the treatment of diabetes. Numerous spirohydantoin compounds exhibit physiological activity such as serotonin and fibrinogen antagonist, inhibitors of the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor also, antagonist of leukocyte cell adhesion, acting as allosteric inhibitors of the protein-protein interactions. Some spirohydantoin derivatives have been identified as antitumor agents. Their activity depends on the substituent presented at position N-3 of the hydantoin ring and increases in order alkene > ester > ether. Besides that, compounds that contain two electron withdrawing groups (e.g. fluorine or chlorine on the third and fourth position of the phenyl ring are better antitumor agents than compounds with a single electron withdrawing group. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172013

  6. Tensegrity I. Cell structure and hierarchical systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993, a Commentary in this journal described how a simple mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture can help to explain how cell shape, movement and cytoskeletal mechanics are controlled, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces (J. Cell Sci. 104, 613-627). The cellular tensegrity model can now be revisited and placed in context of new advances in our understanding of cell structure, biological networks and mechanoregulation that have been made over the past decade. Recent work provides strong evidence to support the use of tensegrity by cells, and mathematical formulations of the model predict many aspects of cell behavior. In addition, development of the tensegrity theory and its translation into mathematical terms are beginning to allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry at the molecular level and to attack the larger problem of biological complexity. Part I of this two-part article covers the evidence for cellular tensegrity at the molecular level and describes how this building system may provide a structural basis for the hierarchical organization of living systems--from molecule to organism. Part II, which focuses on how these structural networks influence information processing networks, appears in the next issue.

  7. Structure determination of membrane proteins in five easy pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marassi, Francesca M; Das, Bibhuti B; Lu, George J; Nothnagel, Henry J; Park, Sang Ho; Son, Woo Sung; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J

    2011-12-01

    Rotational Alignment (RA) solid-state NMR provides the basis for a general method for determining the structures of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Membrane proteins are high priority targets for structure determination, and are challenging for existing experimental methods. Because membrane proteins reside in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayer membranes it is important to study them in this type of environment. The RA solid-state NMR approach we have developed can be summarized in five steps, and incorporates methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, sample preparation, the implementation of NMR experiments, and structure calculations. It relies on solid-state NMR spectroscopy to obtain high-resolution spectra and residue-specific structural restraints for membrane proteins that undergo rotational diffusion around the membrane normal, but whose mobility is otherwise restricted by interactions with the membrane phospholipids. High resolution spectra of membrane proteins alone and in complex with other proteins and ligands set the stage for structure determination and functional studies of these proteins in their native, functional environment. PMID:21964394

  8. Determinants of Capital Structure of UK Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the determinants of capital structure of the UK companies and to provide some up-to-date empirical evidence for previous literatures. The sample of this study involves all non-financial companies listed on the FTSE350 Index during the time period from 2003 to 2012. The analysis of variance and panel data regression models are performed to test what factors may affect the UK companies’ financing decisions. In each model, three different measures of financial leverage...

  9. Determinate the BPA in biological samples by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a new radiation therapy, of which clinical interest has focused primarily on the treatment of high-grade gliomas. At present, the most effective drug for BNCT is p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), because it has little side effect and low toxicity, persisted longer in tumors compared with related molecules. The method of 3-Methoxy-Methylenimine H spectrophotometry was established to measure the concentration of 10B in biological samples. The biodistribution of the BPA was studied in normal mice. (authors)

  10. Use of reverse micelles in membrane protein structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane protein structural biology is a rapidly developing field with fundamental importance for elucidating key biological and biophysical processes including signal transduction, intercellular communication, and cellular transport. In addition to the intrinsic interest in this area of research, structural studies of membrane proteins have direct significance on the development of therapeutics that impact human health in diverse and important ways. In this article we demonstrate the potential of investigating the structure of membrane proteins using the reverse micelle forming surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) in application to the prototypical model ion channel gramicidin A. Reverse micelles are surfactant based nanoparticles which have been employed to investigate fundamental physical properties of biomolecules. The results of this solution NMR based study indicate that the AOT reverse micelle system is capable of refolding and stabilizing relatively high concentrations of the native conformation of gramicidin A. Importantly, pulsed-field-gradient NMR diffusion and NOESY experiments reveal stable gramicidin A homodimer interactions that bridge reverse micelle particles. The spectroscopic benefit of reverse micelle-membrane protein solubilization is also explored, and significant enhancement over commonly used micelle based mimetic systems is demonstrated. These results establish the effectiveness of reverse micelle based studies of membrane proteins, and illustrate that membrane proteins solubilized by reverse micelles are compatible with high resolution solution NMR techniques

  11. Image-based surface matching algorithm oriented to structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merelli, Ivan; Cozzi, Paolo; D'Agostino, Daniele; Clematis, Andrea; Milanesi, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies for structure matching based on surface descriptions have demonstrated their effectiveness in many research fields. In particular, they can be successfully applied to in silico studies of structural biology. Protein activities, in fact, are related to the external characteristics of these macromolecules and the ability to match surfaces can be important to infer information about their possible functions and interactions. In this work, we present a surface-matching algorithm, based on encoding the outer morphology of proteins in images of local description, which allows us to establish point-to-point correlations among macromolecular surfaces using image-processing functions. Discarding methods relying on biological analysis of atomic structures and expensive computational approaches based on energetic studies, this algorithm can successfully be used for macromolecular recognition by employing local surface features. Results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can be employed both to identify surface similarities in context of macromolecular functional analysis and to screen possible protein interactions to predict pairing capability. PMID:21566253

  12. Use of reverse micelles in membrane protein structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Horn, Wade D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Center for Structural Biology (United States); Ogilvie, Mark E.; Flynn, Peter F. [University of Utah, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: peter.flynn@utah.edu

    2008-03-15

    Membrane protein structural biology is a rapidly developing field with fundamental importance for elucidating key biological and biophysical processes including signal transduction, intercellular communication, and cellular transport. In addition to the intrinsic interest in this area of research, structural studies of membrane proteins have direct significance on the development of therapeutics that impact human health in diverse and important ways. In this article we demonstrate the potential of investigating the structure of membrane proteins using the reverse micelle forming surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) in application to the prototypical model ion channel gramicidin A. Reverse micelles are surfactant based nanoparticles which have been employed to investigate fundamental physical properties of biomolecules. The results of this solution NMR based study indicate that the AOT reverse micelle system is capable of refolding and stabilizing relatively high concentrations of the native conformation of gramicidin A. Importantly, pulsed-field-gradient NMR diffusion and NOESY experiments reveal stable gramicidin A homodimer interactions that bridge reverse micelle particles. The spectroscopic benefit of reverse micelle-membrane protein solubilization is also explored, and significant enhancement over commonly used micelle based mimetic systems is demonstrated. These results establish the effectiveness of reverse micelle based studies of membrane proteins, and illustrate that membrane proteins solubilized by reverse micelles are compatible with high resolution solution NMR techniques.

  13. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  14. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-[3H]3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent

  15. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  16. Computer structures perspective on switching dynamics of simple biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moškon, Miha

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a rapidly evolving discipline that copes with the modifications of existent and with the construction of new biological systems with novel functionalities. Its interdisciplinarity arises from combining of engineering and biological sciences. Biological computing is a relatively new research field that is analyzing the possibilities of constructing a biological computer. Synthetic biology approaches can also be used in order to build biological computer. Certain levels of ...

  17. [Critical aspects in determining total radioactivity of biological samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, M P; Paolini, M; Corsi, C; Bauer, C

    1989-03-01

    During measurements of radioactivity in some milk samples with liquid scintillation counter (about one year after the nuclear accident of Chernobyl) we have observed an increase of the values of scintillation fluid with the passing of time. Although this enhancement is absolutely small (about 2 c.p.m. in 500 min), it is very important for an exact measurement of samples at low counting, as those tested. Our protocol of measure provides for insertion of alternate blanks and samples in the automatic sample-holders of liquid scintillation counter. The values of measurement of samples are taken during the increase phase subtracting the value of blank interpolated on the increasing straight line from c.p.m. of sample. Finally, we report the collected values of the whole radioactivity in some milk samples: at least 5-6 nCi/L contrary to about 1 nCi/L of 137Cs reported by USL. In our opinion it is important to consider the whole radioactivity as measure of the overall biological danger of radioactive samples. In fact, this measurement takes into account also biologically very dangerous radionuclides as 3H, 14C, 90Sr. PMID:2765252

  18. Revealing biological information using data structuring and automated learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorianu, Irina; Moulton, Vincent

    2010-11-01

    The intermediary steps between a biological hypothesis, concretized in the input data, and meaningful results, validated using biological experiments, commonly employ bioinformatics tools. Starting with storage of the data and ending with a statistical analysis of the significance of the results, every step in a bioinformatics analysis has been intensively studied and the resulting methods and models patented. This review summarizes the bioinformatics patents that have been developed mainly for the study of genes, and points out the universal applicability of bioinformatics methods to other related studies such as RNA interference. More specifically, we overview the steps undertaken in the majority of bioinformatics analyses, highlighting, for each, various approaches that have been developed to reveal details from different perspectives. First we consider data warehousing, the first task that has to be performed efficiently, optimizing the structure of the database, in order to facilitate both the subsequent steps and the retrieval of information. Next, we review data mining, which occupies the central part of most bioinformatics analyses, presenting patents concerning differential expression, unsupervised and supervised learning. Last, we discuss how networks of interactions of genes or other players in the cell may be created, which help draw biological conclusions and have been described in several patents. PMID:21288193

  19. Determinate structures for wing camber control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of truss structures for the purpose of creating a continuously variable camber trailing edge device for an aircraft wing is presented. By creating structures that are both statically and kinematically determinate and then substituting truss elements for actuators, it is possible to impose structural deflection without inducing member stress. A limited number of actuators with limited strain capabilities are located within the structure in order to achieve a target deflected shape starting from an initially symmetric profile. Two objective functions are used to achieve this: a geometric objective for which the target displacement is fixed and a shape objective for which the target displacement is dependent on the surface shape of the targeted aerofoil. The proposed shape objective function is able to offer improvements over the geometric objective by removing some of the constraints applied to the targeted structure joint locations. Four methods for selecting the location of a set of actuators are compared, namely exhaustive search, a genetic algorithm, stepwise forward selection (SFS) and incremental forward selection (IFS). Both SFS and IFS are variations of regression methods for subset selection; in each case an approach has been created to allow the imposing of upper and lower bounds on the search space. It is shown that the genetic algorithm is well suited to addressing the problem of optimally locating a set of actuators; however, regression methods, particularly IFS, can provide a rapid tool suitable for addressing large selection problems

  20. Mass spectrometric determination of early and advanced glycation in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Naila; Ashour, Amal; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycation in biological systems occurs predominantly on lysine, arginine and N-terminal residues of proteins. Major quantitative glycation adducts are found at mean extents of modification of 1-5 mol percent of proteins. These are glucose-derived fructosamine on lysine and N-terminal residues of proteins, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone on arginine residues and N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine residues mainly formed by the oxidative degradation of fructosamine. Total glycation adducts of different types are quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Metabolism of glycated proteins is followed by LC-MS/MS of glycation free adducts as minor components of the amino acid metabolome. Glycated proteins and sites of modification within them - amino acid residues modified by the glycating agent moiety - are identified and quantified by label-free and stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) high resolution mass spectrometry. Sites of glycation by glucose and methylglyoxal in selected proteins are listed. Key issues in applying proteomics techniques to analysis of glycated proteins are: (i) avoiding compromise of analysis by formation, loss and relocation of glycation adducts in pre-analytic processing; (ii) specificity of immunoaffinity enrichment procedures, (iii) maximizing protein sequence coverage in mass spectrometric analysis for detection of glycation sites, and (iv) development of bioinformatics tools for prediction of protein glycation sites. Protein glycation studies have important applications in biology, ageing and translational medicine - particularly on studies of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, neurological disorders and cancer. Mass spectrometric analysis of glycated proteins has yet to find widespread use clinically. Future use in health screening, disease diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, and

  1. Thorium determination in water and biological materials by fission track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a segment of a research programme on the study of bioaccumulation of radionuclides, in animals and vegetables from Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas, MG, a fission track method for the determination of low levels of thorium in environmental samples was developed as an alternative for alpha spectroscopy. The study was carried out in early alpha spectroscopy samples, containing high levels of 228 Th activity, which makes difficult the 232 Th determination. A dry way method for thorium evaluation was developed. Pieces of membrane filters, containing La F3 (Th), coupled to Makrofol detectors, were irradiated in the core of a research reactor, IEA-R1 (IPEN). (author)

  2. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. PMID:27130094

  3. Determinants of Capital Structure in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladele John AKINYOMI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Capital structure represents one of the most discussed concepts in financial management. Capital structure refers to how a company finances its operations whether through shareholders equity-fund or debt or a combination of both. Various internal and external factors contribute to the choice of these sources of fund. The external factors include factors such as tax policy, capital market conditions and tax policy, among others. Meanwhile, the internal factors are those that relate to individual firm characteristics. This study examines the determinants of capital structure in Nigeria using the descriptive research design. The population comprised of the eighty-six manufacturing firms that are listed in the Nigerian Stock Exchange. The sample firms were selected using the simple random sampling method. Secondary data obtained from the annual accounts of 24 randomly selected manufacturing firms for 10 years period culminating in 240 firm-year observations. The results of the regression analysis revealed that leverage (a measure of capital structure has a negative relationship with firm size and tax on one hand and a positive relationship with tangibility of assets, profitability and growth on the other hand. However, only with tangibility of assets and firm size that significant relationship is established. It is recommended for future researchers to carry out similar studies in multiple sectors.

  4. Nonoxidized, biologically active parathyroid hormone determines mortality in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepel, Martin; Armbruster, Franz Paul; Grön, Hans Jürgen; Scholze, Alexandra; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Roth, Heinz Jürgen; Hocher, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background: It was shown that nonoxidized PTH (n-oxPTH) is bioactive, whereas the oxidation of PTH results in a loss of biological activity. Methods: In this study we analyzed the association of n-oxPTH on mortality in hemodialysis patients using a recently developed assay system. Results......: Hemodialysis patients (224 men, 116 women) had a median age of 66 years. One hundred seventy patients (50%) died during the follow-up period of 5 years. Median n-oxPTH levels were higher in survivors (7.2 ng/L) compared with deceased patients (5.0 ng/L; P = .002). Survival analysis showed an increased survival......-oxPTH levels. Conclusions: The predictive power of n-oxPTH and iPTH on the mortality of hemodialysis patients differs substantially. Measurements of n-oxPTH may reflect the hormone status more precisely. The iPTH-associated mortality is most likely describing oxidative stress-related mortality....

  5. Energy and time determine scaling in biological and computer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Melanie; Bezerra, George; Edwards, Benjamin; Brown, James; Forrest, Stephanie

    2016-08-19

    Metabolic rate in animals and power consumption in computers are analogous quantities that scale similarly with size. We analyse vascular systems of mammals and on-chip networks of microprocessors, where natural selection and human engineering, respectively, have produced systems that minimize both energy dissipation and delivery times. Using a simple network model that simultaneously minimizes energy and time, our analysis explains empirically observed trends in the scaling of metabolic rate in mammals and power consumption and performance in microprocessors across several orders of magnitude in size. Just as the evolutionary transitions from unicellular to multicellular animals in biology are associated with shifts in metabolic scaling, our model suggests that the scaling of power and performance will change as computer designs transition to decentralized multi-core and distributed cyber-physical systems. More generally, a single energy-time minimization principle may govern the design of many complex systems that process energy, materials and information.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431524

  6. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  7. RNAA determination of As, Cd and Zn in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the IAEA project 3739/RB the elements Hg, As, Cd and Zn in human spleen, kidney, heart, liver, SRM Bovine Liver 1577a and Bowen's Kale. The consecutive extraction have been chosen as the most rational approach determining these elements in a single specimen. Aiming at getting reliable results well established systems were used (ditizone to separate Hg, Cu and DEDTC to extract As, Cd and Zn). Special attention was paid to the accuracy of the determination. Monitoring, optimization and cooling time and control of chemical yield were carried out in each case. The samples were irradiated in the vertical channel of the IRT-2000 reactor in Sofia, in thermal neutron flux of about 5.1012n.cm-2.s-1 for 24 h. Iron monitor was used and cooling time varied from 20 h to 30 h

  8. Logical Reduction of Biological Networks to Their Most Determinative Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matache, Mihaela T; Matache, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used as models for gene regulatory networks, signal transduction networks, or neural networks, among many others. One of the main difficulties in analyzing the dynamics of a Boolean network and its sensitivity to perturbations or mutations is the fact that it grows exponentially with the number of nodes. Therefore, various approaches for simplifying the computations and reducing the network to a subset of relevant nodes have been proposed in the past few years. We consider a recently introduced method for reducing a Boolean network to its most determinative nodes that yield the highest information gain. The determinative power of a node is obtained by a summation of all mutual information quantities over all nodes having the chosen node as a common input, thus representing a measure of information gain obtained by the knowledge of the node under consideration. The determinative power of nodes has been considered in the literature under the assumption that the inputs are independent in which case one can use the Bahadur orthonormal basis. In this article, we relax that assumption and use a standard orthonormal basis instead. We use techniques of Hilbert space operators and harmonic analysis to generate formulas for the sensitivity to perturbations of nodes, quantified by the notions of influence, average sensitivity, and strength. Since we work on finite-dimensional spaces, our formulas and estimates can be and are formulated in plain matrix algebra terminology. We analyze the determinative power of nodes for a Boolean model of a signal transduction network of a generic fibroblast cell. We also show the similarities and differences induced by the alternative complete orthonormal basis used. Among the similarities, we mention the fact that the knowledge of the states of the most determinative nodes reduces the entropy or uncertainty of the overall network significantly. In a special case, we obtain a stronger result than in previous

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Arsenic, Manganese, and Selenium in Biological Materials by Neutron-Activation Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else

    1973-01-01

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, manganese, and selenium in biological material by thermal-neutron activation analysis. The use of 81 mSe as indicator for selenium permitted a reduction of activation time to 1 hr for a 1 g sample, and the possibility of loss...... the ppM level in samples of biological tissue....

  10. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  11. Exploiting Microbeams for Membrane Protein Structure Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J; Axford, Danny; Paterson, Neil G; Owen, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    A reproducible, and sample independent means of predictably obtaining large, well-ordered crystals has proven elusive in macromolecular crystallography. In the structure determination pipeline, crystallisation often proves to be a rate-limiting step, and the process of obtaining even small or badly ordered crystals can prove time-consuming and laborious. This is particularly true in the field of membrane protein crystallography and this is reflected in the limited number of unique membrane protein structures deposited in the protein data bank (less than 650 by June 2016 - http://blanco.biomol.uci.edu/mpstruc ). Over recent years the requirement for, and time and cost associated with obtaining, large crystals has been partially alleviated through the development of beamline instrumentation allowing data collection, and structure solution, from ever-smaller crystals. Advances in several areas have led to a step change in what might be considered achievable during a synchrotron trip over the last decade. This chapter will briefly review the current status of the field, the tools available to ease data collection and processing, and give some examples of exploitation of these for membrane protein microfocus macromolecular crystallography. PMID:27553238

  12. Generalized X-ray and neutron crystallographic analysis: more accurate and complete structures for biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray and neutron crystallographic data have been combined in a joint structure-refinement procedure that has been developed using recent advances in modern computational methodologies, including cross-validated maximum-likelihood target functions with gradient-based optimization and simulated annealing. X-ray and neutron crystallographic techniques provide complementary information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. X-ray and neutron (XN) crystallographic data have been combined in a joint structure-refinement procedure that has been developed using recent advances in modern computational methodologies, including cross-validated maximum-likelihood target functions with gradient-based optimization and simulated annealing. The XN approach for complete (including hydrogen) macromolecular structure analysis provides more accurate and complete structures, as demonstrated for diisopropyl fluorophosphatase, photoactive yellow protein and human aldose reductase. Furthermore, this method has several practical advantages, including the easier determination of the orientation of water molecules, hydroxyl groups and some amino-acid side chains

  13. Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 7 November). Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success. Poster presentation at the International ICO Fall School, Girona, Spain.

  14. The High-Strain Rate Loading of Structural Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, W. G.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Bo, C.; Butler, B. J.; Boddy, R. L.; Williams, A.; Masouros, S.; Brown, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    The human body can be subjected to violent acceleration as a result of explosion caused by military ordinance or accident. Blast waves cause injury and blunt trauma can be produced by violent impact of objects against the human body. The long-term clinical manifestations of blast injury can be significantly different in nature and extent to those suffering less aggressive insult. Similarly, the damage seen in lower limbs from those injured in explosion incidents is in general more severe than those falling from height. These phenomena increase the need for knowledge of the short- and long-term effect of transient mechanical loading to the biological structures of the human body. This paper gives an overview of some of the results of collaborative investigation into blast injury. The requirement for time-resolved data, appropriate mechanical modeling, materials characterization and biological effects is presented. The use of a range of loading platforms, universal testing machines, drop weights, Hopkinson bars, and bespoke traumatic injury simulators are given.

  15. Specific determination of clinical and toxicological important substances in biological samples by LC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis of this dissertation is the specific determination of clinical and toxicological important substances in biological samples by LC-MS. Nicotine was determined in serum after application of nicotine plaster and nicotine nasal spray with HPLC-ESI-MS. Cotinine was determined direct in urine with HPLC-ESI-MS. Short time anesthetics were determined in blood and cytostatics were determined in liquor with HPLC-ESI-MS. (botek)

  16. Data acquisition and analysis at the Structural Biology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC), a national user facility for macromolecular crystallography located at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source, is currently being built and commissioned. SBC facilities include a bending-magnet beamline, an insertion-device beamline, laboratory and office space adjacent to the beamlines, and associated instrumentation, experimental apparatus, and facilities. SBC technical facilities will support anomalous dispersion phasing experiments, data collection from microcrystals, data collection from crystals with large molecular structures and rapid data collection from multiple related crystal structures for protein engineering and drug design. The SBC Computing Systems and Software Engineering Group is tasked with developing the SBC Control System, which includes computing systems, network, and software. The emphasis of SBC Control System development has been to provide efficient and convenient beamline control, data acquisition, and data analysis for maximal facility and experimenter productivity. This paper describes the SBC Control System development, specifically data acquisition and analysis at the SBC, and the development methods used to meet this goal

  17. Structure, Function, and Biology of the Enterococcus faecalis Cytolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Van Tyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive commensal member of the gut microbiota of a wide range of organisms. With the advent of antibiotic therapy, it has emerged as a multidrug resistant, hospital-acquired pathogen. Highly virulent strains of E. faecalis express a pore-forming exotoxin, called cytolysin, which lyses both bacterial and eukaryotic cells in response to quorum signals. Originally described in the 1930s, the cytolysin is a member of a large class of lanthionine-containing bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. While the cytolysin shares some core features with other lantibiotics, it possesses unique characteristics as well. The current understanding of cytolysin biosynthesis, structure/function relationships, and contribution to the biology of E. faecalis are reviewed, and opportunities for using emerging technologies to advance this understanding are discussed.

  18. Structural Determinants of Misfolding in Multidomain Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; Best, Robert B

    2016-05-01

    Recent single molecule experiments, using either atomic force microscopy (AFM) or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have shown that multidomain proteins containing tandem repeats may form stable misfolded structures. Topology-based simulation models have been used successfully to generate models for these structures with domain-swapped features, fully consistent with the available data. However, it is also known that some multidomain protein folds exhibit no evidence for misfolding, even when adjacent domains have identical sequences. Here we pose the question: what factors influence the propensity of a given fold to undergo domain-swapped misfolding? Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we can reproduce the known propensities of multidomain proteins to form domain-swapped misfolds, where data is available. Contrary to what might be naively expected based on the previously described misfolding mechanism, we find that the extent of misfolding is not determined by the relative folding rates or barrier heights for forming the domains present in the initial intermediates leading to folded or misfolded structures. Instead, it appears that the propensity is more closely related to the relative stability of the domains present in folded and misfolded intermediates. We show that these findings can be rationalized if the folded and misfolded domains are part of the same folding funnel, with commitment to one structure or the other occurring only at a relatively late stage of folding. Nonetheless, the results are still fully consistent with the kinetic models previously proposed to explain misfolding, with a specific interpretation of the observed rate coefficients. Finally, we investigate the relation between interdomain linker length and misfolding, and propose a simple alchemical model to predict the propensity for domain-swapped misfolding of multidomain proteins. PMID:27163669

  19. Structural Determinants of Misfolding in Multidomain Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; Best, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent single molecule experiments, using either atomic force microscopy (AFM) or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have shown that multidomain proteins containing tandem repeats may form stable misfolded structures. Topology-based simulation models have been used successfully to generate models for these structures with domain-swapped features, fully consistent with the available data. However, it is also known that some multidomain protein folds exhibit no evidence for misfolding, even when adjacent domains have identical sequences. Here we pose the question: what factors influence the propensity of a given fold to undergo domain-swapped misfolding? Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we can reproduce the known propensities of multidomain proteins to form domain-swapped misfolds, where data is available. Contrary to what might be naively expected based on the previously described misfolding mechanism, we find that the extent of misfolding is not determined by the relative folding rates or barrier heights for forming the domains present in the initial intermediates leading to folded or misfolded structures. Instead, it appears that the propensity is more closely related to the relative stability of the domains present in folded and misfolded intermediates. We show that these findings can be rationalized if the folded and misfolded domains are part of the same folding funnel, with commitment to one structure or the other occurring only at a relatively late stage of folding. Nonetheless, the results are still fully consistent with the kinetic models previously proposed to explain misfolding, with a specific interpretation of the observed rate coefficients. Finally, we investigate the relation between interdomain linker length and misfolding, and propose a simple alchemical model to predict the propensity for domain-swapped misfolding of multidomain proteins. PMID:27163669

  20. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Deepa, Mohan [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Sciences-Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Govindaraju, Munisamy [Bio-Spatial Technology Research Unit, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, School of Environmental Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-02-26

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  1. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”

  2. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal Appavu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  3. Core/Shell Structured Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biological Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, drug delivery and cell signaling. The surface modification of the nanomaterials is required for biomedical use to give physiogical stability, surface reactivity and targeting properties. Among many approaches for the surface modification with materials, such as polymers, organic ligands and metals, one of the most attractive ways is using metals. The fabrication of metal-based, monolayer-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively studied. However, the synthesis of metal-capped magnetic nanoparticles with monodispersities and controllable sizes is still challenged. Recently, gold-capped magnetic nanoparticles have been reported to increase stability and to provide biocompatibility. Magnetic nanoparticle with gold coating is an attractive system, which can be stabilized in biological conditions and readily functionalized in biological conditions and readily functionalized through well-established surface modification (Au-S) chemistry. The Au coating offers plasmonic properties to magnetic nanoparticles. This makes the magnetic/Au core/shell combinations interesting for magnetic and optical applications. Herein, the synthesis and characterization of gold capped-magnetic core structured nanomaterials with different gold sources, such as gold acetate and chloroauric acid have been reported. The core/shell nanoparticles were transferred from organic to aqueous solutions for biomedical applications. Magnetic core/shell structured nanoparticles have been prepared and transferred from organic phase to aqueous solutions. The resulting Au-coated magnetic core nanoparticles might be an attractive system for biomedical applications, which are needed both magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging

  4. The Effect of Knowledge Linking Levels in Biology Lessons upon Students' Knowledge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadouh, Julia; Liu, Ning; Sandmann, Angela; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge structure is an important aspect for defining students' competency in biology learning, but how knowledge structure is influenced by the teaching process in naturalistic biology classroom settings has scarcely been empirically investigated. In this study, 49 biology lessons in the teaching unit "blood and circulatory…

  5. Coenzyme Q10 analytical determination in biological matrices and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucangioli, Silvia; Martinefski, Manuela; Tripodi, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analytical determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has gained importance in clinical diagnosis and in pharmaceutical quality control. CoQ10 is an important cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a potent endogenous antioxidant. CoQ10 deficiency is often associated with numerous diseases and patients with these conditions may benefit from administration of supplements of CoQ10. In this regard, it has been observed that the best benefits are obtained when CoQ10 deficiency is diagnosed and treated early. Therefore, it is of great value to develop analytical methods for the detection and quantification of CoQ10 in this type of disease. The methods above mentioned should be simple enough to be used in routine clinical laboratories as well as in quality control of pharmaceutical formulations containing CoQ10. Here, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of CoQ10 analysis. PMID:27100710

  6. Voltammetric determination of cefixime in pharmaceuticals and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajeev; Gupta, Vinod K; Jadon, N; Radhapyari, K

    2010-12-01

    Electroreduction and adsorption of cefixime was studied in phosphate buffer by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPCAdSV), and square-wave cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWCAdSV) at hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). These fully validated sensitive and reproducible cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedures were applied for the trace determination of the bulk drug in pharmaceutical formulations and in human urine. The optimal experimental parameters were as follows: accumulation potential=-0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3M KCl), accumulation time=50s, frequency=140 Hz, pulse amplitude=0.07 V, and scan increment=10 mV in phosphate buffer (pH 2.6). The first peak current showed a linear dependence with the drug concentration over the range of 50 ng ml(-1) to 25.6 μg ml(-1). The achieved limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 3.99 and 13.3 ng ml(-1) by SWCAdSV and 7.98 and 26.6 ng ml(-1) by DPCAdSV, respectively. The procedure was applied to assay the drug in tablets. Applicability was also tested in urine samples. Peak current was linear with the drug concentration in the range of 1 to 60 μg ml(-1) of the urine, and minimum detectability was found to be 12.6 ng ml(-1) by SWCAdSV and 58.4 ng ml(-1) by DPCAdSV. PMID:20678464

  7. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1977-01-01

    Crystallography may be described as the science of the structure of materi­ als, using this word in its widest sense, and its ramifications are apparent over a broad front of current scientific endeavor. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that most universities offer some aspects of crystallography in their undergraduate courses in the physical sciences. It is the principal aim of this book to present an introduction to structure determination by X-ray crystal­ lography that is appropriate mainly to both final-year undergraduate studies in crystallography, chemistry, and chemical physics, and introductory post­ graduate work in this area of crystallography. We believe that the book will be of interest in other disciplines, such as physics, metallurgy, biochemistry, and geology, where crystallography has an important part to play. In the space of one book, it is not possible either to cover all aspects of crystallography or to treat all the subject matter completely rigorously. In particular, certain ...

  8. Crystal structure determination of Jatrorrhizine chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI XianRong; YANG JianHua; LIN Xiang; DAI Qin; CHENG Qiang; GUO LingHong; LI Hui

    2009-01-01

    Optimum resolution data of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for Jatrorrhizine (Jat) were collected by an X' Pert Pro MPD diffractometer with an X'celerator detector under the stepwise scanning condition as 8.255 ms and 0.00836°per step,2θrange of 50°-80° and total scanning period of 8-10 min. Indexing of the crystal system and a search of the space group from the powder X-ray diffraction data were conducted by the computational crystallography method. The pilot crystal models of Jat were globally optimized with Monte Carlo method and then refined with the Rietveld method. In parallel with PXRD test,single crystals of Jat were cultured in an aqueous solution by a slow-decreasing temperature method,then its crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD). Both crystal structures from PXRD and SCXRD are identical. The results show that the crystal structure of Jat belongs to a monoclinic system and the space group P21/c. The parameters of cell dimensions from PXRD are a=7.69(A),b= 12.55(A),c=20.89(A),β=106.53°,Z=4,and V=1933.4(A)3,meanwhile the parameters from SCXRD are a=7.72(A),b=12.61(A),c=20.99(A),β=106.38°,Z=4,and V=1961.3(A)3.

  9. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  10. Structural, biological and biophysical properties of glycated and glycoxidized phosphatidylethanolamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibal, Andrea; Riemer, Thomas; Jovanovic, Olga; Westphal, Dennis; Griesser, Eva; Pohl, Elena E; Schiller, Jürgen; Hoffmann, Ralf; Fedorova, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Glycation and glycoxidation of proteins and peptides have been intensively studied and are considered as reliable diagnostic biomarkers of hyperglycemia and early stages of type II diabetes. However, glucose can also react with primary amino groups present in other cellular components, such as aminophospholipids (aminoPLs). Although it is proposed that glycated aminoPLs can induce many cellular responses and contribute to the development and progression of diabetes, the routes of their formation and their biological roles are only partially revealed. The same is true for the influence of glucose-derived modifications on the biophysical properties of PLs. Here we studied structural, signaling, and biophysical properties of glycated and glycoxidized phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). By combining high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy it was possible to deduce the structures of several intermediates indicating an oxidative cleavage of the Amadori product yielding glycoxidized PEs including advanced glycation end products, such as carboxyethyl- and carboxymethyl-ethanolamines. The pro-oxidative role of glycated PEs was demonstrated and further associated with several cellular responses including activation of NFκB signaling pathways. Label free proteomics indicated significant alterations in proteins regulating cellular metabolisms. Finally, the biophysical properties of PL membranes changed significantly upon PE glycation, such as melting temperature (Tm), membrane surface charge, and ion transport across the phospholipid bilayer. PMID:27012418

  11. Overcoming bottlenecks in the membrane protein structural biology pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, David; Bill, Roslyn M; Jawhari, Anass; Rothnie, Alice J

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins account for a third of the eukaryotic proteome, but are greatly under-represented in the Protein Data Bank. Unfortunately, recent technological advances in X-ray crystallography and EM cannot account for the poor solubility and stability of membrane protein samples. A limitation of conventional detergent-based methods is that detergent molecules destabilize membrane proteins, leading to their aggregation. The use of orthologues, mutants and fusion tags has helped improve protein stability, but at the expense of not working with the sequence of interest. Novel detergents such as glucose neopentyl glycol (GNG), maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG) and calixarene-based detergents can improve protein stability without compromising their solubilizing properties. Styrene maleic acid lipid particles (SMALPs) focus on retaining the native lipid bilayer of a membrane protein during purification and biophysical analysis. Overcoming bottlenecks in the membrane protein structural biology pipeline, primarily by maintaining protein stability, will facilitate the elucidation of many more membrane protein structures in the near future. PMID:27284049

  12. Structural biology of intrinsically disordered proteins: Revisiting unsolved mysteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has challenged the classical protein structure-function paradigm by introducing a new paradigm of "coupled binding and folding". This paradigm suggests that IDPs fold upon binding to their partners. Further studies, however, revealed a novel and previously unrecognized phenomenon of "uncoupled binding and folding" suggesting that IDPs do not necessarily fold upon interaction with their lipid and protein partners. The complex and often unusual biophysics of IDPs makes structural characterization of these proteins and their complexes not only challenging but often resulting in opposite conclusions. For this reason, some crucial questions in this field remain unsolved for well over a decade. Considering an important role of IDPs in cellular regulation, signaling and control in health and disease, more efforts are needed to solve these mysteries. Here, I focus on two long-standing contradictions in the literature concerning dimerization and membrane-binding activities of IDPs. Molecular explanation of these discrepancies is provided. I also demonstrate how resolution of these critical issues in the field of IDPs results in our expanded understanding of cell function and has multiple applications in biology and medicine. PMID:27004461

  13. cellPACK: A Virtual Mesoscope to Model and Visualize Structural Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Graham T; Autin, Ludovic; Al-Alusi, Mostafa; Goodsell, David S.; Sanner, Michel F.; Olson, Arthur J.

    2014-01-01

    cellPACK assembles computational models of the biological mesoscale, an intermediate scale (10−7–10−8m) between molecular and cellular biology. cellPACK’s modular architecture unites existing and novel packing algorithms to generate, visualize and analyze comprehensive 3D models of complex biological environments that integrate data from multiple experimental systems biology and structural biology sources. cellPACK is currently available as open source code, with tools for validation of model...

  14. Using the Cambridge structure database of organic and organometalic compounds in structure biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, 1a (2010), b24-b26. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /8./. Nové Hrady, 18.03.2010-20.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : organic chemistry * Cambridge Structure Database * molecular structure Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://xray.cz/ms/bul2010-1a/friday2.pdf

  15. The Phenix Software for Automated Determination of Macromolecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Hung, Li-Wei; Jain, Swati; Kapral, Gary J.; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J.; Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Zwart, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is a critical tool in the study of biological systems. It is able to provide information that has been a prerequisite to understanding the fundamentals of life. It is also a method that is central to the development of new therapeutics for human disease. Significant time and effort are required to determine and optimize many macromolecular structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data, often using many different software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. The Phenix software package has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation. This has required the development of new algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input in favour of built-in expert-systems knowledge, the automation of procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and the development of a computational framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms. The application of automated methods is particularly appropriate in the field of structural proteomics, where high throughput is desired. Features in Phenix for the automation of experimental phasing with subsequent model building, molecular replacement, structure refinement and validation are described and examples given of running Phenix from both the command line and graphical user interface. PMID:21821126

  16. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  17. Polyphenols from Bee Pollen: Structure, Absorption, Metabolism and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rzepecka-Stojko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bee pollen constitutes a natural source of antioxidants such as phenolic acids and flavonoids, which are responsible for its biological activity. Research has indicated the correlation between dietary polyphenols and cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anticancerogenic, immunostimulating, antianaemic effects, as well as their beneficial influence on osseous tissue. The beneficial effects of bee pollen on health result from the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids which possess anti-inflammatory properties, phytosterol and linolenic acid which play an anticancerogenic role, and polysaccharides which stimulate immunological activity. Polyphenols are absorbed in the alimentary tract, metabolised by CYP450 enzymes, and excreted with urine and faeces. Flavonoids and phenolic acids are characterised by high antioxidative potential, which is closely related to their chemical structure. The high antioxidant potential of phenolic acids is due to the presence and location of hydroxyl groups, a carboxyl group in the immediate vicinity of ortho-diphenolic substituents, and the ethylene group between the phenyl ring and the carboxyl group. As regards flavonoids, essential structural elements are hydroxyl groups at the C5 and C7 positions in the A ring, and at the C3′ and C4′ positions in the B ring, and a hydroxyl group at the C3 position in the C ring. Furthermore, both, the double bond between C2 and C3, and a ketone group at the C4 position in the C ring enhance the antioxidative potential of these compounds. Polyphenols have an ideal chemical structure for scavenging free radicals and for creating chelates with metal ions, which makes them effective antioxidants in vivo.

  18. From structure of the complex to understanding of the biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy single-particle reconstructions. This paper concerns itself with the study of the macromolecular complexes that constitute viruses, using structural hybrid techniques. The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle reconstructions. Both techniques lean heavily on imposing icosahedral symmetry, thereby obscuring any deviation from the assumed symmetry. However, tailed bacteriophages have icosahedral or prolate icosahedral heads that have one obvious unique vertex where the genome can enter for DNA packaging and exit when infecting a host cell. The presence of the tail allows cryo-EM reconstructions in which the special vertex is used to orient the head in a unique manner. Some very large dsDNA icosahedral viruses also develop special vertices thought to be required for infecting host cells. Similarly, preliminary cryo-EM data for the small ssDNA canine parvovirus complexed with receptor suggests that these viruses, previously considered to be accurately icosahedral, might have some asymmetric properties that generate one preferred receptor-binding site on the viral surface. Comparisons are made between rhinoviruses that bind receptor molecules uniformly to all 60 equivalent binding sites, canine parvovirus, which appears to have a preferred receptor-binding site, and bacteriophage T4, which gains major biological advantages on account of its unique vertex and tail organelle

  19. From structure of the complex to understanding of the biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, Michael G., E-mail: mr@purdue.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Arisaka, Fumio [Graduate School and School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 5249 Nagatsuta-cho, Yokohama 226-8501-B39 (Japan); Battisti, Anthony J.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Chipman, Paul R.; Fokine, Andrei; Hafenstein, Susan [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Kanamaru, Shuji [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Graduate School and School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 5249 Nagatsuta-cho, Yokohama 226-8501-B39 (Japan); Kostyuchenko, Victor A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Shneider, Mikhail M. [Laboratory of Molecular Bioengineering, Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, 16/10 Miklukho-Maklaya Street, Moscow, 117997 (Russian Federation); Morais, Marc C.; Leiman, Petr G. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Palermo, Laura M.; Parrish, Colin R. [James A. Baker Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Xiao, Chuan [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy single-particle reconstructions. This paper concerns itself with the study of the macromolecular complexes that constitute viruses, using structural hybrid techniques. The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle reconstructions. Both techniques lean heavily on imposing icosahedral symmetry, thereby obscuring any deviation from the assumed symmetry. However, tailed bacteriophages have icosahedral or prolate icosahedral heads that have one obvious unique vertex where the genome can enter for DNA packaging and exit when infecting a host cell. The presence of the tail allows cryo-EM reconstructions in which the special vertex is used to orient the head in a unique manner. Some very large dsDNA icosahedral viruses also develop special vertices thought to be required for infecting host cells. Similarly, preliminary cryo-EM data for the small ssDNA canine parvovirus complexed with receptor suggests that these viruses, previously considered to be accurately icosahedral, might have some asymmetric properties that generate one preferred receptor-binding site on the viral surface. Comparisons are made between rhinoviruses that bind receptor molecules uniformly to all 60 equivalent binding sites, canine parvovirus, which appears to have a preferred receptor-binding site, and bacteriophage T4, which gains major biological advantages on account of its unique vertex and tail organelle.

  20. Determination of Protein Backbone Structures from Residual Dipolar Couplings

    OpenAIRE

    Prestegard, J H; Mayer, K. L.; Valafar, H.; Benison, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of circumstances where a focus on determination of the backbone structure of a protein, as opposed to a complete all-atom structure, may be appropriate. This is particularly the case for structures determined as a part of a structural genomics initiative where computational modeling of many sequentially related structures from the backbone of a single family representative is anti...

  1. 78 FR 55326 - Determinations Regarding Use of Chemical Weapons in Syria Under the Chemical and Biological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Determinations Regarding Use of Chemical Weapons in Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and..., 22 U.S.C. 5604(a), that the Government of Syria has used chemical weapons in violation of... Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs: (1) Determined that the Government of Syria has...

  2. Determining structure and function in nanomaterial biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, David M.

    Polymeric biomaterials represent the leading technologies available today for the repair of tissue damage and for targeted drug delivery. Perhaps the most valuable aspect of polymer-based systems is the extent to which their physical properties (e.g. elasticity, porosity, etc.) can be controlled and tuned by regulating experimental parameters during their synthesis. Biomaterial performance can be improved further still by including supplementary components resulting in a composite material. Synergetic interactions between the constituents of composite materials often results in bulk physical properties that are substantially more than the sum of individual parts. Through understanding and exploiting these sympathetic relationships, novel biocomposites can be developed which exhibit improved efficacy and biocompatibility. Here we report on the synthesis strategies and characterization of novel biocomposites from our laboratory. We look specifically at hydrogel composites containing a physically-associated network of PluronicRTM block copolymer along with a calcium-phosphate mineral component. Rheological results show that composites containing an in situ deposited mineral exhibit a significantly higher elastic modulus than composites of similar composition formed by conventional means. Moreover, analysis of the calcium-phosphate phase of in situ composites revealed that system parameters such as acidity play an integral role in determining the size and stability of the resultant mineral and subsequently the materials' expected in vivo performance. Changes to the structure in PluronicRTM/calcium-phosphate composite hydrogels during dehydration was investigated to provide a look into the mechanisms involved in composite formation. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of these systems shows that hydrogen bonding interactions between phosphate ions and the polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer block significantly impact the nanoscale structure and long-range order contained

  3. Determination and validation of the elastic moduli of small and complex biological samples: bone and keratin in bird beaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, Joris; Herrel, Anthony; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge in the development of finite-element (FE) models aimed at testing biological hypotheses. For example, recent modelling efforts suggested that the beak in Darwin's finches probably evolved in response to fracture avoidance. However, knowledge of the material properties of the structures involved is crucial for any model. For many biological structures, these data are not available and may be difficult to obtain experimentally given the complex nature of biological structures. Beaks are interesting as they appear to be highly optimized in some cases. In order to understand the biomechanics of this small and complex structure, we have been developing FE models that take into account the bilayered structure of the beak consisting of bone and keratin. Here, we present the results of efforts related to the determination and validation of the elastic modulus of bone and keratin in bird beaks. The elastic moduli of fresh and dried samples were obtained using a novel double-indentation technique and through an inverse analysis. A bending experiment is used for the inverse analysis and the validation of the measurements. The out-of-plane displacements during loading are measured using digital speckle pattern interferometry. PMID:22090286

  4. Labelling of biological structures with technetium 99 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of red blood cells (RBC) with technetium 99m (99m Tc) depends on several factors, as the stannous ion (Sn++) concentration, the time and temperature of incubation, the anticoagulant utilized, the presence of plasma proteins (PP) and others. Although the blinding of 99m Tc with hemoglobin and PP are similar, they appear to have specific characteristics as demonstrated by precipitation with alcohol, acetone, trichloroacetic acid, hydrochloric acid and mercury chloride. The bacterial cultures labeled with Technetium-99m, at optimal Sn++ ion concentration, presents a large stability and their viability is not altered by this treatment. The electrophoretic mobility, the hydrophobicity, the cationized ferritin distribution and the adherence to human buccal epithelial cells are not modified either. The possibility of labelling with 99m Tc of planaria and cercariae of Schistossoma mansoni evaluative cycle increases the utilization of this radionuclide to an experimental level. The results described with the labelling of these biological structures with 99m Tc demonstrated that stable labeled and viable operations are obtained. (author)

  5. Strategies for structuring interdisciplinary education in Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvijovic, Marija; Höfer, Thomas; Aćimović, Jure;

    2016-01-01

    function by employing experimental data, mathematical models and computational simulations. As Systems Biology is inherently multidisciplinary, education within this field meets numerous hurdles including departmental barriers, availability of all required expertise locally, appropriate teaching material...... active performers of Systems Biology education suggest here (i) a definition of the skills that students should acquire within a Master’s programme in Systems Biology, (ii) a possible basic educational curriculum with flexibility to adjust to different application areas and local research strengths, (iii...

  6. A Structure of Biological System and Functionality using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohammed Beer Gamal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks have, as initial motivation, the structure of biological systems, and constitute an alternative computability paradigm. For that reason we will review some aspects of the way in which biological systems perform information processing. The fascination which still pervades this research field has much to do with the points of contact with the surprisingly elegant methods used by neurons in order to process information at the cellular level. Several million years of evolution have led to very sophisticated solutions to the problem of dealing with an uncertain environment. In this chapter we will discuss some elements of these strategies in order to determine what features we want to adopt in our abstract models of neural networks.

  7. The Most Important Concept of Transport and Circulatory Systems: Turkish Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay; Aksu, Ozlem; Aktas, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structure with regard to "Blood". Qualitative research method has been used. The free word association test and the draw-write technique have been used in collection of data. The data obtained have been evaluated and divided into categories based on…

  8. Heme-nitrosyls: electronic structure implications for function in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew P; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2015-07-21

    The question of why mammalian systems use nitric oxide (NO), a potentially hazardous and toxic diatomic, as a signaling molecule to mediate important functions such as vasodilation (blood pressure control) and nerve signal transduction initially perplexed researchers when this discovery was made in the 1980s. Through extensive research over the past two decades, it is now well rationalized why NO is used in vivo for these signaling functions, and that heme proteins play a dominant role in NO signaling in mammals. Key insight into the properties of heme-nitrosyl complexes that make heme proteins so well poised to take full advantage of the unique properties of NO has come from in-depth structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical studies on ferrous and ferric heme-nitrosyls. This Account highlights recent findings that have led to greater understanding of the electronic structures of heme-nitrosyls, and the contributions that model complex studies have made to elucidate Fe-NO bonding are highlighted. These results are then discussed in the context of the biological functions of heme-nitrosyls, in particular in soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC; NO signaling), nitrophorins (NO transport), and NO-producing enzymes. Central to this Account is the thermodynamic σ-trans effect of NO, and how this relates to the activation of the universal mammalian NO sensor sGC, which uses a ferrous heme as the high affinity "NO detection unit". It is shown via detailed spectroscopic and computational studies that the strong and very covalent Fe(II)-NO σ-bond is at the heart of the strong thermodynamic σ-trans effect of NO, which greatly weakens the proximal Fe-NHis (or Fe-SCys) bond in six-coordinate ferrous heme-nitrosyls. In sGC, this causes the dissociation of the proximally bound histidine ligand upon NO binding to the ferrous heme, inducing a significant conformational change that activates the sGC catalytic domain for the production of cGMP. This, in turn, leads to vasodilation and

  9. Solid state structures of cadmium complexes with relevance for biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Rosa; Castiñeiras, Alfonso; Domínguez-Martín, Alicia; García-Santos, Isabel; Niclós-Gutiérrez, Juan

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the literature on structural information from crystal structures determined by X-ray diffractometry of cadmium(II) complexes containing ligands of potential biological interest. These ligands fall into three broad classes, (i) those containing N-donors such as purine or pyrimidine bases and derivatives of adenine, guanine or cytosine, (ii) those containing carboxylate groups such as α-amino acids, in particular the twenty essential ones, the water soluble vitamins (B-complex) or the polycarboxylates of EDTA type ligands, and (iii) S-donors such as thiols/thiolates or dithiocarbamates. A crystal and molecular structural analysis has been carried out for some representative complexes of these ligands, specifically addressing the coordination mode of ligands, the coordination environment of cadmium and, in some significant cases, the intermolecular interactions. PMID:23430774

  10. The structure, occurrence and biological activity of ellagitannins: a general review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Lipińska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the structure, occurrence and biological activity of ellagitannins. Ellagitannins belong to the class of hydrolysable tannins, they are esters of hexahydroxydiphenoic acid and monosaccharide (most commonly glucose. Ellagitannins are slowly hydrolysed in the digestive tract, releasing the ellagic acid molecule. Their chemical structure determines physical and chemical properties and biological activity. Ellagitannins occur naturally in some fruits (pomegranate, strawberry, blackberry, raspberry, nuts (walnuts, almonds, and seeds. They form a diverse group of bioactive polyphenols with anti-infl ammatory, anticancer, antioxidant and antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity. Furthermore, they improve the health of blood vessels. The paper discusses the metabolism and bioavailability of ellagitannins and ellagic acid. Ellagitannins are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract by intestinal microbiota. They are stable in the stomach and undergo neither hydrolysis to free ellagic acid nor degradation. In turn, ellagic acid can be absorbed in the stomach. This paper shows the role of cancer cell lines in the studies of ellagitannins and ellagic acid metabolism. The biological activity of these compounds is broad and thus the focus is on their antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. Ellagitannins exhibit antimicrobial activity against fungi, viruses, and importantly, bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  11. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Soil penetrometers are used routinely to determine the shear strength of soils and deformable sediments both at the surface and throughout a depth profile in disciplines as diverse as soil science, agriculture, geoengineering and alpine avalanche-safety (e.g. Grunwald et al. 2001, Van Herwijnen et al. 2009). Generically, penetrometers comprise two principal components: An advancing probe, and a transducer; the latter to measure the pressure or force required to cause the probe to penetrate or advance through the soil or sediment. The force transducer employed to determine the pressure can range, for example, from a simple mechanical spring gauge to an automatically data-logged electronic transducer. Automated computer control of the penetrometer step size and probe advance rate enables precise measurements to be made down to a resolution of 10's of microns, (e.g. the automated electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) described by Drahorad 2012). Here we discuss the determination, modelling and interpretation of biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structures using automated micropenetrometry. We outline a model enabling the interpretation of depth dependent penetration resistance (PR) profiles and their spatial differentials using the model equations, σ {}(z) ={}σ c0{}+Σ 1n[σ n{}(z){}+anz + bnz2] and dσ /dz = Σ 1n[dσ n(z) /dz{} {}+{}Frn(z)] where σ c0 and σ n are the plastic deformation stresses for the surface and nth soil structure (e.g. soil crust, layer, horizon or void) respectively, and Frn(z)dz is the frictional work done per unit volume by sliding the penetrometer rod an incremental distance, dz, through the nth layer. Both σ n(z) and Frn(z) are related to soil structure. They determine the form of σ {}(z){} measured by the EMP transducer. The model enables pores (regions of zero deformation stress) to be distinguished from changes in layer structure or probe friction. We have applied this method to both artificial calibration soils in the

  12. Flowering biology and nectary structure of Melissa officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Chwil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study on lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L. covered flowering biology, monitoring of pollinating insects and floral nectary structure. The micromorphology of epidermal cells of the nectary was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The nectariferous tissues were observed using light microscopy based on semi-thin sections. Lemon balm flowered from the second decade of June until September. Buds opened from early morning hours until noon. Flowers lived for 24 hours, on the average. Their primary pollinator was the honey bee. The beginning of nectar secretion was found to be at the bud swell stage. The automorphic nectary forms a disc with four protrusions at the base of the nectary. Three smaller ones and one larger than the other ones were distinguished among them. No stomata were found on the lower protuberances, whereas on the highest part anomocytic stomata were present, the number of which was 15. The stomata exhibited different development stages and they were situated above other epidermal cells. In their outline, they were ellipsoidally shaped (18 × 23 µm and they had average-sized cuticular ledges. They produced a smooth cuticle and wax granules. In cross section, the nectary tissues were composed of a singlelayered epidermis and 9 - 11 layers of the nectary parenchyma. Their thickness was 198 µm. In longitudinal section, the height of the nectary was within a range of 354 - 404 µm. The epidermal cells produced thin outer cell walls. Some of them were completely filled with strongly stained cytoplasm, whereas others showed a high degree of vacuolisation. But the nectary parenchyma cells were marked by poorly stained cytoplasm, a large nucleus and vacuolisation of varying degree.

  13. The importance of correct tautomeric structures for biological molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Mortensen, John; Kamounah, Fadhil S.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of usnic acid and tetracycline are determined using deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in a water environment. In case of usnic acid this is achieved by synthesizing a more water soluble usnic acid with a PEG linker. In the usnic acid case an enolic b-triketone (C-1, C......-14 and C-3) tautomeric equilibrium is at hand below pH 5. At pH 7.4 it exists as a mono anion. In case of tetracycline equilibrium between a zwitter ion and a neutral form is found together with an amide functional group and a hydrogen bonded enolic b-diketone system shifted strongly towards one...

  14. Biyoloji Öğretmen Adaylarının “Bakteri” Konusundaki Bilişsel Yapılarının Ve Alternatif Kavramlarının Belirlenmesi Determining Biology Student Teachers’ Cognitive Structure And Alternative Concepts On The Concept Of “Bacteria”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan KURT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To understand how students transfer knowledge to their minds and how they structure this knowledge is one of the most important issues that researchers are interested in. Constructive learning approach indicates that individuals construct knowledge actively through associating this knowledge with pre-existing knowledge and previous experiences (Anderson 1992; Bodner 1986; Mills, Shaw, Van Horne, Zhang and Boughman, 2008. According to this approach, due to the associations with previous experiences, the existing cognitive structures in mind affect individuals' perceptions of new events and the new cognitive structures that they will construct. It is, then, possible that a weak cognitive structure will affect the process of constructing new knowledge in mind adversely, and thus, leading to failure to construct new knowledge meaningfully (Tsai and Huang 2002; Vosniadou, Ioannides, Dimitrakopoulou and Papademetriou, 2001.In this respect, rather than merely dealing with what knowledge students have, researchers have headed towards several techniques (Vance, Miller and Hand, 1995. Bahar (2003 provides these strategies as follows: word association, structured grid, diagnostic tree, concept maps, texts of conceptual change, analogy, and predict-observe-explain. Of the techniques that investigate students’ cognitive structure, word association techniques is the most commonly used and oldest one, which was used as a data collection instrument in this study (Bahar, Johnstone and Sutcliffe, 1999; Hovardas and Korfiatis, 2006; Özatlı and Bahar, 2010; White and Gunstone, 2000. The aim of the current study is to determine biology student teachers’ cognitive structure on the concept of bacteria. However, to the best knowledge of the author, there is not any study in the literature that uses the free word association test and the drawing technique to investigate biology student teachers’ cognitive structure on the concept of bacteria.Qualitative research

  15. Structural Determinants of Juvenile Offenses in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Gregory S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Using multiple regression techniques, evaluates the relative contributions of community structure, school structure, and crime prevention efforts to delinquency in public schools. Finds that distance from central business district, school size, and region are of predictive value, when crimes against persons, property, and perceived crime are…

  16. Structural biology of human H3K9 methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  17. Modelling the structure and dynamics of biological pathways

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Laura; Livigni, Alessandra; Theocharidis, Thanos; Boyer, Benjamin; Angus, Tim; Wright, Derek; Chen, Sz-Hau; Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark; Digard, Paul; Smith, Lee; Freeman, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for formalised diagrams that both summarise current biological pathway knowledge and support modelling approaches that explain and predict their behaviour. Here we present a new, freely-available modelling framework that includes: a biologist-friendly pathway modelling language (mEPN); a simple but sophisticated method to support model parameterisation using accessible biological information, a stochastic flow algorithm that simulates the dynamics of pathway activity, and a 3D...

  18. Structure, function, and behaviour of computational models in systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Knüpfer, Christian; Beckstein, Clemens; Dittrich, Peter; Novère, Nicolas Le

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems Biology develops computational models in order to understand biological phenomena. The increasing number and complexity of such “bio-models” necessitate computer support for the overall modelling task. Computer-aided modelling has to be based on a formal semantic description of bio-models. But, even if computational bio-models themselves are represented precisely in terms of mathematical expressions their full meaning is not yet formally specified and only described in natu...

  19. Structuring heterogeneous biological information using fuzzy clustering of k-partite graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theis Fabian J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive and automated data integration in bioinformatics facilitates the construction of large, complex biological networks. However, the challenge lies in the interpretation of these networks. While most research focuses on the unipartite or bipartite case, we address the more general but common situation of k-partite graphs. These graphs contain k different node types and links are only allowed between nodes of different types. In order to reveal their structural organization and describe the contained information in a more coarse-grained fashion, we ask how to detect clusters within each node type. Results Since entities in biological networks regularly have more than one function and hence participate in more than one cluster, we developed a k-partite graph partitioning algorithm that allows for overlapping (fuzzy clusters. It determines for each node a degree of membership to each cluster. Moreover, the algorithm estimates a weighted k-partite graph that connects the extracted clusters. Our method is fast and efficient, mimicking the multiplicative update rules commonly employed in algorithms for non-negative matrix factorization. It facilitates the decomposition of networks on a chosen scale and therefore allows for analysis and interpretation of structures on various resolution levels. Applying our algorithm to a tripartite disease-gene-protein complex network, we were able to structure this graph on a large scale into clusters that are functionally correlated and biologically meaningful. Locally, smaller clusters enabled reclassification or annotation of the clusters' elements. We exemplified this for the transcription factor MECP2. Conclusions In order to cope with the overwhelming amount of information available from biomedical literature, we need to tackle the challenge of finding structures in large networks with nodes of multiple types. To this end, we presented a novel fuzzy k-partite graph partitioning

  20. Sensitive and Selective Determination of Orotic Acid in Biological Specimens Using a Novel Fluorogenic Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    Orotic acid is an intermediate in the synthesis pathway of uridine-5'-monophosphate, and increases in body fluids of patients suffering from hereditary disorders such as orotic aciduria and hyperammonemia. In this study, we developed a spectrofluorometric method with or without high-performance liquid chromatography for the selective and sensitive quantification of orotic acid in human biological specimens, using 4-trifluoromethylbenzamidoxime (4-TFMBAO) as a fluorogenic reagent. This reagent provided intensive fluorescence for only orotic acid amongst 62 compounds including structurally related bio-substances such as nucleic acid bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, amino acids, vitamins, bilirubin, uric acid, urea, creatine, creatinine and sugars. Under optimized reaction conditions, orotic acid was reacted with 4-TFMBAO, K3[Fe(CN)6] and K2CO3 in an aqueous solution. The fluorescence produced from the orotic acid derivative was measured at an excitation of 340 nm and an emission of 460 nm. A concentration of 1.2 μM orotic acid per 1.0 mM creatinine in normal urine and 0.64 nmol orotic acid per 5.0 × 10(5) HeLa cells were determined by this method. The present method permitted the facile quantification of orotic acid in healthy human urine and cultured HeLa cells by spectrofluorometry and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:26026930

  1. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  2. WAY TO DETERMINE STIFFNESS FUNCTION OF STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-ming; GAI Bing-zheng

    2005-01-01

    For calculating the stiffness function of a structure, the differential equation of the vibration of the structure was divided into the differential equation on the original stiffness function that was known, and Fredholm integral equation of the first kind on the undetermined stiffness function that was unknown. And the stable solutions of the integral equation, when the smooth factor was equal to zero, was solved by the extrapolation with p smooth factors. So the stiffness function of the structure is obtained. Applied examples show that the method is feasible and effective.

  3. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  4. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author)

  5. Sex determination meltdown upon biological control introduction of the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jetske G.; Kuijper, Bram; Heimpel, George E.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2012-01-01

    Natural enemies may go through genetic bottlenecks during the process of biological control introductions. Such bottlenecks are expected to be particularly detrimental in parasitoid Hymenoptera that exhibit complementary sex determination (CSD). CSD is associated with a severe form of inbreeding dep

  6. X-ray spectrometric determination of thorium in bone and other biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of thorium in bone and other biological materials. The limit of detection at the 95% confidence level is 20 ng. This corresponds to a concentration of 2 ppb in a 10-g sample of bone ash

  7. Intracellular biology and virulence determinants of Francisella tularensis revealed by transcriptional profiling inside macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrly, Tara D.; Chong, Audrey; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Dan E.; Child, Robert; Edwards, Jessica A.; Brouwer, Dedeke; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Wicke, Luke; Curda, Alissa J.; Kupko, John J.; Martens, Craig; Crane, Deborah D.; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2009-01-01

    The highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, whose virulence requires proliferation inside host cells, including macrophages. Here we have performed a global transcriptional profiling of the highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 strain during its intracellular cycle within primary murine macrophages, to characterize its intracellular biology and identify pathogenic determinants based on their intracellular expression profile...

  8. Finalizing host range determination of a weed biological control pathogen with BLUPs and damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. salsolae (Penz.) Penz. & Sacc. in Penz. (CGS) is a facultative parasitic fungus being evaluated as a classical biological control agent of Russian thistle or tumbleweed (Salsola tragus L.). In initial host range determination tests, Henderson’s mixed model equat...

  9. Teachers' conceptions of biological determinism in five countries: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France and Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Pierre, 1809-1870.; Castéra, Jérémy

    2013-01-01

    e-book: http://www.esera.org/media/eBook_2013/strand%2012/Pierre_Clement_09Jan2014.pdf International audience The interaction between the genome and its environment (epigenetics) is a new paradigm in biology. Nevertheless, the notion of genetic determinism is still present in syllabuses and textbooks. What about teachers' conceptions? We analyzed the teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human performances in five European countries, using 24 questions of the Biohe...

  10. Laser autofluorescence polarimetry of optically anisotropic structures of biological tissues in cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.

    2015-06-01

    The results of a new physical study of polarization manifestations of laser autofluorescence of optically anisotropic structures in human female reproductive tissues are presented. A Mueller-matrix model of describing the complex anisotropy (linear and circular birefringence, linear and circular dichroism) of such biological layers is proposed. Interrelations between mechanisms of optical anisotropy and polarization manifestations of laser autofluorescence of histological layers of the uterine cervix tissue in different spectral regions are determined. Magnitudes and variation ranges of statistical moments from the first to the fourth order describing the distributions of azimuthally stable elements of Mueller matrices of autofluorescence in human female reproductive tissues in different physiological states are found. The informative value of the proposed method is determined and the differentiation of histological biopsy sections of benign (dysplasia) and malignant (adenocarcinoma) uterine cervix tumors is implemented for the first time.

  11. The Protein Data Bank and Its Uses in Structural Biology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Voet

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The Protein Data Bank (PDB is a repository for the structures of proteins and nucleic acids. Itcontains les of their 3-dimensional coordinates, information on how these structures were determinedand references to the journal articles describing them. The PDB was established in 1971 by HelenBerman (it s present director and has grown exponentially so that it now contains 25,000 data lesrepresenting X-ray crystallographic, NMR and other structure determinations. Database queryingand data miningtools and resources at the PDB make it possible to search, compare and infer orpredict the function of newly identied proteins. Computer graphics capabilities make it possible foranyone to easily visualize and study the structural data. The capability to present beautiful graphicrepresentations of the 3-dimesnional structures of proteins and nucleic acids has been a boon to theeducation community. Communicating an understanding of these structures and the chemical forcesdetermining them and their interactions is one of the major aims of biochemistry and molecular biologyeducation. The ability to teach these principles visually has made a great dierence in our abilityto excite our students and provide them with physical interpretations for some abstract concepts inbiochemistry and molecular biology. In this talk we will explore some of the ways that the education community uses the PDB.

  12. Development of dispersive anomalous diffraction, application to the study of inorganic modulated structures and biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction has been developed since the beginning of the century for the determination of crystallographic structures. Most complex structures (proteins, incommensurate crystals...) require the use of anomalous diffraction, i.e. the measurement of diffracted intensities at several wavelengths around the absorption edge of one element of the crystal. This technique allows the determination of the phase of the structure factor, as well as the positions of the anomalous atoms. In this thesis, we present the Dispersive Anomalous Diffraction (DAD) method, which allows the simultaneous measure of diffracted intensities at a number of wavelengths for many reflections. Two collection modes can be used, either continuous (DDAFS-Dispersive Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure) or discrete (SMAD-Simultaneous Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction. A specific procedure and a program (DAD) have been developed for the quantitative analysis of dispersive diffraction images. This program also allows the analysis of monochromatic diffraction images, with satellite reflections near main diffraction peaks. We present the first two quantitative experiments in dispersive diffraction for biological compounds. Our results show that the use of SMAD for structure determination is possible, although several improvements are still necessary for both data collection and analysis. An important point in this thesis is the study of quasi-1D compound (TaSe4)2I: this crystal exhibits a Peierls transition, for which no condensation of the metallic atoms was shown for the last 15 years. Our study has characterized the domain structure of this material, and anomalous diffraction has shown in a specific way the tetramerisation of tantalum atoms, which exists along the already-known acoustic modulation. (author)

  13. Biological Membrane Ion Channels Dynamics, Structure, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Shin-Ho; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels are biological nanotubes that are formed by membrane proteins. Because ion channels regulate all electrical activities in living cells, understanding their mechanisms at a molecular level is a fundamental problem in biology. This book deals with recent breakthroughs in ion-channel research that have been brought about by the combined effort of experimental biophysicists and computational physicists, who together are beginning to unravel the story of these exquisitely designed biomolecules. With chapters by leading experts, the book is aimed at researchers in nanodevices and biosensors, as well as advanced undergraduate and graduate students in biology and the physical sciences. Key Features Presents the latest information on the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation through membrane ion channels Uses schematic diagrams to illustrate important concepts in biophysics Written by leading researchers in the area of ion channel investigations

  14. Technical and biological variance structure in mRNA-Seq data: life in the real world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberg Ann L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mRNA expression data from next generation sequencing platforms is obtained in the form of counts per gene or exon. Counts have classically been assumed to follow a Poisson distribution in which the variance is equal to the mean. The Negative Binomial distribution which allows for over-dispersion, i.e., for the variance to be greater than the mean, is commonly used to model count data as well. Results In mRNA-Seq data from 25 subjects, we found technical variation to generally follow a Poisson distribution as has been reported previously and biological variability was over-dispersed relative to the Poisson model. The mean-variance relationship across all genes was quadratic, in keeping with a Negative Binomial (NB distribution. Over-dispersed Poisson and NB distributional assumptions demonstrated marked improvements in goodness-of-fit (GOF over the standard Poisson model assumptions, but with evidence of over-fitting in some genes. Modeling of experimental effects improved GOF for high variance genes but increased the over-fitting problem. Conclusions These conclusions will guide development of analytical strategies for accurate modeling of variance structure in these data and sample size determination which in turn will aid in the identification of true biological signals that inform our understanding of biological systems.

  15. Analytical methods for vancomycin determination in biological fluids and in pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Duarte Carvalho Vila

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic employed in the treatment of infections caused by certain methicillin-resistant staphylococci. It is indicated also for patients allergic to penicillin or when there is no response to penicillins or cephalosporins. The adequate vancomycin concentration levels in blood serum lies between 5 and 10 mg/L. Higher values are toxic, causing mainly nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Various analytical methods are described in the literature: spectrophotometric, immunologic, biologic and chromatographic methods. This paper reviews the main analytical methods for vancomycin determination in biological fluids and in pharmaceutical preparations.

  16. Determination of uranium in seawater, biological samples and sediments using laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium has been determined in seawater, biological samples and sediments using laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS). The biological samples and sediments are digested with a mixture of HNO3, HClO4 and HF. The conductivity of the seawater should be below 5.0 mS and the pH of the sample should be in the range 6.5-9.0. The volume of the reagent used to enhance the fluorescence intensity was 0.5 ml. Comparison with other methods was favorable, LIFS being rapid, simple and sensitive, and well suited to environmental monitoring. (author)

  17. Of arrows and flows. Causality, determination, and specificity in the Central Dogma of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Bernardino

    2006-01-01

    From its first proposal, the Central Dogma had a graphical form, complete with arrows of different types, and this form quickly became its standard presentation. In different scientific contexts, arrows have different meanings and in this particular case the arrows indicated the flow of information among different macromolecules. A deeper analysis illustrates that the arrows also imply a causal statement, directly connected to the causal role of genetic information. The author suggests a distinction between two different kinds of causal links, defined as 'physical causality' and 'biological determination', both implied in the production of biological specificity. PMID:18351053

  18. Simultaneous determination of arsenic and selenium in biological samples by HG-AFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hanwen; Liu, Zhanfeng; Shi, Hongmei [Hebei University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Baoding (China); Wu, Wenjuan [Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shijiazhuang 050051 (China); Li, Liqing [Hebei University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Baoding (China); Taishan College, Department of Chemistry, Shan Dong Taian (China)

    2005-06-01

    A new method is proposed for simultaneous determination of traces of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in biological samples by hydride-generation double-channel non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) from tartaric acid media. The effects of analytical conditions on fluorescence signal intensity were investigated and optimized. Interferences from coexisting ions were evaluated. Under optimum conditions linear response ranges above 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As and 32 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Se were obtained with detection limits of 0.13 and 0.12 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The precision for elevenfold determination of As at the 4 {mu}g L{sup -1} level and of Se at the 8 {mu}g L{sup -1} level were 2.7 and 1.9% (RSD), respectively. Recoveries of 92.5-95.5% for As and 101.2-108.4% for Se were obtained for four biological samples and two certified biological reference materials. The proposed method has the advantages of simple operation, high sensitivity, and high efficiency; it was successfully used for simultaneous determination of As and Se in biological samples. (orig.)

  19. Possibilities of nondestructive determination of fluorine in coal and biological materials by IPAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of nondestructive determination of fluorine in coal and biological materials by instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) were studied. The determination was based on counting the non-specific 511 keV annihilation gamma rays of 18F, a pure positron emitter which is the product of the photonuclear reaction 19F(γ, n)18F. The simultaneous formation of some additional positron emitters, particularly 45Ti and 34mCl, is an interfering factor. When using correction standards for Ti and Cl and optimization of the beam energy and irradiation-decay-counting times, fluorine could be determined by IPAA in selected coal and biological samples at the ten ppm level. The feasibility of additional optimization for further improvements of the proposed IPAA procedure are discussed

  20. Determination of chorionic gonadotrophin. Comparison of biological, immunological and radioimmunological methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of analysis were used to quantify chorionic gonadotrophic hormone: biological determination (rana-reaction); immunological determination (simplified pregnosticon test of the Organon Teknika laboratories); radioimmunological determination (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA kits). While the immunochemical technique is specially suited to analysis of the urine, the radioimmunological measurement is carried out on the plasma. This method is extremely sensitive; when traditional biological and immunological methods are used the quantity of CGH detectable is of the order of some hundreds or at best a few tens of international units. The radioimmunological method is a thousand times more sensitive and can therefore measure CGH in amounts of the milli-unit order. Until recently it was not specific enough to differentiate between CGH and LH, but not long ago a β CGH-specific antibody was discovered and it is now possible to detect small amounts of CGH in the presence of LH

  1. Determining the structure of Carbon-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-60 is the most stable and best known of the carbon cage structures known collectively as the fullerenes. It is a remarkable molecule that forms a fascinating solid. Although the molecular shape of C sub 6 sub 0 is familiar - it is simply the shape of a soccer ball with 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons - the manner in which it forms a crystal structure is by no means obvious. This talk will focus on the insights which neutron scattering at ISIS has brought to our understanding of solid C sub6 sub 0. At room temperature, the structure may be regarded as forming as essentially ideal cubic-close packed molecular bubble-raft: each molecule is reorienting so rapidly that a time-averaged picture, over as little as a nanosecond, reveals a closely spherical shell of atomic density. At 260 K, a rather unusual structural transition occurs. The molecules order but still retain cubic symmetry. Although this may not appear to be a rather dramatic change, detailed considerations show that a profound transition has occurred that bears close similarities to a solid-liquid phase transition but in two dimensions. Below 260 K, reorientation still occurs but at a dramatically reduced rate as the temperature is lowered. Indeed at around 90 K, The reorientation is so slow that thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be achieved in a reasonable timescale an orientational glass transition occurs. Although the behaviour of solid C sub 6 sub 0 undergoes dramatic changes as a function of temperature, a coherent description has evolved in which neutron scattering plays a central role. Close analogies are to be found in the study of systems as diverse as solid H sub 2 and human-rhinovirus structures. These analogies and the central role played by neutron scattering at ISIS will be emphasised in this paper. 5 figs., 10 refs. (author)

  2. Polysaccharies of higher fungi: Biological role, structure and antioxidative activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, M.S.; Klaus, A.; Niksic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Vrvic, M.M.; Jakovljevic, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    The fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging bio-logical properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypo-lipidemic, immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application

  3. Polysaccharides of higher fungi: Biological role, structure, and antioxidative activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kozarski Maja S.; Klaus Anita S.; Nikšić Miomir P.; van Griensven Leo J.L.D.; Vrvić Miroslav M.; Jakovljević Dragica M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging biological properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application in many quite distinctive areas, such as food industry, biomedicine, cosmetology, agriculture, environmental protection and waste water management. This article pr...

  4. Some structural determinants of melody recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, M

    1991-05-01

    Sophisticated musicians were asked to recall, using musical notation, a set of unfamiliar folk tunes that varied in rhythmic structure and referents of tonality. The results showed that memory was facilitated by tonic triad members marking phrase endings, but only when their presence was highlighted by a corresponding pattern of temporal accents. Conversely, recall significantly declined when tonal information was either absent or obscured by rhythmic structure. Error analyses further revealed that the retention of overall pitch contour and information at phrase ending points varied as a function of these manipulations. The results are discussed in terms of a framework that links the acts of perceiving and remembering to a common attentional scheme. PMID:1861610

  5. What Determines the Likelihood of Structural Reforms?

    OpenAIRE

    Agnello, Luca; Castro, Vitor; Jalles, João Tovar; Sousa, Ricardo M.

    2014-01-01

    We use data for a panel of 60 countries over the period 1980-2005 to investigate the main drivers of the likelihood of structural reforms. We find that: (i) external debt crises are the main trigger of financial and banking reforms; (ii) inflation and banking crises are the key drivers of external capital account reforms; (iii) banking crises also hasten financial reforms; and (iv) economic recessions play an important role in promoting the necessary consensus for financial, capital, banking ...

  6. RNA Structure Determination Using SAXS Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sichun; Parisien, Marc; Major, François; Roux, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the experimental information from small-angle x-ray solution scattering (SAXS) in conjunction with structure prediction algorithms can be advantageous in the case of ribonucleic acids (RNA), where global restraints on the 3D fold are often lacking. Traditional usage of SAXS data often starts by attempting to reconstruct the molecular shape ab initio, which is subsequently used to assess the quality of model Here, an alternative strategy is explored whereby the models from a very la...

  7. Structure and determinants of consumer expenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Stejskal, Ladislav; Stávková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The local and worldwide present economic situation is often judged and discussed on the basis of the consumer expenditures development. Consumer expenditures or a buying behaviour outcome of each individual market subject is in marketing defined as a product and service seeking, from that consumers expect satisfying of their needs. On the basis of the introduced determination authors conducted a marketing research. Results in combination with a marketing insight into consumer expenditures rea...

  8. Biophysical and biological factors determining the ability to achieve long-term cryobiological preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1997-12-01

    The BESTCapsule will maintain appropriate biological specimens for decades or centuries at cryogenic temperatures in the living state. Maintenance at temperatures below {approximately} {minus}140 C is not a problem. No ordinary chemical reactions in aqueous solutions can occur. The only source of damage will be the slow accumulation of physical damage to DNA from background ionizing radiation. But this source of damage should not become serious in less than a millennium. Rather, the main problem in cryopreservation is to devise procedures for cooling the biological specimens to {minus}196 C and returning them to normal temperatures without inflicting lethal injury. Regardless of the cell type, there are certain encompassing biophysical factors and constraints that determine whether they will survive or die during freezing and thawing. Superimposed on these may be special biological factors that apply to specific cell types. This paper will emphasize the former and give illustrative examples of the latter.

  9. High-resolution permanent photoresist laminate TMMF for sealed microfluidic structures in biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the use of photosensitive epoxy laminate TMMF S2045 for the fabrication and sealing of tapered microfluidic channels. The 45 µm thick resist enables the fabrication of shallow sealed cavities featuring extreme aspect ratios of less than 1:40 (h = 45 µm, w = 2000 µm). It also provides high resolution and enables minimum feature sizes of 10 µm. For the fabrication of free-standing structures, an aspect ratio of up to 7:1 was achieved. The dry-film photoresist can be applied easily by lamination onto structured substrates. The total thickness variation of the resist across a 100 mm wafer was determined to be less than ±0.6 µm. Process parameters for the fabrication and sealing of various micro-channels are discussed and optimized in this paper. The main focus was to minimize thermal impact during lamination, soft-bake, exposure and post–exposure bake, which could lead to lid sagging or channel clogging due to liquefaction of uncured resist. We tested TMMF according to ISO 10995-5 and found it to be non-cytotoxic, enabling its use for biological applications. Swelling of less than 5% for incubation of the dry-film resist in several biologically relevant solvents, buffers and cleaning solutions was observed

  10. Polycyclic Xanthone Natural Products: Structure, Biological Activity and Chemical Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Dana K.; Sloman, David L.; Porco, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic xanthone natural products are a family of polyketides which are characterized by highly oxygenated, angular hexacyclic frameworks. In the last decade, this novel class of molecules has attracted noticeable attention from the synthetic and biological communities due to emerging reports of their potential use as antitumour agents. The aim of this article is to highlight the most recent developments of this subset of the xanthone family by detailing the innate challenges of the constr...

  11. Qualitative analysis of biological oscillators as processing structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon, Jure

    2011-01-01

    Recently there is a certain tendency in the field of computer science to find alternative processing platforms, which would replace the conventional ones that are starting to reach their limits in the meaning of components' size and speed. Computer science is trying to avoid its dependency on traditional electronic components. One of such alternatives is also processing in biological systems. Whatever the future processing platform might be, computer science will most likely always need a com...

  12. Structure of deviations from optimality in biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Rivera-Alba, Marta; G. de Polavieja, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Optimization theory has been used to analyze evolutionary adaptation. This theory has explained many features of biological systems, from the genetic code to animal behavior. However, these systems show important deviations from optimality. Typically, these deviations are large in some particular components of the system, whereas others seem to be almost optimal. Deviations from optimality may be due to many factors in evolution, including stochastic effects and finite time, that may not allo...

  13. Photoelectron holography applied to surface structural determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, B.L.

    1995-05-01

    Photoemitted electron waves are used as coherent source waves for angstrom-scale holographic imaging of local atomic geometry at surfaces. Electron angular distribution patterns are collected above a sample surface and serve as a record of the interference between source wave and waves scattered from surrounding ion cores. Using a mathematical imaging integral transformation, the three-dimensional structural information is obtained directly from these collected patterns. Patterns measured with different electron kinetic energies are phase-summed for image improvement. Pt (111) surface is used as a model system. A pattern 9.6{angstrom}{sup {minus}1} (351 eV) is used to generate a full 3-D image of atom locations around an emitter with nearest neighbors within 0.l{angstrom} of the expected bulk positions. Atoms several layers beyond the nearest neighbors are also apparent. Twin-image reduction and artifact suppression is obtained by phase-summing eight patterns measured from 8.8 to 10.2{angstrom}{sup {minus}1} (295 to 396 eV). 32 were measured in 0.2{angstrom}{sup {minus}1} steps from 6.0 to 12.2{angstrom}{sup {minus}1} (137 to 567 eV) are presented here. Simple models of two-slit interference are compared with electron scattering to illuminate understanding of holographic recording of the structural information. This also shows why it sometimes fails due to destructive interferences. Simple theoretical models of electron scattering are compared to experiment to show the origin of the structural information and the differences that result from atomic scattering and from the source wave. Experimental parameters and their relation to imaging is discussed. Comparison is made to the Pt pattern measured at 351 eV using the simple theoretical model. The remaining data set is also modeled, and the eight appropriate theoretical patterns are used to regenerate the multiple-wavenumber experimental result. A clean Cu (001) surface is also measured and imaged.

  14. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  15. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv

  16. Determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete using pyrohydrolysis and liquid scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete of nuclear reactors was developed. Cl in the concrete sample was extracted quantitatively by pyrohydrolysis at 900 degrees C and recovered in Na2CO3 solution for subsequent measurement of 36Cl by liquid scintillation counting. WO3 was used as an accelerator in the pyrohydrolysis. The Cl extraction procedure was optimized by investigating experimental conditions with the use of ion chromatography and its recovery was evaluated by the analysis of the geochemical reference samples. The detection limit of 36Cl was 0.02 Bq g(-1) for a sample weight of 2 g. The relative standard deviation was 3-7% for the samples containing 0.5 Bq g(-1) levels of 36Cl. The method was applied to determine 36Cl in biological shield concrete of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor. PMID:12173658

  17. Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award Talk: Probing the structure and dynamics of biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Reka

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between the structure and dynamics of networks is one of the central topics in network science. In the context of biological regulatory networks at the molecular to cellular level, the dynamics in question is often thought of as information propagation through the network. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve an understanding of this process, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting biological signal transduction, and at the same time probing the structure-function relation of these networks. This analysis, however, necessitates the extension of current graph theoretical frameworks to incorporate features such as the positive or negative nature of interactions and synergistic behaviors among multiple components. This talk will present a method for structural analysis in an augmented graph framework that can probe the dynamics of information transfer. The first step is to expand the network to a richer representation that incorporates negative and synergistic regulation by the addition of pseudo-nodes and new edges. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. As a first application of this method we ranked the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on various regulatory networks shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and agrees with dynamic simulation results and experimental observations. Future applications include determining the ESMs that (do

  18. Organization of information protection in the information system of determining the toxicity focus of biological objects

    OpenAIRE

    Руженцев, Віктор Ігоревич; Порван, Андрій Павлович; Пащенко, Марія Анатоліївна

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed an approach to the organization of information protection in the information system of determining the toxicity focus of aquatic biological objects to prevent unauthorized access to data. As the most efficient algorithm for the information protection has been elected a symmetric block encryption algorithm. The use of this algorithm is enabled to achieve the necessary and sufficient performance of operations of encryption and decryption of data monitoring of water bodies on diff...

  19. Voltammetric and amperometric determination of biologically active organic compounds using various types of silver amalgam electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Barek, Jiří; Fischer, Jan; Moreira, Josino C.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, possibilities of various types of silver amalgam electrodes for determination of micromolar and submicromolar concentrations of various electrochemically reducible biologically active organic compounds are reviewed. Attention is paid to the use of polished and mercury meniscus modified silver solid amalgam electrodes, silver amalgam paste electrodes both with and without pasting liquids, single crystal silver amalgam electrodes, composite silver amalgam electrodes, and porous s...

  20. Determination of biological transport of oxygen-15 and carbon-11 generated in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of induced 15O and 11C activity in live and dead rats was determined following local irradiation with a 32 MeV proton beam. Results indicate that rapid biological redistribution of some of the induced activity occurs within a minute following irradiation. Sufficient activity remains, bound in the intracellular water, to define the proton beam in tissue. Thus, mapping of the induced 15O activity proves to be a valid means of beam localization

  1. Optimization and validation of spectrophotometric methods for determination of finasteride in dosage and biological forms

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Alaa S.; Kassem, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim and Background: Three simple, accurate and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of finasteride in pure, dosage and biological forms, and in the presence of its oxidative degradates were developed. Materials and Methods: These methods are indirect, involve the addition of excess oxidant potassium permanganate for method A; cerric sulfate [Ce(SO4)2] for methods B; and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) for method C of known concentration in acid medium to finasteride, and the de...

  2. Sex determination meltdown upon biological control introduction of the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula?

    OpenAIRE

    Boer; Kuijper, B.; Heimpel, G.E.; Beukeboom, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Natural enemies may go through genetic bottlenecks during the process of biological control introductions. Such bottlenecks are expected to be particularly detrimental in parasitoid Hymenoptera that exhibit complementary sex determination (CSD). CSD is associated with a severe form of inbreeding depression because homozygosity at one or multiple sex loci leads to the production of diploid males that are typically unviable or sterile. We observed that diploid males occur at a relatively high r...

  3. Gyroid cuticular structures in butterfly wing scales: biological photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Michielsen, K.; Stavenga, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the cuticular structure in the butterfly wing scales of some papilionids (Parides sesostris and Teinopalpus imperialis) and lycaenids (Callophrys rubi, Cyanophrys remus, Mitoura gryneus and Callophrys dumetorum). Using published scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, analytical modelling and computer-generated TEM micrographs, we find that the three-dimensional cuticular structures can be modelled by gyroid structures with various filling ...

  4. Structural and institutional determinants of investment activity in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Chuku, Chuku; Onye, Kenneth; Ajah, Hycent

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the structural and institutional determinants of investment activity in selected African countries within a neoclassical framework. Generalized method of moments and a family of panel data estimation techniques are utilized in addition to nonparametric kernel regression techniques to uncover the relationship. Three main findings emerge; (i) financial openness and institutional quality are reasonably robust structural and institutional determinants of investment activity...

  5. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  6. Analytic determination of the activation of essential and toxic trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron activation-analysis technique for the multielement determination in biological material was developed. The individual steps of this procedure comprise radiochemical and also instrumental analytic techniques. After radiochemical separation 34 elements can be determined, after only instrumental procedures 26 elements can be detected in biological material. The radiochemical analysis of 34 elements lasts 4 days. Tracer investigations on the radionuclide retention of the anorganic separators HAP, TiP and ZP in 9N aqueous HNO3 solution indicated that apart from Na-24, K-42 and P-32 the radionuclides Cs-134, Rb-86 and Se-75 are almost quantitatively adsorbed at the separators. For the remaining investigated radionuclides different but well-reproducible retention values resulted. The pH-value only slightly influences the extent of the radionuclide retention. Kinetic investigations on the radiochemical precipitation of some radionuclides on Cu and Cu(Hg)sub(x) were carried out. The depositing of the radionuclides Ag-110m, Hg-203 and Se-75 at 00C and room temperature on Cu(Hg)sub(x) and Cu foil is a first order reaction. The half-life periods and the velocity constants of the depositing on Cu and Cu(Hg)sub(x) were determined for the investigated radionuclides in dependency of the temperature. The technique was examined by means of international biological multielement standards of known element combinations. The realisation of ring tests for the multielement determination in potatoe and milk powder showed that this method provides precise results. The applicability of the radiochemical method was confirmed by the simultaneous determination of 25 elements in overall nutrition samples. The instrumental technique was applied for the multielement determination in human hair (of the head) and in river water. (orig./MG)

  7. Structural Determinants of Sleeping Beauty Transposase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here, we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein coevolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, coevolving residues into elements called "sectors", which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that (i) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; (ii) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; (iii) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. (iv) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold. PMID:27401040

  8. Determination of Ice Characteristics for Marine Hydroengineering Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantarzhi, I. G., E-mail: kantardgi@yandex.ru [Moscow State University of Civil Engineering (MSGU) (Russian Federation); Maderich, V. S., E-mail: vladmad@gmail.com; Koshebutskii, V. I., E-mail: koshik1@gmail.com [Ukrainian Center of Environmental and Water Projects (UTsÉVP) (Ukraine)

    2016-01-15

    Problems and potential approaches to determining ice characteristics for sea hydroengineering structures design are considered. A system for numerical modeling of ice dynamics is presented. The system may be used to define ice characteristics on approaches to structures with due regard for local hydrometeorological conditions and ice loads on structures. System application examples are presented for determining computational scenarios for ice loads at structures of the Pevek floating nuclear power plant (FNPP), as well as for the breakwater pier under reconstruction in Vanino. A scenario approach is used to determined ice loads.

  9. First-Year Biology Students' Understandings of Meiosis: An Investigation Using a Structural Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Frances; Pegg, John; Panizzon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis is a biological concept that is both complex and important for students to learn. This study aims to explore first-year biology students' explanations of the process of meiosis, using an explicit theoretical framework provided by the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) model. The research was based on responses of 334…

  10. Mass determination based on electron scattering in electron probe X-ray microanalysis of thin biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the development of a method for mass determination of thin biological objects by quantitative electron microscopy. The practical realization of the mass determination consists of photographical recording with subsequent densitometry. (Auth.)

  11. The use of a single technique for the separation and determination of actinides in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the radiotoxicological survey of workers exposed to different types of alpha-emitting contaminants, a procedure was developed which permits the estimate of Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in biological samples with a single technique. The radionuclides are extracted on a column by tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and separated by elution at different pH values. Afterwards, the quantitative determinations are done by physical methods (alpha counting or spectrometry). In the case of an accident it is possible to use a simplification of the procedure (extraction in a beaker) for checks. A procedure for the rapid determination of actinides in faeces and in nasal secretions is described

  12. Proceedings of the 182nd basic science seminar (The workshop on neutron structural biology ) 'New frontiers of structural biology advanced by solution scattering'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Satoru (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    182nd advanced science seminar (the workshop on neutron structural biology) was held in February 9-10, 2000 at Tokai. Thirty-six participants from universities, research institutes, and private companies took part in the workshop, and total of 24 lectures were given. This proceedings collects abstracts, the figures and tables, which the speakers used in their lectures. The proceedings contains two reviews from the point of view of x-ray and neutron scatterings, and six subjects (21 papers) including neutron and x-ray scattering in the era of structure genomics, structural changes detected with solution scattering, a new way in structural biology opened by neutron crystallography and neutron scattering, x-ray sources and detectors, simulation and solution scattering, and neutron sources and detectors. (Kazumata, Y.)

  13. Proceedings of the 182nd basic science seminar (The workshop on neutron structural biology ) 'New frontiers of structural biology advanced by solution scattering'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    182nd advanced science seminar (the workshop on neutron structural biology) was held in February 9-10, 2000 at Tokai. Thirty-six participants from universities, research institutes, and private companies took part in the workshop, and total of 24 lectures were given. This proceedings collects abstracts, the figures and tables, which the speakers used in their lectures. The proceedings contains two reviews from the point of view of x-ray and neutron scatterings, and six subjects (21 papers) including neutron and x-ray scattering in the era of structure genomics, structural changes detected with solution scattering, a new way in structural biology opened by neutron crystallography and neutron scattering, x-ray sources and detectors, simulation and solution scattering, and neutron sources and detectors. (Kazumata, Y.)

  14. Audit Fee Determinants in different Ownership Structures : The Swedish Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Ask, Joakim; LJ Holm, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the audit fee determinants for companies listed on Nasdaq OMX Stockholm Stock Exchange and to examine whether the audit fee determinants diverge for ownership structures. By testing the audit fee determinants in a Swedish setting the study contributes to the research body in two ways; by testing a previously sparsely researched setting and examining the monitoring need for different ownership structures. The results indicate that audit fees are explained to a ...

  15. Determinants of Capital Structure: Empirical Evidence From UK

    OpenAIRE

    XU, WENJING

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of capital structure for the companies in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study is to determine which capital structure is more appropriate to UK listed companies. Results obtained will be compared against previous empirical and theoretical predictions. Panel data set containing 342 UK public quoted companies across 8 industries during the period from 2000-2009 is employed. A Pooled OLS regression is constructed to discuss what the determinants...

  16. The methodology of determining the corrosion of steel structures

    OpenAIRE

    S.D. Fedotov; A.V. Ulybin; N.N. Shabrov

    2013-01-01

    The problems of determining the corrosive wear of steel structures are considered. The results of applying ultrasonic method to determine the remaining profile of the structure are described. The main advantages and disadvantages of ultrasonic thickness meters comparing to mechanical devices are given. Low reliability of the method based on evaluating the thickness of the corrosion oxides is substantiated. The problems of determining the original section of the elements are outlined. The alg...

  17. Ab initio structure determination via powder X-ray diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Digamber G Porob; T N Guru Row

    2001-10-01

    Structure determination by powder X-ray diffraction data has gone through a recent surge since it has become important to get to the structural information of materials which do not yield good quality single crystals. Although the method of structure completion when once the starting model is provided is facile through the Rietveld refinement technique, the structure solution ab initio os still not push-button technology. In this article a survey of the recent development in this area is provided with an illustration of the structure determination of -NaBi3V2O10.

  18. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  19. Determination of macrolides in biological matrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kees, F; Spangler, S; Wellenhofer, M

    1998-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics is described using a cyanopropyl column which proved to be as efficient or superior to the normally used apolar reversed-phase columns. The recovery of the macrolides from water and plasma was 80-90%. Using 0.5 ml of plasma, 30 ng/ml of clarithromycin, 50 ng/ml of roxithromycin and 10 ng/ml of azithromycin could be determined with acceptable precision and accuracy. The method has been employed in pharmacokinetic studies in humans for the determination of roxithromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin in plasma, serum and other biological matrices. The particular selectivity of the cyanopropyl phase may also allow the simultaneous determination of erythromycin and its prodrug esters. PMID:9691325

  20. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs...

  1. Synthesis of a new group of aliphatic hydrazide derivatives and the correlations between their molecular structure and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecka, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    In view of the growing demand for new compounds showing biological activity against pathogenic microorganisms, such as pathogenic and phytopathogenic fungi, the objective of this study was to synthesize a new group of aliphatic and aromatic derivatives of hydrazide. In consequence of the reactions observed during synthesis, the resulting compounds retained their linear structure. Their structure and lipophilicity, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), were analyzed. Correlations were determined between the compounds' molecular parameters and biological activity against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum fungi. The investigated compounds were also examined for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus. The obtained results indicate that compounds with fluorine-containing substituents penetrate the cell structure more effectively and are characterized by higher antifungal potential than analogues with different substituents. PMID:22441334

  2. Synthesis of a New Group of Aliphatic Hydrazide Derivatives and the Correlations between Their Molecular Structure and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kostecka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the growing demand for new compounds showing biological activity against pathogenic microorganisms, such as pathogenic and phytopathogenic fungi, the objective of this study was to synthesize a new group of aliphatic and aromatic derivatives of hydrazide. In consequence of the reactions observed during synthesis, the resulting compounds retained their linear structure. Their structure and lipophilicity, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, were analyzed. Correlations were determined between the compounds’ molecular parameters and biological activity against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum fungi. The investigated compounds were also examined for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus. The obtained results indicate that compounds with fluorine-containing substituents penetrate the cell structure more effectively and are characterized by higher antifungal potential than analogues with different substituents.

  3. Gyroid cuticular structures in butterfly wing scales : biological photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the cuticular structure in the butterfly wing scales of some papilionids (Parides sesostris and Teinopalpus imperialis) and lycaenids (Callophrys rubi, Cyanophrys remus, Mitoura gryneus and Callophrys dumetorum). Using published scanning and transmission electron mic

  4. Insights from the Sea: Structural Biology of Marine Polyketide Synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Akey, David L.; Gehret, Jennifer J.; Khare, Dheeraj; Smith, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    The world’s oceans are a rich source of natural products with extremely interesting chemistry. Biosynthetic pathways have been worked out for a few, and the story is being enriched with crystal structures of interesting pathway enzymes. By far, the greatest number of structural insights from marine biosynthetic pathways has originated with studies of curacin A, a poster child for interesting marine chemistry with its cyclopropane and thiazoline rings, internal cis double bond, and terminal al...

  5. Cryoelectron Tomography or Doing Structural Biology In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Wolfgang

    Electron tomography enables the three-dimensional visualization of large and stochastically variable structures such as supramolecular assemblies, organelles or even cells. In conjunction with cryogenic techniques electron tomography avoids the artefacts that are notorious to conventional electron microscopy specimen preparation. At resolutions of a few (2-4) nanometers it provides unprecedented insights into the molecular organization of cellular landscapes and helps to bridge the divide that hitherto existed between molecular and cellular structural studies.

  6. Structural systems biology evaluation of metabolic thermotolerance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Roger L.; Andrews, Kathleen; Kim, Donghyuk; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2013-01-01

    Genome scale network reconstruction has enabled predictive modeling of metabolism for many systems. Traditionally, protein structural information has not been represented in such reconstructions. Expanding a genome-scale model of Escherichia coli metabolism by including experimental and predicted protein structures enabled the analysis of protein thermostability in a network context, allowing prediction of protein activities that limit network function at super-optimal temperature and mechani...

  7. Structure and Cell Biology of Archaeal Virus STIV

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interaction...

  8. Structural Investigation of Biological and Semiconductor Nanostructures with Nonlinear Multicontrast Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisek, Richard

    Physical and functional properties of advanced nano-composite materials and biological structures are determined by self-organized atoms and molecules into nanostructures and in turn by microscopic organization of the nanostructures into assemblies of higher structural complexity. Therefore, microscopes are indispensable tools for structural investigations at various levels of organization. In this work, novel nonlinear optical microscopy methods were developed to non-invasively study structural organization at the nanoscopic and microscopic levels. Atomic organization of semiconductor nanowires, molecular organization of amylose biocrystallites in starch granules, and microscopic organization of several photosynthetic organisms was elucidated. The structure of ZnSe nanowires, key components in many modern nanodevices, was investigated using polarization harmonic generation microscopy. Based on nonlinear optical properties of the different crystal lattices, zinc blende and wurtzite nanowires were differentiated, and the three-dimensional orientation of the zinc blende nanowires could be found. The structure of starch granules, a model biocrystal, important in food as well as health sciences, was also investigated using polarization harmonic microscopy. The study was combined with ab initio calculations using the crystal structures of amylose A and B, revealing that second harmonic signals originate from the hydroxide and hydrogen bonds in the starch granules. Visualization of several photosynthetic organisms including the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, two species of cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbya sp. and Anabaena sp., aggregates of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes as well as chloroplasts from green plants were also explored, revealing that future nonlinear microscopy applications could include structural studies of cell walls, the Chlamydomonas eyespot, and photosynthetic membranes. In this study, several nonlinear optical microscopy modalities

  9. Application of source-receptor models to determine source areas of biological components (pollen and butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alarcón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The source-receptor models allow the establishment of relationships between a receptor point (sampling point and the probable source areas (regions of emission through the association of concentration values at the receptor point with the corresponding atmospheric back-trajectories, and, together with other techniques, to interpret transport phenomena on a synoptic scale. These models are generally used in air pollution studies to determine the areas of origin of chemical compounds measured at a sampling point, and thus be able to target actions to reduce pollutants. However, until now, few studies have applied these types of models to describe the source areas of biological organisms. In Catalonia there are very complete records of pollen (data from the Xarxa Aerobiològica de Catalunya, Aerobiology Network of Catalonia and butterflies (data from the Catalan Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, a biological material that is also liable to be transported long distances and whose areas of origin could be interesting to know. This work presents the results of the use of the Seibert et al. model applied to the study of the source regions of: (1 certain pollen of an allergic nature, observed in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, and (2 the migratory butterfly Vanessa cardui, observed in Catalonia. Based on the results obtained we can corroborate the suitability of these models to determine the area of origin of several species, both chemical and biological, therefore expanding the possibilities of applying the original model to the wider field of Aerobiology.

  10. The Determinants of Capital Structure: An Empirical Evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Pornsuwankul, Juthamart/Miss

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper develops a preliminary study to explore the determinants of capital structure of listed and unlisted companies in Germany using panel data methodology. The findings suggest that the capital structure of listed and unlisted firms is significantly different. Also, some insights from the modern finance theory of capital structure are portable to Germany in that firm-specific factors that are identified to be significant in explaining capital structure in empirical studies...

  11. COMPLEMENTARY SEX DETERMINATION IN HYMENOPTERAN PARASITOIDS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhishan; KeithR.Hopper; PaulJ.Ode; RogerW.Fuester; CHENJia-hua; GeorgeE.Heimpel

    2003-01-01

    In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, unfertilized eggs produce haploid males while fertilized eggs lead to diploid females under most circumstances. Diploid males can also be produced from fertilization under a system of sex determination known as complementary sex determination (CSD). Under single-locus CSD, sex is determined by multiple alleles at a single sex locus. Individuals heterozygous at the sex locus are female while hemizygous and homozygous individuals develop as haploid and diploid males, respectively. In multiple-locus CSD, two or more loci, each with two or more alleles, determine sex. Diploid individuals are female if one or more sex loci are het-erozygous, while a diploid is male only if homozygous at all sex loci. Diploid males are known to occur in 43 hym-enopteran species and single-locus CSD has been demonstrated in 22 of these species. Diploid males are either developmentally inviable or sterile, so their production constitutes a genetic load. Because diploid male production is more likely under inbreeding, CSD is a form of inbreeding depression. It is crucial to preserve the diversity of sex alleles and reduce the loss of genetic variation in biological control. In the parasitoid species with single-locus CSD, certain precautionary procedures can prevent negative effects of single-locus CSD on biological control.

  12. The determination of iodine in biological media using radioactivation analysis (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this study is to show that the application of radioactivation analysis to the determination of iodine in biological media makes it possible to measure iodine concentrations of the order of 0.0001 μg. After a review of the chemical methods with a mention of the difficulties they present, the optimum conditions for the determination of iodine in biological liquids are given. Three methods are described: - the first consists of a chemical treatment which liberates the protein bound iodine in an inorganic form. After distillation this iodine is irradiated in a flux of thermal neutrons. The induced radioactivity is compared to that of a standard sample irradiated in the same conditions by γ spectrometry. - the second method which is of more general application consists in irradiating the sample and then extracting the iodine; its induced radio-activity is then measured by β-counting. - the third method measures the iodine directly in the thyroid tissue by anti-compton spectrometry. The sensitivity, the reproducibility and the accuracy are discussed. Some applications are described: determination of iodine in its various organic forms in serum, determination of iodine in urines, in food-stuffs, etc., in the thyroid tissue, etc. (author)

  13. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, W; Mail, M; Neinhuis, C

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354736

  14. Family structure and wellbeing of out-of-wedlock children: The significance of the biological parents' relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley H. Liu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the role of the relationship between the biological parents in determining child wellbeing using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS. We extend prior research by considering children born to unmarried parents in an investigation of the effect of the relationship structure between the biological parents on infant health and behavior. The main findings are that children born to cohabiting biological parents (i realize better outcomes, on average, than those born to mothers who are less involved with the child's biological father, and (ii whose parents marry within a year after childbirth do not display significantly better outcomes than children of parents who continue to cohabit. Furthermore, children born to cohabiting or visiting biological parents who end their relationship within the first year of the child's life are up to 9 percent more likely to have asthma compared to children whose biological parents remain (romantically involved. The results are robust to a rich set of controls for socioeconomic status, health endowments, home investments, and relationship characteristics.

  15. Structure and cell biology of archaeal virus STIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, Johnson E

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interactions. Reliable laboratory conditions to propagate STIV and available genetic tools allowed structural characterization of the virus and viral components that lead to the proposal of common capsid ancestry with PRD1 (bacteriophage), Adenovirus (eukaryotic virus) and PBCV (chlorellavirus). Microarray and proteomics approaches systematically analyzed viral replication and the corresponding host responses. Cellular cryo-electron tomography and thin-section EM studies uncovered the assembly and maturation pathway of STIV and revealed dramatic cellular ultra-structure changes upon infection. The viral-induced pyramid-like protrusions on cell surfaces represent a novel viral release mechanism and previously uncharacterized functions in viral replication. PMID:22482708

  16. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  17. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  18. Simultaneous determination of mercury and arsenic in biological materials by radioactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been devised for determining mercury and arsenic simultaneously in biological materials. It is based on complete digestion of the irradiated samples on a hot-plate, extracting arsenic as arsenic (III) chloride with benzene, and isolating mercury by reductive aeration with tin (II) chloride. These elements are precipitated as sulfides, and the activities are counted for quantitative evaluation. The chemical yield is determined by the use of 74As- and 203Hg-spikes, and the neutron flux is checked by the use of copper as a flux monitor. The detection limits are 0.5 ng of As with a counting error of +- 15% and 1 ng of Hg with +- 20%. The method was applied in the determination of mercury and arsenic in the maternal and neonatal hair and blood. (auth.)

  19. Determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical neutron activation procedures using liquid-liquid extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from 1 M HCl and solid extraction with ALIQUAT 336 incorporated in a polyacrylonitrile binding matrix from 0.1 M HCl were developed for accurate determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples at the sub-ng.g-1 level. Concentrations of Re in the range of 0.1 to 2.4 ng.g-1 were determined in several botanical reference materials (RM), while in a RM of road dust a value of approx. 10 ng.g-1 was found. Significantly elevated values of Re, up to 90 ng.g-1, were found in seaweed (brown algae). Results for Re in the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus in which elevated 99Tc values had previously been determined suggest possible competition between Re and Tc in the accumulation process. (author)

  20. A new era for GPCR research: structures, biology anddrug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H Eric XU; Rui-ping XIAO

    2012-01-01

    Cells in a living organism must communicate with each other through continuously sending and receiving messages.G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of communicating molecules at the cell surface.They transmit diverse extracellular signals,ranging from light and small chemical hormones to large peptide and protein hormones,and as such they play crucial roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes.More importantly,GPCRsare the most successful class of drug targets that are relevant to many major diseases,including cancer,heart failure,and inflammatory diseases.Over 50% of currently used drugs are targeted to GPCRs.However,these drugs target only 50-60 GPCRs,leaving the majority of human GPCRs,exceeding 800,unexplored for drug discovery.Given the prominent roles of GPCRs in biology and their successful track records as drug targets,GPCRs have become a hot frontier in basic research of life science and therapeutic discovery of translational medicines.

  1. Nanotwin-governed toughening mechanism in hierarchically structured biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoon Ah; Yin, Sheng; Li, Xiaoyan; Lee, Subin; Moon, Sungmin; Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Minhyug; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Young-Min; Zhang, Teng; Gao, Huajian; Oh, Sang Ho

    2016-02-01

    As a natural biocomposite, Strombus gigas, commonly known as the giant pink queen conch shell, exhibits outstanding mechanical properties, especially a high fracture toughness. It is known that the basic building block of conch shell contains a high density of growth twins with average thickness of several nanometres, but their effects on the mechanical properties of the shell remain mysterious. Here we reveal a toughening mechanism governed by nanoscale twins in the conch shell. A combination of in situ fracture experiments inside a transmission electron microscope, large-scale atomistic simulations and finite element modelling show that the twin boundaries can effectively block crack propagation by inducing phase transformation and delocalization of deformation around the crack tip. This mechanism leads to an increase in fracture energy of the basic building block by one order of magnitude, and contributes significantly to that of the overall structure via structural hierarchy.

  2. Evaluation of a gas chromatography method for azelaic acid determination in selected biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Garelnabi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Azelaic acid (AzA is the best known dicarboxilic acid to have pharmaceutical benefits and clinical applications and also to be associated with some diseases pathophysiology. Materials and Methods: We extracted and methylesterified AzA and determined its concentration in human plasma obtained from healthy individuals and also in mice fed AzA containing diet for three months. Results: AzA was detected in Gas Chromatography (GC and confirmed by Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS, and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMC. Our results have shown that AzA can be determined efficiently in selected biological samples by GC method with 1nM limit of detection (LoD and the limit of quantification (LoQ; was established at 50nM. Analytical Sensitivity as assayed by hexane demonstrated an analytical sensitivity at 0.050nM. The method has demonstrated 8-10% CV batch repeatability across the sample types and 13-18.9% CV for the Within-Lab Precision analysis. The method has shown that AzA can efficiently be recovered from various sample preparation including liver tissue homogenate (95% and human plasma (97%. Conclusions: Because of its simplicity and lower limit of quantification, the present method provides a useful tool for determining AzA in various biological sample preparations.

  3. Determination of steroid hormones in biological and environmental samples using green microextraction techniques: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufartová, Jana; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Nováková, Lucie; Solich, Petr

    2011-10-17

    Residues of steroid hormones have become a cause for concern because they can affect the biological activity of non-target organisms. Steroid hormones are a potential risk for wildlife and humans through the consumption of contaminated food or water. Their determination requires extraction and clean-up steps, prior to detection, to reach low concentration levels. In recent years, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies, such as microextraction techniques, that reduce environmental pollution. Researchers have modified old methods to incorporate procedures that use less-hazardous chemicals or that use smaller amounts of them. They are able to do direct analysis using miniaturised equipment and reduced amounts of solvents and wastes. These accomplishments are the main objectives of green analytical chemistry. In this overview, we focus on microextraction techniques for the determination of steroid hormones in biological (e.g., human urine, human serum, fish, shrimp and prawn tissue and milk) and environmental (e.g., wastewaters, surface waters, tap waters, river waters, sewage sludges, marine sediments and river sediments) samples. We comment on the most recent applications in sorptive-microextraction modes, such as solid phase microextraction (SPME) with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS). We also describe liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) approaches reported in the literature that are applied to the determination of steroid hormones. PMID:21907019

  4. Quality-control method for the determination of biological activity of engineered calcineurin subunit B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinchang; Yang, Huan; Xu, Li; Li, Xiang; Huang, Zongwen; Han, Yudong; Wei, Qun; Rao, Chunming

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a quality-control method for calcineurin subunit B (CNB) biological activity determinations. CNB enhances the p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) dephosphorylating activity of calcineurin subunit A Δ316 mutant (CNAΔ316). A series of CNB concentrations were fitted to a four-parameter equation to calculate the corresponding pNPP maximum dephosphorylation rates. Values were calculated based on biological activity references using a parallel line method. The method was then validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, linear range, sensitivity, specificity, and robustness. The recovery results were greater than 98%. Intra-plate precision was 6.7%, with inter-plate precision of 10.8%. The coefficient of determination was greater than 0.98. The linear range was 0.05-50 μg mL(-1), with sensitivity of 50 μg mL(-1). Tested cytokines did not induce CNAΔ316 dephosphorylation of pNPP. The chosen CNAΔ316 concentration range did not affect activity determinations. PMID:27053126

  5. CONCIDERING OF FUNDATION SLOPE TO DETERMINE THE ENGENEERING STRUCTURE HEIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    Zubko, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The article considers some aspects of determining of engineering structure height. It proposes the technique for terrain slope consideration in the course of base adjustment under difficult conditions of geodetic surveying.

  6. Two-photon excited fluorescent chemosensor for homogeneous determination of copper(II) in aqueous media and complicated biological matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Dong, Xiaohu; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Wenlong; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-05-21

    In the present work, a two-photon excited fluorescent chemosensor for Cu(2+) was prepared. The probe was constructed on the basis of internal charge transfer (ICT) principle with macrocyclic dioxotetraamine as the Cu(2+) receptor. The good water-solubility of the molecule enabled recognition and assay of Cu(2+) ions in biological media. The photophysical properties of the chemosensor were investigated in detail, exhibiting favorable fluorescence quantum yield and moderate two-photon absorption cross-section. The studies on binding thermodynamics demonstrated the formation of 1 : 1 complex between the chemosensor and Cu(2+) and an association constant of ca. 1.04 × 10(5) M(-1). Due to the rational design of the molecular structure, the sensor was highly specific to Cu(2+), which ensured high selectivity in Cu(2+) determination. Upon Cu(2+) binding, the intramolecular charge-transfer extent within the chromophore was weakened resulting in a remarkable quenching of fluorescence, based on which quantitative determination of Cu(2+) was performed. Good linearity was obtained between the fluorescence quenching value and Cu(2+) concentration ranging from 0.04 to 2.0 μM in aqueous solution. Benefiting from the merits of two-photon excitation, the chemosensor was free of interference from background luminescence in serum. A homogeneous quantitative determination of Cu(2+) was achieved in the serum medium with a linear range of 0.04 to 2.0 μM. Considering the structural flexibility of the sensor, this work also opens up the possibility to construct other two-photon excited chemosensors for direct homogeneous assay of various molecules/ions in complicated biological sample matrices. PMID:21416097

  7. Higher order chromatin structure: bridging physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy and genomic techniques have provided new insight into spatial chromatin organization inside of the nucleus. In particular, chromosome conformation capture data has highlighted the relevance of polymer physics for high-order chromatin organization. In this context, we review basic polymer states, discuss how an appropriate polymer model can be determined from experimental data, and examine the success and limitations of various polymer models of high-order interph...

  8. Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins in Five Easy Pieces

    OpenAIRE

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Das, Bibhuti B.; Lu, George J.; Nothnagel, Henry J.; Park, Sang Ho; Son, Woo Sung; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    A general method for determining the structures of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions is described. Membrane proteins are high priority targets for structure determination, and are challenging for the existing experimental methods. Because membrane proteins reside in a liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayer membranes it is important to study them in this type of environment. The approach we have developed can be summarized in five steps, and incorporate...

  9. A Fast Radiochemical Method for the Determination of Some Essential Trace Elements in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for the determination with neutron-activation analysis of the following trace elements in soft biological tissues: Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Sr and Zn. The method consists in performing a short-term irradiation of the samples with a high thermal neutron flux, followed by fast chemical separations and gamma-spectrometric measurements. The chemical separations and the measurements of short-lived nuclides from a run are finished within 70 min, after the end of irradiation

  10. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziechciaż, Małgorzata; Filip, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists' assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it. PMID:25528930

  11. Determination of Biological Treatability Processes of Textile Wastewater and Implementation of a Fuzzy Logic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Akif Kabuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the biological treatability of textile wastewater. For this purpose, a membrane bioreactor (MBR was utilized for biological treatment after the ozonation process. Due to the refractory organic contents of textile wastewater that has a low biodegradability capacity, ozonation was implemented as an advanced oxidation process prior to the MBR system to increase the biodegradability of the wastewater. Textile wastewater, oxidized by ozonation, was fed to the MBR at different hydraulic retention times (HRT. During the process, color, chemical oxygen demand (COD, and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD removal efficiencies were monitored for 24-hour, 12-hour, 6-hour, and 3-hour retention times. Under these conditions, 94% color, 65% COD, and 55% BOD removal efficiencies were obtained in the MBR system. The experimental outputs were modeled with multiple linear regressions (MLR and fuzzy logic. MLR results suggested that color removal is more related to COD removal relative to BOD removal. A surface map of this issue was prepared with a fuzzy logic model. Furthermore, fuzzy logic was employed to the whole modeling of the biological system treatment. Determination coefficients for COD, BOD, and color removal efficiencies were 0.96, 0.97, and 0.92, respectively.

  12. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  13. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR—from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website ( http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm )

  14. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Westler, William M; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2015-08-01

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR--from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website (http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm). PMID:25900069

  15. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Claudia C.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Westler, William M.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR—from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website ( http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm )

  16. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  17. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S.; Y Wang; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ‘entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  18. Determination of absolute structure using Bayesian statistics on Bijvoet differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, R.W.W.; Straver, L.H.; Spek, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    A new probabilistic approach is introduced for the determination of the absolute structure of a compound which is known to be enantiopure based on Bijvoet-pair intensity differences. The new method provides relative probabilities for different models of the chiral composition of the structure. The o

  19. Structure of Biologically Active Organotin(IV) Dithiocarbamates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Y.; Sanuddin, M.; Yamin, B. M.

    2008-03-01

    The diorganotin(IV) complexes of dithiocarbamates derived from from N-ethyl-n-propylamine (EtPrdtc), 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (Me2Etdtc), 3-dimethlyamino-1-propylamine (Me2Prdtc), p-tolylmethanamine (TylMetdtc) and N-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine (MePhMetdtc) have been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on Ph3Sn(EtPrdtc), Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 showed that the complexes adopted a monoclinic system with space group P(2)/n, P21/n and C2/c, respectively. The Ph3Sn(EtPrdtc) complex adopted a trigonal pyramidal structure while the Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 complexes displayed structures which may be described as distorted octahedrons. Cytotoxicity test using HL60 cells (human promyelocytic leukemic) showed that only Me2Sn(Me2Etdtc), Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 complexes were active. The rest of the complexes did not show cytotoxicity behaviour towards HL60 cells.

  20. Synthetical bone-like and biological hydroxyapatites: a comparative study of crystal structure and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase composition, crystal structure and morphology of biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) extracted from human mandible bone, and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp), synthesized by the chemical precipitation method, were studied by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman (R) spectroscopy techniques, combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Structural and microstructural parameters were determined through Rietveld refinement of recorded XRD data, performed using the FullProf computing program, and TEM. Microstructural analysis shows anisotropic extension along the [0 0 l] crystallographic direction (i.e. elongated crystallites shape) of both investigated samples. The average crystallite sizes of 10 and 8 nm were estimated for BHAp and CHAp, respectively. The FTIR and R spectroscopy studies show that carbonate ions substitute both phosphate and hydroxyl ions in the crystal structure of BHAp as well as in CHAp, indicating that both of them are mixed AB-type of CHAp. The thermal behaviour and carbonate content were analysed using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The carbonate content of about 1 wt.% and phase transition, at near 790 0C, from HAp to β-tricalcium phosphate were determined in both samples. The quality of synthesized CHAp powder, particularly, the particle size distribution and uniformity of morphology, was analysed by a particle size analyser based on laser diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. These data were used to discuss similarity between natural and synthetic CHAp. Good correlation between the unit cell parameters, average crystallite size, morphology, carbonate content and crystallographic positions of carbonate ions in natural and synthetic HAp samples was found.

  1. Synthetical bone-like and biological hydroxyapatites: a comparative study of crystal structure and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Smilja; Veselinović, Ljiljana; Lukić, Miodrag J; Karanović, Ljiljana; Bračko, Ines; Ignjatović, Nenad; Uskoković, Dragan

    2011-08-01

    Phase composition, crystal structure and morphology of biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) extracted from human mandible bone, and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp), synthesized by the chemical precipitation method, were studied by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman (R) spectroscopy techniques, combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Structural and microstructural parameters were determined through Rietveld refinement of recorded XRD data, performed using the FullProf computing program, and TEM. Microstructural analysis shows anisotropic extension along the [00l] crystallographic direction (i.e. elongated crystallites shape) of both investigated samples. The average crystallite sizes of 10 and 8 nm were estimated for BHAp and CHAp, respectively. The FTIR and R spectroscopy studies show that carbonate ions substitute both phosphate and hydroxyl ions in the crystal structure of BHAp as well as in CHAp, indicating that both of them are mixed AB-type of CHAp. The thermal behaviour and carbonate content were analysed using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The carbonate content of about 1 wt.% and phase transition, at near 790 °C, from HAp to β-tricalcium phosphate were determined in both samples. The quality of synthesized CHAp powder, particularly, the particle size distribution and uniformity of morphology, was analysed by a particle size analyser based on laser diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. These data were used to discuss similarity between natural and synthetic CHAp. Good correlation between the unit cell parameters, average crystallite size, morphology, carbonate content and crystallographic positions of carbonate ions in natural and synthetic HAp samples was found. PMID:21659698

  2. Generative probabilistic models extend the scope of inferential structure determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Simon; Boomsma, Wouter; Frellsen, Jes;

    2011-01-01

    Conventional methods for protein structure determination from NMR data rely on the ad hoc combination of physical forcefields and experimental data, along with heuristic determination of free parameters such as weight of experimental data relative to a physical forcefield. Recently, a theoretical...

  3. Labor Market Structure and Salary Determination among Professional Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The author investigates the labor market structure and determinants of salaries for professional basketball players. An expanded version of the resource perspective is used. A three-tiered model of labor market segmentation is revealed for professional basketball players, but other variables also are important in salary determination. (Author/CH)

  4. Physical-chemical determinant properties of biological communities in continental semi-arid waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Francisco Cleiton; de Andrade, Eunice Maia; Lopes, Fernando Bezerra; de Paula Filho, Francisco José; Filho, José Hamilton Costa; da Silva, Merivalda Doroteu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout human history, water has undergone changes in quality. This problem is more serious in dry areas, where there is a natural water deficit due to climatic factors. The aims of this study, therefore, were (i) to verify correlations between physical attributes, chemical attributes and biological metrics and (ii) from the biological attributes, to verify the similarity between different points of a body of water in a tropical semi-arid region. Samples were collected every 2 months, from July 2009 to July 2011, at seven points. Four physical attributes, five chemical attributes and four biological metrics were investigated. To identify the correlations between the physicochemical properties and the biological metrics, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were applied. Nine classes of phytoplankton were identified, with the predominance of species of cyanobacteria, and ten families of macroinvertebrates. The use of HCA resulted in the formation of three similar groups, showing that it was possible to reduce the number of sampling points when monitoring water quality with a consequent reduction in cost. Group I was formed from the waters at the high end of the reservoir (points P1, P2 and P3), group II by the waters from the middle third (points P4 and P5), and group III by the waters from the lower part of the reservoir (points P6 and P7). Richness of the phytoplanktons Cyanophyceae, Chorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae was the attribute which determined dissimilarity in water quality. Using CCA, it was possible to identify the spatial variability of the physicochemical attributes (TSS, TKN, nitrate and total phosphorus) that most influence the metrics of the macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton present in the water. Low macroinvertebrate diversity, with a predominance of indicator families for deterioration in water quality, and the composition of phytoplankton showing a predominance of cyanobacteria, suggests greater

  5. Determination of Radiotracer Stability of Tritium-Labelled Compounds in Biological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent extensive use of tritium-labelled compounds in biological studies makes it imperative that investigators verify the radiotracer stability of tritiated compounds. Even purification of labelled compounds to constant specific activity does not preclude the possibility of the tritium atom exchanging with hydrogen within a biological system. Radiotracer stability can be demonstrated by various methods once, meticulous radiochemical purification of the labelled material has been effected. In this report three different methods for establishing radiotracer stability of tritiated compounds are described. One approach is to compare the biological half-life of a H3-compound to that of a similar compound labelled with C14. This method is especially applicable to endogenous substances which undergo isotopic dilution when administered to animals. Stability of exogenous compounds can be verified by a second method. Here it is only necessary to demonstrate no diminution in specific activity when the labelled material is re-isolated from biological samples. A third method, less time-consuming than the first, and applicable to both endogenous and exogenous material is the determination of H3 to C14 isotope ratio in a mixture of the same compound labelled with both isotopes. Identical isotope ratios before administration of the double-labelled material and after re-isolation from organs or excreta demonstrate radiotracer stability. This method is particularly applicable where isolation of minute amounts of material necessitates the use of non-radioactive carrier. Data demonstrating the use of these methods for the verification of radiotracer stability will be presented with special reference to labelled cholesterol, morphine and digitoxin as examples for the three respective methods. (author)

  6. Synthesis, Structure and Biological Activity of Zn(II) Complex with Tris(benzimidazol-2-yl-methyl)amine Ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Xiao-Lan(刘小兰); ZHAO,Ru(赵茹); LIU,Xiao-Hong(刘晓红); YUE,Jun-Jie(岳俊杰); YIN,Yu-Xin(尹宇新); SUN,Yun(孙云); SUN,Ming(孙命)

    2004-01-01

    A new Zn(II) mononuclear complex with tris(benzimidazol-2-yl-methyl)amine (NTB) was synthesized with stoichiometry of [Zn(NTB)NO3]NO3·DIPY·DMF (DIPY∶4,4'-dipyridyl). The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, UV and IR spectra. The crystal structure was determined by using X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystal structure indicates that four N atoms and one O atom coordinate to zinc ion to construct a distorted trigonal-dipyramid configuration. Three nonprotonated N atoms from imidazole groups are in the equatorial plane, one alkylamino N atom and one O atom from in the axial directions. The biological activity assay shows that this complex presents certain biological activity by means of pyrogallol autoxidation and it can be called a model compound of superoxide dismutase (SOD).

  7. Determinants of euro term structure of credit spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Astrid Van Landschoot

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the determinants of the Euro term structure of credit spreads. More specifically, we analyze whether the sensitivity of credit spread changes to financial and macroeconomic variables depends on bond characteristics such as rating and maturity. According to the structural models and empirical evidence on credit spreads, we find that changes in the level and the slope of the default-free term structure, the market return, implied volatility, and liquidity risk sign...

  8. Determinants of Capital Structure: A Cross-Country Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, James

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a cross-country comparison of capital structure; specifically its firm level determinants and how these fluctuate between both Japan and the United States to test the efficacy of competing capital structure theories within contrasting institutional traditions. The purpose of the study is to bring to light the possible effect of such institutional differences on the capital structure decision for financial managers. I utilize a pre-crisis sample of 292 firms, 147 from Japan and 1...

  9. Determinants of Capital Structure: An Empirical Analysis of UK Organisations.

    OpenAIRE

    Gundroo, Shadaab/ SG

    2009-01-01

    In modern day finance, capital structure remains one of those issues under much controversy despite extensive research from academics and practitioners alike. There is a number of existing theories and empirical work on capital structure but as of yet no universal model has been found. The aim of this paper is to analyze the determinants of the capital structure of 73 UK companies over a 5 year period (2004-2008). This study adds to the relatively limited empirical literature on factors infl...

  10. Structural determination of wild-type lactose permease

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Lan; Mirza, Osman; Verner, Gillian; Iwata, So; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Here we describe an x-ray structure of wild-type lactose permease (LacY) from Escherichia coli determined by manipulating phospholipid content during crystallization. The structure exhibits the same global fold as the previous x-ray structures of a mutant that binds sugar but cannot catalyze translocation across the membrane. LacY is organized into two six-helix bundles with twofold pseudosymmetry separated by a large interior hydrophilic cavity open only to the cytoplasmic side and containin...

  11. STRUCTURAL UNEMPLOYMENT AND ITS DETERMINANTS IN SOUTHEAST EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Botrić, Valerija

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides comparative analysis of the structural unemployment for a group of transition countries in Southeast Europe, based on relatively simple measure, NAWRU. The paper also investigates and discusses the determinants of relatively high structural unemployment in the region. The results of the empirical estimates point to the remittances and overall changes in business climate as being the significant variables that explain relatively high structural unemployment in analyzed coun...

  12. The determinants of capital structure: Some evidence from banks

    OpenAIRE

    Heider, Florian; Gropp, Reint

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents that standard cross-sectional determinants of firm leverage also apply to the capital structure of large banks in the United States and Europe. We find a remarkable consistency in sign, significance and economic magnitude. Like non-financial firms, banks appear to have stable capital structures at levels that are specific to each individual bank. The results suggest that capital requirements may only be of second-order importance for banks’ capital structures and confirm ...

  13. Emergence, self-organization and morphogenesis in biological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, R; Purcarea, V I

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the connection between emergence, pattern formation and nonlinear dynamics, focusing on the similarity between discrete patterns and fractal structures, and then describes different solutions to model reaction-diffusion systems as representative processes in morphogenesis. A specific example is the diffusion limited aggregation growth process, illustrated by the simulation of the evolution of a bacterial colony that shows the roles of instability and sensitivity in non-equilibrium pattern formation. Based on this particular case, it is shown how self-organization could be achieved from non-organized agglomeration of separate entities, in a region of space. We conclude with some brief remarks about universality, predictability and long-term prospects for this field of research. PMID:21505578

  14. Magnetic stimulation for non-homogeneous biological structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic stimulation has gained relatively wide application in studying nervous system structures. This technology has the advantage of reduced excitation of sensory nerve endings, and hence results in quasi-painless action. It has become clinically accepted modality for brain stimulation. However, theoretical and practical solutions for assessment of induced current distribution need more detailed and accurate consideration. Some possible analyses are proposed for distribution of the current induced from excitation current contours of different shape and disposition. Relatively non-difficult solutions are shown, applicable for two- and three-dimensional analysis. Methods The boundary conditions for field analysis by the internal Dirichlet problem are introduced, based on the vector potential field excited by external current coils. The feedback from the induced eddy currents is neglected. Finite element modeling is applied for obtaining the electromagnetic fields distribution in a non-homogeneous domain. Results The distributions were obtained in a non-homogeneous structure comprised of homogeneous layers. A tendency was found of the induced currents to follow paths in lower resistivity layers, deviating from the expected theoretical course for a homogeneous domain. Current density concentrations occur at the boundary between layers, suggesting the possibility for focusing on, or predicting of, a zone of stimulation. Conclusion The theoretical basis and simplified approach for generation of 3D FEM networks for magnetic stimulation analysis are presented, applicable in non-homogeneous and non-linear media. The inconveniences of introducing external excitation currents are avoided. Thus, the possibilities are improved for analysis of distributions induced by time-varying currents from contours of various geometry and position with respect to the medium.

  15. Packing regularities in biological structures relate to their dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Robert L; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The high packing density inside proteins leads to certain geometric regularities and also is one of the most important contributors to the high extent of cooperativity manifested by proteins in their cohesive domain motions. The orientations between neighboring nonbonded residues in proteins substantially follow the similar geometric regularities, regardless of whether the residues are on the surface or buried, a direct result of hydrophobicity forces. These orientations are relatively fixed and correspond closely to small deformations from those of the face-centered cubic lattice, which is the way in which identical spheres pack at the highest density. Packing density also is related to the extent of conservation of residues, and we show this relationship for residue packing densities by averaging over a large sample or residue packings. There are three regimes: (1) over a broad range of packing densities the relationship between sequence entropy and inverse packing density is nearly linear, (2) over a limited range of low packing densities the sequence entropy is nearly constant, and (3) at extremely low packing densities the sequence entropy is highly variable. These packing results provide important justification for the simple elastic network models that have been shown for a large number of proteins to represent protein dynamics so successfully, even when the models are extremely coarse grained. Elastic network models for polymeric chains are simple and could be combined with these protein elastic networks to represent partially denatured parts of proteins. Finally, we show results of applications of the elastic network model to study the functional motions of the ribosome, based on its known structure. These results indicate expected correlations among its components for the step-wise processing steps in protein synthesis, and suggest ways to use these elastic network models to develop more detailed mechanisms, an important possibility because most

  16. Analytical Strategies for the Determination of Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors in Pharmaceutical Formulations and Biological Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Cafer

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs that act as reuptake inhibitors for the neurotransmitters norepinephrine and epinephrine. The present review provides an account of analytical methods published in recent years for the determination of NRI drugs. NRIs are atomoxetine, reboxetine, viloxazine and maprotiline. NRIs with less activity at other sites are mazindol, bupropion, tapentadol, and teniloxazine. This review focuses on the analytical methods including chromatographic, spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, and electrophoresis techniques for NRI analysis from pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. Among all of the published methods, liquid chromatography with UV-vis or MS-MS detection is the most popular technique. The most the common sample preparation techniques in the analytical methods for NRIs include liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction. Besides the analytical methods for single components, some of the simultaneous determinations are also included in this review. PMID:26857446

  17. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other 14C-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples

  18. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  19. Radiochemical separation for determining of some trace elements in standard biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical separation method has been developed to determine the elements W, Cd, Cr, U, Th e Co in three biological materials of botanic origin used as SRM's: Peach Leaves, Apples Leaves and the new proposed material Spinach. The aim was to obtain more information for these elements whose values are not yet determined or are given only as suggested values. The radiochemical procedure was based on chromatographic separation using resin Chelex 100 in H Ac 0.1 M-N H4 Ac 0.1 M at pH 4.8. All the experimental data e results obtained are described and compared with the literature values. (author). 10 refs, 4 tabs

  20. Activation analytical determination of essential and toxic trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the essential trace elements Hg, Ag, Cu and Se in food (potatoes, milk powder) and biological standard materials (fruit tree leaves), simple, fast radiochemical separation methods are worked out. Following oxidative decomposition and destillation of Hg, the elements silver, copper and selenium are found in the destillation residue and can be electrochemically enriched on an amalgamated Cu foil (determination of Ag and Se in the concentration range of 10-9 to 10-8g, of Cu in the range of 10-12 to 10-10 g), whilst the matrix elements Na, K, P are adsorbed on a column with 3 different inorganic ion exchangers. The eluate of the ion exchanger can be added directly to the multielement gamma spectroscopy. The possiblity of working purely instrumentally is demonstrated by 2 examples: multielement analysis of human hair and river water. (RB)

  1. Very accurate determination of trace amounts of selenium in biological materials by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium is both a toxic and an essential trace element for humans and animals. The purpose of this work was to elaborate a very accurate (definitive) method for the determination of selenium traces in different types of biological materials. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation and quantitative and very selective radiochemical separation of selenium by ion-exchange and extraction chromatography, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurement of 75Se. Three amines: 2,3-diaminonaphtalene, 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and 4-nitro-phenyldiamine supported on Bio Beads SM-2 or Amberlite XAD-4 were chosen to batch experiments. Using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tracer experiments were carried out with the unirradiated biological samples. They have proved that the whole radiochemical separation procedure is quantitative. Gamma-ray spectrum of the selenium fraction practically did not show any other activities except background peaks. The obtained results demonstrate good agreement of results obtained by our new '' definitive '' method for the determination of selenium with the certified values

  2. Optimized and validated spectrophotometric methods for the determination of nicorandil in drug formulations and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nafisur; Ahmad Khan, Nadeem; Hejaz Azmi, Syed Najmul

    2004-07-01

    Two simple, sensitive and economical spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of nicorandil in drug formulations and biological fluids. Method A is based on the reaction of the drug with brucine-sulphanilic acid reagent in sulphuric acid medium producing a yellow-coloured product, which absorbs maximally at 410 nm. Method B depends on the formation of the intensely blue-coloured product which results due to the interaction of an electrophilic intermediate of 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride (MBTH) with oxidized product of 4-(methyl amino) phenol sulphate (metol) in the presence of nicorandil as an oxidizing agent in sulphuric acid medium. The coloured product shows absorbance maximum at 560 nm. Under the optimized experimental conditions, Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration range of 2.5-35.0 and 0.40-2.2 microg ml(-1) for Methods A and B, respectively. Both the methods have been successfully applied to the determination of nicorandil in drug formulations and biological fluids. The results are validated statistically and through recovery studies. In order to establish the bias and the performance of the proposed methods, the point and interval hypothesis tests have been performed. The experimental true bias of all samples is smaller than +/-2%. PMID:15231427

  3. Resilience of caregivers of people with dementia: a systematic review of biological and psychosocial determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although caregivers of people with dementia may face difficulties, some positive feelings of caregiving may be associated with resilience.Objective: This study systematically reviewed the definitions, methodological approaches and determinant models associated with resilience among caregivers of people with dementia.Methods: Search for articles published between 2003 and 2014 in ISI, PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO and Lilacs using the search terms resilience, caregivers and dementia.Results and conclusions: Resilience has been defined as positive adaptation to face adversity, flexibility, psychological well-being, strength, healthy life, burden, social network and satisfaction with social support. No consensus was found about the definition of resilience associated with dementia. We classified the determinant variables into biological, psychological and social models. Higher levels of resilience were associated with lower depression rates and greater physical health. Other biological factors associated with higher levels of resilience were older age, African-American ethnicity and female sex. Lower burden, stress, neuroticism and perceived control were the main psychological factors associated with resilience. Social support was a moderating factor of resilience, and different types of support seemed to relieve the physical and mental overload caused by stress.

  4. Determination of perfluorinated alkyl acid concentrations in biological standard reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Jessica L; O'Connell, Steven G; Butt, Craig M; Mabury, Scott A; Small, Jeff M; De Silva, Amila O; Muir, Derek C G; Delinsky, Amy D; Strynar, Mark J; Lindstrom, Andrew B; Reagen, William K; Malinsky, Michelle; Schäfer, Sandra; Kwadijk, Christiaan J A F; Schantz, Michele M; Keller, Jennifer M

    2012-11-01

    Standard reference materials (SRMs) are homogeneous, well-characterized materials used to validate measurements and improve the quality of analytical data. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a wide range of SRMs that have mass fraction values assigned for legacy pollutants. These SRMs can also serve as test materials for method development, method validation, and measurement for contaminants of emerging concern. Because inter-laboratory comparison studies have revealed substantial variability of measurements of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), future analytical measurements will benefit from determination of consensus values for PFAAs in SRMs to provide a means to demonstrate method-specific performance. To that end, NIST, in collaboration with other groups, has been measuring concentrations of PFAAs in a variety of SRMs. Here we report levels of PFAAs and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) determined in four biological SRMs: fish tissue (SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue), bovine liver (SRM 1577c), and mussel tissue (SRM 2974a). We also report concentrations for three in-house quality-control materials: beluga whale liver, pygmy sperm whale liver, and white-sided dolphin liver. Measurements in SRMs show an array of PFAAs, with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) being the most frequently detected. Reference and information values are reported for PFAAs measured in these biological SRMs. PMID:22476786

  5. Determination of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents in biological and environmental samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telgmann, Lena [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); Sperling, Michael [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); European Virtual Institute for Speciation Analysis (EVISA), Münster (Germany); Karst, Uwe, E-mail: uk@uni-muenster.de [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany)

    2013-02-18

    Highlights: ► All major methods for the analysis of Gd-based MRI contrast agents are discussed. ► Biological and environmental samples are covered. ► Pharmacokinetics and species transformation can be investigated. ► The figures of merit as limit of detection and analysis time are described. -- Abstract: The development of analytical methods and strategies to determine gadolinium and its complexes in biological and environmental matrices is evaluated in this review. Gadolinium (Gd) chelates are employed as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the 1980s. In general they were considered as safe and well-tolerated, when in 2006, the disease nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was connected to the administration of MRI contrast agents based on Gd. Pathogenesis and etiology of NSF are yet unclear and called for the development of several analytical methods to obtain elucidation in this field. Determination of Gd complex stability in vitro and in vivo, as well as the quantification of Gd in body fluids like blood and urine was carried out. Separation of the Gd chelates was achieved with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). For detection, various methods were employed, including UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A second challenge for analysts was the discovery of high concentrations of anthropogenic Gd in surface waters draining populated areas. The source could soon be determined to be the increasing administration of Gd complexes during MRI examinations. Identification and quantification of the contrast agents was carried out in various surface and groundwater samples to determine the behavior and fate of the Gd chelates in the environment. The improvement of limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) was and still is the goal of past and ongoing

  6. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general

  7. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crick, Duncan J.; Wang, Jue X. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Mott, Helen R.; Nietlispach, Daniel, E-mail: dn206@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  8. Visual Analysis of Transcriptome Data in the Context of Anatomical Structures and Biological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Junker, Astrid; Rohn, Hendrik; Schreiber, Falk

    2012-01-01

    The complexity and temporal as well as spatial resolution of transcriptome datasets is constantly increasing due to extensive technological developments. Here we present methods for advanced visualization and intuitive exploration of transcriptomics data as necessary prerequisites in order to facilitate the gain of biological knowledge. Color-coding of structural images based on the expression level enables a fast visual data analysis in the background of the examined biological system. The n...

  9. Heavy water effects on the structure, functions and behavior of biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H2O substitution for D2O either in environment or in the culture medium of the living systems generates changes in their main functions and composition. In this paper some of the heavy water effects in biological systems such as structural and functional changes were reviewed: normal cell architecture alterations, cell division and membrane functions disturbance, muscular contractility and the perturbations of biological oscillators such as circadian rhythm, heart rate, respiratory cycle, tidal and ultradian rhythm. (authors)

  10. In search of a reliable technique for the determination of the biological stability of the organic matter in the mechanical-biological treated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, Raquel; d'Imporzano, Giuliana; Ponsá, Sergio; Gea, Teresa; Artola, Adriana; Vázquez, Felícitas; Sánchez, Antoni; Adani, Fabrizio

    2009-03-15

    The biological stability determines the extent to which readily biodegradable organic matter has decomposed. In this work, a massive estimation of indices suitable for the measurement of biological stability of the organic matter content in solid waste samples has been carried out. Samples from different stages in a mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant treating municipal solid wastes (MSW) were selected as examples of different stages of organic matter stability in waste biological treatment. Aerobic indices based on respiration techniques properly reflected the process of organic matter biodegradation. Static and dynamic respirometry showed similar values in terms of aerobic biological activity (expressed as oxygen uptake rate, OUR), whereas cumulative oxygen consumption was a reliable method to express the biological stability of organic matter in solid samples. Methods based on OUR and cumulative oxygen consumption were positively correlated. Anaerobic methods based on biogas production (BP) tests also reflected well the degree of biological stability, although significant differences were found in solid and liquid BP assays. A significant correlation was found between cumulative oxygen consumption and ultimate biogas production. The results obtained in this study can be a basis for the quantitative measurement of the efficiency in the stabilization of organic matter in waste treatment plants, including MBT plants, anaerobic digestion of MSW and composting plants. PMID:18606494

  11. Synthesis, Structure and Biological Activities of Novel Triazole Compounds Containing Thioamide Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘法谦; 秦永其; 许良忠; 陆路德; 杨绪杰; 汪信

    2005-01-01

    Two compounds 2-benzoyl-N-phenyl-2-( 1,2,4-triazol- 1-yl)thioacetamide (1) and 2-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-N-phenyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)thioacetamide (2) were synthesized from substituted acetophenone, triazole and phenyl isothiocyanate by several step reactions. The structure of compound 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P21/c, a =0.8806(2) nm, b= 1.2097(2) nm, c= 1.4809(3) nm, β=105.88°, Z=4, V=1.5173(6) nm3, Dc= 1.411 Mg/m3, μ=0.22 mm-1, F(000)=672, final R1=0.040 and Rw=0.103. There is obvious potentially weak C—H…N intermolecular interaction in the crystal, which stabilizes the structure. The results of biological test show that the two compounds have antifungal and plant growth regulating activities.

  12. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  13. [Dialectic of the interrelationship between structure and function in biology and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strukov, A I; Kakturskiĭ, L V

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with some aspects of the dialectics of structure and function relationships in biological objects normally and pathologically. Idealistic and metaphysical concepts of the structure-function relationships (morphological idealism, holism, physiological idealism, functionalism) are critisized, and historical premises of these concepts are characterized. The principle of indissoluble unity and interconnection of changes in structure and function is emphasized, while the thesis of the primacy of function in the shaping of the form and the concept of functional diseases are rejected. Much attention is paid to the methodological principles of the study of structure and function based on the systemic approach to the investigation of biological objects from the point of view of structural levels and integratism. The groundlessness of the principles of reductionism and organicism in the solution of this problem is indicated. The connection of the concepts of structure and function with categories and laws of materialistic dialectics is dwelt on. PMID:880057

  14. Energy group structure determination using particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Particle swarm optimization is applied to determine broad group structure. ► A graph representation of the broad group structure problem is introduced. ► The approach is tested on a fuel-pin model. - Abstract: Multi-group theory is widely applied for the energy domain discretization when solving the Linear Boltzmann Equation. To reduce the computational cost, fine group cross libraries are often down-sampled into broad group cross section libraries. Cross section data collapsing generally involves two steps: Firstly, the broad group structure has to be determined; secondly, a weighting scheme is used to evaluate the broad cross section library based on the fine group cross section data and the broad group structure. A common scheme is to average the fine group cross section weighted by the fine group flux. Cross section collapsing techniques have been intensively researched. However, most studies use a pre-determined group structure, open based on experience, to divide the neutron energy spectrum into thermal, epi-thermal, fast, etc. energy range. In this paper, a swarm intelligence algorithm, particle swarm optimization (PSO), is applied to optimize the broad group structure. A graph representation of the broad group structure determination problem is introduced. And the swarm intelligence algorithm is used to solve the graph model. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated using a fuel-pin model

  15. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  16. Normal and aging hair biology and structure 'aging and hair'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodier, Molly; Hordinsky, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Much like an individual's hairstyle, hair fibers along the scalp see a number of changes over the course of one's lifetime. As the decades pass, the shine and volume synonymous with youthful hair may give way to thin, dull, and brittle hair commonly associated with aging. These changes are a result of a compilation of genetic and environmental elements influencing the cells of the hair follicle, specifically the hair follicle stem cells and melanocytes. Telomere shortening, decrease in cell numbers, and particular transcription factors have all been implicated in this process. In turn, these molecular alterations lead to structural modifications of the hair fiber, decrease in melanin production, and lengthening of the telogen phase of the hair cycle. Despite this inevitable progression with aging, there exists an array of treatments such as light therapy, minoxidil, and finasteride which have been designed to mitigate the effects of aging, particularly balding and thinning hair. Although each works through a different mechanism, all aim to maintain or potentially restore the youthful quality of hair. PMID:26370639

  17. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical 3He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5 Angstrom with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25 Angstrom. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux

  18. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  19. Structure and biological roles of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce N; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Soto, María J; Margaret, Isabel; Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Sanjuan, Juan; Temprano, Francisco; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Vinardell, José M

    2014-01-01

    Here we report that the structure of the Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide (EPS) is composed of glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, pyruvic acid, in the ratios 5∶2∶2∶1 and is partially acetylated. A S. fredii HH103 exoA mutant (SVQ530), unable to produce EPS, not only forms nitrogen fixing nodules with soybean but also shows increased competitive capacity for nodule occupancy. Mutant SVQ530 is, however, less competitive to nodulate Vigna unguiculata. Biofilm formation was reduced in mutant SVQ530 but increased in an EPS overproducing mutant. Mutant SVQ530 was impaired in surface motility and showed higher osmosensitivity compared to its wild type strain in media containing 50 mM NaCl or 5% (w/v) sucrose. Neither S. fredii HH103 nor 41 other S. fredii strains were recognized by soybean lectin (SBL). S. fredii HH103 mutants affected in exopolysaccharides (EPS), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), cyclic glucans (CG) or capsular polysaccharides (KPS) were not significantly impaired in their soybean-root attachment capacity, suggesting that these surface polysaccharides might not be relevant in early attachment to soybean roots. These results also indicate that the molecular mechanisms involved in S. fredii attachment to soybean roots might be different to those operating in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. PMID:25521500

  20. Study of structural model of biological membranes by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, L P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to study, from the structural point of view, the process of incorporation of various types of hydrophobic compounds into the lamellar phase of liposomes and multilayers of the zwitterionic phospholipid DPPC. X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation, have been used to monitor changes of several bilayer systems. Thermotropic phase transitions as well as the order of the lamellar packing were studied in situ experiments. The behavior of the L beta' and L alpha phases was followed as a function of the water content in dispersions of DPPC multi lamellar vesicles with the addition of the alkaloid Ellipticine in several concentrations. The results showed a decrease in the temperature of the pre-transition as well as that of the main transition (P beta' ->L alpha). The decrease of the lamellar spacing as a function of temperature in the liquid crystalline phase leads to the description of the thermal compression coefficient in the L alpha phase. It wa...

  1. Biological aspects of porous-dike intake structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current knowledge is reviewed on the potential for both adult and larval exclusion with a porous dike. It is shown that exclusion is possible, given small enough filter material. In addition, limited observations show that some adult and larval fish will avoid a porous-dike intake, thereby suggesting that dikes can also act as behavioral barriers. Information on fouling and clogging of porous dikes is reviewed, and proposed anti-fouling techniques are discussed. Data are too limited for prediction of flow restrictions due to fouling; however, it is shown that fouling is not a problem when large filter material is used in the dike. To determine the feasibility of a porous-dike intake, a pilot-scale field experiment is proposed. The proposed in-situ test facility, to be installed in Mount Hope Bay, Mass., is described. Plans to assess the exclusion capability and fouling rates of several dike materials are presented. A parallel laboratory program of larval behavioral studies is described. Results of this study are expected in 1981

  2. A Biological Condition Gradient Model for Historical Assessment of Estuarine Habitat Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumchenia, Emily J.; Pelletier, Marguerite C.; Cicchetti, Giancarlo; Davies, Susan; Pesch, Carol E.; Deacutis, Christopher F.; Pryor, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are affected by ever-increasing natural and human pressures. Because the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics unique to estuarine ecosystems control the ways that biological resources respond to ecosystem stressors, we present a flexible and adaptable biological assessment method for estuaries. The biological condition gradient (BCG) is a scientific framework of biological response to increasing anthropogenic stress that is comprehensive and ecosystem based and evaluates environmental conditions and the status of ecosystem services in order to identify, communicate, and prioritize management action. Using existing data, we constructed the first estuarine BCG framework that examines changes in habitat structure through time. Working in a New England (U.S.) estuary with a long history of human influence, we developed an approach to define a reference level, which we described as a "minimally disturbed" range of conditions for the ecosystem, anchored by observations before 1850 AD. Like many estuaries in the U.S., the relative importance of environmental stressors changed over time, but even qualitative descriptions of the biological indicators' status provided useful information for defining condition levels. This BCG demonstrated that stressors rarely acted alone and that declines in one biological indicator influenced the declines of others. By documenting the biological responses to cumulative stressors, the BCG inherently suggests an ecosystem-based approach to management. Additionally, the BCG process initiates thinking over long time scales and can be used to inspire scientists, managers, and the public toward environmental action.

  3. Biological Determinism and the Narrative of Adjustment: The High School Biology Textbooks of Truman Jesse Moon, c. 1921-1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Steven

    2007-01-01

    While the mainline eugenics movement in early 20th century was closely associated with racism and the European Holocaust and was present in biology textbooks in the early 20th century, the following article finds that a transformed eugenics could be found the U.S. science curriculum by mid-century. The following article analyzes the content of 73…

  4. The beamlines of ELETTRA and their application to structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, F; Lausi, A; Savoia, A

    1999-01-01

    sample crystal in order to reduce the radiation damage. SAXS is an experimental technique used to derive structural information about supra-molecular assemblies, amorphous materials and partly ordered systems (e.g. size and shape of large molecules). The high-flux SAXS beamline at ELETTRA is mainly intended for time-resolved studies on fast structural transitions in the sub-millisecond time region in solutions and in partly ordered systems, triggered by external or process parameters, with a SAXS resolution between 10 and 1400 A in real space. The source is the already mentioned 57-pole and the SAXS beamline accepts three discrete energies of its spectrum, namely 5.4, 8 and 16 keV. The beamline optics consists of a flat double-crystal monochromator and a double focusing toroidal mirror. A multi-purpose sample stage, movable along an optical table in order to optimise the sample to detect distance, allows to perform fast time-resolved relaxation studies based on temperature- or pressure-jumps as well as stopped flow experiments. Moreover, the users have option to install their own specialised sample surrounding equipment. The optimisation of the beamline with respect to high-flux and consequently high-flux density, allows to perform the following experiments: low contrast solution scattering, grazing incidence surface diffraction, micro-spot scanning, X-ray fluorescence analysis, time-resolved studies > or = 11 microseconds, simultaneous small- and wide-angle measurements on gels, liquid crystals, biopolymers, amorphous materials, muscles. PMID:10710723

  5. Design, modeling and control of a pneumatically actuated manipulator inspired by biological continuum structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological tentacles, such as octopus arms, have entirely flexible structures and virtually infinite degrees of freedom (DOF) that allow for elongation, shortening and bending at any point along the arm length. The amazing dexterity of biological tentacles has driven the growing implementation of continuum manipulators in robotic systems. This paper presents a pneumatic manipulator inspired by biological continuum structures in some of their key features and functions, such as continuum morphology, intrinsic compliance and stereotyped motions with hyper redundant DOF. The kinematics and dynamics of the manipulator are formulated and identified, and a hierarchical controller taking inspiration from the structure of an octopus nervous system is used to relate desired stereotyped motions to individual actuator inputs. Simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the model and prototype where good agreement was found between the two. (paper)

  6. Structure of CPV17 polyhedrin determined by the improved analysis of serial femtosecond crystallographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) allows the analysis of small weakly diffracting protein crystals, but has required very many crystals to obtain good data. Here we use an XFEL to determine the room temperature atomic structure for the smallest cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus polyhedra yet characterized, which we failed to solve at a synchrotron. These protein microcrystals, roughly a micron across, accrue within infected cells. We use a new physical model for XFEL diffraction, which better estimates the experimental signal, delivering a high-resolution XFEL structure (1.75 Å), using fewer crystals than previously required for this resolution. The crystal lattice and protein core are conserved compared with a polyhedrin with less than 10% sequence identity. We explain how the conserved biological phenotype, the crystal lattice, is maintained in the face of extreme environmental challenge and massive evolutionary divergence. Our improved methods should open up more challenging biological samples to XFEL analysis

  7. DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and computational Biology/Bioinformatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2008-02-21

    The overall goal of the DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and Computational Biology was to enhance the competiveness of Vermont research in these scientific areas. To develop self-sustaining infrastructure, we increased the critical mass of faculty, developed shared resources that made junior researchers more competitive for federal research grants, implemented programs to train graduate and undergraduate students who participated in these research areas and provided seed money for research projects. During the time period funded by this DOE initiative: (1) four new faculty were recruited to the University of Vermont using DOE resources, three in Computational Biology and one in Structural Biology; (2) technical support was provided for the Computational and Structural Biology facilities; (3) twenty-two graduate students were directly funded by fellowships; (4) fifteen undergraduate students were supported during the summer; and (5) twenty-eight pilot projects were supported. Taken together these dollars resulted in a plethora of published papers, many in high profile journals in the fields and directly impacted competitive extramural funding based on structural or computational biology resulting in 49 million dollars awarded in grants (Appendix I), a 600% return on investment by DOE, the State and University.

  8. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  9. The use of self-determination theory to foster environmental motivation in an environmental biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darner, Rebekka

    A scientifically literate person is one who understands the nature of science, its processes, products, and their appropriate application to decision-making contexts. The impetus to make informed decisions about environmental issues is environmental motivation. I examined students' environmental motivation, its relationship to scientific knowledge, and how environmental motivation can be fostered in a science classroom. This study took place in a college-level environmental biology course in which the instructor attempted to support students' basic psychological needs, as defined by self-determination theory (SDT). The first question was to what extent does an SDT-guided environmental biology course differ from a non-SDT-guided course in the degree to which it fostered self-determined motivation toward the environment. The administration of a well-validated scale to two sections before, after, and six months following the end of the course indicated that SDT-guided instruction is a plausible way to foster environmental motivation in the classroom. The second question was what are the multiple influences on fostering self-determined motivation toward the environment in an SDT-guided course. Path analysis indicated that environmental motivation can be partially accomplished in an environmental biology course by conveying to students that they are cared for, are connected to others, and can trust others while solving environmental problems. The third question sought to characterize students' scientific conceptualizations as they solve environmental problems and the extent to which their conceptualizations relate to the satisfaction of their need for competence. Students were videotaped during in-class problem-solving, after which stimulated-recall interviews were conducted. Grounded theory and an established coding scheme were combined to analyze these data, which resulted in three grounded hypotheses about what characterizes students' scientific knowledge when they

  10. Biological and chemical tests of contaminated soils to determine bioavailability and environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the concept of bioavailability of soil contaminants to receptors and its use in supporting the development of EAE is growing but still incomplete. Nonetheless, there is increased awareness of the importance of such data to determine acceptable cleanup levels and achieve timely site closures. This presentation discusses a framework for biological and chemical testing of contaminated soils developed as part of a Gas Research Institute (GRI) project entitled ''Environmentally Acceptable Endpoints in Soil Using a Risk Based Approach to Contaminated Site Management Based on Bioavailability of Chemicals in Soil.'' The presentation reviews the GRI program, and summarizes the findings of the biological and chemical testing section published in the GRI report. The three primary components of the presentation are: (1) defining the concept of bioavailability within the existing risk assessment paradigm, (2) assessing the usefulness of the existing tests to measure bioavailability and test frameworks used to interpret these measurements, and (3) suggesting how a small selection of relevant tests could be incorporated into a flexible testing scheme for soils to address this issue

  11. A Zinc Fusion Method for the Determination of Tritium in Biological Material by Gas Counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of organic compounds to a mixture of hydrogen and methane by mixture with metallic zinc and suitable catalysts offers a convenient means for the determination of tritium in organic material by gas assay. It has been found, however, that, at least in proportional counting, compounds of certain types do not give reliable results with this method; and when a trial of its application to animal tissues was made, the results were extremely inaccurate. As the principle seemed to offer several advantages over other published methods, a search was conducted for reagents which would render it usable with biological material. It was found that, when up to 10 mg of animal tissue, such as blood, muscle and liver, containing or mixed with various tritiated compounds were heated for 3 hours at 650oC in an evacuated and sealed tube of special glass together with sufficient amounts of metallic zinc powder, nickel oxide and anhydrous sodium carbonate, gas which could be assayed in brass cathode proportional counters filled to atmospheric pressure with inactive methane was produced. Above 4000 V the counters filled with this gas mixture exhibited plateaux several hundred volts long and with a slope less than 1% per 100 V. This method for conversion of biological material to a suitable gas for proportional counting was found to be readily reproducible with a mean accuracy of within better than 3%. No serious memory effects have been noted, even with samples of rather high specific activity. (author)

  12. The challenge of determining the need for remediation following a wide-area biological release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, Ellen

    2011-09-01

    Recovering from a biological attack is a complex process requiring the successful resolution of numerous challenges. The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration program is one of the first multiagency efforts to develop strategies and tools that could be effective following a wide-area release of B. anthracis spores. Nevertheless, several key policy issues and associated science and technology issues still need to be addressed. For example, more refined risk assessment and management approaches are needed to help evaluate "true" public health risk. Once the risk is understood, that information can be considered along with the types of characterization activities deemed necessary to determine whether the cost and time of decontamination are actually warranted. This commentary offers 5 recommendations associated with decision making regarding decontamination and clearance options that should accompany a comprehensive risk analysis leading to more effective risk management decisions. It summarizes some of the most important technological gaps that still need to be addressed to help decision makers in their objective of reducing health risks to an acceptable level. The risk management approach described should enable decision makers to improve credibility and gain public acceptance, especially when an adequate science and technology base is available to support the required decisions. PMID:21882967

  13. Determination of the sampling factor in biological standards using INAA and PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations in the distribution of elemental concentrations in most biological materials suggest that a subsample, taken from a specimen containing the elements of interest, may not be representative of the specimen due to lack of homogeneity. It is therefore important when using a trace-element analysis technique, to know the representative mass, defined by a sampling factor for a given relative subsampling error, for whichever material is analysed and for each element detected. We have used two complementary techniques, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using short-lived radionuclides and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis to determine the concentration of 17 elements and obtain their sampling factors in a number of biological standards. In the case of PIXE a 2 MeV, 0.5 mm diameter proton beam was used and the sampling factor was expressed in terms of the number of spots on the target material required for a representative sample mass to be analysed. Six elements, Cl, Ca, Cu, K, Mn and Br, were detected by both techniques and results show that the values of the sampling factors are technique-dependent. (orig.)

  14. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g-1. The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  15. Contribution to structural determination of triterpenes by computer aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible the structural knowledge of several substances. In this work, 13C NMR were used to identify the molecular structure of triterpenes. A system composed by several routines written in FOXBASIC was developed to be used as a help to structural determination of triterpenes. A database of 1,000 triterpenes belonging to different backbones was built. The fields contain the chemical shift of each carbon in the molecule and a 10 digit hexadecimal code that characterizes the carbon environment. The code with the general formula: C. α1 α2 α3 α4. A1 A1E. β1 β2, where C designates the nature of the carbon responsible for the chemical shift and the other symbols represent its chemical environment. This system showed to be useful in structure determination of known and unknown triterpenes. (author)

  16. The Widespread Prevalence and Functional Significance of Silk-Like Structural Proteins in Metazoan Biological Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel McDougall

    Full Text Available In nature, numerous mechanisms have evolved by which organisms fabricate biological structures with an impressive array of physical characteristics. Some examples of metazoan biological materials include the highly elastic byssal threads by which bivalves attach themselves to rocks, biomineralized structures that form the skeletons of various animals, and spider silks that are renowned for their exceptional strength and elasticity. The remarkable properties of silks, which are perhaps the best studied biological materials, are the result of the highly repetitive, modular, and biased amino acid composition of the proteins that compose them. Interestingly, similar levels of modularity/repetitiveness and similar bias in amino acid compositions have been reported in proteins that are components of structural materials in other organisms, however the exact nature and extent of this similarity, and its functional and evolutionary relevance, is unknown. Here, we investigate this similarity and use sequence features common to silks and other known structural proteins to develop a bioinformatics-based method to identify similar proteins from large-scale transcriptome and whole-genome datasets. We show that a large number of proteins identified using this method have roles in biological material formation throughout the animal kingdom. Despite the similarity in sequence characteristics, most of the silk-like structural proteins (SLSPs identified in this study appear to have evolved independently and are restricted to a particular animal lineage. Although the exact function of many of these SLSPs is unknown, the apparent independent evolution of proteins with similar sequence characteristics in divergent lineages suggests that these features are important for the assembly of biological materials. The identification of these characteristics enable the generation of testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these proteins assemble and direct the

  17. The Widespread Prevalence and Functional Significance of Silk-Like Structural Proteins in Metazoan Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Carmel; Woodcroft, Ben J.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, numerous mechanisms have evolved by which organisms fabricate biological structures with an impressive array of physical characteristics. Some examples of metazoan biological materials include the highly elastic byssal threads by which bivalves attach themselves to rocks, biomineralized structures that form the skeletons of various animals, and spider silks that are renowned for their exceptional strength and elasticity. The remarkable properties of silks, which are perhaps the best studied biological materials, are the result of the highly repetitive, modular, and biased amino acid composition of the proteins that compose them. Interestingly, similar levels of modularity/repetitiveness and similar bias in amino acid compositions have been reported in proteins that are components of structural materials in other organisms, however the exact nature and extent of this similarity, and its functional and evolutionary relevance, is unknown. Here, we investigate this similarity and use sequence features common to silks and other known structural proteins to develop a bioinformatics-based method to identify similar proteins from large-scale transcriptome and whole-genome datasets. We show that a large number of proteins identified using this method have roles in biological material formation throughout the animal kingdom. Despite the similarity in sequence characteristics, most of the silk-like structural proteins (SLSPs) identified in this study appear to have evolved independently and are restricted to a particular animal lineage. Although the exact function of many of these SLSPs is unknown, the apparent independent evolution of proteins with similar sequence characteristics in divergent lineages suggests that these features are important for the assembly of biological materials. The identification of these characteristics enable the generation of testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these proteins assemble and direct the construction of

  18. Determinants of capital structure: Evidence from Istanbul stock exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Samery, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This thesis aims to explain determinants of capital structure evidence from istanbul stock exchange from three companies (Turkcell ,Vodafone and Deutesche Telekom).The two main theories used are for trade-off theory and pecking order theory. The essential of the pecking order is the manager's of capital structure decision are influenced by the market perception of manager's superior information. The trade-off theory provides support for manager's trade-off between benefits and costs...

  19. Determinants of Capital Structure on UK Quoted Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Hai Tuan

    2012-01-01

    The dissertation aims to examine the determinants influencing the capital structure decisions on UK listed firms and identify which theory is the most relevant one toward UK companies. A panel data set of 234 firms from 9 different industries on FTSE 350 was recorded from 2002-2012 to analyze the factors affecting capital structure. The one-way ANOVA is employed to validate whether the industry effects importantly seize any influence in explaining firms’ debt ratios. Moreover, statistical tes...

  20. Structural Determinants of the Natural Rate of Unemployment in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Coe, David T

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents empirical estimates of the policy and structural determinants of the natural rate of unemployment in Canada. The paper begins with a discussion of structural features of the economy which impinge on the adjustment of real wages to their equilibrium level. Estimates are presented showing how the generosity of the unemployment insurance system is related to past levels of unemployment. The empirical results indicate that government policies have been largely responsible for ...

  1. Membrane Protein Structure Determination: Back to the Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yong; Ding, Yi; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables the structures of membrane proteins to be determined in the native-like environment of the phospholipid bilayer membrane. This chapter outlines the methods for membrane protein structural studies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy with samples of membrane proteins incorporated in proteoliposomes or planar lipid bilayers. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from OmpX an...

  2. Determinants of Capital Structure in Listed Norwegian Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Nilssen, Cathrine Marie

    2014-01-01

    The main goal for most firms is to maximise firm value and the wealth of shareholders. In order to achieve this goal, firms should use an optimal combination of equity and debt that will result in a low weighted average cost of capital for the firm. It is therefore necessary for firms to be aware of the factors that influence their capital structure decision. Several empirical studies have attempted to explain what determines the choice of capital structure in firms. Howev...

  3. Determinants of Market Structure and the Airline Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raduchel, W.

    1972-01-01

    The general economic determinants of market structure are outlined with special reference to the airline industry. Included are the following facets: absolute size of firms; distributions of firms by size; concentration; entry barriers; product and service differentiation; diversification; degrees of competition; vertical integration; market boundaries; and economies of scale. Also examined are the static and dynamic properties of market structure in terms of mergers, government policies, and economic growth conditions.

  4. Structure determination of drug target proteins by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution X-ray crystallography provides information for most of the atoms comprising the proteins, with the exception of hydrogen atoms. Whereas, neutron crystallography, which is a powerful technique for locating hydrogen atoms, enables us to obtain accurate atomic positions within proteins. Neutron diffraction data can provide information of the location of hydrogen atoms to the structural information determined by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show the recent results of the structural determination of drug-target proteins, porcine pancreatic elastase and human immuno-deficiency virus type-1 protease by both X-ray and neutron diffraction. The structure of porcine pancreatic elastase with its potent inhibitor was determined to 0.094 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.165 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The structure of HIV-PR with its potent inhibitor was also determined to 0.093 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.19 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The ionization state and the location of hydrogen atoms of the catalytic residue in these enzymes were determined by neutron diffraction. Furthermore, collaborative use of both X-ray and neutron crystallography to identify the location of ambiguous hydrogen atoms will be shown. (author)

  5. The determination of plutonium alpha activity in urine, faeces and biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods have been developed for the determination of plutonium alpha activity in urine, faeces and biological materials. The chemical stages involved give practically complete separation of all extraneous material from the plutonium, which is electrodeposited on to a 0.5 inch stainless steel disc to produce a thin high resolution source. The limit of detection is 0.025 μμc/sample (sixteen-hour count) when the sources are counted in a small scintillator counter, but is lowest when counted in a counter which counts particles of energy 5.05-5.25 MeV only, and which therefore discriminates against small quantities of α-active materials introduced with the reagents in the final electrodeposition stage of the process. (Any such alpha activity may readily be identified by alpha pulse height analysis). (author)

  6. Metrological assessment of the high-accuracy RNAA method of co-determination in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes work on the development of the high-accuracy RNAA method for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in biological materials. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation with selective and quantitative isolation of the analyte in a state of high radiochemical purity by use of column chromatography followed by gamma-ray spectrometric measurements. The method was devised according to a set of rules, which were formulated to obtain high accuracy of the method. The procedure has been also equipped with several criteria, being a key factor of quality assurance. The qualification of the high-accuracy RNAA method as a primary ratio method has been demonstrated and its usefulness in the certification of the candidate reference materials: Tea Leaves and Mixed Polish Herbs is presented. (author)

  7. [Determination of ethylene glycol in biological fluids--propylene glycol interferences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka, Ewa; Cudzich-Czop, Sylwia; Sulka, Adrianna

    2013-01-01

    Many laboratories in Poland do not use gas chromatography (GC) method for determination of ethylene glycol (EG) and methanol in blood of poisoned patients, they use non specific spectrophotometry methods. One of the interfering substances is propylene glycol (PG)--compound present in many medical and cosmetic products: drops, air freshens, disinfectants, electronic cigarettes and others. In Laboratory of Analytical Toxicology and Drug Monitoring in Krakow determination of EG is made by GC method. The method enables to distinguish and make resolution of (EG) and (PG) in biological samples. In the years 2011-2012 in several serum samples from diagnosed patients PG was present in concentration from several to higher than 100 mg/dL. The aim of the study was to estimate PG interferences of serum EG determination by spectrophotometry method. Serum samples containing PG and EG were used in the study. The samples were analyzed by two methods: GC and spectrophotometry. Results of serum samples spiked with PG with no EG analysed by spectrophotometry method were improper ("false positive"). The results were correlated to PG concentration in samples. Calculated cross-reactivity of PG in the method was 42%. Positive results of EG measured by spectrophotometry method must be confirmed by reference GC method. Spectrophotometry method shouldn't be used for diagnostics and monitoring of patients poisoned by EG. PMID:24466683

  8. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz [Islamic Azad University, Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran)

    2006-11-15

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 {mu}g g{sup -1} and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. (orig.)

  9. Radiochemical separation and determination of europium by Ge(Li) detector in biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple neutron activation method has been developed for the determination of europium in biological tissues and applied in the analysis of marine organism samples at the nanogram level. The method is based on the separation, by ion-exchange, of the rare earth group from dry or ashed irradiated tissues and subsequent determination of sup(152m)Eu, by γ-spectrometry using a lithium drifted germanium detector. sup(152m)Eu, separated almost completely from other than rare earth elements, with better than 98% chemical yield, is counted on the 121.8 keV photopeak which than is practically free from any other γ-ray energy interfering in this counting. The determination of europium was tested in ten dry tissue samples of a marine organism for precision. The relative standard deviation found, 9%, is good enough compared with the 50% precision of the results given in the literature. The accuracy of the method is not tested, since the results for Eu in BOWEN's kale are dispersed. (T.G.)

  10. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkhanloo Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample and eluent and flow rates of the sample were evaluated. The effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were also investigated. The recoveries were >95 %. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace metal ions in river water, urine and sediment samples, with satisfactory results. The 3δ detection limits for Cu, Pb and Cd were found to be 2, 3 and 0.2 μg dm−3, respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of the copper, lead and cadmium contents in real samples, i.e., river water and biological samples.

  11. A simple kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxamniquine in formulations and spiked biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, M; Belal, F; Ibrahim, F; Ahmed, S M; El-Enany, N M

    2000-08-15

    A simple and sensitive kinetic method for the determination of oxamniquine in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids was developed. The procedure is based upon a kinetic investigation of the oxidation reaction of the drug with alkaline potassium permanganate at room temperature for a fixed time of 20 min. The absorbance of the colored manganate ions was measured at 610 nm. Alternatively, the decrease in the absorbance of potassium permanganate after addition of the drug was measured at 525 nm. The absorbance concentration plots in both procedures were rectilinear over the range 0.5-4 microg ml(-1). The concentration of oxamniquine is calculated using the corresponding calibration equation for the fixed-time method. The determination of oxamniquine by fixed-concentration and rate-constant methods was feasible with the calibration equations obtained but the fixed time method had been found to be more applicable. Both procedures were applied to the determination of oxamniquine in formulations. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained using the official method. The fixed time method of 20 min was further applied to spiked human urine and plasma, the recoveries (%) were 100.94 +/- 0.57 and 98.07 +/- 0.88 for urine and plasma, respectively, at 610 nm, and 97.51 +/- 1.27 and 95.69 +/- 1.23 for urine and plasma, respectively, at 525 nm. PMID:10933544

  12. ALOUD: Adult Learning Open University Determinants Study: Association between biological and psychological determinants and study success in adult formal distance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Renate; Neroni, Joyce; Gijselaers, Jérôme; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    De Groot, R. H. M., Neroni, J., Gijselaers, J., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 6 December). ALOUD: Adult Learning Open University Determinants Study: Associations between biological and psychological determinants and study success in adult formal distance education. Presented at the Open University for t

  13. Determinants of Capital Structure: Panel Data Evidence from UK Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rui

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation intends to analyse and examine the determinants of the capital structure with an unbalanced panel of 1504 listed UK companies from 2000 to 2007. A range of classical capital theories including Modigliani-Miller (M-M)irrelevance theory, the trade-off, pecking-order and agency theories, are deployed to explore and predict the signs and significance of each determinant pointed out by Titman and Wessels (1988) and Harris and Raviv (1991). In the investigation, we first employ th...

  14. Slavnov determinants, Yang-Mills structure constants, and discrete KP

    OpenAIRE

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2012-01-01

    Using Slavnov's scalar product of a Bethe eigenstate and a generic state in closed XXZ spin-1/2 chains, with possibly twisted boundary conditions, we obtain determinant expressions for tree-level structure constants in 1-loop conformally-invariant sectors in various planar (super) Yang-Mills theories. When certain rapidity variables are allowed to be free rather than satisfy Bethe equations, these determinants become discrete KP tau-functions.

  15. LASER METHODS IN BIOLOGY: Optical anisotropy of fibrous biological tissues: analysis of the influence of structural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Sinichkin, Yu P.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2007-08-01

    The results of theoretical analysis of the optical anisotropy of multiply scattering fibrillar biological tissues based on the model of an effective anisotropic medium are compared with the experimental in vivo birefringence data for the rat derma obtained earlier in spectral polarisation measurements of rat skin samples in the visible region. The disordered system of parallel dielectric cylinders embedded into an isotropic dielectric medium was considered as a model medium. Simulations were performed taking into account the influence of a partial mutual disordering of the bundles of collagen and elastin fibres in derma on birefringence in samples. The theoretical optical anisotropy averaged over the spectral interval 550-650 nm for the model medium with parameters corresponding to the structural parameters of derma is in good agreement with the results of spectral polarisation measurements of skin samples in the corresponding wavelength range.

  16. Mixing regime as a key factor to determine DON formation in drinking water biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changqing; Li, Shuai; Gong, Song; Yuan, Shoujun; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as precursor of nitrogenous disinfection by-products formed during chlorination disinfection. The performances of biological fluidized bed (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and bio-ceramic filters (plug flow reactor, PFR) were compared in this study to investigate the influence of mixing regime on DON formation in drinking water treatment. In the shared influent, DON ranged from 0.71mgL(-1) to 1.20mgL(-1). The two biological fluidized bed reactors, named BFB1 (mechanical stirring) and BFB2 (air agitation), contained 0.12 and 0.19mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Meanwhile, the bio-ceramic reactors, labeled as BCF1 (no aeration) and BCF2 (with aeration), had 1.02 and 0.81mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Comparative results showed that the CSTR mixing regime significantly reduced DON formation. This particular reduction was further investigated in this study. The viable/total microbial biomass was determined with propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) and qPCR, respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that the microbes in BFB2 had higher viability than those in BCF2. The viable bacteria decreased more sharply than the total bacteria along the media depth in BCF2, and DON in BCF2 accumulated in the deeper media. These phenomena suggested that mixing regime determined DON formation by influencing the distribution of viable, total biomass, and ratio of viable biomass to total biomass. PMID:25585870

  17. Determination of tin in biological reference materials by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of a lack of reliable analytical techniques for the determination of tin in biological materials, there have been no reference materials certified for this element. However, the authors' experience has shown that it is feasible to use both atomic absorption and nuclear activation techniques at least for selected matrices. Therefore, an investigation was undertaken to determine tin in several biological materials such as non-fat milk powder (NBS-SRM-1549), citrus leaves (NBS-SRM-1572), total diet (NIST-SRM-1548), mixed diet (NBS-RM-8431), and USDIET-I by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). AAS-ashed samples were extracted with MIBK and assayed using a Perkin Elmer model 5000 apparatus. NAA was carried out by irradiating the samples at the NIST reactor in the RT-4 facility and counting with the help of a Ge(Li) detector connected to a multichannel analyzer. The concentration of tin measured by both AAS and NAA agree well for USDIET-I, total diet, citrus leaves and non-fat milk powder (the concentration ranges for tin in these matrices were from 0.0025 to 3.8 micro g/g). However, in the case of mixed diet (RM-8431), the mean values found were 47 ± 5.6 (n = 19) by AAS and 55.5 ± 2.5 (n = 6) by INAA. Since RM-8431 is not certified it is difficult to draw conclusions. For apple and peach leaves, a distillation step was required. The results were apple leaves 0.085 ± 0.015 (n = 10) by AAS and < 0.2 (n = 3) by RNAA; for peach leaves 0.077 ± 0.02 (n = 9) by AAS and < 0.1 (n = 3) by RNAA. All concentrations are expressed in micro g/g dry weight

  18. Determination of total mercury and methylmercury in biological samples by photochemical vapor generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Ribeiro, Anderson S.; Curtius, Adilson J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Quimica, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Sturgeon, Ralph E. [National Research Council Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) based on photochemical reduction by exposure to UV radiation is described for the determination of methylmercury and total mercury in biological samples. Two approaches were investigated: (a) tissues were digested in either formic acid or tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and total mercury was determined following reduction of both species by exposure of the solution to UV irradiation; (b) tissues were solubilized in TMAH, diluted to a final concentration of 0.125% m/v TMAH by addition of 10% v/v acetic acid and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} was selectively quantitated, or the initial digests were diluted to 0.125% m/v TMAH by addition of deionized water, adjusted to pH 0.3 by addition of HCl and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} was selectively quantitated. For each case, the optimum conditions for photochemical vapor generation (photo-CVG) were investigated. The photochemical reduction efficiency was estimated to be {proportional_to}95% by comparing the response with traditional SnCl{sub 2} chemical reduction. The method was validated by analysis of several biological Certified Reference Materials, DORM-1, DORM-2, DOLT-2 and DOLT-3, using calibration against aqueous solutions of Hg{sup 2+}; results showed good agreement with the certified values for total and methylmercury in all cases. Limits of detection of 6 ng/g for total mercury using formic acid, 8 ng/g for total mercury and 10 ng/g for methylmercury using TMAH were obtained. The proposed methodology is sensitive, simple and inexpensive, and promotes ''green'' chemistry. The potential for application to other sample types and analytes is evident. (orig.)

  19. Symmetry determination following structure solution in P1

    OpenAIRE

    Palatinus, Lukas; Lee, Arie van der

    2008-01-01

    A new method for space-group determination is described. It is based on a symmetry analysis of the structure-factor phases resulting from a structure solution in space group P1. The output of the symmetry analysis is a list of all symmetry operations compatible with the lattice. Each symmetry operation is assigned a symmetry agreement factor that is used to select the symmetry operations that are the elements of the space group of the structure. On the basis of the list of the selected operat...

  20. Mapping granular structure in the biological adhesive of Phragmatopoma californica using phase diverse coherent diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates the application of the high sensitivity, low radiation dose imaging method recently presented as phase diverse coherent diffraction imaging, to the study of biological and other weakly scattering samples. The method is applied, using X-ray illumination, to quantitative imaging of the granular precursors of underwater adhesive produced by the marine sandcastle worm, Phragmatopoma californica. We are able to observe the internal structure of the adhesive precursors in a number of states. -- Highlights: → We demonstrate lensless imaging of the biological adhesive of the sandcastle worm. → Phase diverse coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides high contrast images. → The high sensitivity of phase diverse CDI elucidates fine structure within the sample. → Quantitative imaging is achieved with a low X-ray dose, minimising sample damage. → The work shows phase diverse CDI to be a useful microscopy technique for biology.

  1. Capital Structure of Agricultural Businesses and its Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aulová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the capital structure of agricultural businesses of legal entities and its determinants. It discusses the effect of selected determinants on the capital structure of businesses, expressed by way of three categories of indebtedness. The analysis of the determinants of capital structure is conducted by way of multiple linear regression. Also being verified is the hypothesis of whether the effect of individual determinants of capital structure is in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of conditional theories of capital structure and empirical studies.The panel data for the article were acquired from the Albertina database, provided by the company Soliditet, s.r.o. Specifically, the data used were those from accounting statements for the years 2004 – 2010 for the agricultural businesses of legal entities. In total, the object of examination was 16075 businesses, which were divided up according to legal forms (joint stock company, cooperative, and limited liability company and subsequently the relevant size group. In total, 18 groups of businesses were created, whereby the average balance and profit and loss account were drawn up for each group, on the basis of which the relevant calculations were conducted. The article is a part of the grant project IGA 20121069 “Identification of the main determinants of the result of economic activity of agricultural businesses of legal entities and the determination of their specifics” and of the institutional research intentions MSM 6046070906 „Economics sources of Czech agriculture and their efficient use in the context of multifunctional agri-food systems“.

  2. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...

  3. Optimization of polysaccharides extraction from watermelon rinds: Structure, functional and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romdhane, Molka Ben; Haddar, Anissa; Ghazala, Imen; Jeddou, Khawla Ben; Helbert, Claire Boisset; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, optimization of hot water extraction, structural characteristics, functional properties, and biological activities of polysaccharides extracted from watermelon rinds (WMRP) were investigated. The physicochemical characteristics and the monosaccharide composition of these polysaccharides were then determined using chemical composition analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). SEM images showed that extracted polysaccharides had a rough surface with many cavities. GC-FID results proved that galactose was the dominant sugar in the extracted polysaccharides, followed by arabinose, glucose, galacturonic acid, rhamnose, mannose, xylose and traces of glucuronic acid. The findings revealed that WMRP displayed excellent antihypertensive and antioxidant activities. Those polysaccharides had also a protection effect against hydroxyl radical-induced DNA damage. Functional properties of extracted polysaccharides were also evaluated. WMRP showed good interfacial dose-dependent proprieties. Overall, the results suggested that WMRP presents a promising natural source of antioxidants and antihypertensive agents. PMID:27596431

  4. Flowering biology and structure of floral nectaries in Galanthus nivalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Poland Galanthus nivalis L. is partially protected. The flowers of this species are one of the first sources of nectar and pollen for insects from February to April. The aim of this study was to present the flowering biology as well as the topography, anatomical, and ultrastructural features of the floral nectary. The flower lifespan, the breeding system, and the mass of pollen and nectar produced by the flowers were determined. Examination of the nectary structure was performed using light, fluorescence, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The flower of G. nivalis lives for about 30 days. The stamens and pistils mature simultaneously and during this time nectar is secreted. The anthers of one flower produced the large amount of pollen (4 mg. The breeding system of G. nivalis was found to be characterized by partial self-compatibility, outcrossing, and xenogamy. The nectary is located at the top of the inferior ovary. The nectary epidermal cells are characterized by striated cuticular ornamentation. Initially, the secreted nectar formed vesicle-like protuberances under the cuticle. The epidermal and parenchymal cells contain numerous plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, ER cisterns, and vesicles fused with the plasmalemma, which indicates granulocrine nectar secretion.

  5. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu2O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu2O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties

  6. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, A., E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Szade, J.; Talik, E.; Ratuszna, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Ostafin, M. [Agricultural University of Cracow, Department of Microbiology, Krakow (Poland); Peszke, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu{sub 2}O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu{sub 2}O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties.

  7. High voltage electric field effects on structure and biological characteristics of barley seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazaei, J. [Tehran Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Agrotechnology, Univ. College of Abouraihan; Aliabadi, E. [Tehran Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Crop Production Horticulture, Univ. College of Aburaihan; Shayegani, A.A. [Tehran Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Univ. College of Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Electric biostimulation of seeds is a pre-sowing treatment in which an electric field is applied to seeds to increase germination of non standard seeds. This paper reported on a study that examined the effects of AC electric field and exposure time on the structure and biological characteristics of barley seeds. The objective was to determine the potential to accelerate seed germination, plant growth and root development by the electric field strength and exposure time. Makooei cultivar barley seeds were used in this study. The effect of electric field strength (at 2, 4, 9, and 14 kV/m) and exposure time (at 15, 45, 80, and 150 min) on seed germination was studied along with height of seedling, length or root, height of stem, length of leaves, earliness, dry weight and wet weight of seedling. The treated seeds were stored for a month in a refrigerator at 5 degrees C prior to the germination experiments. The initial germination percent of the seed was 81 per cent. The treatment of barley seeds in an AC electric field had a positive effect on all investigated parameters. The germination percent of the treated seed increased to 94.5 per cent . The seeds exposed for long periods of time (45 to 150 min) showed better germination than the seeds exposed to lower exposure times. Dry and wet weights of seedling increased 143.4 per cent and 45.7 per cent, respectively.

  8. Can OCT be sensitive to nanoscale structural alterations in biological tissue?

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Norris, Sam C.P.; Çapoğlu, İlker R.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of nanoscale tissue structures is crucial in understanding biological processes. Although novel optical microscopy methods have been developed to probe cellular features beyond the diffraction limit, nanometer-scale quantification remains still inaccessible for in situ tissue. Here we demonstrate that, without actually resolving specific geometrical feature, OCT can be sensitive to tissue structural properties at the nanometer length scale. The statistical mass-density distributio...

  9. Large, dynamic, multi-protein complexes: a challenge for structural biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rozycki, B.; Bouřa, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 46 (2014), 463103/1-463103/11. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 333916 - STARPI4K Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein structure * multi-protein complexes * hybrid methods of structural biology Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  10. Graph theoretic methods for the analysis of structural relationships in biological macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Artymiuk, P J; Spriggs, R.V.; Willett, P.

    2005-01-01

    Subgraph isomorphism and maximum common subgraph isomorphism algorithms from graph theory provide an effective and an efficient way of identifying structural relationships between biological macromolecules. They thus provide a natural complement to the pattern matching algorithms that are used in bioinformatics to identify sequence relationships. Examples are provided of the use of graph theory to analyze proteins for which three-dimensional crystallographic or NMR structures are available, f...

  11. Breaking Frontiers: Submicron Structures in Physics and Biology - 52 Zakopane School of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 52 Zakopane School of Physics held in Zakopane from 19 to 24 May 2008. The main task of the symposium was to present the newest results of research in field of submicron structures in physics, biology and medicine. Some new technologies as well as their applications are also presented

  12. Determination of f_0(980) Structure by Fragmentation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Oka, M; Sudoh, K

    2008-01-01

    We discuss internal structure of an exotic hadron by using fragmentation functions. The fragmentation functions for the f_0(980) meson are obtained by a global analysis of e^++e^- \\to f_0+X data. Quark configuration of the f_0(980) could be determined by peak positions and second moments of the obtained fragmentation functions.

  13. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  14. Synthesis and structure determination of novel hexasubstituted cyclohexadienes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Mei Qu; Xin Hui Niu; Juan Li; Jun Liu; Li Li Jiang; Jian Ke Tang; Li Shan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The linear trienes were obtained in high yields by copper-mediated cycloaddition of 2,5-bis(trimethylsilyl)zirconacyclopentadienes with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) which can be quantitatively converted to novel asymmetric hexasubstituted cyclohexadienes with high (E)-stereoselectivity.The structure of cyclohexadienes was determined via X-ray analysis.

  15. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, Neni

    2010-01-01

    Few researches have been concerned about relation between children's spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was…

  16. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk; Jenkins, Huw T., E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Samuel C. [University of Oxford, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Byrne, Robert T. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Feodor-Lynen-Strasse 25, 81377 Munich (Germany); Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A., E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  17. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer

  18. Towards the Structure Determination of a Modulated Protein Crystal: The Semicrystalline State of Profilin:Actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, G.; Lovelace, J.; Snell, E. H.; Bellamy, H.

    2003-01-01

    One of the remaining challenges to structural biology is the solution of modulated structures. While small molecule crystallographers have championed this type of structure, to date, no modulated macromolecular structures have been determined. Modulation of the molecular structures within the crystal can produce satellite reflections or a superlattice of reflections in reciprocal space. We have developed the data collection methods and strategies that are needed to collect and analyze these data. If the macromolecule's crystal lattice is composed of physiologically relevant packing contacts, structural changes induced under physiological conditions can cause distortion relevant to the function and biophysical processes of the molecule making up the crystal. By careful measurement of the distortion, and the corresponding three-dimensional structure of the distorted molecule, we will visualize the motion and mechanism of the biological macromolecule(s). We have measured the modulated diffraction pattern produced by the semicrystalline state of profilin:actin crystals using highly parallel and highly monochromatic synchrotron radiation coupled with fine phi slicing (0.001-0.010 degrees) for structure determination. These crystals present these crystals present a unique opportunity to address an important question in structural biology. The modulation is believed to be due to the formation of actin helical filaments from the actin beta ribbon upon the pH-induced dissociation of profilin. To date, the filamentous state of actin has resisted crystallization and no detailed structures are available. The semicrystalline state profilin:actin crystals provides a unique opportunity to understand the many conformational states of actin. This knowledge is essential for understanding the dynamics underlying shape changes and motility of eukaryotic cells. Many essential processes, such as cytokinesis, phagocytosis, and cellular migration depend upon the capacity of the actin

  19. How Events at the Nano/Bio Interface Determine Good and Adverse Biological Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Andre

    2014-03-01

    We have come to recognize that much of biology is executed at the nanoscale level, therefore providing a rational approach to using discovery about the structure and function of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) at the nano/bio interface for interrogation of disease, diagnosis, treatment, and imaging at levels of sophistication not possible before. Moreover, the behavior of ENM's at the nano/bio interface also constitutes the basis for hazard generation and is therefore key for understanding the safety assessment and safer design of nanomaterials. In this overview, I will discuss how discovery at the molecular, cellular, organ and systemic nano/bio interfaces has helped us to my progress progress in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. I will explain how the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials relate to nanoscale interactions at the membrane, intracellular organelles, tissues and organs in response to exposure to a variety of commercial ENMs as well as for therapeutic nanocarriers. I will delineate how the use of high throughput screening to establish structure-activity relationships can be used for the design of improved nanocarriers for cancer treatment as well as hazard and risk ranking of large categories of commercial ENMs on their way to the marketplace.

  20. Silica-titania xerogel for solid phase spectrophotometric determination of salicylate and its derivatives in biological liquids and pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Morosanova, Maria A.; Morosanova, Elena I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Salicylic acid and its derivatives are widely used drugs with potential toxicity. The main areas of salicylate derivatives determination are biological liquids and pharmaceuticals analysis. Results Silica-titania xerogel has been used for solid phase spectrophotometric determination of various salicylate derivatives (salicylate, salicylamide, methylsalicylate). The reaction conditions influence on the interaction of salicylate derivatives with silica-titania xerogels has been inves...

  1. Eu(III)-Sensitized Luminescence Probe for Determination of Tolnaftate in Pharmaceuticals and Biological Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarfaj, Nawal A; El-Tohamy, Maha F

    2016-03-01

    A highly selective, sensitive, accurate, and reproducible luminescence procedure for determination of antifungal drug tolnaftate was developed. The introduced method was based on the formation of Europa Universalis III (Eu(III))-tolnaftate complex using sodium sulfite as a deoxygenated agent in the presence of acetate buffer (pH = 6) and micellar solution of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate. The optimum conditions (effect of pH, buffer, surfactant, Eu(III), and sodium sulfite concentrations) for the luminescence signal were investigated and optimized. The luminescence signals were recorded at λex = 270 nm and λem = 460 nm. The method has a good linear response (0.2-130 μg/mL(-1)) between the luminescence intensity and the concentrations of the drug (r = 0.999), with a LOD 0.07 μg/mL(-1) and LOQ 0.2 μg/mL(-1). The luminescence signals of Eu (III)-tolnaftate-sodium dodecyl sulfate were found to be 200-fold more sensitive without the presence of micelle solution. The interferences of some additives, metals, amino acids, sugars, and other related pharmacological action drugs were examined and no interference was recorded. The proposed method was used for quick and simple determination of tolnaftate in its pharmaceuticals and biological fluids. PMID:26964843

  2. Determination of polycyclic aromatic compounds and heavy metals in sludges from biological sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzek, D; Janoszka, B; Dobosz, C; Warzecha, L; Bodzek, M

    1997-07-11

    The procedure of the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives in the sludges from biological sewage treatment plants has been worked out. The analysis included isolation of organic matter from sludges, separation of the extract into fractions of similar chemical character, qualitative-quantitative analysis of individual PAHs and their nitrogenated and oxygenated derivatives. Liquid-solid chromatography, solid-phase extraction and semipreparative band thin-layer chromatography techniques were used for the separation. Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the separated fractions enabled identification of more than 21 PAHs, including hydrocarbons which contained 2-6 aromatic rings as well as their alkyl derivatives, 10 oxygen derivatives, 9 nitroarenes, aminoarenes and over 20 azaarenes and carbazoles. Using the capillary gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique the content of 17 dominant PAHs was determined. The content of heavy metals was determined in investigated sludges with the use of atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentrations of the respective metals could be ranked in the order Cd coal mine wastes, taking into consideration the contents of toxic organic pollutants and heavy metals. PMID:9253190

  3. Direct experimental determination of the atomic structure at internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, N.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Pennycook, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A crucial first step in understanding the effect that internal interfaces have on the properties of materials is the ability to determine the atomic structure at the interface. As interfaces can contain atomic disorder, dislocations, segregated impurities and interphases, sensitivity to all of these features is essential for complete experimental characterization. By combining Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the ability to probe the structure, bonding and composition at interfaces with the necessary atomic resolution has been obtained. Experimental conditions can be controlled to provide, simultaneously, both incoherent imaging and spectroscopy. This enables interface structures observed in the image to be interpreted intuitively and the bonding in a specified atomic column to be probed directly by EELS. The bonding and structure information can then be correlated using bond-valence sum analysis to produce structural models. This technique is demonstrated for 25{degrees}, 36{degrees} and 67{degrees} symmetric and 45{degrees} and 25{degrees} asymmetric [001] tilt grain boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3} The structures of both types of boundary were found to contain partially occupied columns in the boundary plane. From these experimental results, a series of structural units were identified which could be combined, using continuity of gain boundary structure principles, to construct all [001] tilt boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3}. Using these models, the ability of this technique to address the issues of vacancies and dopant segregation at grain boundaries in electroceramics is discussed.

  4. Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1983.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Park, D.L.

    1984-05-01

    Pacific salmon are tagged or marked as a critical part of numerous research and management studies. A new tag called the PIT (passive integrated transponder) tag measuring 7.5 mm long by 1.5 mm in diameter has a great potential for marking fish if it proves to be biologically compatible. A study was conducted to evaluate the potential of the PIT tag for marking salmonids. The objectives of the first year's research were to determine: (1) the anatomical areas in which the tag could be placed; (2) tissue response to the tag; and (3) tag retention. Juvenile coho, Oncorhynchus kisutch, and chinook O. tshawytscha, salmon and adult chinook salmon held at Manchester or Big Beef Creek, Washington, were used as test animals. Juvenile salmon were injected with sham PIT tags in the body cavity and opercular, dorsal, and caudal masculature. The fish ranged in length from 126 to 212 mm. Observations based on three tests, from 44 to 102 days long, indicated that the dorsal musculature and body cavity were the best locations to inject the tag from biological and social standpoints. Sham PIT tags were injected into the nose; body cavity; and opercular, dorsal, and caudal musculature of jack chinook salmon. The test was conducted for 23 days. Although all five anatomical areas were acceptable from a technical standpoint, the body cavity appeared to be the best area for tag placement. Initial test results with the Sham PIT tag were very encouraging. Apparently the PIT tag can be successfully injected into and carried by salmon, making it a potentially useful tool for fisheries biologists. 5 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Survey of currently available reference materials for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of biological materials is at present the subject of intensive study by many different research groups throughout the world, in view of the importance of these trace elements in health and medical diagnosis. IAEA and other organizations are now making a variety of suitable reference materials available for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials. To help analysts in making a selection from among these various materials, the present report provides a brief survey of data for all such biological reference materials known to the author. These data are compiled by the author from January 1982 to June 1983

  6. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se H; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Bun Y; Lee, Pyung C

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-α-tocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid 4,4'-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli. PMID:26902326

  7. Form and function: Perspectives on structural biology and resources for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this study is largely to explore and expand on the thesis that biological structures and their functions are suited to. Form indeed follows function and if we are to understand the workings of a living system, with all that such an understanding promises, we must first seek to describe the structure of its parts. Descriptions of a few achievements of structural biology lay the groundwork, but the substance of this booklet is a discussion of important questions yet unanswered and opportunities just beyond our grasp. The concluding pages then outline a course of action in which the Department of Energy would exercise its responsibility to develop the major resources needed to extend our reach and to answer some of those unanswered questions. 22 figs.

  8. Solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Asghar; Gökce, Halil; Bahceli, Semiha; Bolte, Michael; Naseer, Muhammad Moazzam

    2016-05-01

    The computational methods are presently emerging as an efficient and reliable tool for predicting structural properties of biologically important compounds. In the present manuscript, the solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone i-e (E)-3-(4-(hexyloxy)phenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one (6c) have been reported. The solid state structure of 6c was measured by X-ray crystallographic technique whereas the optimized molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, the simulated UV-vis spectra (in gas and in methanol solvent), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift (in gas and in chloroform solvent) values, HOMO-LUMO analysis, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface and thermodynamic parameters were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The results of the theoretical investigations were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Form and function: Perspectives on structural biology and resources for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is largely to explore and expand on the thesis that biological structures and their functions are suited to. Form indeed follows function and if we are to understand the workings of a living system, with all that such an understanding promises, we must first seek to describe the structure of its parts. Descriptions of a few achievements of structural biology lay the groundwork, but the substance of this booklet is a discussion of important questions yet unanswered and opportunities just beyond our grasp. The concluding pages then outline a course of action in which the Department of Energy would exercise its responsibility to develop the major resources needed to extend our reach and to answer some of those unanswered questions. 22 figs

  10. Bidimensional microdosimetry as a tool for evaluating biological response and target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the issue of the relevance of microdosimetric spectra for quantifying the effects of low-level exposures to radiation. Biological response functions derived to date from numerical analyses of radiobiological and microdosimetric observations refer to uniform targets of a preassumed size. The characteristic two-modal shape of functions obtained for several endpoints reflects the importance of two different pathways of damage formation, each of them related in fact to different target sizes. The correlated energy deposition distributions in such a bidimensional system are suggested as a more appropriate physical input for analysing biological response and target structure. (author)

  11. X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide [Chiba Institute of Science, 15-8 Shiomi-cho, Cho-shi, Chiba 288-025 (Japan); Chatake, Toshiyuki, E-mail: chatake@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Yatagai, Chieko; Sumi, Hiroyuki [Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajima-cho, Kurashiki, Okayama 712-8505 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Akio [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Chiba-Kamosida, Kaori [Nippon Advanced Technology Co. Ltd, J-PARC, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ogawa, Megumi; Adachi, Tatsumi [Chiba Institute of Science, 15-8 Shiomi-cho, Cho-shi, Chiba 288-025 (Japan); Morimoto, Yukio [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase were performed to facilitate neutron crystallographic analysis. Nattokinase (NK) is a strong fibrinolytic enzyme, which is produced in abundance by Bacillus subtilis natto. Although NK is a member of the subtilisin family, it displays different substrate specificity when compared with other subtilisins. The results of molecular simulations predict that hydrogen arrangements around Ser221 at the active site probably account for the substrate specificity of NK. Therefore, neutron crystallographic analysis should provide valuable information that reveals the enzymatic mechanism of NK. In this report, the X-ray structure of the non-hydrogen form of undeuterated NK was determined, and the preparation of deuterated NK was successfully achieved. The non-hydrogen NK structure was determined at 1.74 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structures of NK and subtilisin E from Bacillus subtilis DB104 are near identical. Deuteration of NK was carried out by cultivating Bacillus subtilis natto in deuterated medium. The D{sub 2}O resistant strain of Bacillus subtilis natto was obtained by successive cultivation rounds, in which the concentration of D{sub 2}O in the medium was gradually increased. NK was purified from the culture medium and its activity was confirmed by the fibrin plate method. The results lay the framework for neutron protein crystallography analysis.

  12. Overconfidence, Managerial Optimism, and the Determinants of Capital Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre di Miceli da Silveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the determinants of the capital structure of firms introducing a behavioral perspective that has received little attention in corporate finance literature. The following central hypothesis emerges from a set of recently developed theories: firms managed by optimistic and/or overconfident people will choose more levered financing structures than others, ceteris paribus. We propose different proxies for optimism/overconfidence, based on the manager’s status as an entrepreneur or non-entrepreneur, an idea that is supported by theories and solid empirical evidence, as well as on the pattern of ownership of the firm’s shares by its manager. The study also includes potential determinants of capital structure used in earlier research. We use a sample of Brazilian firms listed in the Sao Paulo Stock Exchange (Bovespa in the years 1998 to 2003. The empirical analysis suggests that the proxies for the referred cognitive biases are important determinants of capital structure. We also found as relevant explanatory variables: profitability, size, dividend payment and tangibility, as well as some indicators that capture the firms’ corporate governance standards. These results suggest that behavioral approaches based on human psychology research can offer relevant contributions to the understanding of corporate decision making.

  13. Ultra-Structure database design methodology for managing systems biology data and analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemminger Bradley M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern, high-throughput biological experiments generate copious, heterogeneous, interconnected data sets. Research is dynamic, with frequently changing protocols, techniques, instruments, and file formats. Because of these factors, systems designed to manage and integrate modern biological data sets often end up as large, unwieldy databases that become difficult to maintain or evolve. The novel rule-based approach of the Ultra-Structure design methodology presents a potential solution to this problem. By representing both data and processes as formal rules within a database, an Ultra-Structure system constitutes a flexible framework that enables users to explicitly store domain knowledge in both a machine- and human-readable form. End users themselves can change the system's capabilities without programmer intervention, simply by altering database contents; no computer code or schemas need be modified. This provides flexibility in adapting to change, and allows integration of disparate, heterogenous data sets within a small core set of database tables, facilitating joint analysis and visualization without becoming unwieldy. Here, we examine the application of Ultra-Structure to our ongoing research program for the integration of large proteomic and genomic data sets (proteogenomic mapping. Results We transitioned our proteogenomic mapping information system from a traditional entity-relationship design to one based on Ultra-Structure. Our system integrates tandem mass spectrum data, genomic annotation sets, and spectrum/peptide mappings, all within a small, general framework implemented within a standard relational database system. General software procedures driven by user-modifiable rules can perform tasks such as logical deduction and location-based computations. The system is not tied specifically to proteogenomic research, but is rather designed to accommodate virtually any kind of biological research. Conclusion We find

  14. Three-dimensional printing of complex biological structures by freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Thomas J; Jallerat, Quentin; Palchesko, Rachelle N; Park, Joon Hyung; Grodzicki, Martin S; Shue, Hao-Jan; Ramadan, Mohamed H; Hudson, Andrew R; Feinberg, Adam W

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the additive manufacturing of complex three-dimensional (3D) biological structures using soft protein and polysaccharide hydrogels that are challenging or impossible to create using traditional fabrication approaches. These structures are built by embedding the printed hydrogel within a secondary hydrogel that serves as a temporary, thermoreversible, and biocompatible support. This process, termed freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels, enables 3D printing of hydrated materials with an elastic modulus hardware and software tools. Proof-of-concept structures based on femurs, branched coronary arteries, trabeculated embryonic hearts, and human brains were mechanically robust and recreated complex 3D internal and external anatomical architectures. PMID:26601312

  15. Cadmium determination in biological samples using neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chile has 7500 km of coastline on the Southern Pacific ocean,with about 4500 km of continental coastline that contains a variety of different geographical zones.This variety means that there is a great diversity of marine resources such as fish, shellfish and seaweeds. The utilization of these resources has been increasing in recent years making this sector an economically important one. The catch as of May 2002 came to 1.9 million tons and exports of the different species amounted to US$611.5 million as of April.But this important economic resource is being threatened by the technical demands imposed by importing countries, mainly the specific requirements for sanitary certification for fishery export products, depending on the markets of destination. The chemical element cadmium is one of the most strictly controlled elements due some shellfish accumulate a large amount of this element and to its high toxicity. The Chilean standard's analytical procedures for cadmium determination in hydro biological products, which must be met by laboratories that certify and control these products for export, are now being evaluated. Through its Chemical Metrology Unit, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is strongly supporting this sector by preparing the secondary reference or control materials, and it has developed and implemented nuclear analytical methods for the certification of these materials, which will be used mostly in collaborative studies. This work describes the methodology developed for the determination of cadmium in biological samples, particularly in shellfish and fish. The method is based on neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separations, using the radioisotopes 115Cd and 115mIn, generated in the samples by bombarding with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. The samples were digested at 110oC with H2SO4 and H2O2 and then the radioactive cadmium element was separated from the other elements present in the samples using a Bio Rad AG 2-X8 resin

  16. X-ray structure determination at low resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refinement is meaningful even at 4 Å or lower, but with present methodologies it should start from high-resolution crystal structures whenever possible. As an example of structure determination in the 3.5–4.5 Å resolution range, crystal structures of the ATPase p97/VCP, consisting of an N-terminal domain followed by a tandem pair of ATPase domains (D1 and D2), are discussed. The structures were originally solved by molecular replacement with the high-resolution structure of the N-D1 fragment of p97/VCP, whereas the D2 domain was manually built using its homology to the D1 domain as a guide. The structure of the D2 domain alone was subsequently solved at 3 Å resolution. The refined model of D2 and the high-resolution structure of the N-D1 fragment were then used as starting models for re-refinement against the low-resolution diffraction data for full-length p97. The re-refined full-length models showed significant improvement in both secondary structure and R values. The free R values dropped by as much as 5% compared with the original structure refinements, indicating that refinement is meaningful at low resolution and that there is information in the diffraction data even at ∼4 Å resolution that objectively assesses the quality of the model. It is concluded that de novo model building is problematic at low resolution and refinement should start from high-resolution crystal structures whenever possible

  17. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Aström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  18. Observation and Structure Determination of an Oxide Quasicrystal Approximant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, S; Trautmann, M; Roy, S; Adeagbo, W A; Zollner, E M; Hammer, R; Schumann, F O; Meinel, K; Nayak, S K; Mohseni, K; Hergert, W; Meyerheim, H L; Widdra, W

    2016-08-26

    We report on the first observation of an approximant structure to the recently discovered two-dimensional oxide quasicrystal. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and surface x-ray diffraction in combination with ab initio calculations, the atomic structure and the bonding scheme are determined. The oxide approximant follows a 3^{2}.4.3.4 Archimedean tiling. Ti atoms reside at the corners of each tiling element and are threefold coordinated to oxygen atoms. Ba atoms separate the TiO_{3} clusters, leading to a fundamental edge length of the tiling 6.7 Å. PMID:27610863

  19. Numerical and experimental determination of in-structure temperature profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zozulák Marek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When building physics simulations are done initial conditions express the actual hygrothermal state of building envelope. For the temperature field simulations initial condition is represented by the initial temperature in the body profile at the start of heat transfer. In-structure temperature varies quickly so temperature initial conditions are often neglected. Nevertheless in specific cases initial conditions have to be taken into an account even when simple temperature field simulations are done. The contribution shows various temperature initial conditions determination for insulated construction of outdoor test cell. Comparison of measured and calculated temperature profiles in structure shows correctness of start-up pre-calculation initial condition consideration

  20. Membrane protein structure determination: back to the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong; Ding, Yi; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables the structures of membrane proteins to be determined in the native-like environment of the phospholipid bilayer membrane. This chapter outlines the methods for membrane protein structural studies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy with samples of membrane proteins incorporated in proteoliposomes or planar lipid bilayers. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from OmpX and Ail, two bacterial outer membrane proteins that function in bacterial virulence. PMID:23975776

  1. Synthesis, Dimeric Crystal Structure, and Biological Activities of N-(4-Methyl-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidin-2-yl)-N-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-guanidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The title compound, N-(4-methyl-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidin-2-yl)-N′-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-guanidine, was synthesized and its structure was confirmed by using IR, MS, 1H NMR, and elemental analysis. The single crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction. The preliminary biological test showed that the synthesized compound has a weak herbicidal activity.

  2. Determination of fluorine in environmental and biological samples by neutron and photon activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In NAA, two analytical reactions, viz. 19F(n,γ)20F (T(1/2) =11.0 s, E(gamma) =1633.6 keV) and 19F(n,p)19O (T(1/2) =26.9 s, E(gamma) =197.1 keV) with thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, can be used. Due to the short half-lives of the activation products, only non-destructive, instrumental NAA (INAA) is feasible. Unfortunately, neither of the analytical reactions is interference-free: the reaction 23Na(n,α)20F with fast neutrons interferes with the former, the reaction 18O(n,γ)19O with thermal neutrons interferes with the latter. The interference free detection limits for irradiation of several types of biological materials at thermal and fast neutron fluency rates of 8.1013 cm-2 s-1 and 2.1013 cm-2 s -1, respectively, are in the range of 0.3 to 2 μg g-1 for both reactions. The actual detection limits for biological samples, however, are significantly higher, at least by one order of magnitude, due to the above interferences. In addition, the detection limit of the 19F(n,γ)20F reaction is strongly influenced by the Al content, particularly in environmental samples, due to the overwhelming activity of 28Al created even after a very short irradiation (10 s). Thus, fluorine can usually be determined in this type of samples at levels of several hundreds to thousands of μg g-1. The pseudocyclic mode of INAA improves the detection limit only slightly - by a factor of 2 after four cycles, by a factor of 3.2 after ten cycles, etc. The determination of fluorine by PAA is based on the reaction 19F(γ,n)18F (T(1/2) = 1.83 h, E(gamma) = 511.0 keV) that is free from nuclear interferences for irradiation with up to 20-MeV bremsstrahlung. In contrast to NAA, radiochemical separation is mandatory for low-level assay of fluorine by PAA because the radionuclide 18F is a pure positron emitter. Therefore, a radiochemical PAA procedure (RPAA) was developed and tested for analysis of biological materials. It is based on alkaline-oxidative fusion with Na2O2 + NaOH followed by

  3. Human Development VII: A Spiral Fractal Model of Fine Structure of Physical Energy Could Explain Central Aspects of Biological Information, Biological Organization and Biological Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have made a draft of a physical fractal essence of the universe, a sketch of a new cosmology, which we believe to lay at the root of our new holistic biological paradigm. We present the fractal roomy spiraled structures and the energy-rich dancing “infinite strings” or lines of the universe that our hypothesis is based upon. The geometric language of this cosmology is symbolic and both pre-mathematical and pre-philosophical. The symbols are both text and figures, and using these we step by step explain the new model that at least to some extent is able to explain the complex informational system behind morphogenesis, ontogenesis, regeneration and healing. We suggest that it is from this highly dynamic spiraled structure that organization of cells, organs, and the wholeness of the human being including consciousness emerge. The model of ““dancing fractal spirals” carries many similarities to premodern cultures descriptions of the energy of the life and universe. Examples are the Native American shamanistic descriptions of their perception of energy and the old Indian Yogis descriptions of the life-energy within the body and outside. Similar ideas of energy and matter are found in the modern superstring theories. The model of the informational system of the organism gives new meaning to Bateson’s definition of information: “A difference that makes a difference”, and indicates how information-directed self-organization can exist on high structural levels in living organisms, giving birth to their subjectivity and consciousness.

  4. Study on the determination of palladium in biological samples by the method of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium is one of platinum group elements present in the nature at very low concentrations. However with the use of this element in the automobile catalyzers Pd became a new pollutant. Besides, Pd has been studied in the preparation of new antitumour drugs. Consequently, there is a need to determine Pd concentrations in biological and environmental samples. This study presents palladium results obtained in the analysis of biological samples and reference materials using instrumental thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis (INAA and ENAA). The solvent extraction and solid phase extraction separation methods were also applied before ENAA. The samples analyzed in this study were, reference material BCR 723 - Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium in road dust, CCQM-P63 automotive catalyst material of the Proficiency Test and bovine tissue samples containing palladium prepared in the laboratory. Samples and palladium synthetic standard were irradiated at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor under thermal neutron flux of about 4 x 10 12 n cm-2 s-1, during a period of 4 and 16 h for INAA and ENAA, respectively. The induced gamma activity of 109Pd to the sample and standard was measured using a hyper pure Ge detector coupled to a gamma ray spectrometer. The palladium concentration was calculated by comparative method. The gamma ray energy of 109Pd radioisotope measured was of 88.0 keV, located in a spectrum region of low energy where occurs the interference of X rays, 'Bremsstrahlung' radiations, as well as Compton effect of 24Na. The pre-separation of palladium from interfering elements by solvent extraction was performed using dimethylglyoxime complexant and chloroform as diluent. In the case of the pre separation procedure using solid reversed phase column, the palladium was retained using N,N-diethyl-N'-benzoyl thiourea complexant and eluted using ethanol. Aliquots of the resulting solutions from the pre-separations, free of interfering elements, were transferred

  5. Separation Scheme for the Determination of Nine Elements in Biological Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A separation scheme is presented for the determination of nine trace elements in biological samples that give rise to long-lived gamma-emitting isotopes by neutron irradiation, namely silver, molybdenum, mercury, gold, chromium, cobalt, selenium, iron and zinc. The organic material is destroyed by combustion with oxygen in a flask according to Schöniger in the presence of 100 μg of carrier of each element. The ignition is electrical and provides an easy and safe method for burning the samples and avoiding losses of volatile elements. The combustion products are collected in HNO3-H2O2 - solution. Carrier yields of at least 98% were obtained in tracer experiments, except for gold and silver. At high temperatures these elements apparently form an Au-Pt and Ag-Pt alloy with the platinum combustion catalyst. Boiling the platinum sample holder with a few millilitres of aqua regia results in a quantitative recovery of both elements. The HNO3-H2O2 solution is evaporated to dryness and re dissolved in 2N HF. A number of trace elements are adsorbed on a Dowex 1-X8 column and eluted successively with 9N HCl, 1.2N HCl, 8N HNO3 + 4N NH4NO3 and 10% thiourea. A quantitative séparation is thus obtained of Ag, Mo, Hg and Au. Cr, Co, Se, Fe and Zn are not absorbed in 2N HF. This eluate is adsorbed on a second Dowex 1-X8 column in ION HCl and eluated successively with ION HCl, 3N HCl, 0.4N HCl and H2O. Fractions of Cr, Co + Se, Fe and Zn are obtained. A quantitative separation of Co from Se can be achieved on Dowex 50W-X4 in HCl. The volumes in which the individual elements are quantitatively collected are smaller than 30 ml. Consequently a relatively high counting efficiency can be achieved in a 25-ml well-type crystal. Quantitative recovery for all elements is obtained except for mercury and gold. Mercury losses occur on evaporating the HNO3-H2O2 mixture. As a suitable method for the determination of the mercury yield, dithizone titration was chosen. The yield of gold is

  6. Biological determinants of photobioreactor design. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, B.; Brown, G.G.

    1997-04-01

    Microalgae is being considered for the capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from power-plant flue-gases. High productivity of microalgae is necessary to make this process cost effective compared to the conventional methods used for reducing CO{sub 2} levels in the atmosphere. This obviates the need for large-scale cultivation technologies and proper photobioreactor technology. The physical factors that influence the performance of a photoautotrophic microalgal culture are the quality and composition of light, inlet carbon dioxide concentration, nutrients, and secondary metabolites at high cell densities. In developing photobioreactor technology, balancing of biological processes to the physical rate process becomes important. The effect of various light compositions on the culture kinetics was studied. To determine the optimal composition, six wavelengths 470, 555, 560, 570, 580 and 605 nm, each supplemented with 680 nm of red light, were used to cultivate cultures. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that a monochromatic red light of 680 nm is sufficient to obtain maximum capacity.

  7. Biological determinants of photobioreactor design. 1st Quarterly report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, B.O.; Brown, G.G.

    1994-05-01

    Microalgae is being considered for capture and sequestration Of CO{sub 2} from power-plant flue-gases. High productivity of microalgae is necessary to make this process cost effective compared to the conventional methods used for reducing CO{sub 2} levels in the atmosphere. This obviates the need for large-scale cultivation technologies and proper photobioreactor technology. The physical factors that influence the performance of a photoautotrophic microalgal culture are the quality and composition of light, inlet carbon dioxide concentration, nutrients, and secondary metabolites at high cell densities. In developing photobioreactor technology, balancing of biological processes to the physical rate process becomes important. In this first quarterly report, the effect of various light compositions on the culture kinetics is studied. To determine the optimal composition, six wavelengths 470, 555, 560, 570, 580 and 605, each supplemented with 680 nm were used to cultivate cultures. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that a monochromatic red light of 680 nm is sufficient to obtain the maximum capacity.

  8. Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Marketing Contract Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Paulson, Nicholas D.; Katchova, Ani L.; Sergio H. Lence

    2008-01-01

    Initial draft replaced by updated/revised version. This is an electronic version of a journal article, please cite as: Paulson, N.D., A.L. Katchova, and S.H. Lence. “An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Marketing Contract Structures for Corn and Soybeans.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Industrial Organization 8(2010), 4: 1-23.

  9. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shap...

  10. Empirical Study on Capital Structure Determinants in Chinese Listed Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiye

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a preliminary study to investigate the determinants of capital structure of Chinese-listed companies using panel data. The analysis of the research is based on the dataset of 200 Chinese listed firms which publicly traded A-shares on both Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchange between 2005 and 2009. The different theories, specifically, the trade-off, pecking order, agency theory, market timing and signalling theories, are deployed to clarify and predict the signs and signif...

  11. Structural Determination and Daily Variations of Porcine Milk Oligosaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Nannan; Ochonicky, Karen L.; German, J Bruce; Donovan, Sharon M.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2010-01-01

    Free milk oligosaccharides (OS) is a major component of mammalian milk. Swine are important agricultural species and biomedical models. Despite their importance, little is known of the OS profile of porcine milk. Herein, the porcine milk glycome was elucidated and monitored over the entire lactation period by liquid chromatography profiling and structural determination with mass spectrometry. Milk was collected from second parity sows (n=3) at farrowing and on days 1, 4, 7 and 24 of lactation...

  12. Determination of the Basin Structure Beneath European Side of Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Savas; Cengiz Cinku, Mulla; Thomas, Michael; Lamontagne, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul (near North Anatolian Fault Zone:NAFZ, Turkey) is located in northern part of Sea of Marmara, an area that has been influenced by possible Marmara Earthquakes. The general geology of Istanbul divided into two stratigraphic unit such as sedimentary (from Oligocene to Quaternary Deposits) and bedrock (Paleozoic and Eocene). The bedrock units consists of sand stone, clay stone to Paleozoic age and limestone to Eocene age and sedimentary unit consist of sand, clay, mil and gravel from Oligocene to Quaternary age. Earthquake disaster mitigation studies divided into two important phases, too. Firstly, earthquake, soil and engineering structure problems identify for investigation area, later on strategic emergency plan can prepare for these problems. Soil amplification play important role the disaster mitigation and the site effect analysis and basin structure is also a key parameter for determining of site effect. Some geophysical, geological and geotechnical measurements are requeired to defined this relationship. Istanbul Megacity has been waiting possible Marmara Earthquake and their related results. In order to defined to possible damage potential related to site effect, gravity measurements carried out for determining to geological structure, basin geometry and faults in Istanbul. Gravity data were collected at 640 sites by using a Scientrex CG-5 Autogravity meter Standard corrections applied to the gravity data include those for instrumental drift, Earth tides and latitude, and the free-air and Bouguer corrections. The corrected gravity data were imported into a Geosoft database to create a grid and map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly (grid cell size of 200 m). As a previously results, we determined some lineminants, faults and basins beneath Istanbul City. Especially, orientation of faults were NW-SE direction and some basin structures determined on between Buyukcekmece and Kucukcekmece Lake.

  13. X-ray structure analyses of biological molecules and particles in Japan. A brief history and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, X-ray structure analyses of molecules and particles from biology started in the 1970s. The structure analysis methods have been developed through the innovation of various techniques in advance, and have contributed for understanding the elementary and microscopic processes in life. Here we summarize briefly the history of X-ray structure analyses for structural biology in Japan and think about the prospect. (author)

  14. Structural biology studies of CagA from Helicobacter pylori and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of proteins and their complexes have become critical information for molecular-based life science. Biochemical and biological analysis based on tertiary structural information is a powerful tool to unveil complex molecular processes in the cell. Here, we present two examples of the structure-based life science study, structural biology studies of CagA, an effector protein from Helicobacter pylori, and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1, which is involved in transcription initiation. (author)

  15. MOTIVATION INTERNALIZATION AND SIMPLEX STRUCTURE IN SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Ali; Dettweiler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Self-determination theory, as proposed by Deci and Ryan, postulated different types of motivation regulation. As to the introjected and identified regulation of extrinsic motivation, their internalizations were described as "somewhat external" and "somewhat internal" and remained undetermined in the theory. This paper introduces a constrained regression analysis that allows these vaguely expressed motivations to be estimated in an "optimal" manner, in any given empirical context. The approach was even generalized and applied for simplex structure analysis in self-determination theory. The technique was exemplified with an empirical study comparing science teaching in a classical school class versus an expeditionary outdoor program. Based on a sample of 84 German pupils (43 girls, 41 boys, 10 to 12 years old), data were collected using the German version of the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. The science-teaching format was seen to not influence the pupils' internalization of identified regulation. The internalization of introjected regulation differed and shifted more toward the external pole in the outdoor teaching format. The quantification approach supported the simplex structure of self-determination theory, whereas correlations may disconfirm the simplex structure. PMID:26595290

  16. Two-Dimensional Flow Nanometry of Biological Nanoparticles for Accurate Determination of Their Size and Emission Intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Stephan; Lundgren, Anders; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Biological nanoparticles (BNPs) are of high interest due to their key role in various biological processes and use as biomarkers. BNP size and molecular composition are decisive for their functions, but simultaneous determination of both properties with high accuracy remains challenging, which is a severe limitation. Surface-sensitive microscopy allows one to precisely determine fluorescence or scattering intensity, but not the size of individual BNPs. The latter is better determined by tracking their random motion in bulk, but the limited illumination volume for tracking this motion impedes reliable intensity determination. We here show that attaching BNPs (specifically, vesicles and functionalized gold NPs) to a supported lipid bilayer, subjecting them to a hydrodynamic flow, and tracking their motion via surface-sensitive imaging enable to determine their diffusion coefficients and flow-induced drift velocities and to accurately quantify both BNP size and emission intensity. For vesicles, the high accuracy...

  17. Independent component analysis reveals new and biologically significant structures in micro array data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerla Srinivas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An alternative to standard approaches to uncover biologically meaningful structures in micro array data is to treat the data as a blind source separation (BSS problem. BSS attempts to separate a mixture of signals into their different sources and refers to the problem of recovering signals from several observed linear mixtures. In the context of micro array data, "sources" may correspond to specific cellular responses or to co-regulated genes. Results We applied independent component analysis (ICA to three different microarray data sets; two tumor data sets and one time series experiment. To obtain reliable components we used iterated ICA to estimate component centrotypes. We found that many of the low ranking components indeed may show a strong biological coherence and hence be of biological significance. Generally ICA achieved a higher resolution when compared with results based on correlated expression and a larger number of gene clusters with significantly enriched for gene ontology (GO categories. In addition, components characteristic for molecular subtypes and for tumors with specific chromosomal translocations were identified. ICA also identified more than one gene clusters significant for the same GO categories and hence disclosed a higher level of biological heterogeneity, even within coherent groups of genes. Conclusion Although the ICA approach primarily detects hidden variables, these surfaced as highly correlated genes in time series data and in one instance in the tumor data. This further strengthens the biological relevance of latent variables detected by ICA.

  18. Determination of the stretch tensor for structural transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian; Song, Yintao; Tamura, Nobumichi; James, Richard D.

    2016-08-01

    Structural transformations in crystalline solids are increasingly the basis of the functional behavior of materials. Recently, in diverse alloy systems, both low hysteresis and reversibility of phase transformations have been linked to the satisfaction of the nongeneric conditions of compatibility between phases. According to the Cauchy-Born rule, these conditions are expressed as properties of transformation stretch tensor. The transformation stretch tensor is difficult to measure directly due to the lack of knowledge about the exact transforming pathway during the structural change, and the complicating effects of microstructure. In this paper we give a rigorous algorithmic approach for determining the transformation stretch tensor from X-ray measurements of structure and lattice parameters. For some traditional and emerging phase transformations, the results given by the algorithm suggest unexpected transformation mechanisms.

  19. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szakál, Alex, E-mail: szakal.alex@wigner.mta.hu; Markó, Márton, E-mail: marko.marton@wigner.mta.hu; Cser, László, E-mail: cser.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  20. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  1. Shell and membrane theories in mechanics and biology from macro- to nanoscale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhasev, Gennadi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest results related to shells  characterize and design shells, plates, membranes and other thin-walled structures, a multidisciplinary approach from macro- to nanoscale is required which involves the classical disciplines of mechanical/civil/materials engineering (design, analysis, and properties) and physics/biology/medicine among others. The book contains contributions of a meeting of specialists (mechanical engineers, mathematicians, physicists and others) in such areas as classical and non-classical shell theories. New trends with respect to applications in mechanical, civil and aero-space engineering, as well as in new branches like medicine and biology are presented which demand improvements of the theoretical foundations of these theories and a deeper understanding of the material behavior used in such structures.

  2. Heteroaryl Chalcones: Design, Synthesis, X-ray Crystal Structures and Biological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoong-Kun Fun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chalcone derivatives have attracted increasing attention due to their numerous pharmacological activities. Changes in their structures have displayed high degree of diversity that has proven to result in a broad spectrum of biological activities. The present study highlights the synthesis of some halogen substituted chalcones 3(a–i containing the 5-chlorothiophene moiety, their X-ray crystal structures and the evaluation of possible biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal and reducing power abilities. The results indicate the tested compounds show a varied range of inhibition values against all the tested microbial strains. Compound 3c with a p-fluoro substituent on the phenyl ring exhibits elevated antimicrobial activity, whereas the compounds 3e and 3f displayed the least antimicrobial activities. The compounds 3d, 3e, 3f and 3i showed good ferric and cupric reducing abilities, and the compounds 3b and 3c showed the weakest reducing power in the series.

  3. Heteroaryl chalcones: design, synthesis, X-ray crystal structures and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C S Chidan; Loh, Wan-Sin; Ooi, Chin Wei; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Chalcone derivatives have attracted increasing attention due to their numerous pharmacological activities. Changes in their structures have displayed high degree of diversity that has proven to result in a broad spectrum of biological activities. The present study highlights the synthesis of some halogen substituted chalcones 3(a-i) containing the 5-chlorothiophene moiety, their X-ray crystal structures and the evaluation of possible biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal and reducing power abilities. The results indicate the tested compounds show a varied range of inhibition values against all the tested microbial strains. Compound 3c with a p-fluoro substituent on the phenyl ring exhibits elevated antimicrobial activity, whereas the compounds 3e and 3f displayed the least antimicrobial activities. The compounds 3d, 3e, 3f and 3i showed good ferric and cupric reducing abilities, and the compounds 3b and 3c showed the weakest reducing power in the series. PMID:24132195

  4. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  5. Influence of Lipid Oxidization on Structures and Functions of Biological Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Korytowski, Agatha Anna

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to clarify how the structures and functions of biological membranes are influenced by the oxidative damage mediated by free radicals. As a precisely defined model systems, artificially reconstituted lipid membranes (Langmuir monolayers, vesicles, supported membranes, multilamellar membranes) incorporating two oxidized phospholipids bearing aldehyde or carboxyl groups at the end of truncated sn-2 acyl chains were fabricated. By the combination of various exper...

  6. Pearson versus Spearman, Kendall's Tau Correlation Analysis on Structure-Activity Relationships of Biologic Active Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Jäntschi, Lorentz; Sorana-Daniela BOLBOACĂ

    2006-01-01

    A sample of sixty-seven pyrimidine derivatives with inhibitory activity on E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was studied by the use of molecular descriptors family on structure-activity relationships. Starting from the results obtained by applying of MDF-SAR methodology on pyrimidine derivatives and from the assumption that the measured activity (compounds’ inhibitory activity) of a biologically active compounds is a semi-quantitative outcome (can be related with the type of equipment us...

  7. PASBio: predicate-argument structures for event extraction in molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Parantu K; Wattarujeekrit Tuangthong; Collier Nigel

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The exploitation of information extraction (IE), a technology aiming to provide instances of structured representations from free-form text, has been rapidly growing within the molecular biology (MB) research community to keep track of the latest results reported in literature. IE systems have traditionally used shallow syntactic patterns for matching facts in sentences but such approaches appear inadequate to achieve high accuracy in MB event extraction due to complex sen...

  8. Determination of organic crystal structures by X ray powder diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, L

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ibuprofen has been solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the GA is improved by incorporating prior chemical information in the form of hard limits on the values that can be taken by the flexible torsion angles within the molecule. Powder X-ray diffraction data were collected for the anti-convulsant compounds remacemide, remacemide nitrate and remacemide acetate at 130 K on BM 16 at the X-ray European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble. High quality crystal structures were obtained using data collected to a resolution of typically 1.5 A. The structure determinations were performed using a simulated annealing (SA) method and constrained Rietveld refinements for the structures converged to chi sup 2 values of 1.64, 1.84 and 1.76 for the free base, nitrate and acetate respectively. The previously unknown crystal structure of the drug famotidine Form B has been solved using X-ray powder diffraction data colle...

  9. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  10. Computational tools for experimental determination and theoretical prediction of protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donoghue, S.; Rost, B.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. The authors intend to review the state of the art in the experimental determination of protein 3D structure (focus on nuclear magnetic resonance), and in the theoretical prediction of protein function and of protein structure in 1D, 2D and 3D from sequence. All the atomic resolution structures determined so far have been derived from either X-ray crystallography (the majority so far) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy (becoming increasingly more important). The authors briefly describe the physical methods behind both of these techniques; the major computational methods involved will be covered in some detail. They highlight parallels and differences between the methods, and also the current limitations. Special emphasis will be given to techniques which have application to ab initio structure prediction. Large scale sequencing techniques increase the gap between the number of known proteins sequences and that of known protein structures. They describe the scope and principles of methods that contribute successfully to closing that gap. Emphasis will be given on the specification of adequate testing procedures to validate such methods.

  11. Characterization of carbon nanotubes and analytical methods for their determination in environmental and biological samples: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Analytical techniques for characterization of CNTs: classification, description and examples. • Determination methods for CNTs in biological and environmental samples. • Future trends and perspectives for characterization and determination of CNTs. - Abstract: In the present paper, a critical overview of the most commonly used techniques for the characterization and the determination of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is given on the basis of 170 references (2000–2014). The analytical techniques used for CNT characterization (including microscopic and diffraction, spectroscopic, thermal and separation techniques) are classified, described, and illustrated with applied examples. Furthermore, the performance of sampling procedures as well as the available methods for the determination of CNTs in real biological and environmental samples are reviewed and discussed according to their analytical characteristics. In addition, future trends and perspectives in this field of work are critically presented

  12. Characterization of carbon nanotubes and analytical methods for their determination in environmental and biological samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero-Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es; Álvarez-Méndez, J.; Barciela-García, J.; García-Martín, S.; Peña-Crecente, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analytical techniques for characterization of CNTs: classification, description and examples. • Determination methods for CNTs in biological and environmental samples. • Future trends and perspectives for characterization and determination of CNTs. - Abstract: In the present paper, a critical overview of the most commonly used techniques for the characterization and the determination of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is given on the basis of 170 references (2000–2014). The analytical techniques used for CNT characterization (including microscopic and diffraction, spectroscopic, thermal and separation techniques) are classified, described, and illustrated with applied examples. Furthermore, the performance of sampling procedures as well as the available methods for the determination of CNTs in real biological and environmental samples are reviewed and discussed according to their analytical characteristics. In addition, future trends and perspectives in this field of work are critically presented.

  13. The Structure of a Gene Co-Expression Network Reveals Biological Functions Underlying eQTLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  14. Synthesis and Structural Determination of Temocapril Sulfoxide Hydrochlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Seok Bong; Moon, Jong Taik; Kim, Jung Ahn; Choo, Dong Joon; Lee, Jae Yeol [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Impurity (or related substance) control in pharmaceutical products is a primary goal of drug development. Stringent international regulatory requirements have been in place for several years as outlined in the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines Q3A (R), Q3B (R) and Q3C. According to ICH guidelines, impurities associated with the manufacture of a drug substance, also known as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), are classified into the following categories: (1) organic impurities (process and drug-related); (2) inorganic impurities (3) residual solvents. Many potential impurities result from the API manufacturing process including starting materials, isomers, intermediates, reagents, solvents, catalysts and reaction by-products. These potential impurities should be investigated to determine process control mechanisms for their removal and the need for specification controls at appropriate points in the process. The suggested structures of the impurities can be synthesized and will provide the final evidence for their structures, previously determined by spectroscopic methods. Therefore it is essential to know the structure of these impurities in the bulk drug in order to alter the reaction condition and to reduce the quantity of impurity to an acceptable level. Isolation, identification and quantification of impurities help the pharmaceutical company to obtain a pure substance with less toxicity and safety in drug therapy.

  15. Assessment of carotid plaque vulnerability using structural and geometrical determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because many acute cerebral ischemic events are caused by rupture of vulnerable carotid atheroma and subsequent thrombosis, the present study used both idealized and patient-specific carotid atheromatous plaque models to evaluate the effect of structural determinants on stress distributions within plaque. Using a finite element method, structural analysis was performed using models derived from in vivo high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of carotid atheroma in 40 non-consecutive patients (20 symptomatic, 20 asymptomatic). Plaque components were modeled as hyper-elastic materials. The effects of varying fibrous cap thickness, lipid core size and lumen curvature on plaque stress distributions were examined. Lumen curvature and fibrous cap thickness were found to be major determinants of plaque stress. The size of the lipid core did not alter plaque stress significantly when the fibrous cap was relatively thick. The correlation between plaque stress and lumen curvature was significant for both symptomatic (p=0.01; correlation coefficient: 0.689) and asymptomatic patients (p=0.01; correlation coefficient: 0.862). Lumen curvature in plaques of symptomatic patients was significantly larger than those of asymptomatic patients (1.50±1.0 mm-1 vs 1.25±0.75 mm-1; p=0.01). Specific plaque morphology (large lumen curvature and thin fibrous cap) is closely related to plaque vulnerability. Structural analysis using high-resolution MRI of carotid atheroma may help in detecting vulnerable atheromatous plaque and aid the risk stratification of patients with carotid disease. (author)

  16. Synthesis and Structural Determination of Temocapril Sulfoxide Hydrochlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impurity (or related substance) control in pharmaceutical products is a primary goal of drug development. Stringent international regulatory requirements have been in place for several years as outlined in the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines Q3A (R), Q3B (R) and Q3C. According to ICH guidelines, impurities associated with the manufacture of a drug substance, also known as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), are classified into the following categories: (1) organic impurities (process and drug-related); (2) inorganic impurities (3) residual solvents. Many potential impurities result from the API manufacturing process including starting materials, isomers, intermediates, reagents, solvents, catalysts and reaction by-products. These potential impurities should be investigated to determine process control mechanisms for their removal and the need for specification controls at appropriate points in the process. The suggested structures of the impurities can be synthesized and will provide the final evidence for their structures, previously determined by spectroscopic methods. Therefore it is essential to know the structure of these impurities in the bulk drug in order to alter the reaction condition and to reduce the quantity of impurity to an acceptable level. Isolation, identification and quantification of impurities help the pharmaceutical company to obtain a pure substance with less toxicity and safety in drug therapy

  17. Metrological assessment of the high-accuracy RNAA method of Co determination in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the contemporary world, chemical measurements are the basis for making central decisions to effective functioning of the society. The areas critically dependent on results of chemical analysis are e.g. environmental control, health, food safety, crime detection, support for R and D. Hence, there is a need for checking the reliability of the results of chemical analysis. This is of great importance especially in the case of trace analysis. One of the ways of checking the accuracy of chemical results is the use of primary methods. The aim of the presented paper has been to show that radiochemical neutron activation (RNAA) method can meet criteria for a primary ratio method (a definitive method). The high-accuracy RNAA method for the determination of trace amount of cobalt in biological materials has been developed. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation with selective and quantitative isolation of the analyte in a state of high radiochemical purity by use of column chromatography followed by gamma-ray spectrometric measurements. The method was devised according to a set of rules, which were formulated to obtain high accuracy of the method. The procedure has been also equipped with several criteria, being a key factor of quality assurance. The criteria have to be fulfilled by a result of analysis in order to be accepted. The paper summarizes the work on the development of the method and demonstrates the qualifications of the elaborated method as a primary ratio or a definitive method. The usefulness of the elaborated method in the certification of the candidate reference materials: Tea Leaves and Mixed Polish Herbs is presented. (author)

  18. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B., E-mail: wender@unb.br, E-mail: ckleber@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (LaQMOS/UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Vencato, Ivo; Castro, Miriam R.C. de; Camargo, Ademir J. [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lariucci, Carlito [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-01-15

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure activity relationship. (author)

  19. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure activity relationship. (author)

  20. Two Methods of Determining Total Phenolic Content of Foods and Juices in a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Lee Alan; Leung, Sam H.; Puderbaugh, Amy; Angel, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of total phenolics in foods and fruit juices was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry course. Two different colorimetric methods were used over three years and comparative student results indicate that a ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS) indicator…

  1. Host range determination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. salsolae, a biological control agent of tumbleweed: from BLUPs to biomass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host range tests were conducted with Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. salsolae (CGS) in quarantine to determine whether the fungus is safe to release in N. America for biological control of tumbleweed (Salsola tragus L., Chenopodiaceae). Ninety-two accessions were analyzed from 19 families and...

  2. Spectrophotometric Determination of Thioridazine Hydrochloride in Tablets and Biological Fluids by Ion-Pair and Oxidation Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    El-Didamony, Akram; Hafeez, Sameh

    2012-01-01

    Two simple, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric methods have been described for the determination of the psychoactive drug, thioridazine HCl in tablets and in biological fluids. The first method is based on the oxidation of thioridazine HCl with measured excess of KMnO4 under acidic conditions followed by the determination of unreacted oxidant using indigo carmine and methyl orange. The second method is based on the formation of ion-pair complexes with the acidic sulphophthalein dyes s...

  3. Determination of Nitric Oxide-Derived Nitrite and Nitrate in Biological Samples by HPLC Coupled to Nitrite Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Anguo; Duan, Tingting; Tang, Dan; Xu, Youhua; Feng, Liang; Zheng, Zhaoguang; Zhu, Jiaxiao; Wang, Rushang; Zhu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate are main stable products of nitric oxide, a pivotal cellular signaling molecule, in biological fluids. Therefore, accurate measurement of the two ions is profoundly important. Nitrite is difficult to be determined for a larger number of interferences and unstable in the presence of oxygen. In this paper, a simple, cost-effective and accurate HPLC method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate was developed. On the basis of the reaction that nitrite is oxidized rapidly...

  4. In Situ Cryo-Electron Tomography: A Post-Reductionist Approach to Structural Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shoh; Engel, Benjamin D; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-29

    Cryo-electron tomography is a powerful technique that can faithfully image the native cellular environment at nanometer resolution. Unlike many other imaging approaches, cryo-electron tomography provides a label-free method of detecting biological structures, relying on the intrinsic contrast of frozen cellular material for direct identification of macromolecules. Recent advances in sample preparation, detector technology, and phase plate imaging have enabled the structural characterization of protein complexes within intact cells. Here, we review these technical developments and outline a detailed computational workflow for in situ structural analysis. Two recent studies are described to illustrate how this workflow can be adapted to examine both known and unknown cellular complexes. The stage is now set to realize the promise of visual proteomics-a complete structural description of the cell's native molecular landscape. PMID:26456135

  5. Using a commodity high-definition television for collaborative structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennamalli, Ragothaman; Arangarasan, Raj; Bryden, Aaron; Gleicher, Michael; Phillips, George N

    2014-06-01

    Visualization of protein structures using stereoscopic systems is frequently needed by structural biologists working to understand a protein's structure-function relationships. Often several scientists are working as a team and need simultaneous interaction with each other and the graphics representations. Most existing molecular visualization tools support single-user tasks, which are not suitable for a collaborative group. Expensive caves, domes or geowalls have been developed, but the availability and low cost of high-definition televisions (HDTVs) and game controllers in the commodity entertainment market provide an economically attractive option to achieve a collaborative environment. This paper describes a low-cost environment, using standard consumer game controllers and commercially available stereoscopic HDTV monitors with appropriate signal converters for structural biology collaborations employing existing binary distributions of commonly used software packages like Coot, PyMOL, Chimera, VMD, O, Olex2 and others. PMID:24904249

  6. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  7. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  8. Determination of the structure of UFe2Al10 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure of a new ternary phase UFe2Al10 appearing in the U-Fe-Al system was determined using direct methods applied to X-ray powder diffraction data. High resolution electron microscopy combined with the methods of crystallographic image processing was used for the verification of the structural model. The UFe2Al10 phase is orthorhombic and belongs to Cmcm space group, its unit cell contains 40 Al, eight Fe, and four U atoms. The lattice parameters obtained after Rietveld refinement are: a=8.919 A, b=10.208 A, and c=9.018 A. The reliability factors characterizing the Rietveld refinement procedure are: Rp=5.9%, Rwp=8.1%, and Rb=2.9%

  9. The determinants of Capital structure of firms in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, ZHANQUAN

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is going to study the determinants of capital structure of firms in Japan. As previous empirical researches, they all pointed out the factors in different countries. Therefore, it is going to carry out the empirical research in Japanese firms. The sample data used in this dissertation is from a panel data set of 193 non-financial companies in the NIKKIE 225 during the periods from 2003 to 2013. Firstly, it presents MM theory and two mainly modern theories which are the trade...

  10. I love you with all my brain: laying aside the intellectually dull sword of biological determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Woodson, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: By organizing and activating our passions with both hormones and experiences, the heart and mind of sexual behavior, sexual motivation, and sexual preference is the brain, the organ of learning. Despite decades of progress, this incontrovertible truth is somehow lost in the far-too-often biologically deterministic interpretation of genetic, hormonal, and anatomical scientific research into the biological origins of sexual motivation. Simplistic and polarized arguments are used in ...

  11. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli L-Arabinose Isomerase (ECAI), The Putative Target of Biological Tagatose Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty,B.; Chance, M.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase (ECAI; EC 5.3.1.4) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose in vivo. This enzyme is also of commercial interest as it catalyzes the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose in vitro. The crystal structure of ECAI was solved and refined at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. The subunit structure of ECAI is organized into three domains: an N-terminal, a central and a C-terminal domain. It forms a crystallographic trimeric architecture in the asymmetric unit. Packing within the crystal suggests the idea that ECAI can form a hexameric assembly. Previous electron microscopic and biochemical studies supports that ECAI is hexameric in solution. A comparison with other known structures reveals that ECAI adopts a protein fold most similar to E. coli fucose isomerase (ECFI) despite very low sequence identity 9.7%. The structural similarity between ECAI and ECFI with regard to number of domains, overall fold, biological assembly, and active site architecture strongly suggests that the enzymes have functional similarities. Further, the crystal structure of ECAI forms a basis for identifying molecular determinants responsible for isomerization of arabinose to ribulose in vivo and galactose to tagatose in vitro.

  12. Determining the Structure of Biomaterials Interfaces using Synchrotron-based X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, M

    2002-01-24

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of using surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD) to determine the structure of biomineral surfaces in electrolyte solutions and of the adsorbed layer of acidic amino acids that are believed to play a central role in the control of biomineral formation and function. The work is a critical component in the development of an integrated picture of the physical and chemical basis for deposition and dissolution at solid-liquid interfaces in biological systems, and brings a new and very powerful surface-sensitive capability to LLNL. We have chosen as our model systems calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate in aspartic and glutamic acid-bearing solutions. The calcium compounds are ubiquitous among biomineral structures, both those that are beneficial such as bones and teeth, and those that are pathological such as kidney stones, while the two acidic amino acids--both as simple and poly-amino acids--are the dominant constituents of protein mixtures implicated in the control of biomineralization. The goals of the work are: (1) to determine the surface structure of pure calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate surfaces in aqueous solution using SXRD; (2) to determine how those surfaces are modified by the presence of aspartic and glutamic acid, both as the simple amino acids and as poly-aspartate and poly-glutamate and (3) to model the interactions of acidic amino acids with calcite.

  13. Structural characterization of chitin and chitosan obtained by biological and chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Neith; Garnica-Gonzalez, Mónica; Gimeno, Miquel; Bárzana, Eduardo; Trombotto, Stéphane; David, Laurent; Shirai, Keiko

    2011-09-12

    Chitin production was biologically achieved by lactic acid fermentation (LAF) of shrimp waste (Litopenaeus vannameii) in a packed bed column reactor with maximal percentages of demineralization (D(MIN)) and deproteinization (D(PROT)) after 96 h of 92 and 94%, respectively. This procedure also afforded high free astaxanthin recovery with up to 2400 μg per gram of silage. Chitin product was also obtained from the shrimp waste by a chemical method using acid and alkali for comparison. The biologically obtained chitin (BIO-C) showed higher M(w) (1200 kDa) and crystallinity index (I(CR)) (86%) than the chemically extracted chitin (CH-C). A multistep freeze-pump-thaw (FPT) methodology was applied to obtain medium M(w) chitosan (400 kDa) with degree of acetylation (DA) ca. 10% from BIO-C, which was higher than that from CH-C. Additionally, I(CR) values showed the preservation of crystalline chitin structure in BIO-C derivatives at low DA (40-25%). Moreover, the FPT deacetylation of the attained BIO-C produced chitosans with bloc copolymer structure inherited from a coarse chitin crystalline morphology. Therefore, our LAF method combined with FPT proved to be an affective biological method to avoid excessive depolymerization and loss of crystallinity during chitosan production, which offers new perspective applications for this material. PMID:21790136

  14. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering: large-scale structure determination from a bird's eye view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both natural and synthetic materials science and engineering rely increasingly on detailed knowledge of the microstructure and interactions in soft and hard materials. Contemporary research areas in biology and the life sciences, e.g., include membrane biophysics, drug-delivery systems and pharmacology, denial and medical composites, biomaterials, fillings and implants in each of these areas large length scale measurements become necessary as model biological systems begin to approach the complexity of natural systems Porosity (void structure) and particle size need to be understood so that the processes of agglomeration and water transport can be quantified in materials such as cements, oil bearing rooks, and pewit pigments Complex fluids, containing structures and complexes in the nanometre and much larger length scales, have widely varying physical properties and are extensively used in food, cosmetic/personal care, pharmaceuticals and drug-delivery, and mining industries. In these length-scales are some of the organisational features that dictate the bulk rheological and stability properties of solutions. At ANSTO a new ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument, Kookaburra (currently) under construction with an expected transition to operation in mid-2013), will advance large-scale structure determination in the size range of 0.1-10 µm. Based on the well-established Bonse-Hart method. Kookaburra will individually operate at two different wavelengths to optimally accommodate weakly and strongly scattering samples at one sample position. This contribution will present specifics of Kookaburra and also discuss a practical application of the USANS technique in polymer science. Both its versatility and estimated neutron flux suggest that this state-.of-the-art instrument will generate a major impact in the field of large-scale structure determination.

  15. Adapting federated cyberinfrastructure for shared data collection facilities in structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been difficult, historically, to manage and maintain early-stage experimental data collected by structural biologists in synchrotron facilities. This work describes a prototype system that adapts existing federated cyberinfrastructure technology and techniques to manage collected data at synchrotrons and to facilitate the efficient and secure transfer of data to the owner's home institution. Early stage experimental data in structural biology is generally unmaintained and inaccessible to the public. It is increasingly believed that this data, which forms the basis for each macromolecular structure discovered by this field, must be archived and, in due course, published. Furthermore, the widespread use of shared scientific facilities such as synchrotron beamlines complicates the issue of data storage, access and movement, as does the increase of remote users. This work describes a prototype system that adapts existing federated cyberinfrastructure technology and techniques to significantly improve the operational environment for users and administrators of synchrotron data collection facilities used in structural biology. This is achieved through software from the Virtual Data Toolkit and Globus, bringing together federated users and facilities from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, the Advanced Photon Source, the Open Science Grid, the SBGrid Consortium and Harvard Medical School. The performance and experience with the prototype provide a model for data management at shared scientific facilities

  16. Relative biological effectiveness of d(50)-Be neutrons determined for induction of chromosome aberrations in Allium cepa onion roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of d(50)-Be neutrons, as a function of absorbed dose, was determined using as biological criterion induction of chromosome aberrations in Allium cepa onion roots. Two endpoints were used: mean number of aberrations per cell and percentage of intact cells, in anaphase and telophase. For both endpoints, RBE increases regularly from 7 to 12 when neutron absorbed dose decreases from 0.4 to 0.1 Gy. On the other hand, RBE/absorbed dose relationships are almost straight lines, in logarithmic coordinates, with a slope close to -1/2

  17. A review of chromatographic methods for the determination of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaźniewicz-Łada, Marta; Główka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vitamins are an essential element of nutrition and thus contribute to human health. Vitamins catalyze many biochemical reactions and their lack or excess can cause health problems. Therefore, monitoring vitamin concentrations in plasma or other biological fluids may be useful in the diagnosis of various disorders as well as in the treatment process. Several chromatographic methods have been developed for the determination of these compounds in biological samples, including high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. Recently, high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods have been widely used for the determination of vitamins in complex matrices because of their high sensitivity and selectivity. This method requires preconditioning of samples for analysis, including protein precipitation and/or various extraction techniques. The choice of method may depend on the desired cost, convenience, turnaround time, specificity, and accuracy of the information to be obtained. This article reviews the recently reported chromatographic methods used for determination of vitamins in biological fluids. Relevant papers published mostly during the last 5 years were identified by an extensive PubMed search using appropriate keywords. Particular attention was given to the preparation steps and extraction techniques. This report may be helpful in the selection of procedures that are appropriate for certain types of biological materials and analytes. PMID:26503668

  18. Medicinal properties of mangiferin, structural features, derivative synthesis, pharmacokinetics and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biologically active and potentially therapeutically useful pharmacophores from natural products has been a long-term focus in the pharmaceutical industry. The recent emergence of a worldwide obesity and Type II diabetes epidemic has increased focus upon small molecules that can modulate energy metabolism, insulin sensitivity and fat biology. Interesting preliminary work done on mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L., portends potential for this pharmacophore as a novel parent compound for treating metabolic disorders. MGF is comprised of a C-glucosylated xanthone. Owing to the xanthone chemical structure, MGF has a redox active aromatic system and has antioxidant properties. MGF exerts varied and impressive metabolic effects in animals, improving metabolic disorders. For example we have discovered that MGF is a novel activator of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, leading to enhancement of carbohydrate utilization in oxidative metabolism, and leading to increased insulin sensitivity in animal models of obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, recent unbiased proteomics studies revealed that MGF upregulates proteins pivotal for mitochondrial bioenergetics and downregulates proteins controlling de novo lipogenesis in liver, helping to explain protective effects of MGF in prevention of liver steatosis. Several chemical studies have achieved synthesis of MGF, suggesting possible synthetic strategies to alter its chemical structure for development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information. Ultimately, chemical derivatization studies could lead to the eventual development of novel therapeutics based upon the parent pharmacophore structure. Here we provide comprehensive review on chemical features of MGF, synthesis of its derivatives, its pharmacokinetics and biological activities. PMID:25827900

  19. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  20. Methods for empirical formula, molecular structure determination and colloid characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of empirical formula and of molecular structures in issues pertinent to the fuel cycle, waste management and remediation, as well as in risk assessment associated with radionuclide release and its migration to the near and far field of a repository present a particular challenge. Speciation techniques in these areas are needed for extraction chemistry of actinides, aquatic reactions of actinide ions (e.g. tetravalent actinide hydrolysis, formation of ternary complexes and redox chemistry), reactions at the water/mineral interface, formation of secondary phases and the formation of and interaction with colloids. The range of concentrations of interest is extreme, from relatively pure substances such as the fuels themselves, to tracer levels in far-field release scenarios. Actinide speciation in extractant solutions used for separation techniques for partitioning technologies involves investigation of solutions with often acidic pH, whereas speciation in cement pore waters, for example, can involve very basic solutions. Finally, the amount of sample available may be limited, e.g. pore water samples can be as small as μL quantities. There exist a variety of techniques for determining empirical formula and molecular structure of radionuclide species. The actual contents and components of the sample at hand in addition to the degree of complexity required dictates the method that is chosen. The speciation of radionuclides is often governed by their association with or formation to colloids. The characterisation of such colloids is imperative and their quantification and characterisation is, therefore, included as a separate treatise. (author)