WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological shock

  1. Report on the VIIth International Symposium on Heat Shock Proteins in Biology & Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    This seventh symposium in a series on heat shock proteins in biology and medicine was held November 1–5, 2014, at the Hilton Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 70 participants including principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students were in attendance. The major themes were: new properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factor (HSF) and role in the etiology of cancer, molecular chaperones in aging, extracellular HSPs in inflammation and i...

  2. Biological effects of tandem shock waves demonstrated on magnetic resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, J.; Zeman, J.; Poučková, P.; Zadinová, M.; Šunka, Pavel; Lukeš, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 6 (2012), s. 335-338. ISSN 0006-9248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : electrical discharges in water * focused shock waves * cavitations * tandem shock waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2012

  3. Tandem shock waves in medicine and biology: a review of potential applications and successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, P.; Fernández, F.; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J.; Fernández, E.; Alvarez, U. M.; Sunka, P.; Loske, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock waves have been established as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of diseases. Research groups worldwide are working on improving shock wave technology and developing new applications of shock waves to medicine and biology. The passage of a shock wave through soft tissue, fluids, and suspensions containing cells may result in acoustic cavitation i.e., the expansion and violent collapse of microbubbles, which generates secondary shock waves and the emission of microjets of fluid. Cavitation has been recognized as a significant phenomenon that produces both desirable and undesirable biomedical effects. Several studies have shown that cavitation can be controlled by emitting two shock waves that can be delayed by tenths or hundreds of microseconds. These dual-pulse pressure pulses, which are known as tandem shock waves, have been shown to enhance in vitro and in vivo urinary stone fragmentation, cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, delay tumor growth, enhance the bactericidal effect of shock waves and significantly increase the efficiency of genetic transformations in bacteria and fungi. This article provides an overview of the basic physical principles, methodologies, achievements and potential uses of tandem shock waves to improve biomedical applications.

  4. Impact of heat shock on heat shock proteins expression,biological and commercial traits of Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VASUDHA B. CHAVADI; APARNA H. S OSALEGOWDA; MANJUNATHA H.B OREGOWDA

    2006-01-01

    We report the thermotolerance of new bivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori strains NB4D2, KSO1, NP2, CSR2 and CSR4 and differential expression of heat shock proteins at different instars. Different instars of silkworm larva were subjected to heat shock at 35℃,40℃ and 45℃ for 2 hours followed by 2 hours recovery. Heat shock proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The impact of heat shock on commercial traits of cocoons was analyzed by following different strategies in terms of acquired thermotolerance over control. Comparatively NP2 exhibited better survivability than other strains. Resistance to heat shock was increased as larval development proceeds in the order of first instar > second instar > third instar > fourth instar > fifth instar in all silkworm strains. Expression of heat shock proteins varies in different instars. 90 kDa in the first, second and third instars, 84 kDa in the fourth instar and 84, 62, 60, 47 and 33 kDa heat shock proteins in fifth instar was observed in response to heat shock. Relative influence of heat shock on commercial traits that correspond to different stages was significant in all strains. In NB4D2, cocoon and shell weight significantly increased to 17.52% and 19.44% over control respectively. Heat shock proteins as molecular markers for evaluation and evolution of thermotolerant silkworm strains for tropics was discussed.

  5. Punctuated equilibrium and shock waves in molecular models of biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Ghazaryan, Makar H.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2014-08-01

    We consider the dynamics in infinite population evolution models with a general symmetric fitness landscape. We find shock waves, i.e., discontinuous transitions in the mean fitness, in evolution dynamics even with smooth fitness landscapes, which means that the search for the optimal evolution trajectory is more complicated. These shock waves appear in the case of positive epistasis and can be used to represent punctuated equilibria in biological evolution during long geological time scales. We find exact analytical solutions for discontinuous dynamics at the large-genome-length limit and derive optimal mutation rates for a fixed fitness landscape to send the population from the initial configuration to some final configuration in the fastest way.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    CERN Document Server

    de Vera, Pablo; Currell, Fred J; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which lies beyond the possibilities of the analytical model.

  7. Biological implications of high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    A ~ 62 My periodicity in fossil biodiversity has been observed in independent studies of paleobiology databases going back 542 My. The period and phase of this biodiversity cycle coincides with the motion of our solar system in the galactic disk that oscillates perpendicular to the galactic plane with an amplitude of about 70 parsecs and a period of 63.6 My. Our Galaxy is falling toward the Virgo cluster due to its gravitational pull, forming a galactic shock at the north end of our galaxy due to this motion, capable of accelerating particles and exposing our galaxy's northern side to a higher flux of cosmic rays. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating extensive air showers, ionizing the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose, causing DNA damage and increasing mutation rates, which can have serious biological implicatio...

  8. Effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal in a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Xu, Hengjuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Kun; Lin, Ying

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal during a continuous-flow anoxic/aerobic process was investigated using a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor. The results demonstrated that [Formula: see text]-N removal was not affected by any Cu(II) shock loads, but TN removal was inhibited by Cu(II) of shock loads of 2 and 5 mg/L, and the performance could not be recovered at 5 mg/L. Furthermore, the TN removal pathway also changed in response to Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L. Denitrification is more sensitive to Cu(II) shock in SBNR processes. Examination of amoA communities using quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of AOB in the aerobic tank decreased after Cu(II) shock with 5 mg/L, which supported the observed changes in [Formula: see text]-N removal efficiency. The abundance of denitrification genes declined obviously at Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L, which explained the decreased TN removal efficiency at those concentrations. PMID:25833010

  9. Tandem shock waves in medicine and biology: a review of potential applications and successes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Fernández, F.; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J.; Fernández, E.; Alvarez, U.M.; Šunka, Pavel; Loske, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-23. ISSN 0938-1287 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Tandem shock waves * Acoustic cavitation * Clinical applications * Bactericidal effect * Genetic transformation * Cancer treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.885, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00193-015-0577-0

  10. The biological effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (eswt) on tendon tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Biagio

    2012-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the use of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) and in clarifying the mechanisms of action in tendon pathologies. The success rate ranges from 60% to 80% in epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, cuff tendinitis, trocanteritis, Achilles tendinitis or jumper’s knee. In contrast to urological treatments (lithotripsy), where shockwaves are used to disintegrate renal stones, in musculoskeletal treatments (orthotripsy), shockwaves are not being used to disintegr...

  11. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector R. Wong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168 and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299 were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374 and test (n = 93 sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75. Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87 and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97 for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression.

  12. Investigations on biological functions of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) using a gene knock out mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    HSF1 is the major heat shock transcription factor that binds heat shock element (HSE) in the promoter of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and controls rapid HSP induction in cells subjected to various stresses such as elevated temperature, chemicals, or exposure to toxins. Although at least four members of the vertebrate HSF have been cloned, details of their individual physiological roles remain relatively obscure. To clarify the exact in vivo functions of HSF1 and assess whether HSF1 exhibits redundant or unique roles, we have created homozygous Hsf1-/- mice using standard gene targeting techniques and isolated Hsf1-/- embryonic fibroblasts. Here we demonstrate that heat shock response (HSR) was not attainable in Hsf1-/- embryonic fibroblasts, and this response was required for thermotolerance and protection against heat-induced apoptosis, and that homozygous Hsf1-/- mice, which survived to adulthood according to genetic background, exhibited multiple phenotypes including: (1) placental defects that reduced embryonic viability after late midgestation (day 13.5); (2) growth retardation; (3) female infertility caused by preimplantation lethality, and (4) increased mortality (+/+ vs -/-, P<0.05) and exaggerated production of proinflammatory cytokine, TNF α (+/- vs -/-, P<0.05) after endotoxin challenge. Interestingly, although Hsf1-/- mice exhibited placental defects and embryonic death, basal HSP expression is not appreciably altered during embryonic development by the HSF1 null mutation, suggesting this factor might be involved in regulating some non-HSP genes or signaling pathways which may be important for development. Taken together, our results established direct causal effects for the HSF1 transactivator in regulating diverse physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as developnent, growth, reproduction, apoptosis and sepsis. The present work also provided a useful mammalian model for further investigating the implications of Hsf1 and its target

  13. Biological effects of tandem shock waves on soft animal tissues – preliminary “in vivo” experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šunka, Pavel; Hoffer, Petr; Lukeš, Petr; Beneš, J.; Poučková, P.; Zadinová, M.

    San Diego: IEEE, 2009. IP2H-92-IP2H-92. ISBN 978-1-4244-2617-1. ISSN 0730-9244. [The 36th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science and 23rd Symposium on Fusion Engineering. 31.05.2009-05.06.2009, San Diego] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : shock waves * tumor * sonotherapy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://cer.ucsd.edu/icopssofe09/

  14. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  15. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  16. Fused imidazoles as potential chemical scaffolds for inhibition of heat shock protein 70 and induction of apoptosis. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazoles and imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpa; Sharp, Swee Y; Hall, Katelan; Lewis, William; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Workman, Paul; Moody, Christopher J

    2016-04-28

    The imidazole ring is widespread in biologically active compounds, and hence imidazole-containing scaffolds are useful starting points for drug discovery programmes. We report the synthesis of a series of novel imidazole-containing compounds fused with either phenanthrene or phenanthroline, which show enhanced growth inhibitory potency against human colon, breast and melanoma cancer cell lines, as well as evidence of inhibition of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) pathway in cells, as shown by depletion of downstream oncogenic client proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone pathway, and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27035072

  17. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  18. Culture shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Furham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the popular concept of culture shock. From the academic perspective co-researchers from different disciplines (anthropology, education, psychiatry, psychology, sociology have attempted to operationalise the concept and understand the process behind it. It represents fifty years of research using different methodologies and trying to answer different questions about the experience of travel for many reasons. This paper also considers issues concerned with the “overseas” student, of which there are ever more, travelling abroad to study. They can have serious culture shock difficulties. Implications of this research are considered

  19. Desalination shocks in microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

  20. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  1. Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Achong, Michael R.

    1980-01-01

    Septic shock is a dynamic syndrome of inadequate tissue perfusion caused by invasion of the blood by micro-organisms. Gram-negative rod bacteremia accounts for about two-thirds of patients with this syndrome. The fully developed syndrome of high fever, chills, cold, moist extremities, hypotension and oliguria is easy to recognize. However, the initial features of the syndrome may be quite non-specific and subtle, particularly in elderly patients. Treatment is aimed at eliminating the infectio...

  2. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  3. Unified approach to catastrophic events: from the normal state to geological or biological shock in terms of spectral fractal and nonlinear analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Eftaxias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An important question in geophysics is whether earthquakes (EQs can be anticipated prior to their occurrence. Pre-seismic electromagnetic (EM emissions provide a promising window through which the dynamics of EQ preparation can be investigated. However, the existence of precursory features in pre-seismic EM emissions is still debatable: in principle, it is difficult to prove associations between events separated in time, such as EQs and their EM precursors. The scope of this paper is the investigation of the pre-seismic EM activity in terms of complexity. A basic reason for our interest in complexity is the striking similarity in behavior close to irreversible phase transitions among systems that are otherwise quite different in nature. Interestingly, theoretical studies (Hopfield, 1994; Herz and Hopfield 1995; Rundle et al., 1995; Corral et al., 1997 suggest that the EQ dynamics at the final stage and neural seizure dynamics should have many similar features and can be analyzed within similar mathematical frameworks. Motivated by this hypothesis, we evaluate the capability of linear and non-linear techniques to extract common features from brain electrical activities and pre-seismic EM emissions predictive of epileptic seizures and EQs respectively. The results suggest that a unified theory may exist for the ways in which firing neurons and opening cracks organize themselves to produce a large crisis, while the preparation of an epileptic shock or a large EQ can be studied in terms of ''Intermittent Criticality''.

  4. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can' ... reason why emergency treatment is so important. Underlying Causes The underlying causes of cardiogenic shock are conditions ...

  5. Cosmological shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Durret, F

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale structure formation, accretion and merging processes, AGN activity produce cosmological gas shocks. The shocks convert a fraction of the energy of gravitationally accelerated flows to internal energy of the gas. Being the main gas-heating agent, cosmological shocks could amplify magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via the multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. We first discuss the basic properties of standard single-fluid shocks. Cosmological plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. We then review the plasma processes responsible for the microscopic structure of collisionless shocks. A tiny fraction of the particles crossing the shock is injected into the non-thermal energetic component that could get a substantial part of the ram pressure power dissipated at the shock. The energetic particles penetrate deep into the shock upstream producing an extended shock precursor. Scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong coll...

  6. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  7. 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The University of Manchester hosted the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves between 17 and 22 July 2011. The International Symposium on Shock Waves first took place in 1957 in Boston and has since become an internationally acclaimed series of meetings for the wider Shock Wave Community. The ISSW28 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reacting Flows, Dense Gases and Rarefied Flows, Detonation and Combustion, Diagnostics, Facilities, Flow Visualisation, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Multiphase Flow, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shockwave Phenomena and Applications, as well as Medical and Biological Applications. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 28 and individuals interested in these fields.

  8. Pathophysiological roles of peroxynitrite in circulatory shock

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Csaba; Módis, Katalin

    2010-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant produced from nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide, which reacts with proteins, lipids and DNA and promotes cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory responses. Here we overview the role of peroxynitrite in various forms of circulatory shock. Immunohistochemical and biochemical evidence demonstrate the production of peroxynitrite in various experimental models of endotoxic and hemorrhagic shock, both in rodents and in large animals. In addition, biological markers of pero...

  9. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  10. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and a...

  11. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  12. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  13. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  14. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  15. Vasogenic shock physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiria Gkisioti; Spyros D Mentzelopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can un...

  16. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  17. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  18. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  19. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    The modern medium of film has long been hailed for its capacity for producing shocks of an entertaining, thought-provoking, or even politically emancipative nature. But what is a shock, how and when does it occur, how long does it last, and are there particular techniques for producing cinematic...

  20. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  1. Shock in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davendralingam Sinniah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shock, a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children, is the the most anxiety-provokingemergency that needs to be addressed urgently andeffectively by the attending paediatrician. It is a statewhere the metabolic demands of the tissue are not met dueto circulatory dysfunction. Unlike adults, hypotension isa very late feature of shock in children. As the child’scondition worsens, the clinical presentation of thedifferent causes of shock become similar, and nullifyany aetiological differences. Regardless of the type ofshock, the final common pathway is inadequate tissueperfusion and oxygen supply to meet cellular demands.Delayed recognition and treatment result in progressionfrom compensated reversible shock to uncompensatedirreversible shock with widespread multiple systemorgan failure to death. This paper reviews thephysiological basis, and pathophysiological classificationof the various types of shock and their respectiveaetiologies. The clinical features of the different typesof shock are described, and current diagnostic andtherapeutic strategies are applied for the most effectiveand appropriate treatment for resuscitating the child inshock. A strong index of suspicion, early recognition,timely intervention and transfer to an intensive care unitare critical for successful outcomes in the managementof paediatric shock.

  2. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  3. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  4. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  5. Shock breakout theory

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Eli; Katz, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) e...

  6. Endogenous leukotriene formation during anaphylactic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukotriene (LT)C4 is a biologically active substance, presumed to play major roles as a mediator of allergic and anaphylactic reactions. It is formed e.g. by basophilic and eosinophilic leukocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and mast cells. In cells having IgE receptors, bridging of these by divalent anti-IgE-receptor antibodies or by interaction between receptor-bound IgE and anti-IgE will induce LTC4 formation. Leukotriene formation has also been demonstrated in other in vitro models of immediate hypersensivity. The biological actions of LTC4, comprise induction of airway obstruction, constriction of coronary arteries, hypotension, and plasma extravasation. Leukotriene formation in vivo may mediate anaphylactic shock symptoms and cause the death of an animal. In order to prove the presumed mediator role of this substance in anaphylactic reactions, it is necessary to demonstrate its endogenous formation during shock. Studies on the metabolism of LTC4 have revealed rapid catabolism by various transformations of the peptide substituent. Recently, three metabolites were demonstrated to be excreted as end-products in man (LTE4,) and the rat (N-acetyl LTE4 and N-acetyl 11-trans LTE4). By monitoring biliary N-acetyl LTE4 levels, endogenous leukotriene formation in the rat was demonstrated in vivo after tissue trauma and endotoxin shock. We now wish to report evidence for endogenous leukotriene C4 production during anaphylactic shock in guinea pigs. 37 refs. (author)

  7. Simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks: shock structure and particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Spitkovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization ("sigma" parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray...

  8. Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Helge Braun; Reinout De Bock; Riccardo DiCecio

    2009-01-01

    We use structural vector autoregressions to analyze the responses of worker flows, job flows, vacancies, and hours to shocks. We identify demand and supply shocks by restricting the short-run responses of output and the price level. On the demand side we disentangle a monetary and non-monetary shock by restricting the response of the interest rate. The responses of labor market variables are similar across shocks: expansionary shocks increase job creation, the hiring rate, vacancies, and hour...

  9. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS), can be caused by Streptococcal bacteria. Not all staph or strep infections cause toxic ...

  10. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  11. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  12. Biophoton Emission Induced by Heat Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kawano, Shinya; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observe...

  13. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, D C; Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime and for oblique, fully relativistic shocks. We find, for a wide trans-relativistic range extending to shock Lorentz factors >30, that the particle spectrum produced by DSA varies strongly from the canonical f(p) proportional to p^{-4.23} spectrum known to result in ultra-relativistic shocks. Trans- relativistic shocks may play an important role in gamma-ray bursts and other sources and most relativistic shocks will be highly oblique.

  14. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  15. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  16. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  17. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime ...

  18. Vasopressin and septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditio...

  19. Shock waves data for minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  20. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the heart’s main pumping chamber, is causing shock. Medical Procedures and Surgery Sometimes medicines and medical devices aren't enough to treat cardiogenic shock. Medical procedures and surgery can restore blood flow to the ...

  1. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  2. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structur...

  3. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d’Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008–2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  4. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  5. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  6. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-01-01

    Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  7. Vasopressin and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditional  catecholamines for the management of hypotension during septic shock. Vasopressin is both a vasopressor  and  an  antidiuretic  hormone.  It  also  has  hemostatic,  gastrointestinal and thermoregulatory  effects, and is an adrenocorticotropic  hormone secretagogue. Vasopressin  is released from the axonal terminals of magnocellular  neurons in the hypothalamus. Vasopressin mediates vasoconstriction  via V1-receptor activation on vascular smooth muscle and mediates its antidiuretic effect via V2-receptor activation in the renal collecting duct system. Vasopressin  infusion of 0.01 to 0.04 U/min in patients with septic shock increases plasma vasopressin levels. Current guidelines from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommend arginine vasopressin 0.03 unit/minute may be added to norepinephrine with the anticipation of an effect equal to higher doses of norepinephrine alone. Clinicians must be knowledgeable about the use of vasopressin in septic shock, including controversial areas where guidelines do not always provide solid recommendations.

  8. In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available A useful index for estimating the transit speeds was derived by analyzing interplanetary shock observations. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6–0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated for the results of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation show good agreement with the observations. The relation expressed by the index is well explained by a simplified propagation model assuming a blast wave. For several shocks the ratio is approximately 1.2, implying that these shocks accelerated during propagation in slow-speed solar wind. This ratio is similar to that for the background solar wind acceleration.

    Keywords. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary shocks; Solar wind plasma

  9. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetics effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail. Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  10. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetic effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail, Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  11. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  12. Role of shock-timing in two-shock platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia; Bradley, Paul; Olson, Rick; Kyrala, George; Peterson, Bob; Devolder, Barbara; Shah, Rahul

    2015-11-01

    In present work we discuss the role of shock-timing and location of shock coalescence in newly developed two-shock platform on NIF. It is generally believed that single-shell capsules perform better when the shocks coalesce in the gas due to lower shell entropy, larger convergence ratio, better hot-spot assembly, and mix. Using HYDRA and RAGE with BHR we investigated this hypothesis for the case of separated reactants capsule and found when shocks coalesced in the gas yield improved by ~ 50% while acceptance energy only increased by ~ 3%. This suggests that improving shock timing can increase the neutron yield without a significant increase in the drive. The picture of how the mix changes with variation in shock timing is not as crisp as the overall performance. In particular, according RAGE with BHR, the mix mass can be higher or lower depending on the strength of the first shock, even when the location of coalescence is the same. However, DT yield, which is a measure of mix, noticeably increases when the shock coalesce in the gas due to prevalence of higher temperatures in the mixed region. So perhaps the mix mass is more sensitive to the strength of the shocks rather than the location of their coalescence.

  13. Chondrules and Nebular Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E I

    2002-01-01

    Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

  14. Shocks in supersonic sand

    OpenAIRE

    Rericha, E.; Bizon, C.; Shattuck, M. D.; Swinney, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge and calculate a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to 10% of the flow speed. The flow is supersonic, forming shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws and Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equ...

  15. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  16. Bow shock: Power aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    It is clear that the primary energy source for magnetospheric processes is the solar wind, but the process of energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, or rather, to convecting magnetospheric plasma, appears to be rather complicated. Bow shock is a powerful transformer of the solar wind kinetic energy into the gas dynamic and electromagnetic energy. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component at front crossing means that the front carries an electric current. The solar wind kinetic energy partly transforms to gas kinetic and electromagnetic energy during its passage through the bow shock front. The transition layer (magnetosheath) can use part of this energy for accelerating of plasma, but can conversely spend part its kinetic energy on the electric power generation, which afterwards may be used by the magnetosphere. Thereby, transition layer can be both consumer (sink) and generator (source) of electric power depending upon special conditions. The direction of the current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component. It is this electric current which sets convection of plasma in motion.

  17. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  18. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  19. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  20. Heat shock protein 90 in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodina Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone with important roles in regulating pathogenic transformation. In addition to its well-characterized functions in malignancy, recent evidence from several laboratories suggests a role for Hsp90 in maintaining the functional stability of neuronal proteins of aberrant capacity, whether mutated or over-activated, allowing and sustaining the accumulation of toxic aggregates. In addition, Hsp90 regulates the activity of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1, the master regulator of the heat shock response, mechanism that cells use for protection when exposed to conditions of stress. These biological functions therefore propose Hsp90 inhibition as a dual therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative diseases. First, by suppressing aberrant neuronal activity, Hsp90 inhibitors may ameliorate protein aggregation and its associated toxicity. Second, by activation of HSF-1 and the subsequent induction of heat shock proteins, such as Hsp70, Hsp90 inhibitors may redirect neuronal aggregate formation, and protect against protein toxicity. This mini-review will summarize our current knowledge on Hsp90 in neurodegeneration and will focus on the potential beneficial application of Hsp90 inhibitors in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  2. Nanoindentation of shock deformed alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, the experimental results on the nanoindentation response of both as prepared and shock recovered alumina of 10 μm grain size and identical processing history are presented and analyzed. The shock recovery experiments were deliberately conducted with gas gun arrangements at shock pressures much above the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of alumina. The nanoindentation experiments were conducted at 10-1000 mN load with a Berkovich indenter. The nanohardness and Young's modulus value of shock recovered alumina were always lower than those of the as prepared alumina samples. Subsequently, the detailed characterizations of the shock recovered alumina samples by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to understand the reasons behind the drop in nanohardness and Young's modulus of shock recovered alumina samples.

  3. Gene–culture shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hyperbolic model is presented which generalises Aoki's parabolic system for the combined propagation of a mutant gene together with a cultural innovation. It is shown that this model allows for the propagation of a shock wave and the shock amplitude is calculated numerically. Particular attention is paid to the case where the shock moves into a region where the frequencies of the mutant gene and of the individuals adopting the innovation are zero.

  4. Measurement of Strong Shock Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hajime Takada; Daisuke Fujimaki; Takao Tsuboi

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with measurement of a strong shock pressure like an imploding detonation of over 1 GPa which cannot be measured directly with currently available commercial pressure transducers. After the transfer functions of three kinds of materials were measured using a shock tube, Teflon was selected as a shock absorber. As an example of pressure beyond the limit of the pressure transducer, we tried to measure pressure at the center of an imploding detonation. From this measurement, we c...

  5. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Vibration Isolation Review: II. Shock Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    F.C. Nelson

    1996-01-01

    This is the second part of a two part review of shock and vibration isolation. It covers three distinct categories of shock excitation—pulselike shock, velocity shock, and complex shock—and discusses the means that are available in each case to measure the effectiveness of shock mitigation by the imposition of flexible connections between the isolated system and its base.

  7. Historical Oil Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the history of the oil industry with a particular focus on the events associated with significant changes in the price of oil. Although oil was used much differently and was substantially less important economically in the nineteenth century than it is today, there are interesting parallels between events in that era and more recent developments. Key post-World-War-II oil shocks reviewed include the Suez Crisis of 1956-57, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-1974, the Iranian revo...

  8. Heat shock proteins: Molecules with assorted functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Surajit SARKAR; M. Dhruba SINGH; Renu YADAV; K. P. ARUNKUMAR; Geoffrey W. PITTMAN

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) or molecular chaperones,are highly conserved protein families present in all studied organisms.Following cellular stress,the intracellular concentration of Hsps generally increases several folds.Hsps undergo ATP-driven conformational changes to stabilize unfolded proteins or unfold them for transiocation across membranes or mark them for degradation.They are broadly classified in several families according to their molecular weights and functional properties.Extensive studies during the past few decades suggest that Hsps play a vital role in both normal cellular homeostasis and stress response.Hsps have been reported to interact with numerous substrates and are involved in many biological functions such as cellular communication,immune response,protein transport,apoptosis,cell cycle regulation,gametogenesis and aging.The present review attempts to provide a brief overview of various Hsps and summarizes their involvement in diverse biological activities.

  9. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  10. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  11. Plane shock compression generators, utilizing convergence of conical shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental testing of shock wave generators, based on irregular Mach reflection of shock waves in a conical geometry, along with the results of numerical simulation is presented. The shock in a layered cylindrical central body was produced by an impact of a converging conical flyer plate. Conical flyer plate was originating from initially cylindrical cavity liner in a cylindrical HE charge that was launched by a sliding detonation. This approach led to device simplification, since manufacturing of conical parts from metal and explosive is not required. The sequential detonation of HE charge by a multi- point distributor was employed to vary the geometry of formed conical flyer. The dependence of parameters of shock wave in cylindrical Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) core on launch angle was investigated. It was found that launch angles below 10° lead to failure of the Mach reflection mode, while larger angles produced flat Mach disks that can be utilized in various shock experiments.

  12. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  13. Numerical modeling of slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews previous attempt and the present status of efforts to understand the structure of slow shocks by means of time dependent numerical calculations. Studies carried out using MHD or hybrid-kinetic codes have demonstrated qualitative agreement with theory. A number of unresolved issues related to hybrid simulations of the internal shock structure are discussed in some detail. 43 refs., 8 figs

  14. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a 1D shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 0.1$, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 10$ requires much smaller shock velocities ($\\sim 2$ vs 8 k...

  15. Analysis of shock implosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, E.A.; Alejaldre, C. (Polytechnic Inst. of New York, Brooklyn (USA))

    1984-06-01

    An imploding shock wave, coming from infinity, moves through an ideal gas with the adiabatic constant ..gamma... To define a single-valued self-similar coefficient over the whole classical interval 1<..gamma..

  16. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  17. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal L. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy.

  18. The cosmic-ray shock structure problem for relativistic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The time asymptotic behaviour of a relativistic (parallel) shock wave significantly modified by the diffusive acceleration of cosmic-rays is investigated by means of relativistic hydrodynamical equations for both the cosmic-rays and thermal gas. The form of the shock structure equation and the dispersion relation for both long and short wavelength waves in the system are obtained. The dependence of the shock acceleration efficiency on the upstream fluid spped, long wavelength Mach number and the ratio N = P sub co/cP sub co+P sub go)(Psub co and P sub go are the upstream cosmic-ray and thermal gas pressures respectively) are studied.

  19. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  20. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  1. Measurement of Strong Shock Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Takada

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with measurement of a strong shock pressure like an imploding detonation of over 1 GPa which cannot be measured directly with currently available commercial pressure transducers. After the transfer functions of three kinds of materials were measured using a shock tube, Teflon was selected as a shock absorber. As an example of pressure beyond the limit of the pressure transducer, we tried to measure pressure at the center of an imploding detonation. From this measurement, we could estimate the pressure peak of about 1.7 GPa.

  2. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  3. Particle acceleration in modified shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient particle acceleration in shocks must modify the shock structure with consequent changes in the particle acceleration. This effect is studied and analytic solutions are found describing the diffusive acceleration of particles with momentum independent diffusion coefficients in hyperbolic tangent type velocity transitions. If the input particle spectrum is a delta function, the shock smoothing replaces the truncated power-law downstream particle spectrum by a more complicated form, but one which has a power-law tail at high momenta. For a cold plasma this solution can be made completely self-consistent. Some problems associated with momentum dependent diffusion coefficients are discussed. (author)

  4. Simulation of mechanical shock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shocks can produce a severe mechanical environment which must be taken into account when designing and developing new equipments. After some mathematical (Laplace and Fourier transforms) and mechanical recalls (response of a one degree freedom system to a sinusoidal excitation), different analysis methods are compared, these methods being the most used now to compare relative severities of tests and establish specifications. A few chapter deal with the different properties of simple, easy to produce, shock shapes. Then some now-in-use programmators or shock-machines specifications are shown. A final chapter concerns acceleration transducers

  5. Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction in Forced Shock Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Oskar Szulc; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    The flow in transonic diffusers as well as in supersonic air intakes becomes often unsteady due to shock wave boundary layer interaction. The oscillations may be induced by natural separation unsteadiness or may be forced by boundary conditions. Significant improvement of CFD tools, increase of computer resources as well as development of experimental methods have again.drawn the attention of researchers to this topic.To investigate the problem forced oscillations of transonic turbulent flow in asymmetric two-dimensional Laval nozzle were considered. A viscous, perfect gas flow, was numerically simulated using the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes solver SPARC, employing a two-equation, eddy viscosity, turbulence closure in the URANS approach.For time-dependent and stationary flow simulations, Mach numbers upstream of the shock between 1.2 and 1.4 were considered. Comparison of computed and experimental data for steady states generally gave acceptable agreement. In the case of forced oscillations, a harmonic pressure variation was prescribed at the exit plane resulting in shock wave motion. Excitation frequencies between 0 Hz and 1024 Hz were investigated at the same pressure amplitude.The main result of the work carried out is the relation between the amplitude of the shock wave motion and the excitation frequency in the investigated range. Increasing excitation frequency resulted in decreasing amplitude of the shock movement. At high frequencies a natural mode of shock oscillation (of small amplitude) was observed which is not sensitive to forced excitement.

  6. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  7. Identification of pediatric septic shock subclasses based on genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Marie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septic shock is a heterogeneous syndrome within which probably exist several biological subclasses. Discovery and identification of septic shock subclasses could provide the foundation for the design of more specifically targeted therapies. Herein we tested the hypothesis that pediatric septic shock subclasses can be discovered through genome-wide expression profiling. Methods Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted using whole blood-derived RNA from 98 children with septic shock, followed by a series of bioinformatic approaches targeted at subclass discovery and characterization. Results Three putative subclasses (subclasses A, B, and C were initially identified based on an empiric, discovery-oriented expression filter and unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Statistical comparison of the three putative subclasses (analysis of variance, Bonferonni correction, P Conclusion Genome-wide expression profiling can identify pediatric septic shock subclasses having clinically relevant phenotypes.

  8. Shock Train and Pseudo-shock Phenomena in Supersonic Internal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When a normal shock wave interacts with a boundary layer along a wall surface in supersonic internal flows and the shock is strong enough to separate the boundary layer, the shock is bifurcated and a series of shocks called "shock train" is formed. The flow is decelerated from supersonic to subsonic through the whole interaction region that is referred to as "pseudo-shock". In the present paper some characteristics of the shock train and pseudo-shock and some examples of the pseudo-shocks in some flow devices are described.

  9. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  10. Low-Shock Pyrotechnic Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature 1-ampere, 1-watt pyrotechnic actuator enclosed in flexible metal bellows. Bellows confines outgassing products, and pyrotechnic shock reduction achieved by action of bellows, gas cushion within device, and minimum use of pyrotechnic material. Actuator inexpensive, compact, and lightweight.

  11. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with...

  12. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  13. Instability in shocked granular gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  14. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G., E-mail: morlino@arcetri.astro.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non-linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non-linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration.

  15. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non-linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non-linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration

  16. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  17. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  18. The Diffusive Shock Acceleration Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is generally accepted that diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) is the dominant mechanism for particle acceleration at shocks. This is despite the overwhelming observational evidence that is contrary to predictions of DSA models. For example, our most recent survey of hourly-averaged, spin-averaged proton distribution functions around 61 locally observed shocks in 2001 at 1 AU found that in 21 cases no particles were accelerated. Spectral indices (γ ) of suprathermal tails on the velocity distributions around the 40 shocks that did accelerate particles, showed none of the DSA-predicted correlations of γ with the shock compression ratio and the shock normal to magnetic field angle. Here we will present ACE/SWICS observations of three sets of 72 consecutive one-hour averaged velocity distributions (in each of 8 SWICS spin sectors). Each set includes passage of one or more shocks or strong compression regions. All spectra were properly transformed to the solar wind frame using the detailed, updated SWICS forward model, taking into account the hourly-averaged directions of the solar wind flow, the magnetic field and the ACE spin axis (http://www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE/ASC/). The suprathermal tails are observed to be a combination of locally accelerated and remote tails. The local tails are power laws. The remote tails are also power laws with rollovers at higher energies. When local tails are weak (as is the case especially upstream of strong shocks or compression regions) the remote tails also have a rollover at low energies due to modulation (transport effects). Among our main findings are that (1) the spectral indices of both the local and remote tails are -5 within the uncertainties of the measurements, as predicted by our pump acceleration mechanism, and (2) the velocity distributions are anisotropic with the perpendicular (to the magnetic field) pressure greater than the parallel pressure.

  19. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  20. Sectoral Shocks and Structural Unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    When current employers rave more information about worker quality than to potential employers, sectoral shocks cause structural unemployment. That is, some workers laid off from an injured sector remain unemployed despite the fact that trey are of sufficient quality to be productively employed in an expanding sector at toe prevailing wage, Moreover, sectoral unemployment rates are not monotonic in one severity of sectoral shocks due to one interaction of layoff activity and hiring activity. F...

  1. Scientific Evidence for Hydrostatic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific support for a ballistic pressure wave radiating outward from a penetrating projectile and causing injury and incapacitation. This phenomenon is known colloquially as "hydrostatic shock." The idea apparently originates with Col. Frank Chamberlin, a World War II trauma surgeon and wound ballistics researcher. The paper reviews claims that hydrostatic shock is a myth and considers supporting evidence through parallels with blast, describing the physics of the pr...

  2. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  3. Nosocomial Staphylococcal Toxic Shock. Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbune Manuela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is a rare, potentially lethal infection, with a clinical picture of multiple organ dysfunction and shock. The etiology is Staphylococcus aureus exotoxin, while enterotoxins act as superantigens. Most cases are identified in women using a vaginal tampon. A 51-year-old female, with a past medical history of biliary dyskinesia, presented in the emergency room complaining of sudden onset of abdominal pain, vomiting, headache, myalgia, and chills. The initial diagnosis was biliary colic and was treated parenterally with Amoxi-clavulanate and fluid replacement. Initially, progress was unsatisfactory. Four days after admission she developed a systemic inflammatory syndrome, diffuse rash, jaundice, oliguria, confusion, persistent hypotension and biological evidence of thrombocytopenia, nitrogen retention, and cholestasis. She was admitted to the intensive care unit. A gluteal phlegmon induced after intramuscular injections was identified and surgically treated. Blood bacteriological cultures were negative, though MRSA was isolated in phlegmon pus. A diagnosis of STSS was based on CDC criteria.

  4. Identifying gene regulatory modules of heat shock response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A gene regulatory module (GRM is a set of genes that is regulated by the same set of transcription factors (TFs. By organizing the genome into GRMs, a living cell can coordinate the activities of many genes in response to various internal and external stimuli. Therefore, identifying GRMs is helpful for understanding gene regulation. Results Integrating transcription factor binding site (TFBS, mutant, ChIP-chip, and heat shock time series gene expression data, we develop a method, called Heat-Inducible Module Identification Algorithm (HIMIA, for reconstructing GRMs of yeast heat shock response. Unlike previous module inference tools which are static statistics-based methods, HIMIA is a dynamic system model-based method that utilizes the dynamic nature of time series gene expression data. HIMIA identifies 29 GRMs, which in total contain 182 heat-inducible genes regulated by 12 heat-responsive TFs. Using various types of published data, we validate the biological relevance of the identified GRMs. Our analysis suggests that different combinations of a fairly small number of heat-responsive TFs regulate a large number of genes involved in heat shock response and that there may exist crosstalk between heat shock response and other cellular processes. Using HIMIA, we identify 68 uncharacterized genes that may be involved in heat shock response and we also identify their plausible heat-responsive regulators. Furthermore, HIMIA is capable of assigning the regulatory roles of the TFs that regulate GRMs and Cst6, Hsf1, Msn2, Msn4, and Yap1 are found to be activators of several GRMs. In addition, HIMIA refines two clusters of genes involved in heat shock response and provides a better understanding of how the complex expression program of heat shock response is regulated. Finally, we show that HIMIA outperforms four current module inference tools (GRAM, MOFA, ReMoDisvovery, and SAMBA, and we conduct two randomization tests to show that

  5. Electromagnetically driven radiative shocks and their measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results on a generation of strong shocks in a compact pulse power device are reported. The characteristics of strong shocks are different from hydrodynamical shocks' because they depend on not only collisions but radiation processes. Radiative shocks are relevant to high energy density phenomena such as the explosions of supernovae. When initial pressure is lower than about 50 mtorr, an interesting structure is confirmed at the shock front, which might indicate a phenomenon proceeded by the radiative process. (author)

  6. Shocks and growth: adaptation, precaution and compensation.

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Paul; Goderis, Benedikt; Hoeffler, Anke

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how a wide array of types of shock arising from world prices, natural events, and political violence affect growth. Our results suggest that the impact from political shocks are far greater than from natural shocks. However, our preliminary cointegration results suggest that the cost from primary commodity exporting are very large. Potentially shocks can affect growth either due to their impact, or due to the volatility that repeated shocks generate. In our empiri...

  7. Proteotoxic stress of cancer: implication of the heat-shock response in oncogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Chengkai; Dai, Siyuan; Cao, Junyue

    2012-01-01

    Organisms frequently encounter a wide variety of proteotoxic stressors. The heat-shock response, an ancient cytoprotective mechanism, has evolved to augment organismal survival and longevity in the face of proteotoxic stress from without and within. These broadly recognized beneficial effects, ironically, contrast sharply with its emerging role as a culprit in the pathogenesis of cancers. Here, we present an overview of the normal biology of the heat-shock response and highlight its implicati...

  8. Pressurized thermal shock (PTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a description of Thermal Shock in Pressurized conditions (PTS), and its influence in the treatment of the integrity of the pressure vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and/or of a Heavy water Pressurized water Reactor (PHWR) is made. Generally, the analysis of PTS involves a process of three stages: a-) Modeling with a System Code of relevant thermohydraulics transients in reference with the thermal shock; b-) The local distribution of temperatures in the downcomer and the heat transference coefficients from the RPV wall to the fluid, are determined; c-) The fracture mechanical analysis. These three stages are included in this work: Results with the thermohydraulics code Relap5/mod.3, are obtained, for a LOCA scenario in the hot leg of the cooling System of the Primary System of the CAN-I reactor. The method used in obtaining results is described. A study on the basis of lumped parameters of the local evolutions of the temperature of the flow is made, in the downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. The purpose of this study is to determine how the intensification of the stress coefficient, varies in function of the emergency injected water during the thermohydraulic transients that take place under the imposed conditions in the postulated scene. Specially, it is considered a 50 cm2 break, located in the neighborhoods of the pressurized with the corresponding hot leg connection. This size is considered like the most critical. The method used to obtain the results is described. The fracture mechanical analysis is made. From the obtained results we confirmed that we have a simple tool of easy application in order to analyze phenomena of the type PTS in the postulated scenes by break in the cold and hot legs of the primary system. This methodology of calculus is completely independent of the used ones by the Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA) in the analysis of the PTS phenomena in the CAN-I. The results obtained with the adopted

  9. Characteristics of unsteady type IV shock/shock interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y.-B.; Lu, X.-Y.

    2012-05-01

    Characteristics of the unsteady type IV shock/shock interaction of hypersonic blunt body flows are investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with high-order numerical methods. The intrinsic relations of flow structures to shear, compression, and heating processes are studied and the physical mechanisms of the unsteady flow evolution are revealed. It is found that the instantaneous surface-heating peak is caused by the fluid in the "hot spot" generated by an oscillating and deforming jet bow shock (JBS) just ahead of the body surface. The features of local shock/boundary layer interaction and vortex/boundary layer interaction are clarified. Based on the analysis of flow evolution, it is identified that the upstream-propagating compression waves are associated with the interaction of the JBS and the shear layers formed by a supersonic impinging jet, and then the interaction of the freestream bow shocks and the compression waves results in entropy and vortical waves propagating to the body surface. Further, the feedback mechanism of the inherent unsteadiness of the flow field is revealed to be related to the impinging jet. A feedback model is proposed to reliably predict the dominant frequency of flow evolution. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the mechanisms relevant to this complex flow.

  10. Experts' recommendations for the management of cardiogenic shock in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Olivier; Botte, Astrid; Cambonie, Gilles; Dauger, Stéphane; de Saint Blanquat, Laure; Durand, Philippe; Gournay, Véronique; Guillet, Elodie; Laux, Daniela; Leclerc, Francis; Mauriat, Philippe; Boulain, Thierry; Kuteifan, Khaldoun

    2016-12-01

    Cardiogenic shock which corresponds to an acute state of circulatory failure due to impairment of myocardial contractility is a very rare disease in children, even more than in adults. To date, no international recommendations regarding its management in critically ill children are available. An experts' recommendations in adult population have recently been made (Levy et al. Ann Intensive Care 5(1):52, 2015; Levy et al. Ann Intensive Care 5(1):26, 2015). We present herein recommendations for the management of cardiogenic shock in children, developed with the grading of recommendations' assessment, development, and evaluation system by an expert group of the Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et Urgences Pédiatriques (French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies). The recommendations cover four major fields of application such as: recognition of early signs of shock and the patient pathway, management principles and therapeutic goals, monitoring hemodynamic and biological variables, and circulatory support (indications, techniques, organization, and transfer criteria). Major principle care for children with cardiogenic shock is primarily based on clinical and echocardiographic assessment. There are few drugs reported as effective in childhood in the medical literature. The use of circulatory support should be facilitated in terms of organization and reflected in the centers that support these children. Children with cardiogenic shock are vulnerable and should be followed regularly by intensivist cardiologists and pediatricians. The experts emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of management of children with cardiogenic shock and the importance of effective communication between emergency medical assistance teams (SAMU), mobile pediatric emergency units (SMUR), pediatric emergency departments, pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery departments, and pediatric intensive care units. PMID:26879087

  11. Earth's bow shock: Power aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    The process of energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, or rather, to convecting magnetospheric plasma, appears to be rather complicated. The bow shock front is the main converter of solar wind kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy [Ponomarev, Sedykh, J. of Atm. Solar-Terr. Phys. V. 68. 2006; Ponomarev, Sedykh et al., Geomagn. and Aeron., 2009]. Solar wind undergoes significant changes in its parameters during its passing through the bow shock front. Indeed, at the bow point, when crossing the front, the magnetic field tangential component and magnetic energy density increase by factors of almost 4 and approximately 15, respectively. In describing the bow shock, we followed [Whang, 1987; Ponomarev et al., 2006]. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component when crossing the bow shock front means that the front carries an electric current. It is possible to show that electric current is diverging in this layer, that is the front is the generator of the current. Since plasma with magnetic field passes through the bow shock front, electric field arises in the front reference system. Thus, the bow shock front is a source of electric power. The direction of electric current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component. It is this current which sets convection in motion. Energetically, this external current is necessary for maintaining convection of plasma in the inhomogeneous system (geomagnetosphere). The generator at the bow shock front can be a sufficient source of power for supplying energy to substorm processes [Sedykh, Sun and Geosphere, 2011]. The sign of power does not depend on the IMF sign, and energy flux is always directed into the magnetosphere. The magnitude of the power is different and is realized in different regions of the magnetosphere depending on the IMF direction. When the Bz-component is negative, the electric convection field is larger, with the anticonvection field being smaller, than for

  12. Initial resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krausz Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The primary treatment of hemorrhagic shock is control of the source of bleeding as soon as possible and fluid replacement. In controlled hemorrhagic shock (CHS where the source of bleeding has been occluded fluid replacement is aimed toward normalization of hemodynamic parameters. In uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock (UCHS in which bleeding has temporarily stopped because of hypotension, vasoconstriction, and clot formation, fluid treatment is aimed at restoration of radial pulse, or restoration of sensorium or obtaining a blood pressure of 80 mmHg by aliquots of 250 ml of lactated Ringer's solution (hypotensive resuscitation. When evacuation time is shorter than one hour (usually urban trauma immediate evacuation to a surgical facility is indicated after airway and breathing (A, B have been secured ("scoop and run". Precious time is not wasted by introducing an intravenous line. When expected evacuation time exceeds one hour an intravenous line is introduced and fluid treatment started before evacuation. Crystalloid solutions and blood transfusion are the mainstays of pre-hospital and in-hospital treatment of hemorrhagic shock. In the pre-hospital setting four types of fluid are presently recommended: crystalloid solutions, colloid solutions, hypertonic saline and oxygen-carrying blood substitutes. In unstable or unresponsive hemorrhagic shock surgical treatment is mandatory as soon as possible to control the source of bleeding.

  13. Unveiling shocks in planetary nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, M A; Medina, J J; Luridiana, V; Miranda, L F; Riera, A; Velázquez, P F

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of a shock wave into a medium is expected to heat the material beyond the shock, producing noticeable effects in intensity line ratios such as [O III]/Halpha. To investigate the occurrence of shocks in planetary nebulae (PNe), we have used all narrowband [O III] and Halpha images of PNe available in the HST archive to build their [O III]/Halpha ratio maps and to search for regions where this ratio is enhanced. Regions with enhanced [O III]/Halpha emission ratio can be ascribed to two different types of morphological structures: bow-shock structures produced by fast collimated outflows and thin skins enveloping expanding nebular shells. Both collimated outflows and expanding shells are therefore confirmed to generate shocks in PNe. We also find regions with depressed values of the [O III]/Halpha ratio which are found mostly around density bounded PNe, where the local contribution of [N II] emission into the F656N Halpha filter cannot be neglected.

  14. Why the Nature of Oil Shocks Matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article studies the impact of oil shocks on the macro-economy in two ways insofar unexploited in the literature. The analysis is conducted at the global level, and it explicitly accounts for the potentially changing nature of oil shocks. Based on an original world GDP series and a grouping of oil shocks according to their nature, we find that oil supply shocks negatively impact world growth, contrary to oil demand shocks, pro-cyclical in their nature. This result is robust at the national level for the US. Furthermore, endogenous monetary policy is shown to have no counter-cyclical effects in the context of an oil demand shock. (authors)

  15. Strong shock implosion, approximate solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Y.; Mishkin, E. A.; Alejaldre, C.

    1983-01-01

    The self-similar, center-bound motion of a strong spherical, or cylindrical, shock wave moving through an ideal gas with a constant, γ= cp/ cv, is considered and a linearized, approximate solution is derived. An X, Y phase plane of the self-similar solution is defined and the representative curved of the system behind the shock front is replaced by a straight line connecting the mappings of the shock front with that of its tail. The reduced pressure P(ξ), density R(ξ) and velocity U1(ξ) are found in closed, quite accurate, form. Comparison with numerically obtained results, for γ= {5}/{3} and γ= {7}/{5}, is shown.

  16. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Reall, Harvey S; Way, Benson

    2014-01-01

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  17. Shocks in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Pen, Ue-Li

    2015-01-01

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a scale-invariant spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations, of the kind observed in great detail on large scales today, it also leads to the production of shock waves in the radiation fluid of the very early universe. At very early epochs, $1$ GeV$shocks after $\\sim 10^4$ oscillations. The resulting scale-invariant network of shocks provides a natural mechanism for creating significant departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as primordial vorticity and gravitational waves.

  18. Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, Oren; Ouellet, Simon; Frost, David; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Foams are found in a variety of protective equipment, including those used in applications involving high-speed impact and blast waves. Despite their exposure to shock wave loadings, there is a considerable lack of shock Hugoniot data for these materials. Typical characterizations of foams have involved the use of split-Hopkinson pressure bars or quasi-static compression machines to determine the stress-strain relationship in the foams. As such, the elastic-plastic response of foam at intermediate pressure ranges continues to be a source of confusion. In the present study, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure the shock Hugoniot of a foam for a comparison to its quasi-static compression curves. The deviation of these two curves will be discussed and compared to common plasticity models used to describe dynamic foam behaviour in the literature.

  19. Deionization shocks in cross flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ali

    2011-11-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that surface conduction in supported electrolytes, such as in micro/nanochannels or porous media, can lead to nonlinear modes of transport and formation of sharp concentration fronts analogous to shock waves in gas dynamics. Propagation of these shocks leaves behind a region of ultra pure fluid, acting to deionize the bulk solution. In this work we present the analysis of salt transport in a porous medium next to a membrane with an electric field applied normal to the interface and cross flow in tangential direction. We show that two distinct boundary layers grow near the membrane: an inner (shocked) region with almost deionized solution dominated by surface conduction, and an outer layer with diffuse dynamics. Under certain conditions both regions collapse into a similarity solution with the same scaling. We will discuss advantages of such systems for desalination and water purification. Research performed in collaboration with Martin Bazant (MIT).

  20. Shock, diaschisis and von Monakow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of shock apparently emerged in the middle of the 18th century (Whyett as an occurrence observed experimentally after spinal cord transection, and identified as "shock" phenomenon one century later (Hall. The concept was extended (Brown-Séquard and it was suggested that brain lesions caused functional rupture in regions distant from the injured one ("action à distance". The term "diaschisis" (von Monakow, proposed as a new modality of shock, had its concept broadened, underpinned by observations of patients, aiming at distinguishing between symptoms of focal brain lesions and transitory effects they produced, attributable to depression of distant parts of the brain connected to the injured area. Presently, diaschisis is related mainly to cerebrovascular lesions and classified according to the connection fibers involved, as proposed by von Monakow. Depression of metabolism and blood flow in regions anatomically separated, but related by connections with the lesion, allows observing diaschisis with neuroimaging.

  1. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chavez, D.J. [Rockwell White Sands Test Facility, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  2. Applications—Influence of Biology on Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julian F. V. Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Examples are presented showing the way in which biological systems produce a range of functions which can be implemented in engineering, such as feedback-control of stiffness (muscles and nervous system), the design of fault-free structures (trees) and damage-tolerant materials (wood) and high performance insulation (penguin feathers) and shock absorbers (hedgehog spines).

  3. Observations of the termination shock and heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The termination shock was crossed by Voyager 1 in 2004 and by Voyager 2 in 2007. This paper will review the observations at the shock and describe what observations in the heliosheath teach us about this shock. The termination shock presented several surprises. The speed decrease began 60 days in front of the ramp region, suggesting the shock was mediated by energetic particles. The thermal plasma downstream of the shock was still supersonic which allowed us to infer that most of the energy from the bulk flow went into the pickup ions. The ACRs were not accelerated where the Voyagers crossed the shock, so the ACR source must be in the flanks of the shock or elsewhere than the shock. The shock was a good accelerator of few MeV ions, the termination shock particles. Subsequent measurements of flow in the heliosheath suggest that the shock is compressed at the southern pole giving a shock which is blunter in the azimuthal than meridional direction. A recent sharp drop in the energetic particle fluxes may tell us the width of the flank region.

  4. Scientific Evidence for Hydrostatic Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific support for a ballistic pressure wave radiating outward from a penetrating projectile and causing injury and incapacitation. This phenomenon is known colloquially as "hydrostatic shock." The idea apparently originates with Col. Frank Chamberlin, a World War II trauma surgeon and wound ballistics researcher. The paper reviews claims that hydrostatic shock is a myth and considers supporting evidence through parallels with blast, describing the physics of the pressure wave, evidence for remote cerebral effects, and remote effects in the spine and other internal organs. Finally, the review considers the levels of energy transfer required for the phenomenon to be readily observed.

  5. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Damiano [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  7. The Influence of Shock Treatment on Survival Rate of Intestinal Probiotics during Freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun; ZHANG Lanwei; LIU Libo; FENG Zhen

    2006-01-01

    Probiotics which can provide potential health benefits for consumers and prevent disease, is the most important research field for functional food in the future.It is the key point that how much the count of bacteria and how long it can preserve. Freeze-drying skill is one of the best preservation methods, but it's defect that damage to biological systems can be attributed to changes in the physical state of membrane lipids or/and changes in the structure of sensitive proteins and the decreased survival rate. This work used pretreatment methods-cold shock and hot shock to reduce the damage to bacteria during freeze-drying. Using unpretreated samples as control, aspects of cold shock or heat shock. The response of Enterococcous faecalis A31 was investigated during lag phase, the middle of exponential growth phase and the terminal of exponential growth phase. The results suggested that when cold shock,the shock protein concentration produced by treated sample within 2 h during the middle of exponential growth phase was higher than 4, 8, 24 h, The concentration of shock protein produced by treated sample at 10℃ was higher than 20℃,The concentration of sample protein at the middle of exponential growth phase was higher than that at the terminal of exponential growth phase. After one-month storage, the survival rate at 10℃ was better than 20 ℃ and 4 ℃comparatively. The survival rate at (6 h) 4 ℃/24 h (lag period) was higher than (10 h) 4 ℃/24 h (the middle of exponential growth phase), and the effect of 10 ℃/8 h shock treatments was best during the middle of exponential growth phase, when hot shock, The concentration of heat shock proteins produced was not obvious, and survival rate was higher at 45 ℃, 30 min than at 45 ℃, 60 min.

  8. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates

  9. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  10. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ0/p0) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  11. Growth Opportunities, Technology Shocks, and Asset Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Leonid Kogan; Dimitris Papanikolaou

    2012-01-01

    We explore the impact of investment-specific technology (IST) shocks on the crosssection of stock returns. IST shocks reflect technological advances embodied in new capital goods. Using a structural model, we show that IST shocks have a differential effect on the two fundamental components of firm value, the value of assets in place and the value of growth opportunities. This differential sensitivity to IST shocks has two main implications. First, risk premia on firms with abundant growth opp...

  12. Interaction of Accretion Shocks with Winds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinsuk Acharya; Sandip K. Chakrabarti; D. Molteni

    2002-03-01

    Accretion shocks are known to oscillate in presence of cooling processes in the disk. This oscillation may also cause quasi-periodic oscillations of black holes. In the presence of strong winds, these shocks have oscillations in vertical direction as well.We show examples of shock oscillations under the influence of both the effects. When the shocks are absent and the flow is cooler, the wind becomes weaker and the vertical oscillation becomes negligible.

  13. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  14. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  15. Market Crashes without External Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Sergiu Hart; Yair Tauman

    2004-01-01

    It is shown here that market crashes and bubbles can arise without external shocks. Sudden changes in behavior coming after a long period of stationarity may be the result of endogenous information processing. Except for the daily observation of the market, there is no new information, no communication and no coordination among the participants.

  16. Large-scale changes of the atmosphere (climate), geodynamics and biosphere due to the galactic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristoforova, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Solar system periodically passes through spiral arms of the Galaxy, which are stellar density waves. Processes due to the presence of galactic shocks (shock waves) may be responsible for the abrupt atmosphere changes (climate), geodynamics (supercontinental cycle, large tectonic processes, mantle convection, geomagnetic field and others) and biosphere. Galactic shocks (GS) are the narrow region of high gas compression along the inner edge of spiral wave. Shock wave leads to the interstellar dust compression and to the phase transition in the interstellar gas. GS are large-scale trigger mechanism of active star formation. GS ultimately changes temperature, pressure and the radiation balance. It is quite surprisingly that majority of the "data points" of the geochronological and stratigraphic scales are closely related to the time moments when the Solar system has passed through the galactic shocks. This extraterrestrial cause for the change of physical and chemical conditions on the Earth had profound effects on the biologic extinction and explosions. This hypothesis explains the biologic explosion in Cambrian, the Permian - Triassic and Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions, i.e., the beginning of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic. It is valid in the frame of galactic shock model that any discussion time estimates of these past events and their implications for the future must be quantitative. It will permit an evaluation of age of greater catastrophes and changes in the Earth history, of the future meets with the spiral arms of the Galaxy. It predicts the existence of chronological scales of other planets.

  17. Shock-Wave Behavior in Explosive Monocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Dick, J.

    1995-01-01

    The shock response of explosive monocrystals is strongly anisotropic. Shock initiation sensitivity depends strongly on crystal orientation in PETN. This can be understood in terms of steric hindrance to shear during the shock-induced deformation of the molecular crystal. This initiation mechanism appears to be tribochemical rather than thermal. Related work by other researchers is also discussed.

  18. Streptococcus pyogenes toxic-shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, R; Diogo, M; Carvalho, A; Pimentel, T.; Oliveira, J

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been an exponential increase in invasive infections caused by Streptococcus ß hemolyticcus group A. In about one third of cases they are complicated by toxic shock syndrome, characterized by septic shock and multiorgan failure. The authors, by their rarity, report a case of bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes complicated by toxic shock syndrome.

  19. Vasoplegia in septic shock (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamcrlidze, M M; Intskirveli, N A; Vardosanidze, K D; Chikhladze, Kh E; Goliadze, L Sh; Ratiani, L R

    2015-02-01

    Vasoplegia is considered as a key factor responsible for the death of patients with septic shock, due to persistent and irreversible hypotension. The latter associated with vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors is a significant independent prognostic factor of mortality in severe sepsis. Loss of control of the vascular tone occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. The aim of this review is to discuss in detail the recent suggested alternative mechanisms of vasoplegia in severe sepsis: Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by activation of inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; significantly elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors; inactivation of catecholamines by oxidation; over-activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) during septic shock and their involvement in vascular dysfunction. The review also discusses some therapeutic approaches based on pathogenetic mechanisms of severe sepsis and their efficacy in treatment of patients with septic shock. The loss of vascular tone control occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors

  20. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  1. Effect of xinmailong on ischemic cardiac muscle during hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Xinmailong injection solution was invented at 1988 by prof. Li Shunan in Dali medical college. It was made from the material which has high biological activeness to the cardiac and vascular system. During the experimental shock caused by excessive loss of blood in monkey and dog, it was found by ECG that the T-wave of anterion lead on left chest elevated and became high and sharp after acute blood loss. Arterial blood pressure dropped to 8-5.3 kPa for dog and 8-5.3-2.7 kPa for monkey, changes of T-wave all recovered to near normal level after xinmailong solution was injected intravenously (0.05-0.2 mL/kg). These Results implied that xinmailong might improve the ischemia of myocardium induced by hemorrhagic shock.

  2. The shock response of a rendered porcine fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgeroth, J. M.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.

    2010-11-01

    Characterization of the shock response of biological materials is required in order to develop an understanding of how such materials behave under high strain-rate loading. In this work, a predominately linear Us-up Hugoniot relationship for a rendered porcine fat has been established using the plate-impact technique. This has been shown to take the form Us=1.58+2.47up (ρ0=0.945 g/cc) and comparison has been made between the dynamic behavior of the adipose material and both 20 wt % ballistic gelatin and water. The adipose material has been shown to behave in likeness with simple polymers such as polyethylene and to strengthen under shock loading, unlike ballistic gelatin, which has been shown to behave hydrodynamically. An experimental design incorporating direct insertion of lateral stress gauges within the rendered fat has given insight into both the behavior of lateral gauges and the lateral stress response of the material under dynamic loading.

  3. Are health shocks different ? evidence from a multi-shock survey in Laos

    OpenAIRE

    Wagstaff, Adam; Lindelow, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    In Laos health shocks are more common than most other shocks and more concentrated among the poor. They tend to be more idiosyncratic than non-health shocks, and are more costly, partly because they lead to high medical expenses, but also because they lead to income losses that are sizeable compared with the income losses associated with non-health shocks. Health shocks also stand out from...

  4. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  5. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  6. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaolin; XU Cunshuan; WANG Xiujie; WANG Dongjie; WANG Qingshang; ZHANG Baochen

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  7. Hybrid Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2014-11-15

    We present the results of large hybrid (kinetic ions – fluid electrons) simulations of particle acceleration at non-relativistic collisionless shocks. Ion acceleration efficiency and magnetic field amplification are investigated in detail as a function of shock inclination and strength, and compared with predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory, for shocks with Mach number up to 100. Moreover, we discuss the relative importance of resonant and Bell's instability in the shock precursor, and show that diffusion in the self-generated turbulence can be effectively parametrized as Bohm diffusion in the amplified magnetic field.

  8. Hybrid Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of large hybrid (kinetic ions - fluid electrons) simulations of particle acceleration at non-relativistic collisionless shocks. Ion acceleration efficiency and magnetic field amplification are investigated in detail as a function of shock inclination and strength, and compared with predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory, for shocks with Mach number up to 100. Moreover, we discuss the relative importance of resonant and Bell's instability in the shock precursor, and show that diffusion in the self-generated turbulence can be effectively parametrized as Bohm diffusion in the amplified magnetic field.

  9. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to the upstream case. It is possible that downstream fluctuations are generated by ion relaxation as suggested in previous hybrid simulation shocks.

  10. Sub-photospheric shocks in relativistic explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of shocks in opaque outflows from astrophysical explosions, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. Sub-photospheric shocks can produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. Shocks develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the flow: (1) Shocks in `photon gas' with small plasma inertial mass have a unique structure determined by the `force-free' condition -- zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) Strong collisionless subshocks develop in the opaque flow if it is sufficiently magnetized. We evaluate the critical magnetization for this to happen. The collisionless subshock is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated shock structure. (3) Shocks in outflows carrying a free neutron component involve dissipation through nuclear c...

  11. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  12. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  13. Strong shock in the uniformly expanding medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2014-01-01

    Propagation of the strong shock in the flat expanding Friedman universe is investigated using methods of dimension and similarity. Exact analytic solution of self-similar equations is obtained, determining dependences of the radius and velocity of the shock wave on time and radius. It is obtained, that in the expanding medium the velocity of shock decreases as $\\sim t^{-1/5}$, what is slower than the shock velocity in the static uniform medium $\\sim t^{-3/5}$. The radius of the shock wave in the expanding self-gravitating medium increases $\\sim t^{4/5}$, more rapidly than the shock wave radius in the uniform non-gravitating medium $\\sim t^{2/5}$. So, the shock propagates in the direction of decreasing density with larger speed, that in the static medium, due to accelerating action of the decreasing density, even in the presence of a self-gravitation.

  14. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  15. Shock response of dry sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (,; ); Chhabildas, Lalit C.. (..); Vogler, Tracy John; Brown, Justin L.

    2007-08-01

    The dynamic compaction of sand was investigated experimentally and computationally to stresses of 1.8 GPa. Experiments have been performed in the powder's partial compaction regime at impact velocities of approximately 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 km/s. The experiments utilized multiple velocity interferometry probes on the rear surface of a stepped target for an accurate measurement of shock velocity, and an impedance matching technique was used to deduce the shock Hugoniot state. Wave profiles were further examined for estimates of reshock states. Experimental results were used to fit parameters to the P-Lambda model for porous materials. For simple 1-D simulations, the P-Lambda model seems to capture some of the physics behind the compaction process very well, typically predicting the Hugoniot state to within 3%.

  16. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  17. Insight into magnetorheological shock absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gołdasz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with magnetorheological fluid theory, modeling and applications of automotive magnetorheological dampers. On the theoretical side a review of MR fluid compositions and key factors affecting the characteristics of these fluids is followed by a description of existing applications in the area of vibration isolation and flow-mode shock absorbers in particular. As a majority of existing magnetorheological devices operates in a so-called flow mode a critical review is carried out in that regard. Specifically, the authors highlight common configurations of flow-mode magnetorheological shock absorbers, or so-called MR dampers that have been considered by the automotive industry for controlled chassis applications. The authors focus on single-tube dampers utilizing a piston assembly with one coil or multiple coils and at least one annular flow channel in the piston.

  18. Cures for the Expansion Shock and the Shock Instability of the Roe Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xue-song; Gu, Chun-wei

    2016-01-01

    A common defect of the Roe scheme is the production of non-physical expansion shock and shock instability. An improved method with several advantages was presented to suppress the shock instability. However, this method cannot prevent expansion shock and is incompatible with the traditional curing method for expansion shock. Therefore, the traditional curing mechanism is analyzed. The discussion explains the effectiveness of the traditional curing method and identifies several defects, one of which leads to incompatibility between curing the shock instability and expansion shock. Consequently, a new improved Roe scheme is proposed in this study. This scheme is concise, easy to implement, low computational cost, and robust. More importantly, the scheme can simultaneously cure the shock instability and expansion shock without additional costs.

  19. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  20. Terahertz radiation from shocked materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J. Reed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Distinct physical mechanisms for the generation of temporally coherent, narrow bandwidth optical radiation are few and rare in nature. Such sources, including lasers, have widespread applications ranging from spectroscopy to interferometry. We review the recent theoretical prediction of a new type of temporally coherent optical radiation source in the 1–100 THz frequency range that can be realized when crystalline polarizable materials like NaCl are subject to a compressive shock wave.

  1. Wage adjustment and productivity shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Mikael; Messina, Julián; Nordström Skans, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    We study how workers’ wages respond to TFP-driven innovations in firms’ labor productivity. Using unique data with highly reliable firm-level output prices and quantities in the manufacturing sector in Sweden, we are able to derive measures of physical (as opposed to revenue) TFP to instrument labor productivity in the wage equations. We find that the reaction of wages to sectoral labor productivity is almost three times larger than the response to pure idiosyncratic (firm-level) shocks, a re...

  2. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly

  3. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  4. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  5. Micro-Shock wave Measurement and Evaluation of Laser Shock Peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro shock waves are induced in laser shock peening and their effect on metal samples is presented. Laser shock peening produces maximized internal compressive stress on metal surfaces. This research evaluated the effects of micro shock waves from laser shock peening with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on steel samples, through the analysis of the mechanical properties of the samples. In the experiments, a piezo material was applied to measure the micro shock waves and the hardnesses and micro tensile strengths of the samples were evaluated

  6. Micro-Shock wave Measurement and Evaluation of Laser Shock Peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Han; Lee, Woo Ram; Kim, Teak Gu; Cheong, Seong Kyun [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Micro shock waves are induced in laser shock peening and their effect on metal samples is presented. Laser shock peening produces maximized internal compressive stress on metal surfaces. This research evaluated the effects of micro shock waves from laser shock peening with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on steel samples, through the analysis of the mechanical properties of the samples. In the experiments, a piezo material was applied to measure the micro shock waves and the hardnesses and micro tensile strengths of the samples were evaluated.

  7. Times New Materials Company Enhancing the Technical Innovation of Building Shock Absorption and Shock Insulation Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Tian

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the technical innovation and market promotion of building shock absorption and shock insulation products, to promote institute-enterprise cooperation and realize complementary advantage, on March 27, Zhuzhou Times New Materials Technology Co., Ltd. concluded Framework Agreement on the Joint R&D Strategic Cooperation of Building Shock Absorption and Shock Insulation Products with Yunnan Earthquake Engineering Institute in Kunming. Both parties will fully exert their technology and resource advantages, and develop and promote shock absorption and shock insulation products jointly in the form of strategic partners.

  8. Optimal Shock Wave Rate for Shock Wave Lithotripsy in Urolithiasis Treatment: A Prospective Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Keun Bai; Lim, Go San; Hwang, Jae Seung; Lim, Chae Hong; Lee, Jae Won; Son, Jeong Hwan; Jang, Seok Heun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to compare the effects of a fast shock wave rate (120 shocks per minute) and a slow shock wave rate (60 shocks per minute) on the shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) success rate, patient's pain tolerance, and complications. Materials and Methods A total of 165 patients with radiopaque renal pelvis or upper ureter stones were included in the study. Patients were classified by use of a random numbers table. Group I (81 patients) received 60 shock waves per minute and group II (84 pat...

  9. Electron velocity distributions near collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of the amount of electron heating and of the shapes of electron velocity distributions across shocks near the earth are reviewed. It is found that electron heating increases with increasing shock strength but is always less than the ion heating. The scale length of electron heating is also less than that for the ions. Electron velocity distributions show characteristic shapes which depend on the strength of the shocks. At the weaker shocks, electron heating is mostly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, bar B, and results in Gaussian-shaped velocity distributions at low-to-moderate energies. At the stronger shocks, parallel heating predominates resulting in flat-topped velocity distributions. A reasonable interpretation of these results indicates that at the weaker shocks electron heating is dominated by a tendency toward conservation of the magnetic moment. At the stronger fast-mode shocks, this heating is thought to be dominated by an acceleration parallel to bar B produced by the macroscopic shock electric field followed by beam driven plasma instabilities. Some contribution to the heating at the stronger shocks from conservation of the magnetic moment and cross-field current-driven instabilities cannot be ruled out. Although the heating at slow-mode shocks is also dominated by instabilities driven by magnetic field-aligned electron beams, their acceleration mechanism is not yet established

  10. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  11. [Bacteriostatic shock in acute purulent pyelonephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuliev, M G; Arbuliev, K M; Gadzhiev, D P

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with acute purulent pyelonephritis (APP) complicated by bacteriotoxic shock (BTS) were treated in Daghestan Medical Academy's urological clinic from 1982 to 1999. The condition was primarily caused by acute occlusion of the urinary tracts. The first step of the treatment was aimed at the recovery of normal hemodynamics. As early as the first hours of BTS, plasma- and hemosorption, hemodialysis, hemodialysis were made. If the patients got better, they were operated to remove the obstruction for urine flow (epicystostomy, nephrostomy). 28 recent cases received adjuvant laser therapy--irradiation of the cavitary renal system and blood. This was performed via light guide inserted into the renal pelvis through the nephrostomic drainage. The guide was connected with the He-Ne optic quantum generator AFL-1. Laser procedure lasted for 8-12 min, a course consisted of 7-8 procedures. Later, laser beam was also directed to the biologically active points corresponding to pyelonephritis. Normalization of renal function and T, B immunity was faster in patients exposed to laser radiation. Lethality in this group was lower. PMID:12180052

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Condensation Shock in Shock Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Marsik; P.Sopuch; 等

    1997-01-01

    The homogeneous nucleation with subsequent spontaneous condensation of water,pentanol,and ethanol vapors in a carrier gas are investigated experimentally and theoretically in the expansion part of a shock tube.The precise pressure and MCW measurements give additional information about the wetness,so that the nucleation and condensation rates which are closely coupled for stronger expansion rates are determied more accurately,Predictions of the principle of the minimum of entropy production are compared with experiments performed for water,ethanol and pentanol at different pressures.

  13. Suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, A; Sergis, N; Stawarz, L; Fujimoto, M; Coates, A J; Dougherty, M K

    2016-01-01

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini. The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, 18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically onl...

  14. Corrugation of relativistic magnetized shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M; Gremillet, L

    2016-01-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence, it develops corrugation which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating from downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophys...

  15. The dynamic quasiperpendicular shock: Cluster discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoselskikh, V; Walker, S N; Schwartz, S; Sundkvist, D; Lobzin, V; Gedalin, M; Bale, S D; Mozer, F; Soucek, J; Hobara, Y; Comisel, H

    2013-01-01

    The physics of collisionless shocks is a very broad topic which has been studied for more than five decades. However, there are a number of important issues which remain unresolved. The energy repartition amongst particle populations in quasiperpendicular shocks is a multi-scale process related to the spatial and temporal structure of the electromagnetic fields within the shock layer. The most important processes take place in the close vicinity of the major magnetic transition or ramp region. The distribution of electromagnetic fields in this region determines the characteristics of ion reflection and thus defines the conditions for ion heating and energy dissipation for supercritical shocks and also the region where an important part of electron heating takes place. All of these processes are crucially dependent upon the characteristic spatial scales of the ramp and foot region provided that the shock is stationary. The earliest studies of collisionless shocks identified nonlinearity, dissipation, and dispe...

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  17. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  18. Link between laboratory and astrophysical radiative shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Michaut, Claire; Cavet, Cécile; Bouquet, Serge; Koenig, Michel; Vinci, Tommaso; Loupias, Bérénice

    2008-01-01

    This work provides analytical solutions describing the post-shock structure of radiative shocks growing in astrophysics and in laboratory. The equations including a cooling function $\\Lambda \\propto \\rho^{\\epsilon} P^{\\zeta} x^{\\theta}$ are solved for any values of the exponents $\\epsilon$, $\\zeta$ and $\\theta$. This modeling is appropriate to astrophysics as the observed radiative shocks arise in optically thin media. In contrast, in laboratory, radiative shocks performed using high-power lasers present a radiative precursor because the plasma is more or less optically thick. We study the post-shock region in the laboratory case and compare with astrophysical shock structure. In addition, we attempt to use the same equations to describe the radiative precursor, but the cooling function is slightly modified. In future experiments we will probe the PSR using X-ray diagnostics. These new experimental results will allow to validate our astrophysical numerical codes.

  19. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  20. Quantum Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledge...

  1. Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are used to model nonlinear particle acceleration in parallel collisionless shocks of various speeds, including mildly relativistic ones. When the acceleration is efficient, the backreaction of accelerated particles modifies the shock structure and causes the compression ratio, r, to increase above test-particle values. Modified shocks with Lorentz factors less than about 3 can have compression ratios considerably greater than 3 and the momentum distribution of energeti...

  2. Creditor Protection and Credit Response to Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo, Arturo José; Alejandro Micco

    2007-01-01

    Creditor Protection and Credit Response to Shocks Arturo Jose Galindo and Alejandro Micco This article studies the relationship between creditor protection and credit responses to macroeconomic shocks. Using a data set on legal determinants of finance in a panel of data on aggregate credit growth for 79 countries during 1990 2004, it is shown that credit is more responsive to external shocks in countries with weak legal creditor protection and weak enforcement. The results are statistically a...

  3. Ion dynamics and acceleration in relativistic shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, S. F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-01

    Ab-initio numerical study of collisionless shocks in electron-ion unmagnetized plasmas is performed with fully relativistic particle in cell simulations. The main properties of the shock are shown, focusing on the implications for particle acceleration. Results from previous works with a distinct numerical framework are recovered, including the shock structure and the overall acceleration features. Particle tracking is then used to analyze in detail the particle dynamics and the acceleration ...

  4. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids

    OpenAIRE

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-01-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The e...

  5. Optimal Monetary Policy Rules Under Persistent Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Singh, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    The tug-o-war for supremacy between inflation targeting and monetary targeting is a classic yet timely topic in monetary economics. In this paper, we revisit this question within the context of a pure-exchange overlapping generations model of money where spatial separation and random relocation create an endogenous demand for money. We distinguish between shocks to real output and shocks to the real interest rate. Both shocks are assumed to follow AR(1) processes. Irrespective of the nature o...

  6. Plasma Heating by Strong Shock Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 104 cm3 of plasma at T ∼ 1 keV, n ∼ 1 x 1016 cm-3, were created by fast collisional shock waves in an electromagnetic shock tube. The speed of these shock waves ranges up to 4 x 108cm/s, corresponding to an acoustic Mach number of 3200 and an Alfvén-Mach number of 15. These experiments were performed in a 3-metre-long coaxial electromagnetic shock tube, employing a 60-μf, 120-kV capacitor bank which produces a 2 x 106 -A drive current. The pre-shock hydrogen initial state was T = 239°K, p = 50 mTorr. The preshock 7.2- kG transverse magnetic field was used to keep the shock thickness small and retard plasma interaction with the walls. Separation of the transverse ionizing shock wave from the driving current was clearly observed, and a hot dense plasma was created behind the shock wave. The state of this plasma was determined by laser interferometer measurements, X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra, a particle energy analyser, probes, and neutron detectors. The shock-created plasma contained an azimuthal magnetic field of B ∼ 22 kG. When deuterium gas was used, neutrons were detected and we estimate a yield of about 5 x 105 neutrons per shot. The transverse ionizing shock thickness, as determined by magnetic field structure, was found to be from 5 to 80 cm thick, the larger values occurring at higher shock speeds. These thicknesses are found to agree with the calculations made from a two-fluid MHD computer code employing classical plasma transport properties. The calculated structure of these collisional shock waves predict that the ion temperature substantially exceeds the electron temperature. (author)

  7. Child Labor, Crop Shocks, and Credit Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Beegle; Rajeev Dehejia; Roberta Gatti

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between household income shocks and child labor. In particular, we investigate the extent to which transitory income shocks lead to increases in child labor and whether household access to credit mitigates the effects of these shocks. Using panel data from a survey in Tanzania, we find that both relationships are significant. Our results suggest that credit constraints play a role in explaining child labor and consequently that child labor is inefficient, ...

  8. Fiscal Shocks in an Efficiency Wage Model

    OpenAIRE

    Craig Burnside; Martin Eichenbaum; Fisher, Jonas D. M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper illustrates a particular limited information strategy for assessing the empirical plausibility of alternative quantitative general equilibrium business cycle models. The basic strategy is to test whether a model economy can account for the response of actual economy to an exogenous shock. Here we concentrate on the response of aggregate hours worked and real wages to a fiscal policy shock. The fiscal policy shock is identified with the dynamic response of government purchases and a...

  9. Therapeutic effect of cisapride on gastric injury following hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian-yang; WANG Zheng-guo; ZHU Pei-fang; XU Yan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of cisapride on gastric injury following hemorrhagic shock resuscitation.Methods: 108 Wistar rats weighing (200 g±30 g) were randomly divided into a sham shock (SS) group (n=36), a hemorrhagic shock resuscitation (HS) group (n=36) and a hemorrhagic shock cisapride treated (HSC) group (n=36). Sampling at 1, 2 and 4 hours after resuscitation was done and 6 samples for each observation item were taken. The gastric blood flow volume was measured by isotope label biological microglobulin. Gastric pHi, gastric emptying, MDA and Na+-K+-ATPase of gastric mucosa were measured.Results: In the HSC group, the relative residual rate of gastric pigment decreased significantly, the gastric blood flow volume elevated; gastric pHi increased significantly at 2 hours; the level of mucosal MDA decreased at 4 hours, the activity of Na+-K+-ATPase increased and the lactic acid level in the portal vein decreased significantly compared to the HS group.Conclusions: After hemorrhagic shock resuscitation, cisapride contained the following functions,1) promoting gastric emptying, 2) increasing the blood flow of gastric blood flow volume and gastric pHi, 3) depressing the lactic acid concentration of the portal vein and improving MDA volume and Na+-K+ -ATPase activity of gastric mucosa. It suggests that after comple menting effective circulating blood volume for hemorrhagic shock resuscitation, early use of cisapride for gastric motility is helpful for an improvement of lasting ischemia and hypoxia in stomach.

  10. Role of heat shock protein 70 in innate alloimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. eLand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly describes our own experience with the proven demonstration of heat shock protein 70 in reperfused renal allografts from brain-deaddonors and reflects about its potential role as a typical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP in the setting of innate alloimmunity. In fact, our group was able to demonstrate a dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression after postischemic reperfusion of renal allografts. Of note, up-regulation of this stress protein expression, although to a lesser extent, was already observed after cold storage of the organ indicating that this molecule is already induced in the stressed organism of a brain-dead donor. However, whether or not the dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression contributes to mounting an innate alloimmune response cannot be judged in view of these clinical findings.Nevertheless, heat shock protein 70, since generated in association with postischemic reperfusion-induced allograft injury, can be called a typical DAMP - as can everymolecule be termed a DAMP that is generated in associationwith any stressful tissue injury regardless of its final positive or negative regulatory function within the innate immune response elicited by it.In fact, as we discuss in this article, the context-dependent, even contradistinctive activities of heat shock protein 70 reflect the biological phenomenon that, throughout evolution, mammals have developed an elaborate network of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, which provide balance between defensive and protective measures against unwarranted destruction of the host. In this sense, up-regulated expression of heat shock protein 70 in an injured allograft might reflect a pure protective response against the severe oxidative injury of a reperfused donor organ. On the other hand, up-regulated expression of this stress protein in an injured allograft might reflect a(futile attempt of the innate immune system to

  11. Understanding the puzzling effects of technology shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei Wang; Yi Wen

    2007-01-01

    The research led by Gali (AER 1999) and Basu et al. (AER 2006) raises two important questions regarding the validity of the RBC theory: (i) How important are technology shocks in explaining the business cycle? (ii) Do impulse responses to technology shocks found in the data reject the assumption of flexible prices? This paper argues that the conditional impulse responses of the U.S. economy to technology shocks are not grounds to reject the notion that technology shocks are the main driving f...

  12. Shock Waves in Outflows from Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Patrick

    This review focuses on physics of the cooling zones behind radiative shocks and the emission line diagnostics that can be used to infer physical conditions and mass loss rates in jets from young stars. Spatial separations of the cooling zones from the shock fronts, now resolvable with HST, and recent evidence for C-shocks have greatly increased our understanding of how shocks in outflows interact with the surrounding medium and with other material within the flow. By combining multiple epoch HST images, one can create `movies' of flows like those produced from numerical codes, and learn what kinds of instabilities develop within these systems.

  13. Shock wave equation of state of muscovite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Rubin, Allan M.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Shock wave data were obtained between 20 and 140 GPa for natural muscovite obtained from Methuen Township (Ontario), in order to provide a shock-wave equation of state for this crustal hydrous mineral. The shock equation of state data could be fit by a linear shock velocity (Us) versus particle velocity (Up) relation Us = 4.62 + 1.27 Up (km/s). Third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state parameters were found to be K(OS) = 52 +/-4 GPa and K-prime(OS) = 3.2 +/-0.3 GPa. These parameters are comparable to those of other hydrous minerals such as brucite, serpentine, and tremolite.

  14. Balmer-Dominated Shocks: A Concise Review

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A concise and critical review of Balmer-dominated shocks (BDSs) is presented, summarizing the state of theory and observations, including models with/without shock precursors and their synergy with atomic physics. Observations of BDSs in supernova remnants are reviewed on an object-by-object basis. The relevance of BDSs towards understanding the acceleration of cosmic rays in shocks is emphasized. Probable and possible detections of BDSs in astrophysical objects other than supernova remnants, including pulsar wind nebulae and high-redshift galaxies, are described. The case for the continued future of studying BDSs in astrophysics is made, including their relevance towards understanding electron-ion temperature equilibration in collisionless shocks.

  15. Detonation Initiation via Imploding Shock Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, S. I.; Shepherd, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    An imploding annular shock wave driven by a jet of air was used to initiate detonations inside a 76 mm diameter tube. The tube was filled with a test gas composed of either stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen or propane-oxygen diluted with nitrogen. The strength of the imploding shock wave and the sensitivity of the test gas were varied in an effort to find the minimum shock strength required for detonation of each test mixture. The results show that the minimum required shock stren...

  16. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  17. The source of real and nominal exchange rate fluctuations in Thailand: Real shock or nominal shock

    OpenAIRE

    Le Thanh, Binh

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the source of exchange rate fluctuations in Thailand. We employed a structural vector auto-regression (SVAR) model with the long-run neutrality restriction of Blanchard and Quah (1989) to investigate the changes in real and nominal exchange rates from 1994 to 2015. In this paper, we assume that there are two types of shocks which related to exchange rate movements: real shocks and nominal shocks. The empirical analysis indicates that real shocks are the fundamental compon...

  18. Accuracy of Rapid Ultrasound in Shock (RUSH) Exam for Diagnosis of Shock in Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ghane, Mohammad Reza; Gharib, Mohammad Hadi; Ebrahimi, Ali; Samimi, Kaveh; Rezaee, Maryam; Rasouli, Hamid Reza; Kazemi, Hossein Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rapid ultrasound in shock (RUSH) is the most recent emergency ultrasound protocol, designed to help clinicians better recognize distinctive shock etiologies in a shorter time frame. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of the RUSH protocol, performed by an emergency physician or radiologist, in predicting the type of shock in critical patients. Patients and Methods: An emergency physician or radiologist performed the RUSH protocol for all patients with shock status...

  19. Shock Safe Nepal: team one

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterhof, A.J.; Düzgün, B.C.; Spelt, C.J.; De Stoppelaar, A.O.; Van Wijnbergen, E.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    As a response to the 2015 Nepal earthquakes Shock Safe Nepal was founded to function as platform intended to contribute to the development of knowledge on earthquake safe housing. The project started on initiative of the Consul General of Nepal to The Netherlands Cas de Stoppelaar and the faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences (CiTG) of Delft University of Technology. Five students went to Nepal; our purpose was twofold what resulted in two reports. The goal of report one is to serve as...

  20. Shock initiation of high explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have substantially advanced the experimental and theoretical study of shock initiation in the past five years. The current generation of our stress and particle-velocity gauges allows quantitative input to a predictive initiation model. Fast infrared radiometry has provided insight into the ignition and growth aspect of initiation and provided semiquantitative data on particle-size effects for inclusion into the model. This approach, combining experimental and theoretical studies, has already paid off in the design and modeling of our initation systems, which are important to a weapon's safety and vulnerability as well as to its performance

  1. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  2. Isothermal Shock Wave in Magnetogasdynamics

    OpenAIRE

    B. G. Verma; J. P. Vishwakarma; Vishnu Sharan

    1983-01-01

    The problem of propagation of a plane isothermal discontinuity (shock) wave in a homogeneous semi-infinite body of a perfect gas, in the presence of amagnetic field have been solved. It has been shown that under certain definiteconditions, the density p at the wave front may be arbitrarily high for a singlecompression pulse. A certain class of solutions of the present problem for a nonhomogeneous semi-infinite body have been derived. Such solutions are expected to be of great importance in co...

  3. Electron physics in shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The non-relativistic shocks that we find in the solar wind (no matter if driven by CMEs or encounters with planets) are dominated by ion dynamics. Therefore a detailed treatment of electrons is often neglegted to gain significant reductions in computational effort. With recent super computers and massively parallel codes it is possible to perform self-consistent kinetic simulations using particle in cell code. This allows to study the heating of the electrons as well as the acceleration to superthermal energies. These energetic electrons are interesting for couple of reasons. e.g. as an influence on plasma instabilities or for the generation of plasma waves.

  4. Termination shock particle spectral features

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; McDonald, F. B.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.

    2006-01-01

    Spectral features of energetic H ions accelerated at the termination shock may be evidence of two components. At low energies the energy spectrum is ~E^(–1.55), with break at ~0.4 MeV to E^(–2.2). A second component appears above ~1 MeV with a spectrum of E^(–1.27) with a break at ~3.2 MeV. Even though the intensities upstream are highly variable, the same spectral break energies are observed, suggesting that these are durable features of the source spectrum. The acceleration processes for th...

  5. CAVEAT calculations of shock interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAVEAT is a computer code for calculating the time-varying fluid dynamics of several adjacent materials in two or three space dimensions. Using an extended Godunov technique and adaptive meshing, the code allows for large slippage at material interfaces. To exhibit the capability for calculating strong distortions we have performed a variety of calculations describing the interaction of shocks with rigid wedges, cylinders, and spheres and deformable cylindrical, spherical, and conical shells in two space dimensions. Comparison of the results with experimental data and analytical solutions demonstrates the considerable accuracy that can be expected from calculations with this code

  6. Investigation of shock focusing in a cavity with incident shock diffracted by an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Chen, X.; He, L.-M.; Rong, K.; Deiterding, R.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out in order to investigate the focusing of a shock wave in a test section after the incident shock has been diffracted by an obstacle. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach numbers of 1.4 and 2.1 were tested. A high-speed camera was employed to obtain schlieren photos of the flow field in the experiments. In the numerical simulations, a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme of third-order accuracy supplemented with structured dynamic mesh adaptation was adopted to simulate the shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experiments and numerical results is observed. The configurations exhibit shock reflection phenomena, shock-vortex interaction and—in particular—shock focusing. The pressure history in the cavity apex was recorded and compared with the numerical results. A quantitative analysis of the numerically observed shock reflection configurations is also performed by employing a pseudo-steady shock transition boundary calculation technique. Regular reflection, single Mach reflection and transitional Mach reflection phenomena are observed and are found to correlate well with analytic predictions from shock reflection theory.

  7. Interaction between shock wave and single inertial bubbles near an elastic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G. N.; Zhong, P.

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of laser-generated single inertial bubbles (collapse time=121μs ) near a silicon rubber membrane with a shock wave ( 55MPa in peak pressure and 1.7μs in compressive pulse duration) is investigated. The interaction leads to directional, forced asymmetric collapse of the bubble with microjet formation toward the surface. Maximum jet penetration into the membrane is produced during the bubble collapse phase with optimal shock wave arrival time and stand-off distance. Such interaction may provide a unique acoustic means for in vivo microinjection, applicable to targeted delivery of macromolecules and gene vectors to biological tissues.

  8. Shocks, star formation and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdorf, A.

    2015-12-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is constantly evolving due to unremitting injection of energy in various forms. Energetic radiation transfers energy to the ISM: from the UV photons, emitted by the massive stars, to X- and γ-ray ones. Cosmic rays are another source of energy. Finally, mechanical energy is injected through shocks or turbulence. Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies. They are associated to star formation (through jets and bipolar outflows), life (via stellar winds), and death (in AGB stellar winds or supernovae explosion). The dynamical processes leading to the formation of molecular clouds also generate shocks where flows of interstellar matter collide. Because of their ubiquity, the study of interstellar shocks is also a useful probe to the other mechanisms of energy injection in the ISM. This study must be conducted in order to understand the evolution of the interstellar medium as a whole, and to address various questions: what is the peculiar chemistry associated to shocks, and what is their contribution to the cycle of matter in galaxies ? What is the energetic impact of shocks on their surroundings on various scales, and hence what is the feedback of stars on the galaxies ? What are the scenarios of star formation, whether this star formation leads to the propagation of shocks, or whether it is triggered by shock propagation ? What is the role of shocks in the acceleration of cosmic rays ? Can they shed light on their composition and diffusion processes ? In order to progress on these questions, it is paramount to interpret the most precise observations with the most precise models of shocks. From the observational point of view, the James Webb Space Telescope represents a powerful tool to better address the above questions, as it will allow to observe numerous shock tracers in the infrared range at an unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution.

  9. Shock-resistant scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique scintillation detector unit is disclosed which employs a special light transfer and reflector means that encases and protects the scintillator crystal against high g forces. The light transfer means comprises a flexible silicon rubber optical material bonded between the crystal and the optical window and having an axial thickness sufficient to allow the scintillator to move axially inside the container under high g forces without destroying the bonds. The reflector means comprises a soft elastic silicone rubber sleeve having a multiplicity of closely arranged tapered protrusions radiating toward and engaging the periphery of the scintillator crystal to cushion shocks effectively and having a reflective material, such as aluminum oxide powder, in the spaces between the protrusions. The reflector means provides improved shock absorption because of the uniform support and cushioning action of the protrusions and also provides the detector with high efficiency. The silicon rubber composition is specially compounded to include a large amount of aluminum oxide which enables the rubber to function effectively as a light reflector

  10. Shock Dynamics In Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Cantó, J; Fernández-López, M; González, R F; Hernández-Gómez, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a formalism of the dynamics of internal shocks in relativistic jets where the source has a time-dependent injection velocity and mass-loss rate. The variation of the injection velocity produces a two-shock wave structure, the working surface, that moves along the jet. This new formalism takes into account the fact that momentum conservation is not valid for relativistic flows where the relativistic mass lost by radiation must be taken into account, in contrast to the classic regime. We find analytic solutions for the working surface velocity and radiated energy for the particular case of a step function variability of the injection parameters. We model two cases: a pulse of fast material and a pulse of slow material (with respect to the mean flow). Applying these models to gamma ray burst light curves, one can determine the ratio of the Lorentz factors gamma_2 / gamma_1 and the ratio of the mass-loss rates dot{m_2} / dot{m_1} of the upstream and downstream flows. As an example, we apply this model ...

  11. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  12. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  13. Parametric study of the formation of magnetohydrodynamic shocks. I - Model. II - Slow shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Y.C. (Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents a model to study the formation and propagation of planar MHD shocks. The model treats the discontinuity surface of a moving shock as a surface with zero thickness and uses the exact Rankine-Hugoniot relations to describe the jumps in flow properties at all shock crossings. It is shown that in low-beta plasma the impact of coronal mass ejecta on the ambient solar wind evolves to form a pair of forward and reverse slow shocks. The dimensionless parameters that control the formation process are identified, leading to an understanding of how the formation of MHD shocks is affected by various controlling parameters. 15 refs.

  14. Shock viscosity and the prediction of shock wave rise times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is focused on viscouslike behavior of solids during large-amplitude compressive stress-wave propagation. Maximum strain rate in the plastic wave has been determined for 30 steady- or near steady-wave profiles obtained with velocity interferometry methods. The materials include six metals, aluminum, beryllium, bismuth, copper, iron, and uranium, and two insulating solids, magnesium oxide and fused silica. A plot of Hugoniot stress versus maximum strain rate for each material is adequately described by eta-dot = asigma/sup m//sub h/. The exponent m is approximately 4 for all materials while the coefficient a is material dependent. A model is developed which incorporates the observed trends of the shock viscosity data in a three-dimensional framework. Finite-difference calculations using the model reproduce the experimental wave profile data

  15. Shock waves in concrete: constitutive laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a shock wave experiments used to determine the hydrostatic part of such a model. The deviatonic part is estimated in a first approach by some reanalysis of the tests using an existing computer code for shock wave analysis. 9 refs., 12 figs

  16. Post-shock relaxation in crystalline nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of shocked (100)-oriented crystalline nitromethane were carried out to determine the rates of relaxation behind the shock wave. The forces were described by the fully flexible non-reactive Sorescu-Rice-Thompson force field [D. C. Sorescu, B. M. Rice, and D. L. Thompson, J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)], 10.1021/jp000942q. The time scales for local and overall thermal equilibration in the shocked crystal were determined. The molecular center-of-mass and atomic kinetic energy distributions rapidly reach substantially different local temperatures. Several picoseconds are required for the two distributions to converge, corresponding to establishment of thermal equilibrium in the shocked crystal. The decrease of the molecular center-of-mass temperature and the increase of the atomic temperature behind the shock front exhibit essentially exponential dependence on time. Analysis of covalent bond distance distributions ahead of, immediately behind, and well behind the shock front showed that the effective bond stretching potentials are essentially harmonic. Effective force constants for the C-N, C-H, and N-O bonds immediately behind the shock front are larger by factors of 1.6, 2.5, and 2.0, respectively, than in the unshocked crystal; and by factors of 1.2, 2.2, and 1.7, respectively, compared to material sufficiently far behind the shock front to be essentially at thermal equilibrium.

  17. Going to Teach in Prisons: Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Novice prison teachers experience confusion and disorientation--culture shock--when they go to teach in prison because teaching and prison cultures collide. The stages of acculturation associated with culture shock are predictable and so are the identities and experiences of teachers who are positioned by the cultural dynamics of prison teaching.…

  18. Shock structure formation in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the evolution of a perturbation in a dusty plasma and its transformation into a nonlinear wave structure is considered. A computational method that allows one to solve the set of nonlinear evolutionary equations describing variable-charge dust grains, Boltzmann electrons, and inertial ions is developed. Exact steady-state solutions corresponding to ion-acoustic shock structures associated with anomalous dissipation originating from dust grain charging are found taking into account the effect of electron and ion charge separation. The role of this effect increases with the speed of the shock. The evolutions of an initial soliton (which is a steady-state wave solution in a plasma containing dust grains with a constant charge) and an initially immobile perturbation with a constant increased ion density are investigated. In a charge-varying dusty plasma, the soliton evolves into a nonsteady shock wave structure that propagates at a constant speed and whose amplitude decreases with time. The initially immobile perturbation with a constant increased ion density evolves into a shock structure similar to a steady-state shock wave. In the latter case, the compression shock wave is accompanied by a rarefaction region (dilatation wave), which finally leads to the destruction of the shock structure. The solution of the problem of the evolution of a perturbation and its transformation into a shock wave in a charge-varying dusty plasma opens up the possibility of describing real phenomena (such as supernova explosions) and laboratory and active space experiments

  19. Numerical simulations of shocks encountering clumpy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Alūzas, R; Hartquist, T W; Falle, S A E G; Langton, R

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a clumpy region containing many individual clouds. Our work incorporates a sub-grid turbulence model which for the first time makes this investigation feasible. We vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the clouds, and the ratio of total cloud mass to inter-cloud mass within the clumpy region. Cloud material becomes incorporated into the flow. This "mass-loading" reduces the Mach number of the shock, and leads to the formation of a dense shell. In cases in which the mass-loading is sufficient the flow slows enough that the shock degenerates into a wave. The interaction evolves through up to four stages: initially the shock decelerates; then its speed is nearly constant; next the shock accelerates as it leaves the clumpy region; finally it moves at a constant speed close to its initial speed. Turbulence is generated in the post-shock flow as the shock sweeps through the clumpy region. Clouds exposed to turbulence ...

  20. Benjamin Franklin and Shock-Induced Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in…

  1. The Dynamic Quasiperpendicular Shock: Cluster Discoveries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Balikhin, M.; Walker, S. N.; Schwartz, S.; Sundkvist, D.; Lobzin, V.; Gedalin, M.; Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.; Souček, Jan; Hobara, Y.; Comisel, H.

    Venice: CAA - ESA, 2015. s. 10. [Cluster Workshop /25./. 12.10.2015–16.10.2015, Venice] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : collisionless shocks * Plasma heating and acceleration * Shock scales Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://caa.estec.esa.int/images/cluster_workshops/25/Cluster25_abstract_book4.pdf

  2. Cylinder overpack phenolic foam shock testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical shock absorbability of phenolic foam made from reagent grade chemicals, specified in US Atomic Energy Commission (Department of Energy) Material and Equipment Specification SP-9 is compared to that of foam made from substituted commercial grade chemicals. The testing reported herein compares mechanical properties of the foams. The test results demonstrate the equivalence in the shock absorbability of the two foam types

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Radiative Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaut, C.; Vinci, T.; Boireau, L.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Osaki, N.; Herpe, G.; Falize, E.; Loupias, B.; Atzeni, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the radiative shock from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It is based on the whole experimental results obtained at Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, École Polytechnique). Radiative shocks are high-Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. These shocks are involved in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction between supernovae and the interstellar medium. In laboratory, these radiative shocks are generated using high power lasers. New diagnostics have been implemented to study the geometrical shape of the shock and the front shock density. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and temperature. The modeling of these phenomena is mainly performed through numerical simulations (1D and 2D) and analytical studies. We exhibit results obtained from several radiative hydrodynamics codes. As a result, it is possible to discuss about the influence of the geometry and physical parameters introduced in the 1D and 2D models.

  4. Are credit crunches supply or demand shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  5. Is the EMP an electromagnetic shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors considers three types of explosion: near to earth (0-2 km); endoatmospheric (2-20 km), endonemp; and exospheric (> 40 km), exonemp. Dispersion relations and shock waves are dealt with in depth, followed by a calculation for a polarised electromagnetic wave using Maxwell's equations. Finally there are definitions of exonemp as an electromagnetic shock wave. (H.G.)

  6. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  7. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Tan, Sheng; He, Liming; Rong, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP) Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO) scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing) were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  8. Standing Shocks in Viscous Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous accretion flows around black holes.We parameterize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K.By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with shocks of different types, namely Rankine-Hugoniot shocks, isothermal shocks, and more realistically, mixed shocks.

  9. Revisiting the Macroeconomic Impact of Oil Shocks in Asian Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Cunado, Juncal; Jo, Soojin; Perez de Gracia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the macroeconomic impact of oil shocks in four of the largest oil-consuming Asian economies, using a structural vector autoregressive model. We identify three different types of oil shocks via sign restrictions: an oil supply shock, an oil demand shock driven by global economic activity and an oil-specific demand shock. The main results suggest that economic activity and prices respond very differently to oil price shocks depending on their type. In addition, a country's o...

  10. Energy concentration by converging shock waves in gases

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellander, Malte

    2012-01-01

    Converging shock waves have been studied experimentally in a shock tube, and numerically using inviscid calculations and the theory of geometrical shock dynamics. The converging shock waves were created in a shocktube with two modular test sections designed to create cylindrical respectively spherical waves. In the spherical case the shock waves take the shape of spherical cap before propagating into a cone, while the cylindrical shocks converge in a fully circular cylindrical chamber. The dy...

  11. Fundamentals of Non-relativistic Collisionless Shock Physics: III. Quasi-Perpendicular Supercritical Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A

    2008-01-01

    The theory and simulations of quasi-perpendicular and strictly perpendicular collisionless shocks are reviewed. The text is structured into the following sections and subsections: 1. Setting the frame, where the quasi-perpendicular shock problem is formulated, reflected particle dynamics is described in theoretical terms, foot formation and foot ion acceleration discussed, and the shock potential explained. 2. Shock structure, 3. Ion dynamics, describing its role in shock reformation and the various ion-excited instabilities. 4. Electron dynamics, describing electron instabilities in the foot; 5. The problem of stationarity, posing the theoretical reasons for shocks being non-stationary, discussing nonlinear whistler mediated variability, two-stream and modified two-stream variability, formation of ripples in two-dimensions, 6. Summary and conclusions: The possibility of shock breaking.

  12. Design of a magnetorheological automotive shock absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindler, Jason E.; Dimock, Glen A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2000-06-01

    Double adjustable shock absorbers allow for independent adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping in the force versus velocity response. To emulate the performance of a conventional double adjustable shock absorber, a magnetorheological (MR) automotive shock absorber was designed and fabricated at the University of Maryland. Located in the piston head, an applied magnetic field between the core and flux return increases the force required for a given piston rod velocity. Between the core and flux return, two different shaped gaps meet the controllable performance requirements of a double adjustable shock. A uniform gap between the core and the flux return primarily adjusts the yield force of the shock absorber, while a non-uniform gap allows for control of the post-yield damping. Force measurements from sinusoidal displacement cycles, recorded on a mechanical damper dynamometer, validate the performance of uniform and non- uniform gaps for adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping, respectively.

  13. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  14. Electrostatic shock dynamics in superthermal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sultana, S; Kourakis, I

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of ion acoustic shocks in nonthermal plasmas is investigated, both analytically and numerically. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a superthermal (non-Maxwellian) electron distribution, which is modeled by a $\\kappa$- (kappa) distribution function. Adopting a multiscale approach, it is shown that the dynamics of low-amplitude shocks is modeled by a hybrid Korteweg-de Vries -- Burgers (KdVB) equation, in which the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients are functions of the $\\kappa$ parameter, while the dissipative coefficient is a linear function of the ion viscosity. All relevant shock parameters are shown to depend on $\\kappa$: higher deviations from a pure Maxwellian behavior induce shocks which are narrower, faster and of larger amplitude. The stability profile of the kink-shaped solutions of the KdVB equation against external perturbations is investigated and the spatial profile of the shocks is found to depend upon and the role of the interplay betw...

  15. Dust suspensions accelerated by shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, J.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Sci. and Technol. (China). Dept. of Power Eng.; Groenig, H. [Shock Wave Laboratory Technical University of Aachen D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The motion of dust suspensions accelerated by shock waves has been experimentally investigated in a vertical shock tube, in which a completely developed plane shock wave of moderate strength propagates into a homogeneously distributed dust suspension with a planar interface. Trajectories of the accelerated interfaces as well as transmitted and reflected shock waves are recorded by using a shadowgraph system with a Cranz-Schardin camera. Two kinds of particle samples, i.e. porous lycopodium particles 30 {mu}m in diameter and corn starch particles with a mean diameter of 10 {mu}m, are employed. The effects of shock wave strength and particle loading ratio are also examined. Experimental data are compared with theoretical results, and the agreement is good. (orig.)

  16. Strong imploding shock - The representative curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, E. A.; Alejaldre, C.

    1981-02-01

    The representative curve of the ideal gas behind the front of a spherically or cylindrically asymmetric strong imploding shock is derived. The partial differential equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations by the method of quasi-separation of variables, following which the reduced pressure and density as functions of the radius with respect to the shock front are explicit functions of coordinates defining the phase plane of the self-similar solution. The curve in phase space representing the state of the imploded gas behind the shock front is shown to pass through the point where the reduced pressure is maximum, which is located somewhat behind the shock front and ahead of the tail of the shock.

  17. Ion acceleration processes at reforming collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, R E; Dendy, R O

    2004-01-01

    The identification of pre-acceleration mechanisms for cosmic ray ions in supernova remnant shocks is an important problem in astrophysics. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) shock simulations have shown that inclusion of the full electron kinetics yields non-time-stationary solutions, in contrast to previous hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations. Here, by running a PIC code at high phase space resolution, ion acceleration mechanisms associated with the time dependence of a supercritical collisionless perpendicular shock are examined. In particular the components of $\\int \\mathbf{F} \\cdot \\mathbf{v} dt$ are analysed along trajectories for ions that reach both high and low energies. Selection mechanisms for the ions that reach high energies are also examined. In contrast to quasi-stationary shock solutions, the suprathermal protons are selected from the background population on the basis of the time at which they arrive at the shock, and thus are generated in bursts.

  18. Shocks, Star Formation, and the JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is constantly evolving due to unremitting injection of energy in various forms. Energetic radiation transfers energy to the ISM: from the UV photons, emitted by the massive stars, to X- and $\\gamma$-ray ones. Cosmic rays are another source of energy. Finally, mechanical energy is injected through shocks or turbulence. Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies. They are associated to star formation (through jets and bipolar outflows), life (via stellar winds), and death (in AGB stellar winds or supernovae explosion). The dynamical processes leading to the formation of molecular clouds also generate shocks where flows of interstellar matter collide. Because of their ubiquity, the study of interstellar shocks is also a useful probe to the other mechanisms of energy injection in the ISM. This study must be conducted in order to understand the evolution of the ISM as a whole, and to address various questions: what is the peculiar chemistry associated to shocks, and ...

  19. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2015-01-01

    We explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud of fossil relativistic electrons in the cluster periphery. Such a scenario could explain uniformity of the surface brightness and spectral curvature in the integrated spectra of thin arc-like radio relics. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. The surface brightness profile of radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated as well. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed $u_s \\sim 3,000 \\kms$ and sonic Mach number $M_s \\sim 3$. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over $(0.1-10) \

  20. OBLIQUE SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION FROM THE WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Regular and Mach (irregular reflection of an oblique shock wave from the wall is considered. Criteria for the transition from regular to irregular reflection are described: von Neumann criterion and the criterion for fixed Mach configuration. Specific incident shock wave intensities corresponding to the two criteria for the transition from regular to irregular reflection were plotted. The area of ambiguity solutions was demonstrated in which both regular and Mach reflection is not prohibited by the conditions of dynamic compatibility. Areas in which the transition from one type of reflection to another is possible only by a shock wave were described, as well as areas of a possible smooth transition. Dependence of the magnitude of this abrupt change in reflected discontinuity intensity from the intensity of the incident shock wave was plotted. Intensity dependences of the reflected discontinuity from the intensity of the shock wave incident on the wall for all types of reflections were shown.

  1. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  2. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig

  3. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  4. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  5. On engineering reliability concepts and biological aging

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim S. Finkelstein

    2006-01-01

    Some stochastic approaches to biological aging modeling are studied. We assume that an organism acquires a random resource at birth. Death occurs when the accumulated dam-age (wear) exceeds this initial value, modeled by the discrete or continuous random vari-ables. Another source of death of an organism is also taken into account, when it occurs as a consequence of a shock or of a demand for energy, which is a generalization of the Strehler-Mildwan’s model (1960). Biological age based on the...

  6. Heat shock proteins and immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinZHAO; XueMeiXU; GuoxingSONG

    2005-01-01

    Being one of the most abundant intracellular proteins,heat shock proteins(HSPs) have many housekeeping functions which are crucial for the survival of organisms.In addition,some HSPs are new immunoactive molecules which play important roles in both adaptive and innate immunity.They could activate CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes,induce innate immune response including natural killer(NK) cell activation and cytokine secretion,and induce maturation of dendritic cells(DCs).These characteristics have been used for immunotherapy of various types of cancers and infectious disenses.This review focuses on the main HSP families——HSP70 and 90 families.The mechanism of HSPs’ function in eliciting immune response are elucidated and various forms of HSPs used in immunotherapy are discussed in details.At the end of this review,authors summarize clinical trials related to HSPs and evaluate their clinical efficacy.

  7. Shock waves on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable...

  8. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  9. Global Aeroheating Measurements of Shock-Shock Interactions on a Swept Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Berry, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of fin leading-edge radius and sweep angle on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interactions were investigated in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The cylindrical leading-edge fin models, with radii varied from 0.25 to 0.75 inches, represent wings or struts on hypersonic vehicles. A 9deg wedge generated a planar oblique shock at 16.7deg. to the flow that intersected the fin bow shock, producing a shock-shock interaction that impinged on the fin leading edge. The fin sweep angle was varied from 0deg (normal to the free-stream) to 15deg and 25deg swept forward. These cases were chosen to explore three characterized shock-shock interaction types. Global temperature data were obtained from the surface of the fused silica fins using phosphor thermography. Metal oil flow models with the same geometries as the fused silica models were used to visualize the streamline patterns for each angle of attack. High-speed zoom-schlieren videos were recorded to show the features and any temporal unsteadiness of the shock-shock interactions. The temperature data were analyzed using a one-dimensional semi-infinite method, as well as one- and two-dimensional finite-volume methods. These results were compared to determine the proper heat transfer analysis approach to minimize errors from lateral heat conduction due to the presence of strong surface temperature gradients induced by the shock interactions. The general trends in the leading-edge heat transfer behavior were similar for each explored shock-shock interaction type regardless of the leading-edge radius. However, the dimensional peak heat transfer coefficient augmentation increased with decreasing leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer output from the two-dimensional code was about 20% higher than the value from a standard, semi-infinite one-dimensional method.

  10. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  11. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Lichte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes. Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  12. Shock compaction of silicon carbide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of shock compaction experiments on SiC powder were carried out over a wide range of shock pressures and shock temperatures up to 30 GPa and 3400 K. Large changes in some physical properties and a variety of unique microstructures were observed in the shock-treated samples with changes in impact conditions. For an iron plate impactor, the optimum impact condition, which depends on the initial density, is 2.5 km sec-1 for 70% initial density and 2.0 km sec-1 for 50%. The best-sintered compact of SiC with 97% density and micro-Vicker's hardness of 2700 kg mm-2 was obtained under optimum conditions. Good compacts with high relative density and high strength exhibit the disruptive effects of the shock wave, which are indicated by microstrain increase and crystallite size reduction. The skin model is presented here in order to estimate the heterogeneous shock state which is realized under and after shock loading of the initial powder aggregates. (author)

  13. Biological programming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Bándi, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Biology offers a tremendous set of concepts that are potentially very powerfully usable for the software engineer, but they have been barely exploited hitherto. In this position paper we propose a fresh attempt to create the building blocks of a programming technology that could be as successful as life. A key guiding principle is to develop and make use of unambiguous definitions of the essential features of life.

  14. Biological radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the patent description, the biological radioprotector is deuterium depleted water, DDW, produced by vacuum distillation with an isotopic content lower than natural value. It appears as such or in a mixture with natural water and carbon dioxide. It can be used for preventing and reducing the ionizing radiation effects upon humans or animal organisms, exposed therapeutically, professionally or accidentally to radiation. The most significant advantage of using DDW as biological radioprotector results from its way of administration. Indeed no one of the radioprotectors currently used today can be orally administrated, what reduces the patients' compliance to prophylactic administrations. The biological radioprotector is an unnoxious product obtained from natural water, which can be administrated as food additive instead of drinking water. Dose modification factor is according to initial estimates around 1.9, what is a remarkable feature when one takes into account that the product is toxicity-free and side effect-free and can be administrated prophylactically as a food additive. A net radioprotective action of the deuterium depletion was evidenced experimentally in laboratory animals (rats) hydrated with DDW of 30 ppm D/(D+H) concentration as compared with normally hydrated control animals. Knowing the effects of irradiation and mechanisms of the acute radiation disease as well as the effects of administration of radiomimetic chemicals upon cellular lines of fast cell division, it appears that the effects of administrating DDW result from stimulation of the immunity system. In conclusion, the biological radioprotector DDW presents the following advantages: - it is obtained from natural products without toxicity; - it is easy to be administrated as a food additive, replacing the drinking water; - besides radioprotective effects, the product has also immunostimulative and antitumoral effects

  15. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  16. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  17. A merger shock in A2034

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Hopkins, Andrew M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Van Weeren, Reinout J., E-mail: matthew.owers@aao.gov.au [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present a 250 ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within ∼27° about the axis of symmetry of the edge, the density, temperature, and pressure drop abruptly by factors of 1.83{sub −0.08}{sup +0.09}, 1.85{sub −0.41}{sup +0.41}, and 3.4{sub −0.7}{sup +0.8}, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number M=1.59{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06} and corresponding shock velocity v {sub shock} ≅ 2057 km s{sup –1}. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph, we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy that is located just ahead of the nose of the shock. The data are consistent with a merger viewed within ∼23° of the plane of the sky. The merging subclusters are now moving apart along a north-south axis approximately 0.3 Gyr after a small impact parameter core passage. The gas core of the secondary subcluster, which was driving the shock, appears to have been disrupted by the merger. Without a driving 'piston,' we speculate that the shock is dying. Finally, we propose that the diffuse radio emission near the shock is due to the revival of pre-existing radio plasma that has been overrun by the shock.

  18. Spatial control of calcineurin in response to heat shock in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Mari; Kita, Ayako; Hagihara, Kanako; Kitai, Yuki; Doi, Akira; Nagasoko, Rie; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-02-01

    In fission yeast, Ppb1, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin regulates multiple biological processes, such as cytokinesis, Ca2+-homeostasis, membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. Calcineurin dephosphorylates the Prz1 transcription factor, leading to its nuclear translocation and gene expression under the control of CDRE (calcineurin-dependent response element). Although the calcineurin-mediated spatial control of downstream transcription factors has been intensively studied in many organisms, less is known about the spatial regulation of calcineurin on stresses. Here, we show that heat shock stimulates calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of Prz1 and CDRE-dependent gene expression. Notably, calcineurin exhibited a dramatic change in subcellular localization, translocating from diffuse cytoplasmic to dot-like structures on heat shock. The calcineurin dots colocalized with Dcp2 or Pabp, the constituent of P-bodies or stress granules, respectively, thus suggesting that calcineurin is a component of RNA granules under heat shock. Importantly, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 markedly inhibited the accumulation of calcineurin granules, whereas the constitutively active calcineurin strongly accumulated in the granules on heat shock, suggesting that phosphatase activity is important for calcineurin localization. Notably, the depletion of calcineurin induced a rapid appearance of Nrd1- and Pabp-positive RNA granules. The possible roles of calcineurin in response to heat shock will be discussed. PMID:25529221

  19. The Dynamic Behaviour and Shock Recovery of a Porcine Skeletal Muscle Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgeroth, James; Hazell, Paul; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth

    2011-06-01

    Modern-day ballistic armours provide a high degree of protection to the individual. However, the effects of non-penetrating projectiles, blast, and high-energy blunt impact events may still cause severe tissue trauma/remote injury. The energies corresponding to such events allow for the formation and transmission of shock waves within body tissues. Consequently, the nature of trauma inflicted upon such soft tissues is likely to be intimately linked to their interaction with the shock waves that propagate through them. Notably, relatively little is known about the effect of shock upon the structure of biological materials, such as skeletal muscle tissue. In this study plate-impact experiments have been used to interrogate the dynamic response of a porcine skeletal muscle tissue under one-dimensional shock loading conditions. Additionally, development of a soft-capture system that has allowed recovery of shocked skeletal muscle tissue specimens is discussed and comparison made between experimental diagnostics and hydrocode simulations of the experiment.

  20. The effects of drying following heat shock exposure of the desert moss Syntrichia caninervis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shujun; Liu Chunjiang [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jiang Pingan [College of Pratacultural and Environmental Science, Xinjiang Agricultural University, Urumqi 830052 (China); Cai Weimin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang Yan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: xusj@mail.sjtu.edu.cn

    2009-03-15

    Desert mosses are components of biological soil crusts (BSCs) and their ecological functions make assessment and protection of these mosses a high-ranking management priority in desert regions. Drying is thought to be useful for desert mosses surviving heat shock. In this study, we investigated the role of drying by monitoring the responses of physiological characters and asexual reproduction in the typical desert moss Syntrichia caninervis. Heat significantly decreased chlorophyll content and weakened rapid recovery of photochemical activity, and increased carotenoid content and membrane permeability. Lethal temperatures significantly destroyed shoot regeneration potential. In comparison with heat alone, drying significantly increased protonema emergence time and depressed protonema emergence area. Drying combined with heat accelerated water loss, followed by a decrease of photosynthetic activity. Drying had different influences on membrane permeability at different temperatures. When moss leaves were subjected to a combined stress of drying and heat shock, photosynthesis was maintained mainly due to the effects of drying on physiological activity although the cellular morphological integrity was affected. Drying caused opposing effects on moss physiological and reproductive characteristics. On the one hand, drying caused a positive synergistic effect with heat shock when the temperature was below 40 deg. C. On the other hand, drying showed antagonism with heat shock when the moss was subjected to temperatures higher than 40 deg. C. These findings may help in understanding the survival mechanism of dessert mosses under heat shock stress which will be helpful for the artificial reconstruction of BSCs.

  1. Coherent Raman Studies of Shocked Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Shawn; Brown, Kathryn; Dang, Nhan; Bolme, Cynthia; Moore, David

    2013-06-01

    Transient vibrational spectroscopies offer the potential to directly observe time dependent shock induced chemical reaction kinetics. We report recent experiments that couple a hybrid picosecond/femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) diagnostic with our tabletop ultrafast laser driven shock platform. Initial results on liquids shocked to 20 GPa suggest that sub-picosecond dephasing at high pressure and temperature may limit the application of this nonresonant background free version of CARS. Initial results using interferometric CARS to increase sensitivity and overcome these limitations will be presented.

  2. Existence and stability of viscoelastic shock profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Blake; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate existence and stability of viscoelastic shock profiles for a class of planar models including the incompressible shear case studied by Antman and Malek-Madani. We establish that the resulting equations fall into the class of symmetrizable hyperbolic--parabolic systems, hence spectral stability implies linearized and nonlinear stability with sharp rates of decay. The new contributions are treatment of the compressible case, formulation of a rigorous nonlinear stability theory, including verification of stability of small-amplitude Lax shocks, and the systematic incorporation in our investigations of numerical Evans function computations determining stability of large-amplitude and or nonclassical type shock profiles.

  3. Existence and Stability of Viscoelastic Shock Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Blake; Lewicka, Marta; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    We investigate existence and stability of viscoelastic shock profiles for a class of planar models including the incompressible shear case studied by Antman and Malek-Madani. We establish that the resulting equations fall into the class of symmetrizable hyperbolic-parabolic systems, hence spectral stability implies linearized and nonlinear stability with sharp rates of decay. The new contributions are treatment of the compressible case, formulation of a rigorous nonlinear stability theory, including verification of stability of small-amplitude Lax shocks, and the systematic incorporation in our investigations of numerical Evans function computations determining stability of large-amplitude and nonclassical type shock profiles.

  4. Nonequilibrium volumetric response of shocked polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, B E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior. However, investigations involving both high rate shock experiments and equilibrium measured thermodynamic quantities remind us that the volumetric behavior also exhibits a non-equilibrium response. Experiments supporting the notion of a non-equilibrium volumetric behavior will be summarized. Following that discussion, a continuum-level theory is proposed that will account for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium response. Upon finding agreement with experiment, the theory is used to study the relaxation of a shocked polymer back towards its shocked equilibrium state.

  5. Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D2 and H2 up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems

  6. Fiscal Shocks and Fiscal Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd-Ellis, H.; Xiaodong Zhu

    1998-01-01

    We use the returns on a set of international financial securities to identify exogenous shocks to the Canadian federal surplus. We find that a large portion of the variation in the surplus can be replicated by a linear combination of these returns and that the rising debt observed in the 1980s and 1990s was a result of adverse exogenous shocks and a delayed response by the government to these shocks. We develop a formal framework to evaluate the potential gains from a fiscal risk management s...

  7. Clinico-Pathological aspects of Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni M.D.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Shock can be defined as “a common grave medical emergency characterised basically by reduction in the effective circulating blood volume and blood pressure”. (Robbins or as “Disparity between the volume of blood and the volume capacity of the vascular system” which cause inability of body tissue to metabolise nutrients due to inadequate oxygen supply. Shock can be classified into: Primary and Secondary.Cardiogenic, Vasogenic, Hematogenic, Neurogenic and Electrocution. The therapy includes Blood, Plasma, Saline transfusion, antibiotic, antihistaminic, hyperimmune serum, vasoconstrictor according to the cause of the shock. [Vet. World 2009; 2(4.000: 163-165

  8. Radiation influence on shock wave stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers the shock wave dissociates and ionizes the gaz where it is propagating. Experimental results show that a front bifurcation occurs when the shock wave is strong and leads to high temperature in shock heated zone. An attempt to study this relation is carried here. One would take in account the thermoradiative exchange with the front when strong temperature growth exists. Particularly, the plasma free energy calculation must be done under thermoradiative exchange condition i.e. to take in account the radiation free energy

  9. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Justesen, Mogens Kamp

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals' evaluations of well-being. We do so by using......-treatment respondents, surveyed after the devaluation. Our estimates show that the devaluation had a large and significantly negative effect on individuals' evaluations of subjective well-being. These results suggest that macroeconomic shocks, such as unanticipated currency devaluations, may have significant short......-term costs in the form of reductions in people's sense of well-being...

  10. Shock acceleration in partially neutral plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Morlino, G.; Amato, E.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Caprioli, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present the non-linear theory of shock acceleration applied to SNRs expanding into partially neutral plasma. Using this theory we show how the Balmer lines detected from young SNRs can be used to test the efficiency of shocks in the production of cosmic rays. In particular we investigate the effect of charge-exchange between protons and neutral hydrogen occurring in the precursor formed ahead of the shock. In this precursor the CR pressure accelerate the ionized component of the plasma and...

  11. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Justesen, Mogens Kamp

    This paper examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals’ evaluations of well-being. We do so by using......-treatment respondents, surveyed after the devaluation. Our estimates show that the devaluation had a large and significantly negative effect on individuals’ evaluations of subjective well-being. These results suggest that macroeconomic shocks, such as unanticipated currency devaluations, may have significant short......-term costs in the form of reductions in people’s sense of well-being....

  12. Cold Fronts by Merging of Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Birnboim, Yuval; Keshet, Uri; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Cold fronts (CFs) are found in most galaxy clusters, as well as in some galaxies and groups of galaxies. We propose that some CFs are relics of merging between two shocks propagating in the same direction. Such shock mergers typically result in a quasi-spherical, factor ~1.4-2.7 discontinuity in density and in temperature. These CFs may be found as far out as the virial shock, unlike what is expected in other CF formation models. As a demonstration of this effect, we use one dimensional simul...

  13. Injection to rapid diffusive shock acceleration at perpendicular shocks in partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and the upstream ionization fraction are Vsh ~ 1333 km/s and fi ~ 0.5, that are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region, they are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected to the diffusive shock acceleration at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed diffusive shock acceleration can be interpreted as the shock drift acceleration with scattering. Particles are accelerated to v ~ 100 Vsh ~ 0.3c within ~ 100 gyroperio...

  14. Cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction; prognostic impact of early and late shock development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, M G; Køber, L; Boesgaard, S;

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiogenic shock accounts for the majority of deaths following acute myocardial infarction. The majority of outcome data on this issue are, however, derived from single hospitals, referral centers or selected patients in randomized studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate...... incidence, outcome and prognostic significance of cardiogenic shock in 6676 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Demographic and clinical data including the presence of cardiogenic shock were prospectively collected in 6676 non-invasively managed patients with...... myocardial infarction consecutively admitted to 27 different hospitals during a 2-year period. Six-year mortality data were collected in 99.9% of the population. Cardiogenic shock developed in 444 patients (6.7%). In 59% of these patients cardiogenic shock developed within 48 h, 11% developed shock during...

  15. Diffusive shock acceleration at laser driven shocks: studying cosmic-ray accelerators in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Reville, B; Gregori, G

    2012-01-01

    The non-thermal particle spectra responsible for the emission from many astrophysical systems are thought to originate from shocks via a first order Fermi process otherwise known as diffusive shock acceleration. The same mechanism is also widely believed to be responsible for the production of high energy cosmic rays. With the growing interest in collisionless shock physics in laser produced plasmas, the possibility of reproducing and detecting shock acceleration in controlled laboratory experiments should be considered. The various experimental constraints that must be satisfied are reviewed. It is demonstrated that several currently operating laser facilities may fulfil the necessary criteria to confirm the occurrence of diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at laser produced shocks. Successful reproduction of Fermi acceleration in the laboratory could open a range of possibilities, providing insight into the complex plasma processes that occur near astrophysical sources of cosmic rays.

  16. Effect of leading edge sweep on shock-shock interference at Mach 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    These Mach 8 experimental results are applicable to the details of a shock-shock interference that may occur on an engine inlet of a hypersonic vehicle from a swept forebody shock interacting with a swept cowl leading edge bow shock or from a swept splitter plate shock interacting with a swept fuel injection strut bow shock. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 deg and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results shows that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  17. Shock Analysis on a Packaged Washing Machine from Damage Boundary: Shock Response Spectrum to Component Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Qian; Heping Cai; Weiwei Ma; Zhiwei Hao

    2015-01-01

    Both analyses of the damage boundary and shock response spectrum (RSR) are the basis for the development of the protective packaging system. The shock analysis through lab test and numerical simulation found that the root cause of packaging failure was due to the stress of the critical component beyond the yield limit of the material. Lab shock test data showed that the packaging design based on the damage boundary is conservative, and the RSR could be helpful and provide support to develop m...

  18. Septic Shock Due to Candidemia: Outcomes and Predictors of Shock Development

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Jorge A.; Tchokonte, Ronny; Sobel, Jack D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The present report describes the outcomes of a cohort of patients with Candida induced septic shock. Methods Retrospective analysis of individuals who had at least one positive blood culture for Candida species ≥ 48 h after ICU admission. Data from patients that developed septic shock within 48 hr of the positive blood culture were compared to non-shock candidemic patients. Patients with a concomitant bacteremia and/or endocarditis were excluded. Results Fifteen patients with Candi...

  19. Long-term physical outcome in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J B; Møller, K; Kehlet, H;

    2009-01-01

    Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock.......Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock....

  20. Investigation of pyrotechnic shock. [for spacecraft structural tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, S. N.

    1974-01-01

    Review of comparative pyrotechnic shock outputs of various electro-explosive release devices that have been obtained in tests of an instrumented spacecraft structure. This research uses pyrotechnic shock spectra levels as an indicator of shock environment severity in support of a program of pyrotechnic device analysis and redesign intended to reduce shock generation.

  1. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Shock Wave Surfing

    CERN Document Server

    Parziale, N J; Hornung, H G; Shepherd, J E

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave surfing is investigated experimentally in GALCIT's Mach 4.0 Ludwieg Tube. Shock wave surfing occurs when a secondary free-body follows the bow shock formed by a primary free-body; an example of shock wave surfing occurs during meteorite breakup. The free-bodies in the current investigation are nylon spheres. During each run in the Ludwieg tube a high speed camera is used to capture a series of schlieren images; edge tracking software is used to measure the position of each sphere. Velocity and acceleration are had from processing the position data. The radius ratio and initial orientation of the two spheres are varied in the test matrix. The variation of sphere radius ratio and initial angle between the centers of gravity are shown to have a significant effect on the dynamics of the system.

  3. Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Shock waves in multiphase flows refers to a rich variety of phenomena of interest to physicists, chemists, and fluid dynamicists, as well as mechanical, biomedical and aeronautical engineers. This volume treats shock and expansion waves in (bullet) complex, bubbly liquids (L van Wijngaarden, Y Tomita, V Kedrinskii) and (bullet) cryogenic liquids (M Murakami) and examines the relationship of shock waves with (bullet) phase transitions (A Guha, CF Delale, G Schnerr, MEH van Dongen) (bullet) induced phase transitions (GEA Meier) as well as their interaction with (bullet) solid foams, textiles, porous and granular media (B Skews, DMJ Smeulders, MEH van Dongen, V Golub, O Mirova) All chapters are self-contained, so they can be read independently, although they are of course thematically interrelated. Taken together, they offer a timely reference on shock waves in multiphase flows, including new viewpoints and burgeoning developments. The book will appeal to beginners as well as professional scientists and engineer...

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present molecular dynamic simulations of the shock compression of graphite with the LCBOPII potential. The range of shock intensities covers the full range of available experimental data, including near-tera-pascal pressures. The results are in excellent agreement with the available DFT data and point to a graphite-diamond transition for shock pressures above 65 GPa, a value larger than the experimental data (20 to 50 GPa). The transition mechanism leads preferentially to hexagonal diamond through a diffusion-less process but is submitted to irreversible re-graphitization upon release: this result is in good agreement with the lack of highly ordered diamond observed in post-mortem experimental samples. Melting is found for shock pressures ranging from 200 to 300 GPa, close to the approximate LCBOPII diamond melting line. A good overall agreement is found between the calculated and experimental Hugoniot data up to 46% compression rate. (authors)

  5. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H; Nataraj, S K; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics. PMID:22120413

  6. Analysis of Z Pinch Shock Wave Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report details of our computational study of two shock wave physics experiments performed on the Sandia Z machine in 1998. The novelty of these particular experiments is that they represent the first successful application of VISAR interferometry to diagnose shock waves generated in experimental payloads by the primary X-ray pulse of the machine. We use the Sandia shock-wave physics code ALEGRA to perform the simulations reported in this study. Our simulations are found to be in fair agreement with the time-resolved VISAR experimental data. However, there are also interesting and important discrepancies. We speculate as to future use of time-resolved shock wave data to diagnose details of the Z machine X-ray pulse in the future

  7. Density shock waves in confined microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from `subsonic' with compression at the back to `supersonic' with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a non-trivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechan...

  8. Adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension for shock mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    An adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension (AMSS) was analyzed for optimal protection of occupants from shock loads caused by the impact of a helicopter with the ground. The AMSS system consists of an adaptive linear stroke magnetorheological shock absorber (MRSA) integrated into the seat structure of a helicopter. The MRSA provides a large controllability yield force to accommodate a wide spectrum for shock mitigation. A multiple degrees-of-freedom nonlinear biodynamic model for a 50th percentile male occupant was integrated with the dynamics of MRSA and the governing equations of motion were investigated theoretically. The load-stroke profile of MRSA was optimized with the goal of minimizing the potential for injuries. The MRSA yield force and the shock absorber stroke limitations were the most crucial parameters for improved biodynamic response mitigation. An assessment of injuries based on established injury criteria for different body parts was carried out.

  9. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  10. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics

  11. Comments on ''Analysis of spherical imploding shocks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is asserted that Fujimoto and Mishkin's article is incorrect in its claim for a pressure extremum at or behind the shock for all values of γ and in its claim for an analytical form for the similarity exponent

  12. Thresholds in shock response across the elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, F. L.; Bourne, N. K.; CMEC Team

    2015-06-01

    Compendia of shock data have been assembled across national laboratories across the world. Previous work has shown a threshold in behaviour for materials; the weak shock limit. This corresponds the stress state at which the shock is overdriven in a single front. The shock velocity-particle velocity data for elements and compounds has been systematically analysed to note discontinuities in the data. A range of materials show these features and the form of the discontinuity in each case is analysed. Some correspond to martensitic phase transformations as expected whilst others are more difficult to track down. Particular groups within the elements show characteristic forms according to groupings in the periodic table. The datasets are presented and trends are noted.

  13. Anisotropic Shock Propagation in Single Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Cox, J; Unites, W; Collins, G; McWilliams, R; Jeanloz, R; Bruygoo, S; Loubeyre, P

    2005-05-26

    Most single-crystal shock experiments have been performed in high-symmetry directions while the nature of shock propagation in low-symmetry directions remains relatively unstudied. It is well known that small-amplitude, linear acoustic waves propagating in low-symmetry directions can focus and/or form caustics (Wolfe, 1995). In this report we provide evidence for similar focusing behavior in nonlinear (shock) waves propagating in single crystals of silicon and diamond. Using intense lasers, we have driven non-planar (divergent geometry) shock waves through single-crystals of silicon or diamond and into an isotropic backing plate. On recovery of the backing plates we observe a depression showing evidence of anisotropic plastic strain with well-defined crystallographic registration. We observe 4-, 2-, and 3-fold symmetric impressions for [100], [110], and [111] oriented crystals respectively.

  14. SPECIAL PURPOSE SHOCK TUBE for BLAST ASSESSMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This device is a specially designed shock tube for testing fabric samples in a controlled environment. The device determines the appropriate types of sensors to be...

  15. Tribology Aspect of Rubber Shock Absorbers Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Banić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubber is a very flexible material with many desirable properties Which enable its broad use in engineering practice. Rubber or rubber-metal springs are widely used as anti-vibration or anti-shock components in technical systems. Rubber-metal springs are usually realized as a bonded assembly, however especially in shock absorbers, it is possible to realize free contacts between rubber and metal parts. In previous research it authors was observed that friction between rubber and metal in such case have a significant influence on the damping characteristics of shock absorber. This paper analyzes the development process of rubber or rubber-metal shock absorbers realized free contacts between the constitutive parts, starting from the design, construction, testing and operation, with special emphasis on the development of rubber-metal springs for the buffing and draw gear of railway vehicles.

  16. Gamow Vectors Explain the Shock "Batman" Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Conti, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The description of shock waves beyond the shock point is a challenge in nonlinear physics. Finding solutions to the global dynamics of dispersive shock waves is not always possible due to the lack of integrability. Here we propose a new method based on the eigenstates (Gamow vectors) of a reversed harmonic oscillator in a rigged Hilbert space. These vectors allow analytical formulation for the development of undular bores of shock waves in a nonlinear nonlocal medium. Experiments by a photothermal induced nonlinearity confirm theoretical predictions: as the undulation period as a function of power and the characteristic quantized decays of Gamow vectors. Our results demonstrate that Gamow vector are a novel and effective paradigm for describing extreme nonlinear phenomena.

  17. Analytical modeling of the steady radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, L.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Clique, C.

    2006-06-01

    In a paper dated 2000 [1], a fully analytical theory of the radiative shock has been presented. This early model had been used to design [2] radiative shock experiments at the Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers (LULI) [3 5]. It became obvious from numerical simulations [6, 7] that this model had to be improved in order to accurately recover experiments. In this communication, we present a new theory in which the ionization rates in the unshocked (bar{Z_1}) and shocked (bar{Z_2} neq bar{Z_1}) material, respectively, are included. Associated changes in excitation energy are also taken into account. We study the influence of these effects on the compression and temperature in the shocked medium.

  18. Design and fabrication of magnetic shock absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gopinath

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In a vehicle, shock absorber reduces the effect of travelling over rough ground, without shock absorber the vehicle would have a bouncing ride, as an energy is stored in the spring and then released to the vehicle, possibly exceeding the allow range of suspension movement [1]. Control of excessive suspension movement without shock absorption requires stiffer springs, which would intern gives a harsh ride. Shock absorber allows the use of soft springs while controlling the rate of suspension movement in response to bumps [2]. In this project a new suspension system based on magnetic power which can be used in automobile in future. The suspension system consists of magnets freely moving inside the cylinder with their same poles facing each other. Since the magnetic poles repel each other while moving closer, the up and down spring action is obtained.   Keywords: Suspension System, Magnetic Power, Magnetic Poles.

  19. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book, as a volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library, is primarily concerned with detonation waves or compression shock waves in reactive heterogeneous media, including mixtures of solid, liquid and gas phases. The topics involve a variety of energy release and control processes in such media - a contemporary research field that has found wide applications in propulsion and power, hazard prevention as well as military engineering. The six extensive chapters contained in this volume are: - Spray Detonation (SB Murray and PA Thibault) - Detonation of Gas-Particle Flow (F Zhang) - Slurry Detonation (DL Frost and F Zhang) - Detonation of Metalized Composite Explosives (MF Gogulya and MA Brazhnikov) - Shock-Induced Solid-Solid Reactions and Detonations (YA Gordopolov, SS Batsanov, and VS Trofimov) - Shock Ignition of Particles (SM Frolov and AV Fedorov) Each chapter is self-contained and can be read independently of the others, though, they are thematically interrelated. They offer a t...

  20. Relative frequencies of seismic main shocks after strong shocks in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara; Vannucci, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed a catalog of Italian earthquakes, covering 55 years of data from 1960 to 2014 with magnitudes homogeneously converted to Mw, to compute the time-dependent relative frequencies with which strong seismic shocks (4.0≤Mwearthquakes (with Mw≥6.0) mainly occurred within two or three months of the strong shock. The frequency gains vary from about 10000 for very short time intervals to less than 10 for a time interval of two years. Only about one-third of main shocks were preceded by at least a strong shock in the previous day and about one-half in the previous month.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  2. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  3. Relative locations of the bow shocks of the terrestrial planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed bow shock encounters at Mercury, Venus and Mars are least square fit using the same technique so that their sizes and shapes can be intercompared. The shock front of Mercury most resembles the terrestrial shock in shape, and the shock stand off distance is consistent with the observed moment. The shapes of the Venus and Mars shock fronts more resemble each other than the earth's and the stand off distances are consistent with direct interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere on the dayside. The Venus shock is closer to the planet than the Mars shock suggesting more absorption of the solar wind at Venus

  4. Pressurized-thermal-shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the ORNL pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) experiments is to verify analytical methods that are used to predict the behavior of pressurized-water-reactor vessels under these accident conditions involving combined pressure and thermal loading. The criteria on which the experiments are based are: scale large enough to attain effective flaw border triaxial restraint and a temperature range sufficiently broad to produce a progression from frangible to ductile behavior through the wall at a given time; use of materials that can be completely characterized for analysis; stress states comparable to the actual vessel in zones of potential flaw extension; range of behavior to include cleavage initiation and arrest, cleavage initiation and arrest on the upper shelf, arrest in a high K/sub I/ gradient, warm prestressing, and entirely ductile behavior; long and short flaws with and without stainless steel cladding; and control of loads to prevent vessel burst, except as desired. A PTS test facility is under construction which will enable the establishment and control of wall temperature, cooling rate, and pressure on an intermediate test vessel (ITV) in order to simulate stress states representative of an actual reactor pressure vessel

  5. heavy ion acceleration at shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, V. I.; Galinsky, V.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical study of alpha particle acceleration at a quasi-parallel shock due to interaction with Alfven waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model [1]. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or dumped and hence particles will be pitch--angle scattered as well as the change of the wave energy due to instability or damping. It includes in consideration the total distribution function (the bulk plasma and high energy tail), so no any assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles) are required. In previous studies heavy ions were treated as perfect test particles, they only experienced the Alfven turbulence excited by protons and didn’t contribute to turbulence generation. In contrast to this approach, we consider the ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves. It is important for alpha particles with their relatively large mass-loading parameter that defines efficiency of the wave excitation by alpha particles. The energy spectra of alpha particles is found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation. [1] Galinsky, V.L., and V.I. Shevchenko, Astrophys. J., 669, L109, 2007.

  6. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy -absorption capability

  7. Thermal shock resistant ceramic insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specification is given for thermal shock resistant cermet insulators which contain 0.1 to 20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. They are prepared by (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, the metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide the desired cermet insulator. Examples of the ceramics include BN, B4C, ZrO2, WO3, BeO, Y2O3, TaO, the lanthanide oxides, the oxides of uranium, the oxides of thorium, the oxides of niobium. Examples of the metal precursor include TaHsub(0.5), UH3, ZrH2, ThH2, W(CO)6, ReCl3, WO3 MoO3. (author)

  8. Public Investment, Revenue Shocks, and Borrowing Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, Thiess; David E. Wildasin

    2010-01-01

    This paper lays out a theory of taxation and public investment in an intertemporal setting under conditions of revenue shocks. Without borrowing restrictions, the optimal policy is characterized by smooth time paths of taxes and public investment. While the introduction of formal borrowing restrictions leads to some precautionary savings, it gives rise to fluctuations in public investment in response to adverse but also favorable revenue shocks. This theoretical result is tested empirically u...

  9. Heat shock proteins in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Jacqueline H L Fok; Davies, Faith E.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones with a central role in protein folding and cellular protein homeostasis. They also play major roles in the development of cancer and in recent years have emerged as promising therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the known molecular mechanisms of various heat shock protein families and their involvement in cancer and in particular, multiple myeloma. In addition, we address the current progress and challenges in pharmacologically targeting...

  10. Learning Financial Shocks and the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Suda; Patrick Pintus

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a simple business-cycle model in which financial shocks have large macroeconomic effects when private agents are gradually learning their uncertain environment. When agents update their beliefs about the parameters that govern the unobserved process driving financial shocks to the leverage ratio, the responses of output and other aggregates under adaptive learning are significantly larger than under rational expectations. In our benchmark case calibrated using US data on l...

  11. Learning Leverage Shocks and the Great Recession.

    OpenAIRE

    Pintus, P. A.; Suda, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a simple business-cycle model in which financial shocks have large macroeconomic effects when private agents are gradually learning their economic environment. When agents update their beliefs about the unobserved process driving financial shocks to the leverage ratio, the responses of output and other aggregates under adaptive learning are significantly larger than under rational expectations. In our benchmark case calibrated using US data on leverage, debt-to-GDP and lan...

  12. Learning Financial Shocks and the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick A. Pintus; Suda, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a simple business-cycle model in which financial shocks have large macroeconomic effects when private agents are gradually learning their economic environment. When agents update their beliefs about the unobserved process driving financial shocks to the leverage ratio, the responses of output and other aggregates under adaptive learning are significantly larger than under rational expectations. In our benchmark case calibrated using US data on leverage, debt-to-GDP and lan...

  13. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, E.

    2006-12-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from a few GeV to > 1020 eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of γ-ray burst (GRB) 'afterglows' provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars. Their 'afterglows', delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of γ-rays, are well accounted for by a model in which afterglow radiation is due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Within the framework of this model, some striking characteristics of collisionless relativistic shocks are implied. These include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ~1010 skin-depths downstream of the shock and the acceleration of particles to a power-law energy spectrum, d log n/d logɛ ap -2, possibly extending to 1020 eV. I review in this talk the phenomenological considerations, based on which these characteristics are inferred, and the challenges posed to our current models of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in collisionless shocks. Some recent theoretical results derived based on the assumption of a self-similar shock structure are briefly discussed. Invited review presented at the 33rd annual European Physical Society Conference, Rome, 2006.

  14. Small Price Responses to Large Demand Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Etienne; Lopez-Salido, J. David

    2014-01-01

    We study the pricing response of U.S. supermarkets to large demand shocks triggered by labor conflicts, mass population relocation, and shopping sprees around major snowstorms and hurricanes. Our focus on demand shocks is novel in the empirical literature that uses large datasets of individual data to bridge micro price behavior and aggregate price dynamics. We find that large swings in demand have, at best, modest effects on the level of retail prices, consistent with flat short- to medium-t...

  15. Small Price Responses to Large Demand Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Etienne; López-Salido, J David

    2015-01-01

    We study the pricing response of U.S. supermarkets to large demand shocks triggered by labor conflicts, mass population relocation, and shopping sprees around major snowstorms and hurricanes. We find that these large swings in demand have, at best, modest effects on the level of retail prices, consistent with flat short- to medium-term supply curves. This finding holds even when shocks are highly persistent and even though stores adjust prices frequently. We also uncover evidence that retaile...

  16. Picosecond Dynamics Behind the Shock Front

    OpenAIRE

    Dlott, D.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the microscopic details of shock-wave initiation of energetic materials requires a realistic picture of picosecond time scale processes occurring in large molecules located in an ≈100 nanometer thin layer just behind the front. In this paper, I discuss a theoretical model for shock wave induced chemistry which highlights the role of molecular mechanical energy transfer processes, especially multiphonon up-pumping. Picosecond laser measurements of multiphonon up-pumping in a high...

  17. Monetary shocks and the nominal interest rate

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the effects of monetary shocks on the nominal interest rate in a standard macroeconomic model. It is determined that, when the policy objective is controlling the money stock, money supply shocks generate a situation of excess demand for money. The positive relationship between nominal interest rates and monetary innovations in the United States following the 1979 change in regime is, thus, not puzzling but perfectly consistent with standard theory. Nominal interest rat...

  18. The dynamic quasiperpendicular shock: Cluster discoveries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Balikhin, M.; Walker, S. N.; Schwartz, S.; Sundkvist, D.; Lobzin, V.; Gedalin, M.; Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.; Souček, Jan; Hobara, Y.; Comisel, H.

    New York: Springer, 2014, s. 459-522. (Space Science Series of ISSI). ISBN 978-1-4899-7413-6 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : collisionless shocks * waves in plasmas * nonstationarity * shock scales * plasma heating and acceleration * wave-particle interactions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4899-7413-6_18

  19. The Dynamic Quasiperpendicular Shock: Cluster Discoveries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Balikhin, M.; Walker, S. N.; Schwartz, S.; Sundkvist, D.; Lobzin, V.; Gedalin, M.; Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.; Souček, Jan; Hobara, Y.; Comisel, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 178, 2-4 (2013), s. 535-598. ISSN 0038-6308 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : collisionless shocks * waves in plasmas * nonstationarity * shock scales * plasma heating and acceleration * wave-particle interactions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-013-9972-y

  20. Shock wave induced vaporization of porous solids

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Andy H.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; O'Keefe, John D.

    2003-01-01

    Strong shock waves generated by hypervelocity impact can induce vaporization in solid materials. To pursue knowledge of the chemical species in the shock-induced vapors, one needs to design experiments that will drive the system to such thermodynamic states that sufficient vapor can be generated for investigation. It is common to use porous media to reach high entropy, vaporized states in impact experiments. We extended calculations by Ahrens [J. Appl. Phys. 43, 2443 (1972)] and Ahrens and O'...

  1. Radio signature of cosmological structure formation shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeft, Matthias; Brueggen, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    In the course of the formation of cosmological structures, large shock waves are generated in the intra-cluster medium. In analogy to processes in supernova remnants, these shock waves may generate a significant population of relativistic electrons which, in turn, produce observable synchrotron emission. The extended radio relics found at the periphery of several clusters and possibly also a fraction of radio halo emission may have this origin. Here we derive an analytic expression for (i) th...

  2. L1-stability of stationary discrete shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear stability in the Lp-norm, p ≥ 1, of stationary weak discrete shocks for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme approximating general m x m systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws is proved, provided that the summations of the initial perturbations equal zero. The result is proved by using a both weighted estimate and characteristic energy method based on the internal structures of the discrete shocks and the essential monotonicity of the Lax-Friedrichs scheme. 13 refs

  3. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Tudorache, Marion; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropi...

  4. Scaling the electromagnetically driven explosive shock simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persh, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    A heavy payload electromagnetically driven explosive shock simulator, referred to as EDESS-3, has been assembled and characterized at the Navel research Weapons Center. EDESS-3 is the logical outgrowth of the earlier EDESS 1 and 2 simulator work which explored the use of electrical pulse power technology for the generation of explosive like shocks. The features of the EDESS-3 are presented, and designs for the next generation of EDESS machines are introduced.

  5. Terrorism Shocks and Stock Market Reaction Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Kallandranis, Christos; Drakos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    In this Policy Briefing, we discuss two important questions: (i) whether and how terrorism shocks are transmitted across international stock markets, (ii) what is the role of behavioral factors in explaining these stock market reactions. According to our findings terrorism shocks are indeed diffused cross-nationally in a non-uniform manner. Economic channels such as the degree of a country's integration with the world market, its liquidity and its ties to the zeroground country are found to p...

  6. Motor simulation of a shock absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, Brian

    1996-01-01

    The use of modern control theory to produce an electrical motor simulation of a Formula 1, Grand Pnx, passive motorcycle front suspension shock absorber is investigated. It is shown, using a test-rig comprising two permanent magnet DC motors directly coupled, that desired shock absorber responses to load forces can be achieved using model reference control. The controller feedback in this test rig is provided via a high resolution rotary position sensor. A stochastic Kalman filter is used to ...

  7. Explaining the Effects of Government Spending Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Zubairy, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify and explain effects of a government spending shock. After accounting for large military events, I find that in response to a structural unanticipated government spending shock, output, hours, consumption and wages all rise, whereas investment falls on impact. I construct and estimate a dynamic general equilibrium model featuring deep habit formation and show that it successfully explains these effects. In particular, deep habits give rise to count...

  8. Electron dynamics of shocked polyethylene crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Theofanis, Patrick L.; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A.; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron force field (eFF) wave-packet molecular-dynamics simulations of the single shock Hugoniot are reported for a crystalline polyethylene (PE) model. The eFF results are in good agreement with previous density-functional theories and experimental data, which are available up to 80 GPa. We predict shock Hugoniots for PE up to 350 GPa. In addition, we analyze the structural transformations that occur due to heating. Our analysis includes ionization fraction, molecular decomposition, and el...

  9. Shock and release behaviour of sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A considerable body of knowledge exists on the shock properties of dry sand. However, capturing the release properties has proven experimentally complex, and currently little information exists on the topic. The measured Hugoniot and release behaviour from a number of experiments is presented, carried out with the aim of furthering understanding of the fundamental physics behind the unloading of dry sand from a shocked state.

  10. Child Labor, Idiosyncratic Shocks, and Social Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Fabre, Alice; Pallage, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a dynamic model with heterogeneous agents to study child labor in an economy with idiosyncratic shocks to employment. Households facing adverse shocks may use child labor as a buffer to smooth consumption. We show that the introduction of an unemployment insurance program and/or a universal basic income system help eliminate child labor endogenously in this context. A calibration to South Africa in the 1990s is provided.

  11. Polaprezinc Protects Mice against Endotoxin Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Ohata, Shuzo; Moriyama, Chihiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Nishida, Tadashi; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Mochida, Shinsuke; Minami, Yukari; Nakada, Junya; Shomori, Kohei; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), a chelate compound consisting of zinc and l-carnosine (Car), is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In the present study, we investigated whether PZ suppresses mortality, pulmonary inflammation, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in endotoxin shock mice after peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how PZ protects against LPS-induced endotoxin shock. PZ pretreatment inhibited the decrease in the survival rate of mice after ...

  12. Temporary and persistent fiscal policy shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Sola, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper conducts an empirical investigation of the effects of temporary versus persistent fiscal policy shocks. Using data from the US I show that short lived fiscal expansions have a positive effect on output and consumption; while persistent fiscal shocks generate negative effects on consumption and - to a lesser extent - on output. Persistent fiscal expansions are associated with an increase in precautionary savings, collapse in consumers' confidence and an increase the yield c...

  13. Nonthermal radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks with low Mach numbers and the ensuing spectral signatures imprinted in radio synchrotron emission. Time-dependent simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of electrons in the test-particle limit have been performed for spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for typical shocks in the intracluster medium. The electron and radiation spectra at the shock location can be described properly by the test-particle DSA predictions with the instantaneous shock parameters. However, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons at the shock gradually decrease as the shock slows down in time. So one needs to be cautious about interpreting observed radio spectra of evolving shocks by simple DSA models in the test-particle regime.

  14. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  15. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  16. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  17. Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, D C; Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are used to model nonlinear particle acceleration in parallel collisionless shocks of various speed, including mildly relativistic ones. When the acceleration is efficient, the backreaction of accelerated particles modifies the shock structure and causes the compression ratio, r, to change from test-particle values. Modified shocks with Lorentz factors less than about 3, can have compression ratios greater than 4 and the momentum distribution of energetic particles no longer follows a power law relation. For faster shocks, r depends on the shock Lorentz factor but can drop below 3, giving self-consistent spectra considerably steeper than the so-called `universal' test-particle result of N(E) proportional to E^{-2.3}. In the ultra-relativistic limit (i.e., Lorentz factors greater than about 50), shocks undergoing efficient particle acceleration may adjust enough to conserve energy and momentum without lowering r and the compression ratio may again approach the test-particle value of 3.

  18. Thermal shock investigation of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the thermal shock properties of commercial reaction-bonded Si3N4 quality material (RBSN), of commercial hot-pressed Si3N4 (HPSN) and of different laboratory grades of hot-pressed Si3N4 were examined. The thermal shock properties of RBSN quality material differ according to the structure considerably: The critical temperature difference for sample crossections of 5 x 5 or 6 x 6 mm after quenching in oil lies between 7300C and over 14000C. The best thermal shock properties are shown by high density RBSN quality material having very fine pores and high initial strength. The results indicate that for RBSN large pores and density inhomogenities are responsible for bad thermal shock properties. Resistance to fast temperature change is higher for hot-pressed Si3N4 than for RBSN quality material. In HPSN, the thermal shock results show dependence on structure. High MgO content and the associated coarse rod-shaped configuration of the β phase and structural inhomogenities affect the thermal shock properties in an adverse way. (orig.)

  19. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    CERN Document Server

    Dasadia, Sarthak; Sarazin, Craig; Morandi, Andrea; Markevitch, Maxim; Wik, Daniel; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele; Govoni, Federica; Vacca, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) \\chandra\\ observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of $M$ = 3.0 $\\pm$ 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell~665 the second cluster where a strong merger shock of $M \\approx$ 3 has been detected, after the Bullet cluster. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 $\\pm$ 0.7) $\\times$ 10$^3$ km sec$^{-1}$. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front, with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  20. Emissive spectra of shock-heated argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the radiant properties of argon under weak shock compression, an aluminum target filled with gaseous argon at ambient states was impacted by a tungsten alloy projectile which was launched from a two-stage light gun to 2.00 km/s. The radiant signals of single shock-compressed argon were recorded by a six-channel pyrometer and oscilloscopes, which varied with time linearly for the five channels from 405 nm to 700 nm and exponentially for the channel 800 nm, and the corresponding velocity of shock wave was determined to be 4.10 ± 0.09 km/s. By the present experiment, it has been shown that the absorbability of the shock-heated argon is low for visual light and the optical depths of argon gas turn from thin to thick as wavelengths gradually increase. The time-resolved spectra in the rising-front of the radiant signal in the re-shocked argon were recorded by means of an OMA, and strong emissive spectrum bands near 450 nm light-wave length but no linear spectrum were found. The emissive spectrum properties of shock-compression argon were qualitatively explained by the state parameters and ionization degree

  1. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Shivvers, Isaac; Williams, Peter K G; Kopac, Drejc; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mundell, Carole; Gomboc, Andreja; Zheng, WeiKang; Menten, Karl M; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a $\\gamma$-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-LAT GRB 160509A at $z = 1.17$ up to $20$ days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at $\\lesssim10~$days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of $n_0\\approx10^{-3}~$cm$^{-3}$, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, $N_{\\rm H} \\approx 1.5\\times10^{22}~$cm$^{-2}$, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, $A_{\\rm V}\\approx3.4~$mag. We...

  2. Oblique magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of oblique steady plane-parallel radiative reacting C-type shocks in diffuse molecular clouds is examined. Numerical models are presented for typical parameters: n(H2) = 20/cu cm, n(H) = 10/cu cm, and v(s) = 10 km/s. C-type shock structure is weakly dependent on the angle (theta) between the upstream magnetic field B0 and the direction of shock propagation. For typical field strengths there is a critical angle below which the neutral flow must have at least one critical point (implying that the shock must be either transonic C-type or J-type), although in general this angle need not exist. Models differing only in the component of B0 parallel to the direction of shock propagation (i.e., having identical transverse components of B0) can have markedly different hydrodynamic structures. The column densities of most shock-produced species vary only mildly with theta between 90 and 40 deg when either B0 or B0 sin theta are held constant. 21 references

  3. Simulation of a Shock Recovery Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K.; Vignjevic, R.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-06-01

    It is difficult to obtaining experimental data for the behaviour of material under shock loading due to dynamic nature of this process and finite time available in which measurement can be taken. As a result shock recovery technique have been developed to allow examination of a material after shock propagation. The main goal of this experimental technique is to examine material properties after a single, well-defined shock wave followed by a single release wave have been introduced. The process should be such that any change found in the sample after recovery can only be attributed to the shock process alone. In order to achieve this, the geometry and design of the target and the fixture play an important role. In this work the simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA3D in order to size lateral and longitudinal momentum traps for the material being investigated. The investigation of the shock wave propagation in the simulation entails examining the stress, and velocity time histories for the whole fixture as well as for the single element, or block of elements of interest. In addition residual velocity of the sample was minimised to reduce its damage in the process of sample catching.

  4. Bank Lending Shocks and the Euro Area Business Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Peersman, G.

    2011-01-01

    I estimate the impact of different types of bank lending shocks on the euro area economy. I first show that the dynamic effects depend on the type of shock. Whereas surges in lending caused by shocks at the supply side of the banking market have a significant positive impact on economic activity and inflation, exactly the opposite is the case for exogenous lending demand shocks. Second, the macroeconomic relevance of bank lending shocks is considerable. Overall, they account for more than hal...

  5. Thermographic Phosphor Measurements of Shock-Shock Interactions on a Swept Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle L.; Berry, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of fin leading-edge radius and sweep angle on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interactions were investigated in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The fin model leading edges, which represent cylindrical leading edges or struts on hypersonic vehicles, were varied from 0.25 inches to 0.75 inches in radius. A 9deg wedge generated a planar oblique shock at 16.7deg to the flow that intersected the fin bow shock, producing a shock-shock interaction that impinged on the fin leading edge. The fin angle of attack was varied from 0deg (normal to the free-stream) to 15deg and 25deg swept forward. Global temperature data was obtained from the surface of the fused silica fins using phosphor thermography. Metal oil flow models with the same geometries as the fused silica models were used to visualize the streamline patterns for each angle of attack. High-speed zoom-schlieren videos were recorded to show the features and temporal unsteadiness of the shock-shock interactions. The temperature data were analyzed using one-dimensional semi-infinite as well as one- and two-dimensional finite-volume methods to determine the proper heat transfer analysis approach to minimize errors from lateral heat conduction due to the presence of strong surface temperature gradients induced by the shock interactions. The general trends in the leading-edge heat transfer behavior were similar for the three shock-shock interactions, respectively, between the test articles with varying leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer coefficient augmentation increased with decreasing leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer output from the two-dimensional code was about 20% higher than the value from a standard, semi-infinite onedimensional method.

  6. Ion heating and energy redistribution across supercritical perpendicular shocks: Application to planetary and interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Y. D.; Richardson, J. D.; Parks, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how the ion dissipative process across supercritical perpendicular shocks depends on the shock front micro-structures. At a collisionless plasma shock, the dissipation and micro-structure of the shock font are dominated by wave-particle interactions. Comparison of the ion thermalization at different kinds of shocks, e.g., planetary and interplanetary shocks, can quantify how much interaction is occurring at the shock boundary. Investigation of this problem for diverse solar wind (SW) conditions will yield important information on the dependences of the ion thermalization and energy redistribution on plasma parameters. With the aid of a successful automatic separation method [Yang et al., 2009], the incident ions at the shock can be divided into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions. Corresponding heating efficiency of each population of ions at the shock can be calculated respectively. Wilkinson & Schwartz [1990] have theorized that the amount of reflected ions at perpendicular shocks depends on plasma parameters. Based on the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) conservation laws, they found that the fraction reflected is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the ratio of specific heat capacities γ chosen in the R-H relations. The main goal of this work is to investigate how the plasma parameters, e.g. the particle velocity distribution, the plasma beta value, seed populations, etc. (from a particle dynamic point of view), control the amount of reflected ions by using one-dimensional (1-D) full-particle-cell simulations. The simulation results may help to explain the ion heating efficiency and energy redistribution at shocks observed by Cluster, Wind, Voyager, etc.

  7. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH)

  8. Pressurized-thermal-shock technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was recognized at the time the original Issues on Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were conducted that distinct vertical plumes of cooling water form beneath the cold leg inlet nozzles during those particular transients that exhibit fluid/thermal stratification. The formation of these plumes (referred to as thermal streaming) induces a time-dependent circumferential temperature variation on the inner surface of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall that creates an axial stress component. This axial stress component is in addition to the axial stress components induced by time-dependent radial temperature variation through the wall thickness and the time-dependent pressure transient. This additional axial stress component will result in a larger axial stress resultant that results in a larger stress-intensity factor acting on circumferential flaws, thus reducing the fracture margin for circumferential flaws. Although this was recognized at the time of the original IPTS study, the contribution appeared to be relatively small; therefore, it was neglected. The original IPTS studies were performed with OCA-P, a computer program developed at ORNL to analyze the cleavage fracture response of a nuclear RPV subjected to PTS loading. OCA-P is a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-element code that analyzes the stresses and stress-intensity factors (axial and tangential) resulting from the pressure and the radial temperature variation through the wall thickness only. The HSST Program is investigating the potential effects of thermal-streaming-induced stresses in circumferential welds on the reactor vessel PTS analyses. The initial phase of this investigation focused on an evaluation of the available thermal-hydraulic data and analyses results. The objective for the initial phase of the investigation is to evaluate thermal-streaming behavior under conditions relevant to the operation of U.S. PWRs and chracterize any predicted thermal-streaming plumes

  9. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  10. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryJoe K Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  11. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  12. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacalone, Joe [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  13. Experiments and simulations of radiative shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) was established at the University of Michigan by the United States Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliances Program (PSAAP) to study the physics of radiative shocks propagating through plasma. This work is part of the laser astrophysics program at the University of Michigan, and the study is relevant to shocks emerging from supernova explosions. For a shock propagating at a sufficiently high velocity, radiative effects become important, and the shock structure becomes quite different from that of a simple hydrodynamic shock, producing much greater compression. We typically achieve compression ratios of a factor of 25 or more. Experiments have been conducted using the Omega laser facility at the University of Rochester. The laser beams strike a thin disk of beryllium, driving a shock into a tube filled with xenon with an initial speed of 200 km/s, well above the limit for radiative effects to be important. We are also attempting to perform numerical simulations of these experiments using an Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamics code called CRASH. Since CRASH does not currently contain the physics necessary to compute the laser-plasma interaction, initial conditions are computed using the twodimensional Lagrangian code Hyades. Hyades can only be used for the initial evolution of the system due to grid tangling problems frequently encountered with Lagrangian codes. After the laser turns off, the results are passed to CRASH for the remainder of the evolution. CRASH uses a high-order Godunov solver for the Euler equations and uses multigroup flux-limited diffusion for the radiation transfer. The ions, electrons, and radiation are all allowed to have different temperatures. Electron heat conduction is also included, and the equations of state and opacities of the various materials are computed self consistently. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to reduce the computational cost of the simulations

  14. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  15. Geometrical shock dynamics, formation of singularities and topological bifurcations of converging shock fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suramlishvili, Nugzar; Eggers, Jens; Fontelos, Marco

    2014-11-01

    We are concerned with singularities of the shock fronts of converging perturbed shock waves. Our considerations are based on Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics. The recently developed method of local analysis is applied in order to determine generic singularities. In this case the solutions of partial differential equations describing the geometry of the shock fronts are presented as families of smooth maps with state variables and the set of control parameters dependent on Mach number, time and initial conditions. The space of control parameters of the singularities is analysed, the unfoldings describing the deformations of the canonical germs of shock front singularities are found and corresponding bifurcation diagrams are constructed. Research is supported by the Leverhulme Trust, Grant Number RPG-2012-568.

  16. Critical Shock Energy and Shock and Detonation Parameters of an Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Yadav

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the connection between critical shock energy and detonation properties of an explosive. A relation for critical shock energy has been derived in terms of detonation velocity, width of reaction zone, initial density of the explosive, specific heat ratio of detonation products and either constants of linear relation between shock and particle velocity of the explosive or the constants of the Murnaghan’s type of equation of state of the explosive. These relations have been used to calculate the critical shock energy of RDX, HMX, RDX/TNT (60/40 and TNT explosives. The values of critical shock energies obtained in this study are in close agreement with those reported in the literature.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.436-440, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1543

  17. Characterization of Saturn's bow shock: Magnetic field observations of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. Here we present the parameter space of MA bow shock crossings from 2004-2014 as observed by the Cassini spacecraft. We find that Saturn's bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we determined the {\\theta}Bn of each crossing to show that Saturn's (days...

  18. A methodology for defining shock tests based on shock response spectra and temporal moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cap, J.S.; Smallwood, D.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanical and Thermal Environments Dept.

    1997-11-01

    Defining acceptable tolerances for a shock test has always been a problem due in large part to the use of Shock Response Spectra (SRS) as the sole description of the shock. While SRS do contain a wealth of information if one knows what to look for, it is commonly accepted that different agencies can generate vastly different time domain test inputs whose SRS all satisfy the test requirements within a stated tolerance band. At an even more basic level, the laboratory test specifications often fail to resemble the field environment even though the SRS appear to be similar. A concise means of bounding the time domain inputs would be of great benefit in reducing the variation in the resulting shock tests. This paper describes a methodology that uses temporal moments to improve the repeatability of shock test specifications.

  19. The effect of shock wave therapy on gene expression in human osteoblasts isolated from hypertrophic fracture non-unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A.; Ritz, U.; Rompe, J.-D.; Tresch, A.; Rommens, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Shock wave therapy has been increasingly evaluated as a non-invasive alternative for the treatment of delayed fracture healing and non-unions. Although several clinical studies showed a beneficial effect especially for the hypertrophic type of non-union, little is known about the biological mechanism of its osteogenic effect. To identify the molecular background for the positive effect of shock waves on healing of fracture non-unions, we have analyzed the changes of the global gene expression in human osteoblasts after exposure to shock waves of different energy flux densities. Human osteoblasts were isolated from five patients at non-union sites, treated with 500 impulses of energy flux densities of 0.06 and , and cultured for 96 h. HG-U133A microarrays were used for the analysis of the shock wave-regulated mRNA-transcripts. Differential gene expression was verified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions. We identified 47 transcripts that showed differential expression after and 45 transcripts after energy treatment. Most intriguing was the up-regulation of neprilysin, calmegin, osteoglycin, asporin, and interleukin-13 receptor-. Eighteen identified genes were previously described to fulfill an important function in bone growth and metabolism. Our study provides the first molecular profile of shock wave-induced gene expression changes in human osteoblasts from patients with hypertrophic fracture non-unions, and it offers a possible molecular explanation for the positive effects of shock waves in patients ridden with this disease.

  20. A mechanical analysis of woodpecker drumming and its application to shock-absorbing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang-Hee [Molecular Cell Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Park, Sungmin, E-mail: sang-hee.yoon@wyss.harvard.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    A woodpecker is known to drum the hard woody surface of a tree at a rate of 18 to 22 times per second with a deceleration of 1200 g, yet with no sign of blackout or brain damage. As a model in nature, a woodpecker is studied to find clues to develop a shock-absorbing system for micromachined devices. Its advanced shock-absorbing mechanism, which cannot be explained merely by allometric scaling, is analyzed in terms of endoskeletal structures. In this analysis, the head structures (beak, hyoid, spongy bone, and skull bone with cerebrospinal fluid) of the golden-fronted woodpecker, Melanerpes aurifrons, are explored with x-ray computed tomography images, and their shock-absorbing mechanism is analyzed with a mechanical vibration model and an empirical method. Based on these analyses, a new shock-absorbing system is designed to protect commercial micromachined devices from unwanted high-g and high-frequency mechanical excitations. The new shock-absorbing system consists of close-packed microglasses within two metal enclosures and a viscoelastic layer fastened by steel bolts, which are biologically inspired from a spongy bone contained within a skull bone encompassed with the hyoid of a woodpecker. In the experimental characterizations using a 60 mm smoothbore air-gun, this bio-inspired shock-absorbing system shows a failure rate of 0.7% for the commercial micromachined devices at 60 000 g, whereas a conventional hard-resin method yields a failure rate of 26.4%, thus verifying remarkable improvement in the g-force tolerance of the commercial micromachined devices.

  1. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  2. A Brief Introduction to Chinese Biological Biological

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Biological Abstracts sponsored by the Library, the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, the Biological Documentation and Information Network, all of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, commenced publication in 1987 and was initiated to provide access to the Chinese information in the field of biology.

  3. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  4. Partical acceleration at collisionless shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic field of the sun is not a simple static dipole field but comprises much more complicated structures. When magnetic reconnection changes the topology of a structure the large amount of energy that was stored in the magnetic field is released and can eject the remainder of the magnetic structure and the plasma that is frozen to the magnetic field lines from the solar corona at large velocities. This event is called a coronal mass ejection (CME). Given that the upward motion happens at velocities larger than the local Alfven speed, the critical speed in the solar wind, the CME will act as a piston that drives a shock front through the solar wind ahead of itself. Satellites that monitor solar wind conditions detect an enhanced flux of high energy particles associated with the shock front. Radio instruments typically pick up bursts of electromagnetic emission, termed radio bursts, that are also consistent with processes driven by energetic particles. Thus, and due to theoretical considerations, it is safe to assume that particles can be accelerated at the shock front. Particle acceleration at collisionless shock fronts is an interesting topic for another reason. Earth is constantly bombarded by very energetic particles called (due to historical reasons) cosmic rays. The leading theory for the production of at least the fraction of cosmic rays that originate in our galaxy is acceleration at shock fronts, e.g. in super nova remnants. The large distance and consequently limited observation of these shock fronts restrict more detailed investigations. It is therefore useful to study the process of shock acceleration at shocks in the solar system that are much closer and more approachable to develop and test models and simulation methods that can be applied in different regimes. This dissertation aims at simulations of shock fronts with parameters that are close to the ones occurring in CME driven shocks. Since the goal is the investigation of the changing

  5. Shock wave interaction with porous plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skews, Beric [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Aeronautical Engineering, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2005-11-01

    Previous detailed studies of the interaction of a shock wave with a perforated sheet considered the impact of a shock wave on a plate with regularly spaced slits giving area blockages of 60 and 67%, at various angles of incidence, and resulting in both regular and Mach reflection. The current work extends this study to a much wider variety of plate geometries. Blockage ratios of 20, 25, 33, 50, and 67 and inclinations of 45, 60, 75, and 90 to the shock wave were tested. Four different thicknesses of plate were tested at the same frontal blockage in order to assess the effects of gap guidance. Tests were conducted at two shock Mach numbers of 1.36 and 1.51 (inverse pressure ratios of 0.4 and 0.5). It is found that secondary reflected and transmitted waves appear due to the complex interactions within the grid gaps, and that the vortex pattern which is generated under the plate is also complex due to these interactions. The angle of the reflected shock, measured relative to the plate, decreases with plate blockage and the angle of inflow to the plate reduces with increasing blockage. By analysing the flow on the underside of the plate the pseudo-steady flow assumption is found to be a reasonable approximation. Both the pressure difference and the stagnation pressure loss across the plate are evaluated. It is found that over the range tested the plate thickness has a minimal effect. (orig.)

  6. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  7. Probe measurements on a shock precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shock front of speed V/sub s/ from 0.6 to 5 x 106 cm/sec is launched by a capacitor discharge in one end of a 10 cm i.d. Pyrex pipe 150 cm long. Initial gas pressures range from 0.05 to 1.35 Torr of argon and observations with internal probes are carried out at positions down the tube, z of 73 to 117 cm. A steady magnetic field is applied and the shock, detected by pressure traces, compresses the field by 1.7: 1. Ahead of this shock a precursor is found which produces a magnetic field change which is abrupt (risetime=0.7 μsec) and substantial (approximately 50% of the imposed field). The size of this diamagnetic field change increases with V/sub s/ in agreement with a simple diamagnetic model which includes substantial radial flow. The location of precursor field change moves upstream toward the shock with reduced V/sub s/ and the strength of the field change is reduced at radii nearer the tube walls. Measurements of excitation temperature yield values of kT/sub e/=2.0 eV for the shock and 2.5 eV for the precursor region

  8. Passive Control of Steady Condensation Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShigeruMatsuo; ShenYu; 等

    2000-01-01

    When condensation occurs in supersonic flow fields.the flow is affected by the latent heat released,and if the heat released exceeds a certain quantity,a condensation shock wave will occur,There are many papers for the passive control of shock-boundary layer interaction using the porous wall with a plenum underneath on the application of the technique to transonic airfoil folws.In the present study,this passive technique is appled to the control of a steady condensation shock wave generated in a supersonic nozzle .In order to clarify the effect of the passive shock boundary layer control on condensation shock.Navier-Stokes equations were soled numerically using a 3rd-order MUSCL type TVD finite-difference scheme with a second-order fractional-step for time integration,As a result ,the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement and the aspect of the flow field has been clarified.

  9. Neural contributions to irradiation shock and hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have introduced the young rabbit as a model for the irradiation hypotension of mammals, including man. Double cervical vagotomy (DCV) eliminates the acute shock and hypotension which occur 60 min after irradiation. DCV plus shielding of the heart and lungs protects almost completely. Low doses of atropine (1 mg/kg) block vagal depression of the heart, but have little effect on shock or hypotension. Higher doses (2 to 6 mg/kg) give partial protection proportional to the dose of atropine. Beta adrenergic block has no effect. Alpha block prevents the changes in the cutaneous vasculature which precede and accompany shock, but does not prevent shock. The electrical activity of the vagus may increase progressively from 20 min. This requires further work to establish its consistency and intensity, and the contributions of afferent and efferent pathways. Shock and severe hypotension depend on the intact vagus and this dependence is difficult to attribute to increased vagal depression of the heart or to increased adrenergic activity to date

  10. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  11. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghasemi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI. The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012 and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013 that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  12. Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reanyansky, Anatoly D [DSTO, AUSTRALIA; Bourne, Neil K [AWE, UK; Millett, Jeremy C F [AWE, UK

    2009-01-01

    The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

  13. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fa st forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, here after IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30$^o$ in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger...

  14. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K; McCoy, C A; Fryer, C L; Greeff, C W; Hungerford, A L; Montgomery, D S; Schmidt, D W; Sheppard, D G; Williams, J R; Boehly, T R; Benage, J F

    2014-09-01

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO_{2}) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1-15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3-2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. Simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements. PMID:25314547

  15. Dopamine versus noradrenaline in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ‘Surviving Sepsis’ Campaign guidelines recommend theuse of dopamine or noradrenaline as the first vasopressor inseptic shock. However, information that guides clinicians inchoosing between dopamine and noradrenaline as the firstvasopressor in patients with septic shock is limited.ObjectiveThis article presents a review of the literature regarding theuse of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patients with septicshock.ResultsTwo randomised controlled trials (RCT and two largeprospective cohort studies were analysed. RCT data showeddopamine was associated with increased arrhythmic events.One cohort study found dopamine was associated with higher30-day mortality. The other cohort study found noradrenalinewas associated with higher 28-day mortality.DiscussionData on the use of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patientswith septic shock is limited. Following the recent SOAP IIstudy, there is now strong evidence that the use of dopaminein septic shock is associated with significantly morecardiovascular adverse events, compared tonoradrenaline.ConclusionNoradrenaline should be used as the initial vasopressor inseptic shock to avoid the arrhythmic events associatedwith dopamine.

  16. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    MaryJoe K Rice; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic bi...

  17. Shock propagation and attenuation in Green River oil shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock waves produced by planar impact of thin plates onto samples of oil shale are monitored with time-resolved velocity interferometer diagnostics. Peak shock stresses are below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Stress wave measurements at successive sample thickness are analysed to determine the experimental shock energy attenuation with propagation distance. Shock attenuation is attributed to stress wave scattering at planes of oil shale kerogen within the shale matrix. Wave scattering from planar defects are evaluated from a shock physics perspective and a scattering model is constructed that sensibly reproduces the experimental observation of shock energy attenuation.

  18. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book is the second of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation and high-velocity impact and penetration events. Of the four extensive chapters in this volume, the first two describe the reactive behavior of condensed phase explosives, - Condensed-Phase Explosives: Shock Initiation and Detonation Phenomena (SA Sheffield and R Engelke) - First Principles Molecular Simulations of Energetic Materials at High-Pressures (F Zhang, S Alavi, and TK Woo), and the remaining two discuss the inert, mechanical response of solid materials. - Combined Compression and Shear Plane Waves (ZP Tang and JB Aidun), and - Dynamic Fragmentation of Solids (D Grady). All chapters are each self-contained, and can be read independently of each other. They offer a timely reference, for beginners as well as professional scientists and engineers, on the foundations of detonation phenomen...

  19. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Ivancic, S.; Gregor, M. C.; McCoy, C. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target material shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. One-dimensional streaked x-ray radiography also provided a time-resolved trajectory of the release wave. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. Models for the optical properties of the released material is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Analysis of a cylindrical imploding shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the self-similar solution of the gasdynamic equations of a strong cylindrical shock wave moving through an ideal gas, with γ = csub(p)/csub(v), is considered. These equations are greatly simplified following the transformation of the reduced velocity U1 (xi) → U1 = 1/2(γ + 1 ) (U + xi). The requirement of a single maximum pressure, dsub(xi)P = 0, leads to an analytical determination of the self-similarity exponent α(γ). For gases with γ = 2 + 3sup(1/2), this maximum ensues right at the shock front and the pressure distribution then decreases monotonically. The postulate of analyticity by Gelfand and Butler is shown to concur with the requirement dsub(xi)P 0. The saturated density of the gas left in the wake of the shock is computed and - U is shown to be the reduced velocity of sound at P = P sub(m). (author)

  2. MEMS performance challenges: packaging and shock tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Bin; Lin, Liwei

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes recent advances in the MEMS performance challenges with emphases on packaging and shock tests. In the packaging area, metal to metal bonding processes have been developed to overcome limitations of the glass frit bonding by means of two specific methods: (1) pre-reflow of solder for enhanced bonding adhesion, and (2) the insertion of thin metal layer between parent metal bonding materials. In the shock test area, multiscale analysis for a MEMS package system has been developed with experimental verifications to investigate dynamic responses under drop-shock tests. Structural deformation and stress distribution data are extracted and predicted for device fracture and in-operation stiction analyses for micro mechanical components in various MEMS sensors, including accelerometers and gyroscopes.

  3. Diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Schure, K M; Drury, L O'C; Bykov, A M

    2012-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration is the theory of particle acceleration through multiple shock crossings. In order for this process to proceed at a rate that can be reconciled with observations of high-energy electrons in the vicinity of the shock, and for cosmic rays protons to be accelerated to energies up to observed galactic values, significant magnetic field amplification is required. In this review we will discuss various theories on how magnetic field amplification can proceed in the presence of a cosmic ray population. On both short and long scales, cosmic ray streaming can induce instabilities that act to amplify the magnetic field. Developments in this area that have occurred over the past decade are the main focus of this paper.

  4. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  5. On the charged particle shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shock acceleration method employs injection of beam particles into the linear accelerator unexcited structure. Upon injecting a wave of accelerating electromagnetic field is excited in the structure it catches up with the particles and accelerates them. Dynamics of particle acceleration using the abovesaid method is under consideration. A d gree of particle beam compression in the process of beam acceleration is found out. New technique is suggested of shock acceleration with particle outlet to the potential barrier plateau that enables to attain compression not only of relativistic beams but also of non relativistic ones. It is shown that the method in question enables to get compression of electron and ion beams while increasing essentially their current and reducing the density modulation period. Shock acceleration in high current accelerators enables to obtain high-energy current beams (above 104A), which ght be used in studies on ionic thermonuclear fusion in powerful free electron lasers

  6. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropic exponent and shock jump conditions were obtained using the Helfand equation of state. The closed-form analytical solutions permitted us to gain physical insight on the role of the material's density on its compressibility, i.e. how the medium compresses under mechanical loadings and sustains wave motion. Furthermore, the predictions were found in excellent agreement with calculations using the Event Driven Molecular Dynamic method involving 30,000 particles over the entire range of compressibility spanning the dilute id...

  7. Constitutive modeling of shock response of polytetrafluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Brown, E. N.

    2011-08-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a polymer with a simple atomic structure that shows complex behavior under pressure and demonstrates a highly variable metastable phase structure in shock waves with amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high-pressure transition of the crystalline domain from crystalline phase IV at ambient through phase II to III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region nucleates from the amorphous one with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate features that may be related to the impedance mismatch between the phase domains subjected to such transitions resulting in variations of mechanical and thermophysical characteristics. We consider the inter-phase non-equilibrium and the amorphous-to-crystalline and inter-crystalline transitions that are associated with the high pressure and temperature transformations under shock wave loading as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase constitutive model that considers strength effects to describe the observed response under shock loading of the PTFE material. Experimental plate impact shock-wave histories are compared with calculated profiles using kinetics describing the transitions. The study demonstrates that the inter-phase pressure non-equilibrium of the state parameters plays the key role in the delay of the shock wave attenuation. At the same time, the forward transition associated with the crystallization might be responsible for the velocity spike in the experimental velocity profiles at high impact velocity and the modulus variation at low impact velocity. On the other hand, an accelerated attenuation of the velocity in the rarefaction wave is associated with another transition resulting in the residual crystallinity change during unloading.

  8. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 1045/(f HIsin i) g cm2. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φWNM ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φWNM seems problematic.

  9. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}∼ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}∼ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1–10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}∼ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ∼60–80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ∼1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  10. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  11. Investigating shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov ripple evolution before and after re-shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S. R.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Raman, K. S.; Baumann, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Islam, T. S.; Felker, S.; Holder, J. P.; Seugling, R. M.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.; Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Late-time Rayleigh-Taylor/Richtmyer-Meshkov(RM) ripple growth in an opposing-shock geometry is investigated using x-ray area backlit imaging of a shock-tube with indirectly driven shocks. The shocks are driven from opposing sides of the tube. The ablator layer on one side has pre-imposed ripples in the form of a sine wave with two amplitudes and a single wavelength. This ablator includes an opaque tracer layer that is used to track the perturbed interface as it is driven into a lower density foam. The ablator on the opposing side of the tube is flat, and is used to launch the shock that re-shocks the rippled interface. A large-area backlighter and gated x-ray radiography is used to capture images at different times during the RM instability growth. Here, first measurements obtained with this experimental platform at the NIF, including the optimization of the platform are presented. The RM ripple evolution before and after re-shock, including a possible loss of initial conditions are, also discussed. The data that informs the codes is compared to simulation results Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-674941.

  12. Shock finding on a moving-mesh: II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universe

    CERN Document Server

    Schaal, Kevin; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements that robustly suppress spurious shock detections. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below $\\mathcal{M} \\approx 10$ contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in strong contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a lar...

  13. Spherical strong-shock generation for shock-ignition inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments on the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' OMEGA laser have been carried out to produce strong shocks in solid spherical targets with direct laser illumination. The shocks are launched at pressures of several hundred Mbars and reach Gbar upon convergence. The results are relevant to the validation of the shock-ignition scheme and to the development of an OMEGA experimental platform to study material properties at Gbar pressures. The experiments investigate the strength of the ablation pressure and the hot-electron production at incident laser intensities of ∼2 to 6 × 1015 W/cm2 and demonstrate ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar, which is crucial to developing a shock-ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility. The timing of the x-ray flash from shock convergence in the center of the solid plastic target is used to infer the ablation and shock pressures. Laser–plasma instabilities produce hot-electrons with a moderate temperature (<100 keV). The instantaneous conversion efficiencies of laser power into hot-electron power reached up to ∼15% in the intensity spike. The large amount of hot electrons is correlated with an earlier x-ray flash and a strong increase in its magnitude. This suggests that hot electrons contribute to the augmentation of the shock strength

  14. The physiological impacts of wealth shocks in late life: Evidence from the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boen, Courtney; Yang, Y Claire

    2016-02-01

    Given documented links between individual socioeconomic status (SES) and health, it is likely that-in addition to its impacts on individuals' wallets and bank accounts-the Great Recession also took a toll on individuals' disease and mortality risk. Exploiting a quasi-natural experiment design, this study utilizes nationally representative, longitudinal data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) (2005-2011) (N = 930) and individual fixed effects models to examine how household-level wealth shocks experienced during the Great Recession relate to changes in biophysiological functioning in older adults. Results indicate that wealth shocks significantly predicted changes in physiological functioning, such that losses in net worth from the pre-to the post-Recession period were associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and C-reactive protein over the six year period. Further, while the association between wealth shocks and changes in blood pressure was unattenuated with the inclusion of other indicators of SES, psychosocial well-being, and health behaviors in analytic models, we document some evidence of mediation in the association between changes in wealth and changes in C-reactive protein, which suggests specificity in the social and biophysiological mechanisms relating wealth shocks and health at older ages. Linking macro-level conditions, meso-level household environments, and micro-level biological processes, this study provides new insights into the mechanisms through which economic inequality contributes to disease and mortality risk in late life. PMID:26773705

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1994-02-01

    The Fermi shock acceleration mechanism may be responsible for the production of high-energy cosmic rays in a wide variety of environments. Modeling of this phenomenon has largely focused on plane-parallel shocks, and one of the most promising techniques for its study is the Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in shocked fluid flows. One of the principal problems in shock acceleration theory is the mechanism and efficiency of injection of particles from the thermal gas into the accelerated population. The Monte Carlo technique is ideally suited to addressing the injection problem directly, and previous applications of it to the quasi-parallel Earth bow shock led to very successful modeling of proton and heavy ion spectra, as well as other observed quantities. Recently this technique has been extended to oblique shock geometries, in which the upstream magnetic field makes a significant angle ThetaB1 to the shock normal. Spectral resutls from test particle Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique, nonrelativistic shocks are presented. The results show that low Mach number shocks have injection efficiencies that are relatively insensitive to (though not independent of) the shock obliquity, but that there is a dramatic drop in efficiency for shocks of Mach number 30 or more as the obliquity increases above 15 deg. Cosmic-ray distributions just upstream of the shock reveal prominent bumps at energies below the thermal peak; these disappear far upstream but might be observable features close to astrophysical shocks.

  16. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness: A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Raeder, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using Wind and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere are investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.78) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and for varied IP shock impact angle. We attribute this result, predicted previously with simulations, to the fact that frontal shocks compress the magnetosphere symmetrically from all sides, which is a favorable condition for the release of magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail, which in turn can produce moderate to strong auroral substorms, which are then observed by ground-based magnetometers.

  17. Multiwavelength optical pyrometer for shock compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for measurement of the spectral radiance of materials shocked to high pressures (approx.100 GPa) by impact using a light gas gun is described. Thermal radiation from the sample is sampled at six wavelength bands in the visible spectrum, and each signal is separately detected by solid-state photodiodes, and recorded with a time resolution of approx.10 ns. Interpretation of the records in terms of temperature of transparent sample materials is discussed. Results of a series of exploratory experiments with metals are also given. Shock temperatures in the range 4000--8000 K have been reliably measured. Spectral radiance and temperatures have been determined with uncertainties of 2%

  18. Seismic, shock, and vibration isolation 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It covers a wide variety of topics, including shock and vibration isolation analysis methods, development of new isolation system, characterization of material properties of vibration isolation components, analytical/experimental methods, optimal isolation design, and isolation system design criteria and requirements. The structures considered included buildings, high-tech facilities, nuclear power plants, and pipe lines. The work reported here is representative of current research activities and contributed to the advancement of the state of the art in vibration isolation. THe editor hopes this volume will serve as a useful resource for research and design engineers and stimulate further interest in seismic, shock, and vibration isolation research

  19. Supernova Shock Breakout from a Red Supergiant

    OpenAIRE

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C.; Bell, Tony; Roeser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominque

    2008-01-01

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning ...

  20. Materials and structures under shock and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    In risk studies, engineers often have to consider the consequences of an accident leading to a shock on a construction. This can concern the impact of a ground vehicle or aircraft, or the effects of an explosion on an industrial site.This book presents a didactic approach starting with the theoretical elements of the mechanics of materials and structures, in order to develop their applications in the cases of shocks and impacts. The latter are studied on a local scale at first. They lead to stresses and strains in the form of waves propagating through the material, this movement then extending

  1. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Ghasemi; A. H. Farahbod; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-01-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV...

  2. Magnetostructural Transition Kinetics in Shocked Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surh, Michael P; Benedict, Lorin X; Sadigh, Babak

    2016-08-19

    A generalized Heisenberg model is implemented to study the effect of thermal magnetic disorder on kinetics of the Fe α-ε transition. The barrier to bulk martensitic displacement remains large in α-Fe shocked well past the phase line but is much reduced in the [001] α-ε boundary. The first result is consistent with observed overdriving to metastable α, while the second suggests structural instability, as implied by observation of a [001] shock transformation front without plastic relaxation. Reconciling both behaviors may require concurrent treatment of magnetic and structural order. PMID:27588867

  3. Supply Shocks and Monetary Policy Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Gordon

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the main issues that supply shocks pose for the conduct of monetary policy. A simple version of the Gordon-Phelps model shows that the necessary condition for actual real GNP to be maintained at its equilibrium level in the wake of a supply shock is for the change innominal GNP to exceed the change in the nominal wage by the change in the income share of the raw material in GNP. The required "wedge" between nominal GNP and wage growth can be accomplished by any combination ...

  4. Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, sinusoidal vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lalanne, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Everything engineers need to know about mechanical vibration and shock...in one authoritative reference work! This fully updated and revised 3rd edition addresses the entire field of mechanical vibration and shock as one of the most important types of load and stress applied to structures, machines and components in the real world. Examples include everything from the regular and predictable loads applied to turbines, motors or helicopters by the spinning of their constituent parts to the ability of buildings to withstand damage from wind loads or explosions, and the need for cars to m

  5. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  6. Shock-to-Detonation Transition simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) experiments with embedded velocity gauges provide data that can be used for both calibration and validation of high explosive (HE) burn models. Typically, a series of experiments is performed for each HE in which the initial shock pressure is varied. Here we describe a methodology for automating a series of SDT simulations and comparing numerical tracer particle velocities with the experimental gauge data. Illustrative examples are shown for PBX 9502 using the HE models implemented in the xRage ASC code at LANL.

  7. Pyrotechnic shock measurement and data analysis requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, L.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is described into the laboratory measurement and analysis of pyrotechnic shock which was prompted at JPL when two separate facilities generated discrepant pyrotechnic shock data while testing Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 spacecraft hardware. Both of the testing facilities were surveyed. The only difference noted was in the FM tape recorders used to record the data. One facility used a tape recorder operating at 60 in./sec with a frequency response of 20 kHz; the other used a tape recorder operating at 120 in./sec with a frequency response of 80 kHz. The accelerometers, cables, charge amplifiers, and mechanical setups were identical.

  8. Pyroshock testing-shock simulation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Vesta I.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of shock simulation facilities are available to simulate pyroshock events. These facilities range from bounded impact shock machines and electrodynamic shakers to resonant fixture techniques. This presentation will focus on the use of general purpose and tuned resonant fixture techniques including a unique tunable beam apparatus developed at SNL. Examples of application of the resonant fixture technique for both component and full-scale structure pyroshock simulations will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed along with the usable frequency content and bandwidth.

  9. Stock Split Bubble and Livedoor-Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Youki Kohsaka

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines whether the stock split bubble in Japan burst by not only reformed system, but also Livedoor-shock. It is difficult to identify the effects of the both events, because they occurred in the same month (January, 2006). Thus, I identify both effects by dividing the samples into the following three; the split stocks in the old system and the split stocks in the new system, the news of which was announced before and after Livedoor-shock. Empirical results reveal that restrictio...

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic structure of a plasmoid in fast reconnection in low-beta plasmas: 2. Shock-shock interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The shock structure of a plasmoid in magnetic reconnection in low-beta plasmas is investigated by two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Using a high-accuracy code with unprecedented resolution, shocks, discontinuities, and their intersections are resolved and clarified. Contact discontinuities emanate from triple-shock intersection points, separating fluids of different origins. Shock-diamonds inside the plasmoid appear to decelerate a supersonic flow. New shock-diamonds and a slow expansion fan are found inside the Petschek outflow. A sufficient condition for the new shock-diamonds and the relevance to astrophysical jets are discussed.

  11. THE ROLE OF PICKUP IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE VENUSIAN BOW SHOCK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TERMINATION SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Quanming; Shan Lican; Zhang Tielong; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zank, Gary P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Yang Zhongwei [SOA Key Laboratory for Polar Science, Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai (China); Du Aimin, E-mail: qmlu@ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-08-20

    The recent crossing of the termination shock by Voyager 2 has demonstrated the important role of pickup ions (PUIs) in the physics of collisionless shocks. The Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft orbits Venus in a 24 hr elliptical orbit that crosses the bow shock twice a day. VEX provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of PUIs on the structure of collisionless shocks more generally. Using VEX observations, we find that the strength of the Venusian bow shock is weaker when solar activity is strong. We demonstrate that this surprising anti-correlation is due to PUIs mediating the Venusian bow shock.

  12. Fuzzy logic control algorithms for MagneShock semiactive vehicle shock absorbers: design and experimental evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Michael J.; Buckner, Gregory D.; Anderson, Richard D.

    2003-07-01

    Automotive ride quality and handling performance remain challenging design tradeoffs for modern, passive automobile suspension systems. Despite extensive published research outlining the benefits of active vehicle suspensions in addressing this tradeoff, the cost and complexity of these systems frequently prohibit commercial adoption. Semi-active suspensions can provide performance benefits over passive suspensions without the cost and complexity associated with fully active systems. This paper outlines the development and experimental evaluation of a fuzzy logic control algorithm for a commercial semi-active suspension component, Carrera's MagneShockTM shock absorber. The MagneShockTM utilizes an electromagnet to change the viscosity of magnetorheological (MR) fluid, which changes the damping characteristics of the shock. Damping for each shock is controlled by manipulating the coil current using real-time algorithms. The performance capabilities of fuzzy logic control (FLC) algorithms are demonstrated through experimental evaluations on a passenger vehicle. Results show reductions of 25% or more in sprung mass absorbed power (U.S. Army 6 Watt Absorbed Power Criterion) as compared to typical passive shock absorbers over urban terrains in both simulation and experimentation. Average sprung-mass RMS accelerations were also reduced by as much as 9%, but usually with an increase in total suspension travel over the passive systems. Additionally, a negligible decrease in RMS tire normal force was documented through computer simulations. And although the FLC absorbed power was comparable to that of the fixed-current MagneShockTM the FLC revealed reduced average RMS sprung-mass accelerations over the fixed-current MagneShocks by 2-9%. Possible means for improvement of this system include reducing the suspension spring stiffness and increasing the dynamic damping range of the MagneShockTM.

  13. Contributions to the cross shock electric field at supercritical perpendicular shocks: Impact of the pickup ions

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhongwei; Han, Desheng; Yang, Huigen; Hu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Beichen; Zhang, Qinhe; Liu, Ruiyuan

    2012-01-01

    A particle-in-cell code is used to examine contributions of the pickup ions (PIs) and the solar wind ions (SWs) to the cross shock electric field at the supercritical, perpendicular shocks. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Herein, two different runs with relative pickup ion density of 25% and 55% are presented in this paper. Present preliminary results show that: (1) in the low percentage (25%) pickup ion case, the shock front is nonstationary. During th...

  14. Shock Analysis on a Packaged Washing Machine from Damage Boundary: Shock Response Spectrum to Component Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Both analyses of the damage boundary and shock response spectrum (RSR are the basis for the development of the protective packaging system. The shock analysis through lab test and numerical simulation found that the root cause of packaging failure was due to the stress of the critical component beyond the yield limit of the material. Lab shock test data showed that the packaging design based on the damage boundary is conservative, and the RSR could be helpful and provide support to develop more effective packaging system. Furthermore, numerical simulation can accurately analyze the component and the entire product packaging system in great detail.

  15. Gut as source of sepsis after hemorrhagic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a model of severe hemorrhagic shock in rats, blood culture findings became positive within 2 to 4 hours of shock. The organisms cultured were primarily gram-negative. To test the hypothesis that the gut was the source of the bacteria, E. coli labeled with carbon-14 oleic acid were fed to rats undergoing hemorrhagic shock. Their plasma was then assayed for carbon-14 activity. Seven of the 14 shocked animals demonstrated increased plasma carbon-14 activity during or after shock. The mortality rate was 100 percent 80 hours postshock, and all animals had E. coli on subsequent blood culture. The seven rats without increased plasma carbon-14 activity had a survival rate of 83 percent postshock. Sham-shocked animals did not exhibit plasma carbon-14 levels greater than the background levels. These data suggest that bacterial translocation occurs during hemorrhagic shock and that the gut is the source of the bacteremia seen during hemorrhagic shock

  16. Shock wave compression of condensed matter a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces the core concepts of the shock wave physics of condensed matter, taking a continuum mechanics approach to examine liquids and isotropic solids. The text primarily focuses on one-dimensional uniaxial compression in order to show the key features of condensed matter’s response to shock wave loading. The first four chapters are specifically designed to quickly familiarize physical scientists and engineers with how shock waves interact with other shock waves or material boundaries, as well as to allow readers to better understand shock wave literature, use basic data analysis techniques, and design simple 1-D shock wave experiments. This is achieved by first presenting the steady one-dimensional strain conservation laws using shock wave impedance matching, which insures conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Here, the initial emphasis is on the meaning of shock wave and mass velocities in a laboratory coordinate system. An overview of basic experimental techniques for measuring pressure...

  17. Experiments on shock formation in a Q-device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    For equal ion and electron temperatures, Ti = Te, Landau damping prevents shock formation. When the ratio Te/Ti is made as large as 3-4 through ion-neutral atom collisions, shock formation is observed....

  18. Shocks Externos y Política Fiscal

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Larrañaga; Jorge Marshall

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of external shocks on fiscal policy in the developing economies. Following a survey of recent experiences regarding fiscal responses to external shocks the paper offers a basic analytical framework to analyze the issue. The c

  19. Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Shock: Injection Unveiled

    CERN Document Server

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Burgess, David; Mazelle, Christian X

    2015-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic rays energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration, however, for this process to become active the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the ups...

  20. Geometrical on-the-fly shock detection in SPH

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Alexander M; Donnert, Julius M F

    2015-01-01

    We present an on-the-fly geometrical approach for shock detection and Mach number calculation in simulations employing smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We utilize pressure gradients to select shock candidates and define up- and downstream positions. We obtain hydrodynamical states in the up- and downstream regimes with a series of normal and inverted kernel weightings parallel and perpendicular to the shock normals. Our on-the-fly geometrical Mach detector incorporates well within the SPH formalism and has low computational cost. We implement our Mach detector into the simulation code GADGET and alongside many SPH improvements. We test our shock finder in a sequence of shock-tube tests with successively increasing Mach numbers exceeding by far the typical values inside galaxy clusters. For the all shocks, we resolve the shocks well and the correct Mach numbers are assigned. An application to a strong magnetized shock-tube gives stable results in full magnetohydrodynamic set-ups. We simulate a merger of ...

  1. Collisionless Weibel shocks: full formation mechanism and timing

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, Antoine; Narayan, Ramesh; Silva, Luis O

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  2. State of the art extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics that are covered are: Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Development; Laser-Generated Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripter; Radiation Exposure during ESWL; Caliceal Calculi; and Pediatric ESWL

  3. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  4. Formation of slow shock pairs associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. V.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of a forward-reverse slow shock pair in the solar corona is presently simulated by an MHD model that uses the Rankine-Hugoniot solution to calculate the flow-property jumps at all shock crossings. The shocks divide the solution-domain into several continuous flow regions whose respective governing characteristics are solved by the method of characteristics. The plasma impact compresses the plasma near the front of the coronal mass ejection (CME); as the CME-associated slow shock pair moves outwards in interplanetary space, it evolves into a pair of fast shocks. All three phenomena are eventually manifested in interplanetary space as a magnetic cloud accompanied by a fast shock pair, with a forward shock preceding the cloud and a reverse shock appearing either within or behind the cloud.

  5. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Jump Conditions for Oblique Relativistic Shocks with Gyrotropic Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Double, Glen P.; Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2003-01-01

    Shock jump conditions are obtained for steady-state, plane shocks with oblique magnetic fields and arbitrary flow speeds. For ultrarelativistic and nonrelativistic shocks, the jump conditions may be solved analytically. For mildly relativistic shocks, analytic solutions are obtained for isotropic pressure using an approximation for the adiabatic index that is valid in high sonic Mach number cases. In the more general case of gyrotropic pressure, the jump conditions cannot be solved analytical...

  7. Right heart in septic shock: prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ratender Kumar; Kumar, Sudeep; Nadig, Sreevatsa; Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Poddar, Banani; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Background The right heart often receives less attention during echocardiography. The situation is no different in septic shock. We prospectively investigated the echocardiographic indices of the right heart in septic shock adult patients. Methods Septic shock ICU patients within 24 h of admission were subjected to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as per the 2005 guidelines from the American Society of Echocardiography. Results Eighty-eight septic shock patients (M:F = 52:36) underwent TT...

  8. Slow mode shocks propagating in open and closed magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕建永; 魏奉思

    1999-01-01

    A 2-D MHD model is used to investigate the propagation of slow mode shocks in the open and closed magnetic fields of the meridional plane near the sun. The solutions demonstrate that a forward slow shock could retain its slow shock characteristics into interplanetary space in the magnetically open region; however, it can evolve into an intermediate shock through the helmet-type current sheet to the open magnetic field.

  9. Experimental investigation of damping force of twin tube shock absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Sandip K. Kadu; Milind S. Mhaske

    2014-01-01

    A shock absorber is a mechanical device to damp shock impulse and convert kinetic energy into thermal energy. The damping effect of shock absorber depends on damping force and damping force is affected by various process parameters. In this analysis three process parameters damping diameter(A), number of holes(B) and suspension velocity(C) were considered and their effect on damping force of shock absorber was studied and accordingly suitable orthogonal array was selected by t...

  10. Signal Transduction Pathways Leading to Heat Shock Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Calderwood, S K; Xie, Y.; X. Wang; Khaleque, M. A.; Chou, S. D.; Murshid, A.; Prince, T.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are essential for intracellular protein folding during stress and protect cells from denaturation and aggregation cascades that can lead to cell death. HSP genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) that is activated by stress and binds to heat shock elements in HSP genes. The activation of HSF1 during heat shock involves conversion from an inert monomer to a DNA binding trimer through a series of intramolecular foldi...

  11. News Shocks and Labor Market Dynamics in Matching Models

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Zanetti; Konstantinos Theodoridis

    2015-01-01

    We enrich a baseline RBC model with search and matching frictions on the labor market and real frictions that are helpful in accounting for the response of macroeconomic aggregates to shocks. The analysis allows shocks to have an unanticipated and a news (i.e. anticipated) component. The Bayesian estimation of the model reveals that the model which includes news shocks on macroeconomic aggregates produces a remarkable fit of the data. News shocks in stationary and non-stationary TFP, investme...

  12. Do monetary and technology shocks move euro area stock prices?

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Tim Oliver

    2010-01-01

    I use a Bayesian vector autoregressive (VAR) model to investigate the impact of monetary and technology shocks on the euro area stock market in 1987-2005. I find an important role for technology shocks, but not monetary shocks, in explaining variations in real stock prices. The identification method is flexible enough to study the effects of technology news shocks. The responses are consistent with the idea that news on technology improvements have an immediate impact on stock prices. These f...

  13. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  14. Acceleration mechanisms flares, magnetic reconnection and shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several mechanisms are briefly discussed for the acceleration of particles in the astrophysical environment. Included are hydrodynamic acceleration, spherically convergent shocks, shock and a density gradient, coherent electromagnetic acceleration, the flux tube origin, symmetries and instabilities, reconnection, galactic flares, intergalactic acceleration, stochastic acceleration, and astrophysical shocks. It is noted that the supernova shock wave models still depend critically on the presupernova star structure and the assumption of highly compact presupernova models for type I supernovae. 37 references

  15. Shock Emergence in Supernovae: Limiting Cases and Accurate Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Ro, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of accelerating normal shocks in stratified planar atmospheres, providing accurate fitting formulae for the scaling index relating shock velocity to the initial density and for the post-shock acceleration factor as functions of the polytropic and adiabatic indices which parameterize the problem. In the limit of a uniform initial atmosphere there are analytical formulae for these quantities. In the opposite limit of a very steep density gradient the solutions match the outcome of shock acceleration in exponential atmospheres.

  16. Shock Emergence in Supernovae: Limiting Cases and Accurate Approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2013-08-01

    We examine the dynamics of accelerating normal shocks in stratified planar atmospheres, providing accurate fitting formulae for the scaling index relating shock velocity to the initial density and for the post-shock acceleration factor as functions of the polytropic and adiabatic indices which parameterize the problem. In the limit of a uniform initial atmosphere, there are analytical formulae for these quantities. In the opposite limit of a very steep density gradient, the solutions match the outcome of shock acceleration in exponential atmospheres.

  17. SHOCK EMERGENCE IN SUPERNOVAE: LIMITING CASES AND ACCURATE APPROXIMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2013-08-10

    We examine the dynamics of accelerating normal shocks in stratified planar atmospheres, providing accurate fitting formulae for the scaling index relating shock velocity to the initial density and for the post-shock acceleration factor as functions of the polytropic and adiabatic indices which parameterize the problem. In the limit of a uniform initial atmosphere, there are analytical formulae for these quantities. In the opposite limit of a very steep density gradient, the solutions match the outcome of shock acceleration in exponential atmospheres.

  18. Oil Price, Exchange Rate Shock, and the Japanese Economy

    OpenAIRE

    IWAISAKO, TOKUO; NAKATA Hayato

    2015-01-01

    By using the framework of a structural vector autoregression (VAR) model, in this paper, we provide a quantitative assessment of the relative importance of exogenous shocks to Japanese output, as measured by aggregate sales, industry sales, and the sales of different firm-size groups. We analyze four structural shocks: (i) oil supply shock; (ii) oil price fluctuations not related to supply and demand; (iii) world economic activity (an aggregate demand shock); and (iv) exchange rate fluctuatio...

  19. Oil Price, Exchange Rate Shock, and the Japanese Economy (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    IWAISAKO, TOKUO; NAKATA Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Using the framework of structural vector autoregressions (VAR), this paper provides a quantitative assessment of the relative importance of exogenous shocks to Japanese output as measured by aggregate sales, industry sales, and the sales of different firm size groups. We assume four structural shocks, namely, (i) oil supply shock, (ii) oil price fluctuations not related to supply and demand, (iii) world economic activity (aggregate demand shock), and (iv) exchange rate fluctuations not relate...

  20. Superior Information, Income Shocks and the Permanent Income Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Pistaferri

    1998-01-01

    According to the permanent income hypothesis with quadratic preferences, savings should react only to transitory income shocks, but not to permanent shocks. The problem is that income shock components are not separately observable. I show how the combination of income realizations with subjective expectations can help to identify separately the transitory and the permanent shock to income, thus providing a powerful test of the theory. The empirical analysis is performed on a sample of Italian...

  1. Shock, release, and tension response of soda lime glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the result of shock wave experiments on soda lime glass in which the shock wave profiles were recorded simultaneously at or near the impact surface and the free surface of the glass specimen by means of multi-beam VISAR. Since earlier work indicated that the glass under shock compression does not follow the Gladstone-Dale model, these profiles provide accurate and self consistent values of transit times for shock, release, and tensile waves propagating in soda lime glass

  2. The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks on the UK Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Denis; Prakash Kannan

    2013-01-01

    This paper quantifies the economic impact of uncertainty shocks in the UK using data that span the recent Great Recession. We find that uncertainty shocks have a significant impact on economic activity in the UK, depressing industrial production and GDP. The peak impact is felt fairly quickly at around 6-12 months after the shock, and becomes statistically negligible after 18 months. Interestingly, the impact of uncertainty shocks on industrial production in the UK is strikingly similar to th...

  3. On the escape of particles from cosmic ray modified shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, D.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Amato, E.

    2008-01-01

    Stationary solutions to the problem of particle acceleration at shock waves in the non-linear regime, when the dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock cannot be neglected, are known to show a prominent energy flux escaping from the shock towards upstream infinity. On physical grounds, the escape of particles from the upstream region of a shock has to be expected in all those situations in which the maximum momentum of accelerated particles, $p_{max}$, decreases with time,...

  4. Shock waves in crystalline dielectrics at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study shock wave propagation in dielectric undeformable isotropic crystals at very low temperature (T<20 K). Starting from a model based on extended irreversible thermodynamics and using the Lax and entropy growth selection rules, it is shown that not only the classical (hot) shocks but also so-called cold shocks are physically admissible. Cold shocks are characterized by the property that the body is cooled after the passage of the wavefront. (author)

  5. Line emission processes in atomic and molecular shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review discusses the observations and theoretical models of interstellar shock waves in diffuse and molecular clouds. After summarizing the relevant gas dynamics, atomic, molecular and grain processes, and physics of radiative and magnetic precursors, the author describes observational diagnostics of shocks. This paper concludes with a discussion of two topics: unstable or non-steady shocks and thermal conduction in metal-rich shocks

  6. How Important are Financial Shocks for the Canadian Business Cycle?

    OpenAIRE

    Shin-Ichi Nishiyama

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the importance of financial shocks for the Canadian business cycle employing the financial friction DSGE framework following Bernanke, Gertler, and Gilchrist (1999) with an extension of a small-open economy feature. In particular, we explored the importance of an external finance premium shock and an aggregate net worth shock. In order to identify financial shocks in the model, we utilized financial data in estimating our model. Our variance decomposition results...

  7. Shock Re-equilibration of Fluid Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, M. E. Elwood; Horz, F.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (microscopic volumes of fluid trapped within minerals as they precipitate) are extremely common in terrestrial minerals formed under a wide range of geological conditions from surface evaporite deposits to kimberlite pipes. While fluid inclusions in terrestrial rocks are nearly ubiquitous, only a few fluid inclusion-bearing meteorites have been documented. The scarcity of fluid inclusions in meteoritic materials may be a result of (a) the absence of fluids when the mineral was formed on the meteorite parent body or (b) the destruction of fluid inclusions originally contained in meteoritic materials by subsequent shock metamorphism. However, the effects of impact events on pre-existing fluid inclusions trapped in target and projectile rocks has received little study. Fluid inclusions trapped prior to the shock event may be altered (re-equilibrated) or destroyed due to the high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates associated with impact events. By examining the effects of shock deformation on fluid inclusion properties and textures we may be able to better constrain the pressure-temperature path experienced by terrestrial and meteoritic shocked materials and also gain a clearer understanding of why fluid inclusions are rarely found in meteorite samples.

  8. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  9. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  10. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  11. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...

  12. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  13. Income Shocks and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Sarah; de Hoop, Jacobus; Ozler, Berk

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a positive income shock on mental health among adolescent girls using evidence from a cash transfer experiment in Malawi. Offers of cash transfers strongly reduced psychological distress among baseline schoolgirls. However, these large beneficial effects declined with increases in the transfer amount offered to the…

  14. Strong imploding shock, the representative curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The representative curve of the ideal gas behind the front of a spherically, or cylindrically, symmetric strong imploding shock is shown to pass through the point where the reduced pressure is maximum, P(xisub(m)) = Psub(m)sub(a)sub(x). (orig.)

  15. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti (

  16. Shock Syntheses of Novel Nitrides and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure spinel nitride of Si3N4 was discovered more than 10 years ago. Since then there have been many studies on the spinel nitrides and related materials including oxynitrides. We have developed shock synthesis method to investigate their structural, mechanical, chemical, physical, and optical properties. At the same time we tried to synthesize carbon nitrides from the organic substances. And later we extended to shock synthesis of ammonia through the Haber-Bosch reaction under shock in order to apply geochemical subjects related to the origin of life. The simplest amino acid of glycine, as well as animes (up to propylamine) and carboxylic acids (up to pentanoic acid), has been synthesized successfully in aqueous solutions through meteoritic impact reactions. Recently we are trying to make more complex biomolecules for implications of biomolecule formation for the origin of life through meteorite impacts on early Earth's ocean. These results of shock syntheses may imply significant contributions to materials science and Earth and planetary sciences. This research is collaborated with National Institute for Materials Science and Tohoku University.

  17. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renyi Ma; Dongsu Ryu; Hyesung Kang

    2011-03-01

    Based on hydrodynamic numerical simulations and diffusive shock acceleration model, we calculated the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) to thermal energy. We found that the CR fraction can be less than ∼ 0.1 in the intracluster medium, while it would be of order unity in the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  18. Isentropic expansion of shock-compressed substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.

    2001-06-01

    The below parts of the paper are devoted to experimental results = obtained by the barrier method when researching metals, explosion = products, and polymers. Metals. The method of isentropic expansion was used to research = trancritical states of copper, lead, bismuth, molybdenum, uranium, = tungsten, nickel, tin, chrome, and zinc. To increase entropy under shock = compression and realize trancritical states during expansion, porous = samples were used. The highest degrees of expansion are reached on = isentropes obtained with use of hemispherical generators of shock waves. = The performed tests showed absence of significant jumps of thermodynamic = function or any hydrodynamic anomalies which could be interpeted as = specific plasma phase transformations. The tests data testify to = continuous change of metals properties at expansion from the condensed = state up to the gas state. Isentropes of explosion products (EP). In tests the shock wave = parameters were determined in inert materials-obstacles directly = contacting HE under research. TNT and two TNT-RDX alloys (50/50 and = 25/75) were used as this HE. The experimental data were compared with = data obtained by calculations using various EOS, including the cubic EOS = (P=3DAρ^3). It is shown that the cubic EOS has significant = disagreement with test in the area below 1 GPa. Polymeric materials. Teflon, polystyrene, plexiglas, phenylone, and = stilbene are studied. Analysis of experimental data testifies that = polystyrene, phenylone, and stilbene undergo a series of = physical-chemical transformations with pressure growth in the front of = shock-waves.

  19. Review of simulation of quasiparallel collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the numerical simulation of quasiparallel shocks is reviewed. Recent work on one-dimensional hybrid codes (fluid electrons, particle ions) and two-dimensional particle codes is emphasized. Basic goals and limitations of the various models are stated throughout the text

  20. Shock buffer for nuclear control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shock buffer is provided for the gradual deceleration of a rapidly descending control element assembly in a nuclear reactor. The interactive buffer components are associated respectively with the movable control element assembly and part of the upper guide structure independent of and spaced from the fuel assemblies of the reactor

  1. Falling forever: the price of chronic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathleen A

    2006-04-01

    Manifestations of chronic shock and annihilation anxiety-including autistic defenses, chaotic relationships, disorganized attachment, split-off affective states, and vulnerability to disintegration--exist side by side with apparent ego strength and high functioning, even in nonabused patients. Chronic shock stemming from uncontained distress and failed dependency during childhood can persist throughout the lifespan, creating ripples of dysfunction that mask as character distortion and contribute to therapeutic impasse. Patients rely on omnipotent defenses to provide a sense of "having skin" in the face of the fear of breakdown, striving to avoid vulnerability, and trying to insulate themselves from shock experience. Although the relinquishment of autistic defenses and subsequent integration of disowned affect states are overwhelming and painful, patients can emerge from this process with significant shifts in intrapsychic, interpersonal, and existential/spiritual functioning. Clinical material from one psychodynamic psychotherapy group tracks the group process and growth trajectories of seven group members struggling with chronic shock. The ability to recognize subtle dissociative states is a valuable tool in the repertoire of the group psychotherapist. PMID:16643124

  2. UHECR acceleration at GRB internal shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, Noemie; Mochkovitch, Robert; Parizot, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    We study the acceleration of CR protons and nuclei at GRB internal shocks. Physical quantities and their time evolution are estimated using the internal shock modeling implemented by Daigne & Mochkovitch 1998. We consider different hypotheses about the way the energy dissipated at internal shocks is shared between accelerated CR, e- and B field. We model CR acceleration at mildly relativistic shocks, including all the significant energy loss processes. We calculate CR and neutrino release from single GRBs, assuming that nuclei heavier than protons are present in the relativistic wind. Protons can only reach maximum energies of ~ 10^19.5 eV, while intermediate and heavy nuclei are able to reach values of ~ 10^20 eV and above. The spectra of nuclei escaping from the acceleration site are found to be very hard while the combined spectrum of protons and neutrons is much softer. We calculate the diffuse UHECR flux expected on Earth using the GRB luminosity function from Wanderman & Piran 2010. Only the mod...

  3. A Merger Shock in Abell 2034

    CERN Document Server

    Owers, Matt S; Couch, Warrick J; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P; Forman, William R; Hopkins, Andrew M; Jones, Christine; van Weeren, Reinout J

    2013-01-01

    We present a $250\\,$ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within $\\sim 27\\,$degrees about the axis of symmetry of the edge the density, temperature and pressure drop abruptly by factors of $1.83^{+0.09}_{-0.08}$, $1.85^{+0.41}_{-0.41}$ and $3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number $M = 1.59^{+0.06}_{-0.07}$ and corresponding shock velocity $v_{\\rm shock}\\simeq 2057\\,$km/s. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy whi...

  4. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  5. Polaprezinc Protects Mice against Endotoxin Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Shuzo; Moriyama, Chihiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Nishida, Tadashi; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Mochida, Shinsuke; Minami, Yukari; Nakada, Junya; Shomori, Kohei; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2010-05-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), a chelate compound consisting of zinc and l-carnosine (Car), is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In the present study, we investigated whether PZ suppresses mortality, pulmonary inflammation, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels in endotoxin shock mice after peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how PZ protects against LPS-induced endotoxin shock. PZ pretreatment inhibited the decrease in the survival rate of mice after LPS injection. PZ inhibited the increases in plasma NO as well as TNF-alpha after LPS. Compatibly, PZ suppressed LPS-induced inducible NO synthase mRNA transcription in the mouse lungs. PZ also improved LPS-induced lung injury. However, PZ did not enhance the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 in the mouse lungs after LPS. Pretreatment of RAW264 cells with PZ suppressed the production of NO and TNF-alpha after LPS addition. This inhibition likely resulted from the inhibitory effect of PZ on LPS-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Zinc sulfate, but not Car, suppressed NO production after LPS. These results indicate that PZ, in particular its zinc subcomponent, inhibits LPS-induced endotoxin shock via the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and subsequent induction of proinflammatory products such as NO and TNF-alpha, but not HSP induction. PMID:20490319

  6. Macroeconomic shocks and firms' labor adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses some recent research which aims at producing evidence on how firms adjust their employment in response to output shocks using micro-level data and with a particular focus on the relationship between worker and job flows. The evidence presented is mainly based on Danish data...

  7. Potential Flow Downstream of the Heliospheric Terminal Shock: A Non-Spherical Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have solved for the potential flow downstream of the terminal shock of the solar wind in the limit of small departures from a spherical shock due to a latitudinal ram pressure variation in the supersonic solar wind. The solution connects anisotropic streamlines at the shock to uniform streamlines down the heliotail because we use a non-slip boundary condition on the heliopause at large radii. The rotational velocity about the heliotail in the near-field solution decays as the fourth power of distance from the shock. The polar divergence of the streamlines will have consequences for the previously discussed magnetic pressure ridge that may build-up just inside the heliopause.

  8. Particle energization during solar maximum: Diffusive shock acceleration at multiple shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neergaard Parker, L.; Zank, G. P., E-mail: linda.parker@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present a model for the acceleration of particles at multiple shocks using an approach related to box models. A distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles out of the box by either the method used in Melrose and Pope and Pope and Melrose or by the approach introduced in Zank et al. where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E{sub max}) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks. We provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum.

  9. Correlation between particle removal and shock-wave dynamics in the laser shock cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that the laser shock cleaning (LSC) method is effective for eliminating micron- and submicron-scale particulates from solid surfaces. In the LSC process, a high-power laser pulse induces optical breakdown of the ambient gas close to the solid surface to be cleaned and the subsequently-created shock wave followed by a high-speed flow stream detaches the particles. Therefore, there should be a strong correlation between the dynamics of the shock wave and the cleaning performance. In this work, experimental analyses are conducted to measure the cleaning performance using micron-sized alumina particles attached to a silicon surface. The experimental data showing the particle-removal performance are compared with the results of the dynamics of the laser-induced shock waves, leading to a simple model for particle removal by the LSC scheme in the continuum-flow regime

  10. Shock Pulse Effects in PTFE Shocked Through the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2008-03-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  11. Hybrid Simulations and Scaling Laws for Shock Formation in the UCLA Collisionless Shock Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David; Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa; Clark, S. Eric; Niemann, Christoph; Brecht, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional simulations are used to compare and contrast the plasma expansion, formation of a magnetic cavity, and generation of an outgoing shock wave for conditions relevant to the laser experiment at UCLA, as a function of the background ion mass. A model of the shock formation process is constructed that yields an expression for the speed of the shock, which we show is in good agreement with the simulations. In addition, the criteria for generating strongly-coupled shocks are derived and simulations are used to examine the velocity scaling obtained via momentum conservation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by DTRA10027-6759.

  12. The Transmission of Liquidity Shocks to the Real Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dursun-de Neef, Özlem

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the 2007-2009 financial crisis as a negative liquidity shock on banks to analyze their lending behavior and study the differences between US and euro-area banks. When faced with a negative liquidity shock, US banks transmitted liquidity shocks to the real economy by reducing...

  13. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  14. Aggregate Economic Shocks, Child Schooling, and Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H.G. Ferreira; Schady, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Do aggregate economic shocks, such as those caused by macroeconomic crises or droughts, reduce child human capital? The answer to this question has important implications for public policy. If shocks reduce investments in children, they may transmit poverty from one generation to the next. This paper uses a simple framework to analyze the effects of aggregate economic shocks on child schoo...

  15. Markups’ cyclical behavior : the role of demand and supply shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, António; Jalles, João Tovar

    2015-01-01

    We assess how demand and supply shocks (identified via the Blanchard and Quah (1989) SVAR approach) in 14 OECD countries affect mark-ups. We find that individual responses of markups to demand shocks push down the markup for most countries (confirmed in the panel analysis). On the other hand, a supply shock has a more mixed effect.

  16. Markups’ Cyclical Behavior: The role of Demand and Supply Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    António Afonso; João Tovar Jalles

    2015-01-01

    We assess how demand and supply shocks (identified via the Blanchard and Quah (1989) SVAR approach) in 14 OECD countries affect mark-ups. We find that individual responses of markups to demand shocks push down the markup for most countries (confirmed in the panel analysis). On the other hand, a supply shock has a more mixed effect.

  17. Observation of laser driven supercritical radiative shock precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, S; Stéhlé, C; Koenig, M; Chièze, J-P; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Batani, D; Leygnac, S; Fleury, X; Merdji, H; Michaut, C; Thais, F; Grandjouan, N; Hall, T; Henry, E; Malka, V; Lafon, J-P J

    2004-06-01

    We present a supercritical radiative shock experiment performed with the LULI nanosecond laser facility. Using targets filled with xenon gas at low pressure, the propagation of a strong shock with a radiative precursor is evidenced. The main measured shock quantities (electronic density and propagation velocity) are shown to be in good agreement with theory and numerical simulations. PMID:15245230

  18. Shock wave generated by high-energy electric spark discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingming; Zhang, Yunming

    2014-10-01

    Shock wave generated by electric spark discharge was studied experimentally and the shock wave energy was evaluated in this paper. A pressure measurement system was established to study the pressure field of the electric spark discharge process. A series of electric spark discharge experiments were carried out and the energy of the electric spark used in present study was in the range of 10 J, 100 J, and 1000 J, respectively. The shock wave energy released from the electric spark discharge process was calculated by using the overpressure values at different measurement points near the electric spark discharge center. The good consistency of shock wave energies calculated by pressure histories at different measuring points in the same electric spark discharge experiment illustrates the applicability of the weak shock wave theory in calculating the energy of shock wave induced by electric spark discharge process. The result showed that shock wave formed at the initial stage of electric spark discharge process, and the shock wave energy is only a little part of electric spark energy. From the analysis of the shock wave energy and electric spark energy, a good linear relationship between shock wave energy and electric spark energy was established, which make it possible to calculate shock wave energy by measuring characteristic parameters of electric spark discharge process instead of shock wave. So, the initiation energy of direct initiation of detonation can be determined easily by measuring the parameters of electric spark discharge process.

  19. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness: A Statistical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using WIND and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere is investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.70) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and varying the IP shock impact angle. We ...

  20. Identifying structural shocks behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Deryugina, Elena B.; Ponomarenko, Alexey A.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the drivers behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia using Bayesian vector autoregressive model with sign restrictions on impulse response functions. We identify two types of structural innovations: loan supply shock and monetary stance shock. We find that contractionary shocks of both types contributed significantly and in the roughly equal measure to the decrease of bank lending after the Lehman Brothers collapse.