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Sample records for biological shields

  1. Asphalt as biological shielding against fusion neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For fusion experiments, thick biological radiation protection shields are necessary due to the deep penetration capability of the 14 MeV neutrons. A (D,T) neutron generator with a moderate output of around 1012 n/sec requires a concrete shielding of a wall thickness of 2 meters laterally and at the top of an experimental assembly. The cost for this biological shield may exceed the cost for most of the equipment for a fusion and/or hybrid experimental installation. Particularly, in Saudi Arabia, asphalt is very cheap and available in bulk quantities. As it is rich in hydrogen and carbon, it is worthwhile to investigate its shielding potential against fusion neutron. In the present work different biological shield configurations of asphalt at the wall of the experimental cavity for a research program being undertaken in Saudi Arabia, are investigated. The experimental cavity is approximated by a sphere of 5 meters radius. The yield of the neutron generator is taken as 1012 - 14 MeV - neutron/sec

  2. The manufacturing of depleted uranium biological shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique combination of the physical and mechanical properties of uranium made it possible to manufacture biological shield components of transport package container (TPC) for transportation nuclear power plant irradiated fuel and radionuclides of radiation diagnostic instruments. Protective properties are substantially dependent on the nature radionuclide composition of uranium, that why I recommended depleted uranium after radiation chemical processing. Depleted uranium biological shield (DUBS) has improved specific mass-size characteristics compared to a shield made of lead, steel or tungsten. Technological achievements in uranium casting and machining made it possible to manufacture DUBS components of TPC up to 3 tons of mass and up to 2 metres of the maximum size. (authors)

  3. Biological shield design for a 10 MeV Rhodotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We evaluate the produced radiations of the Rhodotron-TT200 and their attenuation to the permitted level. ► We apply analytical calculations to determine the shield material and thickness. ► We simulate the Rhodotron accelerator and its shielding using MCNPX code to make sure of results accuracy. -- Abstract: Radiation field of the Rhodotron-TT200 electron accelerator is determined in this study. Regarding the interactions of electron with matter, the produced radiations and their attenuation to the permitted level (i.e. 0.01 mrem/h) are evaluated and calculated. For this purpose analytical calculations are applied to determine the biological shield material and thickness. In order to make sure of results accuracy, Rhodotron accelerator and its shielding are simulated using MCNPX code and the results of analytical calculations and MCNPX code are compared with the experimental ones.

  4. Leakage from biological shield cooling system in Pickering NGS A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past eight years, a number of leaks have developed in the Biological Shield Cooling (BSC) system of the Pickering NGS A reactors. The highest leak rate exists in Unit 4. The failure mechanism is not known, but corrosion and/or weld failure are suspected. This paper summarizes the concerns associated with the leaks and possible solutions. It should be noted that the BSC system is peculiar to Pickering A reactors only

  5. Historical waste - biological shield and documentation during decommissioning - 59056

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Inventory records of isotopes in radioactive waste are important as documentation with respect to governmental control, final disposal and public transparency. We present a simple, practical and cost-effective method for characterization of a part of the radioactive waste from decommissioning of a research reactor: The biological shielding. The method uses documentation from the decommissioning and from the construction drawings and blueprints of the reactor as well as measurements based on samples from the facility. The data presented is from a 5 MW experimental light water nuclear reactor (DR-2) shutdown in 1975 and decommissioned in 2008. The method incorporates an activity distribution in the biological shield. The distribution is based on measurements of samples from across the shielding and coupled with the distance to the center of the reactor core. The exact origin of each waste item is determined from pictures from the decommissioning and from old blueprints and construction drawings of the reactor. The uncertainty and usefulness of the method is related directly to different factors such as: The amount of samples obtained and the position of these with respect to the origin of the waste, the accuracy of the documentation of the decommissioning, the size of the waste items

  6. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Dismantling of the biological shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e.g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given.

  7. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor - dismantling of the biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration) and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e. g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given. (author)

  8. Design, construction and erection of the biological shield wall for the Caorso nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the major aspects of the design, construction and erection of the biological shield wall encircling the reactor pressure vessel of the Caorso nuclear power station (Italy) (BWR-Mark 2, 840MWe)

  9. Design concepts to minimize the activation of the biological shield of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation, concentrating on the nuclear aspects, has been made into the concept of minimizing the activation of the biological shield by substituting the material concrete with other neutron-shielding materials. This work was for nuclear plant designs which have a non-supporting inner shield wall such as that in the General Electric BWR/6 and the Kraftwerk Union PWR. The attenuation performance and activation levels have been analysed. Based on this analysis the performance of the materials in relation to that of concrete was assessed. Other non-nuclear properties were considered but the engineering problems were not addressed. The conclusion reached was that the concept was credible but would require a more rigorous examination in terms of structural design, economics and licensability

  10. Calculation of neutron fluxes in biological shield of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete calculation of neutron fluxes in biological shield and verification with experimental results is presented. Calculated results are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Experimental results used for comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in irradiation channel 4 in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark. Homogeneous type of problem (without inserted irradiation channel) and problem with asymmetry (inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. Deviation from material data set up as original parameters is also considered (first of all presence of water in concrete and density of concrete) for type of concrete in biological shield and for selected type of concrete in irradiation channel. BUGLE-96 (47 neutron energy groups) library is used. Excellent agreement between calculated and experimental results for reaction rate is received.(author)

  11. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  12. Determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete using pyrohydrolysis and liquid scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete of nuclear reactors was developed. Cl in the concrete sample was extracted quantitatively by pyrohydrolysis at 900 degrees C and recovered in Na2CO3 solution for subsequent measurement of 36Cl by liquid scintillation counting. WO3 was used as an accelerator in the pyrohydrolysis. The Cl extraction procedure was optimized by investigating experimental conditions with the use of ion chromatography and its recovery was evaluated by the analysis of the geochemical reference samples. The detection limit of 36Cl was 0.02 Bq g(-1) for a sample weight of 2 g. The relative standard deviation was 3-7% for the samples containing 0.5 Bq g(-1) levels of 36Cl. The method was applied to determine 36Cl in biological shield concrete of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor. PMID:12173658

  13. Application of a calculational model for thermal neutrons through biological shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a computational program, based on the Boltzmann transport integrodifferential equation, is applied. The scattering kernel is represented by the synthetic scattering model. The behaviour of thermal neutron in hydrogenous materials, which can be used as biological shields, are studied. These materials are water, polyethylene, Oak-Ridge concrete, ordinary concrete and manganese concrete. The data obtained are presented in tables. The results are analysed and compared with similar experimental values. Safety evaluation and environmental impact are discussed. 2 tabs

  14. Improvements at the biological shielding of BNCT research facility in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of neutron capture in boron is a promising technique in cancer treatment, it uses the high LET particles from the reaction 10B (n, α) 7Li to destroy cancer cells.The development of this technique began in the mid-'50s and even today it is the object of study and research in various centers around the world, Brazil has built a facility that aims to conduct research in BNCT, this facility is located next to irradiation channel number three at the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 and has a biological shielding designed to meet the radiation protection standards. This biological shielding was developed to allow them to conduct experiments with the reactor at maximum power, so it is not necessary to turn on and off the reactor to irradiate samples. However, when the channel is opened for experiments the background radiation in the experiments salon increases and this background variation makes it impossible to perform measurements in a neutron diffraction research that utilizes the irradiation channel number six. This study aims to further improve the shielding in order to minimize the variation of background making it possible to perform the research facility in BNCT without interfering with the action of the research group of the irradiation channel number six. To reach this purpose, the code MCNP5, dosimeters and activation detectors were used to plan improvements in the biological shielding. It was calculated with the help of the code an improvement that can reduce the average heat flow in 71.2% ± 13 and verified experimentally a mean reduce of 70 ± 9% in dose due to thermal neutrons. (author)

  15. Erection and Installation of thermal and biological shield in BNPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe operation of nuclear reactors when neutron flux and gamma rays and their related dose are high requires an advance technology so that to provide the equipment and operation personnel with protection and a safe area for accessing them in repair time. Biological and thermal shield, not only provide a safe area for operating personnel to execute the inspections and repairs in shut down time and reduce The effects of neutron dose and gamma rays on the personnel when accessing to these areas in reactor cavity, but also play an important role in preventing the reduction of heat degree and thermal drop from Rp body and preventing the effect of temperature degree and radiation resulted from gamma rays on available concrete structures in reactor cavity. The selection, erection and installation of shields in B NPP-1 are considered in this article

  16. Characterisation of the inventory of radioisotopes induced in the biological shield a WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant part of the radwaste originating from the decommissioning of NPPs is made up of the activated concrete and steel components of the biological shield. The paper presents the results of studies aimed at the determination of the amount of radionuclides accumulating in the serpentinous and ordinary concrete shield around the WWER-440 reactors of the Paks NPP. For the calculations, the reactor, vessel and shield were modelled in detail both in terms of geometry and material composition. The spatial and energy distribution of the activating neutron spectrum was determined by certain modules of SCALE 4.3 and the code TORT in two and three dimensions, while the activation was calculated using ORIGEN-S for 22 geometrical regions. The results showed that the activity of the concrete structures at final shutdown after 30 years of operation is approximately 50 TBq, which decreases to 20, 12, 1.1 TBq and 27 GBq after 1 month, 1 year, 10 and 100 years, respectively (Authors)

  17. Neutron spectra at the outlet from the labyrinths in the IHEP proton synchrotron biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectra in transport and cable labyrinths of concrete shielding were measured. It was related with planned increase of proton beam intensity in the IHEP synchrotron and the necessity of searching isotope radiation sources suitable for simulation of fields of neutron radiation in the accelerator biological shield. Multisphere Bonner spectrometer with 6LiI(Eu) monocrystal of 10x10 mm size as thermal neutron detector and a set of seven cadmium-plated polyethylene thermalizing spheres 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 and 18 inch in diameter was used for measurement. Measurements were conducted at 100 MeV, 8 and 70 GeV proton energies. Analysis of obtained data shows that the average energy of neutron spectra increases at the outlet from the labyrinths from 110 up to 390 keV with growth of accelerated proton energy from 100 MeV up to 70 GeV. Neutron spectra are similar with respect to form and component composition at one and the same energy of accelerated particles and the same shield material regardless of labyrinth configuration. The shares of fast and interiediate neutrons equal about 10 and 90% respectively. It was concluded that neutron radiation fields typical for the labyrinths of the IHEP synchrotron yield can be simulated in model labyrinths with the use of californium-252 source

  18. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  19. Evaluation and Verification of a Biological Shield in a SHARS Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused SHARS in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. This unit, designed and manufactured by the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), can be assembled, disassembled and packed inside two ISO containers and transported to the desired destination with relative ease. The unit was also licensed by the South African Regulator, the Department of Health (DoH), Directorate Radiation Control. This facility is used for the recovery and conditioning of orphaned/ abandoned or spent high activity radioactive sources from teletherapy units, gamma irradiators, and brachytherapy units. The hot cell was designed for a 3,7 E+13 Bq (1000 Ci) activity although it was demonstrated that it can handle activities of more than 7,4 E+13 Bq (2000 Ci) with ease. The biological shield of the SHARS facility consists of river sand sandwiched between metal plates, and a viewing window filled with a 50% zinc bromide solution. The shielding effectiveness of the river sand is evaluated experimentally by determining its density. The experimentally measured dose rates are compared to the dose rates estimated by computational codes. (authors)

  20. Investigation of the biological shielding properties of ferruginous and sandy clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological shielding properties of two local clays, the ferruginous clay from Nsaba and the sandy clay from Winneba, at three different firing temperatures (9500C, 10000C and 11000C) have been investigated. The attenuation coefficient and hence the half-value-layers for different gamma energies determined revealed that Portland concrete is better than the clays for lower gamma energies but the reverse is true for high energy gammas. The diffusion lengths of thermal neutrons in the clays were observed to be relatively shorter than the 6.61 cm recorded for Portland concrete. The worst value obtained being 1.81 cm. There is the possibility of improving on the shielding properties of the clays by adding boron or cadmium and firing below 444.60C in the former and 746.40C in the latter or by hand pressing during moulding to reduce the porosity. The values of the moduli of rupture indicates their general weakness in comparison with concrete but again it is believed that hand pressed bricks would be stronger. (author)

  1. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. PMID:21646026

  2. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Pape, Yann Le [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) values in the concrete biological shields of the US PWR fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to assure reliable risk assessment for NPPs extended operation.

  3. Activation of the biological shield of the shut-down Gundremmingen block A reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the dismantling planning of a nuclear reactor, it is important to know the depth of the activation of the biological shield. With an important sampling and measurement program to support activity computer calculations, data have been obtained and hypothesis defined to avoid in the future high-cost measurement program. Measurement results agree with calculations. Some provisional results have been used as well to correct measurement results, doing new measurements, as to correct enter data, more particularly for what concerns the weight proportions. It is shown that a calculation of the activity in the median plane of the core is sufficient to determine the field from which concrete is only weakly activated. For the A-block of the RWE-Bayerwerk nuclear power plant, this field is before the external layer (primary concrete). Only, the inner (secondary) concrete is activated, separated from the first one by a layer of styropore

  4. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/μm. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm2 of material is used

  5. Geochemical pathways and biological uptake of radium in small Canadian Shield lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediment-water interactions and biological uptake of 226Ra are described for four small Canadian Shield lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area, Kenora, Ontario. A single addition of 226Ra was made to each lake between 1970 and 1976. Approximately 90 percent of the added 226Ra initially sorbed to the sediments. Outflow from the lakes showed losses of only 5-11 percent 226Ra per year. Models are proposed for adsorption and outflow of 226Ra from lakes. Biological uptake and long-term 226Ra concentrations were measured in three species of macrophytes, crayfish, and five species of fish. Bioaccumulation ranged from 1100 to 5000 in macrophytes, 705 in crayfish, from 30 to 80 in large trout (Salvelinus namaycush), white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and from 230 to 1200 in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), pearl dace (Semotilus margarita), and northern redbelly dace (Chrosomus eos). The concept of Ra/Ca ratio in organisms versus water and food is used to explain the differences in bioaccumulation. 226Ra is discriminated against versus calcium by fish but favoured by macrophytes and crayfish

  6. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization through post-nucleation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua; Miura, Robert

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are present at high concentrations throughout body fluids - at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. We adapted mean-field classical nucleation theory to the case of surface-shielding in order to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues. Mathematical Biosciences Institute, NSF DMS-1021818, National Institutes of Health, Rehab Medicine.

  7. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M.; Field, Kevin G.; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-02-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  8. Design improvement for reduction of decommissioning waste of PWR primary biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most operating nuclear power plants were constructed with no attention to the amount of decommissioning waste. Consequently, a large portion of the primary concrete shield wall is irradiated by neutrons escaping from the reactor core to produce high concentration of activation products. These radioactive waste comprises of around 30% of the decommissioning waste. Under the circumstance that the rad waste disposal cost is continuously increasing, reduction of decommissioning waste becomes an important issue. In this study, a design improvement was attempted to reduce activation of the primary shield wall by placing a water-filled neutron shield tank between the reactor pressure vessel and the primary shield wall. Procedure for calculating the amount of activated radionuclides remaining at different cooling times were developed by MCNP-ORIGEN coupled calculations. Particular attention was paid to correction of activation cross sections since the ORIGEN code was designed for use in calculation of isotope generation and depletion in the operating reactor core where temperature is high, while temperature of the shield wall is low. The established procedure was applied to the 1500MWe APR+ model to evaluated the effectiveness of the neutron shield tank. Distributions of activation products for many different thickness of the neutron shield tank were calculated and an effective thickness was selected. Finally, by comparing the resulting activity distributions with the exemption criteria for radioactive waste, the expected cost reduction was assessed. The model applied in this study, however, is limited to preliminary design in terms of neutronics and does not take account any engineering problems which may be caused by installation of the shield tank. Practical engineering needs further detailed design analysis including cooling and cleaning of the shield water and other related engineering issues

  9. Evaluation of the Biological Shields of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of Ghana Using MCNP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Deatanyah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective with radiation sources and facilities is the protection of both radiation workers and the general public. The biological shields of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI Ghana had been evaluated for a collimated isotropic cesium-137 source for calibration purpose using MCNP5 code. The dose rate at supervised areas ranged from 0.57 to 8.35 :Sv/h and 0.26 to 10.22 :Sv/h at control areas when the source was panoramic. When the source was collimated, the dose rate ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 :Sv/h at supervised areas and 0.23 to 8.88 :Sv/h at control areas for 22.2 GBq of the cesium-137 source. The scatter contribution from the surfaces of the walls and roofs were also accounted for. The scatter radiation in the room decreased to 400 :Sv/h when the source was first collimated and to 3.5 :Sv/h when the source was further collimated. These results agreed quite well with experimental measurement. To effectively protect the staff, a narrow beam of 1.2 cm diameter which was defined at 1.0 m by the total surface of the ISO slab phantom was recommended to reduce the dose rate to less than 1.5 :Sv/h outside the calibration bunker even when the current activity is doubled. It was concluded that the 4.7 cm diameter of the existing narrow beam should be decreased to 1.2 cm by further collimation of the beam.

  10. Pilot tests for dismantling by blasting of the biological shield of a shut down nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following free-field tests on concrete blocks the feasibility of explosive dismantling of the biological shield of nuclear power stations has been succesfully tested at the former hotsteam reaction in Karlstein/Main Germany. For this purpose a model shield of scale 1:2 was embedded into the reactor structure at which bore-hole blasting tests employing up to about 15 kg of explosive were performed. An elaborate measurement system allowed to receive detailed information on the blast side-effects: Special emphasis was focussed on the quantitative registration of the dynamic blast loads; data for the transfer of the dismantling method to the removal of real ractor structures were obtained. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of neutron fluxes obtained by 2-D and 3-D geometry with different shielding libraries in biological shield of the TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron fluxes in different spatial locations in biological shield are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Libraries used with TORT code were BUGLE-96 library (coupled library with 47 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups) and VITAMIN-B6 library (coupled library with 199 neutron groups and 42 gamma groups). BUGLE-96 library is derived from VITAMIN-B6 library. 2-D and 3-D models for homogeneous type of problem (without inserted beam port 4) and problem with asymmetry (non-homogeneous problem; inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. The main purpose is to verify the possibility for using 2-D approximation model instead of large 3-D model in some calculations. Another purpose of this paper was to compare neutron spectral constants obtained from neutron fluxes (3-D model) determined with smaller BUGLE-96 library with new constants obtained from fluxes calculated with bigger VITAMIN-B6 library. These neutron spectral constants are used in isotopic calculation with SCALE code package (ORIGEN-S). In past only neutron spectral constants determined by neutron fluxes from BUGLE-96 library were used. Experimental results used for isotopic composition comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in beam port 4 (irradiation channel 4) in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark in this paper. (author)

  12. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeorge, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from 51 to 184 keV/micron and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected at G2 and mitosis in first division post irradiation after chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 9 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 600 MeV/n Fe ions with LET of 184 keV/micron. When the LET of the primary beam was below approximately 100 keV/micron, the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of primary beams was higher than 100 keV/micron. The yield of aberrations correlated with the dose-average LET of the beam after traversal through the shielding.

  13. Investigations on construction material and construction concepts in order to obtain dose-reducing effects in the dismantling of the biological shield of a 1300 MWe-PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical values of neutron fluxes, activations, dose rates etc. as a function of characteristic values of materials required for optimization purposes to reduce the radiation effect of the biological shield of a PWR are not available. Design concepts are presented for biological shields of PWRs made of concrete with respect to both the most suitable application of materials and the design principles aiming at reduced radiation exposure as compared to present designs during entering, waste disposal and ultimate storage. To evaluate the present-state design the above values have been calculated. Suggested alternative designs are biological shields with selective material application, built from precast elements with or without boron carbide layer arranged in front of it. (orig./HP)

  14. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C; Miura, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids-at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleationtheory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system. PMID:27389239

  15. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Miura, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  16. Practical evaluation of the biological shielding effectiveness of the Gamma Irradiation Facility at Kwabenya, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of re-inforced concrete to attenuate photons in a facility housing a 50 kCi Cobalt-60 source has been practically assessed using a Chinese made dose rate survey meter model SG-102. Just within the maze entrances, the measured dose rates were 6273.8 ± 745.7 nGy/hr (Personnel) and 755.4 ± 94.4nGy/hrs(Goods).Outside the maze entrances and behind the lead shielding doors, the net dose rates were 392.3 nGy/hr (Personnel) and 388.4 nGy/hr (Goods). At other locations within the facility, the net dose rates determined were as follows: 303.4 nGy/hr (concrete roof top), 3984 nGy/hr over the small water pool in the de-ionizer room, less than 11 nGy/hr in the control room, less than 10 nGy/hr in the electrical room and less than 3 nGy/hr in the de-ionizer room. These measured values are consistent with earlier theoretical estimates undertaken by Emi-Reynolds and Akaho. (author). 6 refs. 4 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Evaluation of neutron flux distribution for radioactivity analysis of biological shield concrete required for study on decommissioning of Tokai 1 Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokai Power Station, a 166 MWe gas cooled reactor, ceased commercial operation in March 31, 1998 and at present spent fuels are being discharged. Meanwhile, a specific plan for the decommissioning to be performed after the fuel discharging is being studied. The reactor is surrounded by thick primary biological shield, but large penetrations such as primary cooling gas ducts filled with CO2 and shield cooling ducts and also the large opening covered with thin steel doors called rapture doors exist in the primary biological shield. They cause big neutron leakages into the outer region, called duct enclosure area, surrounded by secondary biological shield, and then enhance the radioactive nuclide concentration in the surrounding shield wall concrete. The radioactive nuclide concentration in this area distributes widely from the low level radioactive waste to below the clearance level. Its precise evaluation, which depends on data of neutron flux distribution, is essential for estimation of dismantling work, dismantling cost, disposal cost of the dismantled waste etc. of the decommission planing. In order to obtain the neutron flux distribution data, a few kinds of activation metal foils were placed at many positions in the space and on the wall surface in the duct enclosure area during the reactor operations. Also neutron transport calculation covering several floors was performed with use of three-dimensional discrete ordinates code, which is suitable for complicated geometry with some neutron streaming paths from the reactor room through the primary shield. By comparing results of calculation and measurement, good correlation was confirmed between them. (author)

  18. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein- Leopoldshafen (Germany); Klute, Stefan [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Stanke, Dieter [Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  19. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  20. Spectral and angular distributions of charged particles outside biological shielding of the 70 GeV Serpukhov accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space, angular and energy distributions of the charged particle of radiation field outside the Serpukhov accelerator shielding at different protons beam energies obtained with the ΔE-E spectrometer are presented. The influence of the accelerating complex operation on the charged particles field shaping outside the concrete and heterogeneous steel-concrete shieldings has been analyzed. The ratios between neutrons and charged particles of the radiation field outside the 70 GeV accelerator shielding have been estimated

  1. Theoretical evaluation of the biological shielding sufficiency for the Pelletron NEC Particle Accelerator at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical evaluation of the biological shielding sufficiency provided for 1.7MV Pelletron NEC Particle Accelerator yet to be installed at the Accelerator Research Centre of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) has been done. Using the Beer Lambert law attenuation of radiation dose outside the walls of the facility was made for protons of energy 1.7MeV. Simulation of charged particle-matter interactions leading to bremsstrahlung radiation using Monte Carlo code (MCNP5) have been carried out. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique has also been used to identify the composition of the concrete material used during the construction of the Accelerator Research Centre (ARC) building. The NAA analysis revealed that the elemental constituents of the ordinary concrete of density 2.3g/cm3 used for the construction of the walls included Na, Al, and Ca. Background radiation levels within and outside the facility was measured with the aid of a Sodium Iodide (NaI) identifinder and a Rados detector so as to have a practical reference datum. The weekly background radiation measurements yielded an average dose rate value of 0.05μSv/hr from recorded value range of 0.01μSv/hr to 0.07μSv/hr for an eight month period. Modeling and simulation of charged particle-matter interactions at different beam energies using Monte Carlo code (MCNP5) have yielded the dose rate of 1.58E-07μSv/hr, 1.98E-07μSv/h and 2.20E-05μSv/h outside the 22.86cm (9.0 inch) thick wall of the accelerator facility, for the beam energy range of 0.5-3.0MeV for Titanium, iron and Zirconium target samples respectively. From the Beer-Lambert law, the operational energy of 1.7MeV was used to evaluate theoretically the radiation dose rate of 1.178E-05μSv/hr, 2.656E-05μSv/hr and 4.787E-05μSv/hr outside the 22.86cm thick wall of the accelerator facility for Titanium, Iron and Zirconium targets respectively. At the operational energy energy of 3.0 MeV, the dose rate values obtained were 4.382E-05μSv/h, 9

  2. Shielding practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of shielding practice against external irradiation is shown in a simple way. For most sources of radiation (point sources) occurring in shielding practice, the basic data are given, mainly in the form of tables, which are required to solve the shielding problems. The application of these data is explained and discussed using practical examples. Thickness of shielding panes of glove boxes for α and β radiation; shielding of sealed γ-radiography sources; shielding of a Co-60 radiation source, and of the manipulator panels for hot cells; damping factors for γ radiation and neutrons; shielding of fast and thermal neutrons, and of bremsstrahlung (X-ray tubes, Kr-85 pressure gas cylinders, 42 MeV betatrons, 20 MeV linacs); two-fold shielding (lead glass windows for hot cells, 14 MeV neutron generators); shielding against scattered radiation. (orig./HP)

  3. Measurements and calculation of the activation of the biologic shield of the Lingen BWR power reactor definitively stopped (in view of dismantling)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the dismantling planning of a power reactor, it is important to know among others the depth of activation of the biological shield. A large sampling and measurement program joint to computer calculations, has given data which will allow to avoid in the future high-cost measurement programs. One shows that the calculation of activation induced by neutrons in the median plane of the core, to determine the zone from which concrete is only slightly activated. In the reactor considered, this zone does not reach the external concrete (or first layer of concrete)

  4. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  5. Biological Shielding Design Effectiveness of the Brachytherapy Unit at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana Using Mcnp5 Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Arwui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Design objectives for brachytherapy treatment facilities require sufficient shielding to reduce primary and scatter radiation to design limit in order to limit exposure to patients, staff and the general public. The primary aim of this study is to verify whether shielding of the brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching Hospital in Ghana provides adequate protection in order to assess any radiological health and safety impact and also test the suitability of other available sources. The study evaluates the effectiveness of the biological shielding design of a Cs-137 brachytherapy unit at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana using MCNP5. The facility was modeled based on the design specifications for LDR Cs-137, MDR Cs-137, HDR Co-60 and HDR Ir-192 treatment modalities. The estimated dose rate ranged from (0.01-0.15 μSv/h and (0.37-3.05 μSv/h for the existing initial and decayed activities of LDR Cs-137 for the public and controlled areas respectively, (0.03-0.57 μSv/h and (1.53-8.06 μSv/h for MDR Cs-137, (7.47-59.46 μSv/h and (144.87-178.74 μSv/h for HDR Co- 60, (0.13-6.95 μSv/h and (19.47-242.98 μSv/h for HDR Ir-192 for the public and controlled areas respectively. The results were verified by dose rates measurement for the current LDR setup at the Brachytherapy unit and agreed quiet well. It was also compared with the reference values of 0.5 μSv/h for public areas and 7.5 μSv/h for controlled areas respectively. It can be concluded that the shielding is adequate for the existing source.

  6. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Y. Jayasree, V. S. S. N. S. Baba, B. P. Rao

    2008-01-01

    Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigatio...

  7. High-temperature heat and mass transfer in a concrete layer of the biological shield of nuclear reactors at critical heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem on high-temperature heat and mass transfer in a concrete layer of the biological shield of nuclear reactors at critical heat loads is considered. The processes of the adsorbed moisture evaporation and dehydration reaction are accounted for. It is shown that concrete dehydration process at heating up to 800-900 K leads to formation in the concrete of the high-pressure (up to 5 x 105 Pa) area of evaporation and dehydration gaseous products. The level of stresses originating thereby essentially exceeds the limits of typical concrete strength at the corresponding high temperatures. It is also established that the concrete dehydration process having high-quality and low porosity may lead to higher pressures as compared with low-quality concretes. The results obtained constitute the basis for a more accurate calculation of temperature fields in the biological shield of nuclear reactors and also for calculating the stress-deformed concrete and forecasting the operational reliability of power reactors as a whole

  8. Improvement of numerical analytical model for temperature of primary biological shielding toward HTTR-LOFC test with VCS inactive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toward the loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test that is performed at HTTR, this study improved an axisymmetric numerical analysis model. The heat from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of HTTR is transferred to the concrete-made primary radiation shielding body that is positioned around the vessel cooling system (VCS), through the radiant heat transfer and natural convection from the fins between the water-cooled tubes adjacent to VCS, and through heat conduction from the metal support that supports VCS. This study aims to properly predict this hear transmission. In this numerical analysis model, the water-cooled tubes of VCS water-cooled panel are simulated as a horizontal arrangement, and the fins are simulated as the shape supported by the metal support. Numerical analysis results were in good agreement with the test results of the temperatures of each structure. From the numerical analysis results, it was clarified that the primary shielding body temperature locally rises in the vicinity of VCS support, but the support vicinity can be maintained at low temperatures. (A.O.)

  9. Shielding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding mock-up experiments for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) are carried out in shielding corner facility of APSARA reactor, to assess the overall accuracy of the codes and nuclear data used in reactor shield design. As APSARA is a swimming pool-type thermal reactor, for fast reactor experiments, typical fast reactor shielding facility was created by using uranium assemblies as spectrum converter. The flux was also enhanced by replacing water by air. Experiments have been carried out to study neutron attenuation through typical fast reactor radial and axial bulk shielding materials such as steel, sodium, graphite, borated graphite and boron carbide. A large number of reaction rates, sensitive to different regions of the neutron energy spectrum, were measured using foil activation and Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) techniques. These experimental results were analysed using computational tools normally used in design calculations, viz., discrete ordinate transport codes with multigroup cross section sets. Comparison of measured reaction rates with calculations provided suitable bias factors for parameters relevant to shield design, such as sodium activation, fast neutron fluence, fission equivalent fluxes etc. The measured neutron spectrum on the incident face of shield model compares well with the calculated fast reactor blanket leakage neutron spectrum. The comparison of calculated reaction rates within shield model indicate that the calculations suffer from considerable uncertainties, in shield models with boron carbide/borated graphite. For AHWR shielding experiments, no spectrum converter was used as it is also a thermal reactor. Radiation streaming studies through penetrations/ducts of various shapes and sizes relevant to AHWR shielding were carried out. (author)

  10. The photon and fast neutron spectra measurement and calculation in the concrete of the simulator of WWER-1000 reactor biological shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements have been performed in the WWER-1000 model in experimental reactor LR-0 in N.R.I. (Nuclear Research Institute). The biological shielding simulator consists of serpentinite concrete with stainless steel cover. It is placed behind the reactor pressure vessel (R.P.V.) simulator situated in a concrete hall outside of LR-0 tank. Simulators of reactor internals as well as the driving core are in the LR-0 reactor tank. The fuel assemblies consist of 312 fuel pins (hexagon of WWER-1000 type) with 1.25 m active length. The measurements were performed before concrete shielding and in the channel in the concrete. The photon and neutron spectra have been measured simultaneously with two-parametric spectrometer with extended energy range [1], 0.5 MeV 10 MeV for both parts of radiation field. The results were by means of monitoring system normalized to other ones in the WWER-1000 model. The calculation of the measured spectra has been performed with the deterministic 3D code T.O.R.T. and cross section library B.U.G.L.E. 96. Comparison of calculated and measured results can enable evaluate reliability of calculation results for deep penetration of radiation, as well as the capability for planning of decommissioning issues. (authors)

  11. Shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention effectively utilizes iron reinforced concrete wastes generated upon dismantling of concretes of nuclear facilities, to provide shielding material. That is, at least one of members selected from the group consisting of iron rods in iron-reinforced concretes and, regenerated aggregates regenerated from concrete wastes upon dismantling is charged in a predetermined mold. Cement pastes or cement mortars are charged therein, and solidified, cured and released from the mold. With such procedures, a block-formed shielding materials made of precast concretes can be obtained. In this case, the cements including much water of crystallization are used. Since iron reinforcing dusts and iron reinforcing dust chips are contained in the shielding materials, a great γ-ray shielding effect can be obtained. Further, since cements containing a great amount of water of crystallization are used, a great neutron shielding effect can be obtained. (I.S.)

  12. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  13. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  14. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of

  15. Shielded syringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent specification relates to a partially disposable shielded syringe for injecting radioactive material into a patient. It is claimed that the technique overcomes the problems of non-standardisation of syringe size. (U.K.)

  16. Japanese contributions to ITER shielding neutronics design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding design for superconducting magnets and personal exposure were performed in ITER nuclear design on the basis of reports presented to the 1990 winter and summer ITER specialist meetings. Inboard shield benchmark calculation, bulk inboard shielding analysis, inboard heterogeneity effect on shielding property analysis, gap streaming analysis were discussed on shielding properties for superconducting magnets. In addition to these, transport and Monte Carlo analyses in neutral beam injector duct for biological shielding were investigated with relation to the concept of cryostat. Further biological shielding were investigated in reactor room and site boundary during the maintenance when one activated module was extracted and hanged from the ceiling. As the results of these studies, ITER shielding characteristics were evaluated and problem areas and directions for future works were shown. (author)

  17. Decommissioning of the research reactor ASTRA in Seibersdorf, Austria: Determination of exemption limits at the Barite-concrete of the neutron activated biological shield to minimize radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10 MW multipurpose M.T.R. research reactor ASTRA at Arcs was in successful operation for 39 years (1960 to 1999) and after the decision of the government to shut it down it was necessary to decommission and dismantle the reactor. A team consisting of former reactor crew staff members was set up to perform the decommissioning. Working instructions for handling and operating sequences and radiation protection were developed. An extensive documentation describes the project. The planning took into account that all the work and operations for decommissioning could be performed inside the existing buildings (confinement or pump room) with the ventilation and radiological monitoring systems in operation. Hence, virtually no possibility for a release of activity to the environment during the whole decommissioning process would exist. In immediate succession and still under the operating license, all experimental facilities and components of the reactor within the vicinity of the core or in intermediate storage within the building (e.g. old beam-tube-inserts) were removed and treated in a first stage of dismantling from 2001 to 2003. In 2002 an environmental impact statement was prepared, the public hearing was held on December 19, 2002 to be followed by a license to decommission, which was granted on April 08, 2003 and was legalized in May 2003. It was intended to take down the structures of the biological shield by cutting blocks of between 7 and 9 tons (limited by the 10-ton-capacity of the crane) from the inactive zones in multiple section planes using wire-cutting techniques, and to get clearance for the material by referencing the surfaces and by additional internal probing.Actual work on the second state of dismantling could only be started after May 2003. It comprised the dismantling of the primary and secondary cooling facilities and the removal of he upper, inactive part of the biological shield (roughly 1600 tons).A building directly attached to the reactor

  18. Shielding door

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exhaust processing device disposed at the outside of a radioactive nuclide handling chamber is connected to a shielding door as an exit/inlet for the radioactive nuclide handling chamber. An exhaust chamber is disposed in the inside of the thick shielding door having a thickness. The exhaust chamber is always evacuated by an exhaustion blower and maintained at a negative pressure. The radioactive nuclides in the radiation nuclide handling facility are shielded by an inner seal of the double seals which seal the gap between the wall body and the shielding door. Even if a trace amount of radioactive nuclides leaks from the seal at the inner side, it is shielded by an outer seal, and sucked into the exhaust chamber which is maintained at the negative pressure. Then, it is passed from a ventilation channel through a flexible tube then caught and removed by the filter of the exhaust processing device. This can reduce the capacity of the exhaustion blower to reduce the scale of the exhaust processing device. (I.N.)

  19. Radiation shields for a shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and cheap closure and radiation shield arrangement is described for the entrance of an underground shelter. The shelter can serve as a blast-proof, biological or nuclear shelter. The radiation shield is positioned above the habitable space of the shelter and below a blast-proof, dust-proof outer cover. The shield consists of a box containing a filling, e.g. coke with a concrete screed, is closed by bolted panels and is horizontally moveable by sliding on castors. (author)

  20. Biological Shielding Design Effectiveness of the Brachytherapy Unit at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana Using Mcnp5 Monte Carlo Code

    OpenAIRE

    C.C. Arwui; E.O. Darko; P. Deatanyah; S. Wotorchi-Gordon; H. Lawluvi; Kpeglo, D. O.; G. Emi-Reynolds

    2011-01-01

    Design objectives for brachytherapy treatment facilities require sufficient shielding to reduce primary and scatter radiation to design limit in order to limit exposure to patients, staff and the general public. The primary aim of this study is to verify whether shielding of the brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching Hospital in Ghana provides adequate protection in order to assess any radiological health and safety impact and also test the suitability of other available sources. The stu...

  1. Improvements at the biological shielding of BNCT research facility in the IEA-R1 reactor; Projeto e implantacao de melhorias na blindagem biologica da instalacao para estudos em BCNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Gregorio Soares de

    2011-07-01

    The technique of neutron capture in boron is a promising technique in cancer treatment, it uses the high LET particles from the reaction {sup 10}B (n, {alpha}) {sup 7}Li to destroy cancer cells.The development of this technique began in the mid-'50s and even today it is the object of study and research in various centers around the world, Brazil has built a facility that aims to conduct research in BNCT, this facility is located next to irradiation channel number three at the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 and has a biological shielding designed to meet the radiation protection standards. This biological shielding was developed to allow them to conduct experiments with the reactor at maximum power, so it is not necessary to turn on and off the reactor to irradiate samples. However, when the channel is opened for experiments the background radiation in the experiments salon increases and this background variation makes it impossible to perform measurements in a neutron diffraction research that utilizes the irradiation channel number six. This study aims to further improve the shielding in order to minimize the variation of background making it possible to perform the research facility in BNCT without interfering with the action of the research group of the irradiation channel number six. To reach this purpose, the code MCNP5, dosimeters and activation detectors were used to plan improvements in the biological shielding. It was calculated with the help of the code an improvement that can reduce the average heat flow in 71.2% {+-} 13 and verified experimentally a mean reduce of 70 {+-} 9% in dose due to thermal neutrons. (author)

  2. Handout on shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to avoid the difficulties of the radioprotection supervisors in the tasks related to shielding calculations, is presented in this paper the basic concepts of shielding theory. It also includes exercises and examples. (author)

  3. Magnetic shielding design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two passive magnetic-shielding-design approaches for static external fields are reviewed. The first approach uses the shielding solutions for spheres and cylinders while the second approach requires solving Maxwell's equations. Experimental data taken at LLNL are compared with the results from these shieldings-design methods, and improvements are recommended for the second method. Design considerations are discussed here along with the importance of material gaps in the shield

  4. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  5. Enhanced Whipple Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor); Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Robinson, Jennifer R. (Inventor); Nolen, Angela M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact (HVI) Whipple Shield and a method for shielding a wall from penetration by high velocity particle impacts where the Whipple Shield is comprised of spaced apart inner and outer metal sheets or walls with an intermediate cloth barrier arrangement comprised of ceramic cloth and high strength cloth which are interrelated by ballistic formulae.

  6. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  7. Electromagnetic shielding formulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This addendum to an earlier collection of electromagnetic shielding formulae (TRITA-EPP-75-27) contains simple transfer matrices suitable for calculating the quasistatic shielding efficiency for multiple transverse-field and axial-field cylindrical and spherical shields, as well as for estimating leakage fields from long coaxial cables and the normal-incidence transmission of a plane wave through a multiple plane shield. The differences and similarities between these cases are illustrated by means of equivalent circuits and transmission line analogies. The addendum also includes a discussion of a possible heuristic improvement of some shielding formulae. (author)

  8. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  9. Rotating shielded crane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  10. Space reactor shield technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor shield mass contributes a large portion (10% to 25%) to the total mass of an unmanned reactor system. Different shield materials are required to attenuate neutrons and gamma rays and still obtain a minimum mass. The shield material selection should also consider structural characteristics, physical and chemical properties, fabricability and availability. Minimum mass is achieved by using a shadow shield. Neutron capture gamma ray and heat generation are extremely important considerations. Lithium hydride was selected for the neutron shield material due to its excellent properties. It has to be canned and may be compartmentalized to reduce the probability of complete shielding effectiveness loss due to meteoroid puncture of the can. The initial shield design was based on previous SNAP shield design experience. The Monte Carlo Neutron Photon code, which includes the radiation scattering with the radiator and power conversion system, was then used to ensure that the design requirements were met. Fabrication of the shield by casting techniques is recommended to maintain shield integrity during vibration and to accommodate complex penetrations. A method for casting full-scale shields is described

  11. Significance of residual activity due to long-lived beta emitting radionuclides in reflectors and biological shield of research reactor, CIRUS - for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor system and structural components (SSCs) develop residual activity due to neutron irradiation during the operation of the reactor. The neutron activated components, are of significance in any planning of decommissioning of the reactors. Within the wide spectrum of radionuclides representing the radioactive inventory of a shut down nuclear facility, there are several radionuclides, mainly long lived, low energy beta emitters which pose a concern in long term waste management program. Even though in terms of radiation level, 60Co will be most predominant after few years of shutdown, long lived activation products like 59Ni, 63Ni, 55Fe, 14C and 3H etc. contribute to major activity on the irradiated structural components and would be of concern in the long term waste management. Quantification of such nuclides are essential for release of materials for reuse and recycling as per the clearance levels prescribed by the regulatory body. An attempt is made in this work to evaluate the significance of such radionuclides in the Graphite reflector and concrete bio-shield of CIRUS. (author)

  12. Under the Rape Shield

    OpenAIRE

    Roman, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the Rape Shield Laws and their evolution in the United States, one of the pioneers in this field. The article also discusses constitutional and feminist critiques of present Rape Shield Laws, and ends with a comparative perspective throughout the Anglo-American legal space today. Finally, although the Rape Shield Laws can be approached from a variety of discourses, this article engages specifically with a discourse that intersects legal and feminist analyses.

  13. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  14. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T. [and others

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author).

  15. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  16. Rotating shielded crane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rotating, radiation-shielded crane system is described comprising: a generally cylindrical, radiation-shielding wall, the top of the wall forming a first annular ledge; a second annular ledge integrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall; a generally cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material, the ceiling including a flange portion on the top thereof and a body portion, the flange portion associated with the second annular ledge such that the ceiling is supported thereby, the volume inside the wall and the ceiling forming a test cell; a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling such that the crane is outside of the test cell; removable access means in the ceiling for allowing the crane to access the inside of the test cell from the top of the ceiling; means for sealing the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling

  17. Reactor shielding. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor shielding is necessary that people may work and live in the vicinity of reactors without receiving detrimental biological effects and that the necessary materials and instrumentation for reactor operation may function properly. Much of the necessary theoretical work and experimental measurement has been accomplished in recent years. Scientists have developed some very sophisticated methods which have contributed to a more thorough understanding of the problems involved and have produced some very reliable results leading to significant reductions in shield configurations. A panel of experts was convened from 9 to 13 March 1964 in Vienna at the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss the present status of reactor shielding. The participants were prominent shielding experts from most of the laboratories engaged in this field throughout the world. They presented status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of reactor shielding in their countries and much valuable discussion took place on some of the most relevant aspects of reactor shielding. All this material is presented in this report, together with abstracts of the supporting papers read to the Panel

  18. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To lower the shielding cost by providing a shielding wall having cavities and charging spherical shiedling materials in the cavities only when the shielding is required. Constitution: The structure comprises two parallel steel side plates aparting from each other to form a space therebetween and reinforcements such as H-type steels vertically provided between the side plates. The upper and the lower ends of the reinforcements are aparted from the upper and the lower edges of the side plates by a predetermined distance to form lateral passage between the top plate and the bottom plate. A guide plate having a plurality of openings is mounted on the upper ends of the reinforcements. If it is required for the structure to serve as the shield, spherical radioactive shielding materials are supplied through an injection port onto the guide plate while opening the injection port is opened and closing discharge port. The spherical radioactive shielding materials are fallen through the openings and filled in the space to thereby providing the structure with shielding performance. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Performance study of galactic cosmic ray shield materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Nealy, John E.; Badavi, Francis F.; Kiefer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The space program is faced with two difficult radiation protection issues for future long-term operations. First, retrofit of shield material or conservatism in shield design is prohibitively expensive and often impossible. Second, shielding from the cosmic heavy ions is faced with limited knowledge on the physical properties and biological responses of these radiations. The current status of space shielding technology and its impact on radiation health is discussed herein in terms of conventional protection practice and a test biological response model. The impact of biological response on the selection of optimum materials for cosmic ray shielding is presented in terms of the transmission characteristics of the shield material. Although the systematics of nuclear cross sections are able to demonstrate the relation of exposure risk to shield-material composition, the current uncertainty in-nuclear cross sections will not allow an accurate evaluation of risk reduction. This paper presents a theoretical study of risk-related factors and a pilot experiment to study the effectiveness of choice of shield materials to reduce the risk in space operations.

  20. Shielding member for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a thermonuclear device for shielding fast neutrons by shielding members disposed in a shielding vessel (vacuum vessel and structures such as a blanket disposed in the vacuum vessel), the shielding member comprises a large number of shielding wires formed fine and short so as to have elasticity. The shielding wires are sealed in a shielding vessel together with water, and when the width of the shielding vessel is changed, the shielding wires follow after the change of the width while elastically deforming in the shielding vessel, so that great stress and deformation are not formed thereby enabling to improve reliability. In addition, the length, the diameter and the shape of each of the shielding wires can be selected in accordance with the shielding space of the shielding vessel. Even if the shape of the shielding vessel is complicated, the shielding wires can be inserted easily. Accordingly, the filling rate of the shielding members can be changed easily. It can be produced more easily compared with a conventional spherical pebbles. It can be produced more easily than existent spherical shielding pebbles thereby enabling to reduce the production cost. (N.H.)

  1. Alternate shield material feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility and cost/benefit of using materials other than stainless steel for in-vessel neutron shielding in large LMFBRs were investigated. Canned vibratorally compacted B4C powder shields were found to be much more economical than stainless steel (a savings of $1.1M in loop plant designs and $9.4M in pool plant designs). The helium gas pressure buildup in B4C shields placed around LMFBR in-vessel components (direct reactor heat exchangers in a loop reactor and intermediate heat exchangers in a pool reactor) would only be 0.04 atm after 40 y of reactor operation (with 80% dense powder). The irradiation-induced swelling of the B4C would only be 0.002%. No adverse reactor impact would occur if the B4C escaped from the B4C shields

  2. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  3. Alternate shield material feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, E.R.; Levitt, L.B.

    1984-04-01

    The feasibility and cost/benefit of using materials other than stainless steel for in-vessel neutron shielding in large LMFBRs were investigated. Canned vibratorally compacted B/sub 4/C powder shields were found to be much more economical than stainless steel (a savings of $1.1M in loop plant designs and $9.4M in pool plant designs). The helium gas pressure buildup in B/sub 4/C shields placed around LMFBR in-vessel components (direct reactor heat exchangers in a loop reactor and intermediate heat exchangers in a pool reactor) would only be 0.04 atm after 40 y of reactor operation (with 80% dense powder). The irradiation-induced swelling of the B/sub 4/C would only be 0.002%. No adverse reactor impact would occur if the B/sub 4/C escaped from the B/sub 4/C shields.

  4. Consolidated fuel shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated fuel radiation dose rate and radiation shielding requirements are calculated using a validated ISOSHLD-II model. Comparisons are made to experimental measurements. ISOSHLD-11 calculations are documented

  5. EBT-P gamma-ray shielding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.

    1981-12-01

    An elaborate study was carried out for the coil and biological shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle (EBT-P) device. A three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat per coil from the gamma ray sources. Also, a detailed biological dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the machine room, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent.

  6. EBT-P gamma-ray shielding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elaborate study was carried out for the coil and biological shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle (EBT-P) device. A three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat per coil from the gamma ray sources. Also, a detailed biological dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the machine room, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent

  7. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  8. Shield for a medical actinometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shield is designed for an actinometer enabling a kidney clearance determination. It shields the radioactive radiation coming from the kidney-bladder region opposite the measuring head. The shield consists of two plates which can be pushed together so that the dimensions of the shield are variable. (DG)

  9. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  10. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  11. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  12. Radiation shielding bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation shielding brick for use in building dry walls to form radiation proof enclosures and other structures is described. It is square in shape and comprises a sandwich of an inner layer of lead or similar shielding material between outer layers of plastics material, for structural stability. The ability to mechanically interlock adjacent bricks is provided by shaping the edges as cooperating external and internal V-sections. Relatively leak-free joints are ensured by enlarging the width of the inner layer in the edge region. (author)

  13. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  14. Radiation shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain putty-like shielding materials excellent in the radiation shielding and packing workability for use in penetrations of electrical wires or pipeways in a nuclear installation. Constitution: A putty-like material is prepared from 100 parts by weight of a binder comprising a grease or the like having viscosity of greater than 5000 cst or an immiscible consistency of greater than 100 (JIS K 2220 (1980) para. 5.3.4) at 25 0C and from 1200 to 4000 parts by weight of high density inorganic powder such as lead powder or lead oxide powder having a density of greater than 5 g/cm3 and such a particle size that more than 95 % thereof passes through a 145 mesh sieve. The putty-like material is adjusted such that it has 1 - 35 mm of softness (JIS A 5752) at normal temperature, more than 1 g/5 sec of injection amount and a density of greater than 4 g/cm3. In this way, non-curable radiation shielding agent with excellent X-ray or γ-ray shielding property and being capable of packed densely to void portions can be obtained. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  16. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  17. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  18. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  19. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  20. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  1. Multilayer radiation shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  2. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  3. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  4. Shielding calculations for SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations of hadron and muon shielding for SSC are reviewed with emphasis on their application to radiation safety and environmental protection. Models and algorithms for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic showers, and for production and transport of muons in the TeV regime are briefly discussed. Capabilities and limitations of these calculations are described and illustrated with a few examples. 12 refs., 3 figs

  5. Shielded cells transfer automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. To reduce radiation exposure to operators, technological advances in remote handling and automation were employed. An industrial robot and a specially designed end effector, access port, and sealing machine were used to remotely bag waste containers out of a glove box. The system is operated from a control panel outside the work area via television cameras

  6. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-09-17

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC).

  7. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding

  8. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  9. Activation of the concrete in the bio shield of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of neutron spectra in different parts of the tokamak building of ITER are performed. A computational geometry model of the tokamak building is prepared using MCNP-4C. The model includes adequate material composition and geometry description of the main parts of the tokamak for PPCS plant model A: toroidal field coils, vacuum vessel, shield, blanket structure, first wall, divertor, 14.1 MeV neutron source. The design and the dimensions of the bio shield are taken from the current ITER design. MCNP calculations of the neutron spectra in the bio shield (concrete) of ITER are performed, using the neutron spectra in TF coils calculated at UKAEA as external neutron source. The neutron spectra in the concrete calculated by MCNP are used as input data in the code EASY99 for estimations of the activation of the concrete in the bio shield around the tokamak. The time evolutions of the maximum (in the bio shield floor) and minimum (in the bio shield side walls) specific activity (Bq/kg) and dose rate (Sv/h.) of the main dominant nuclides in the concrete are evaluated and compared for 3 different concrete types, used as biological shield in the PWR and BR3 reactors. (author)

  10. Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions Active and passive methods

    CERN Document Server

    Spillantini, P; Durante, M; Müller-Mellin, R; Reitz, G; Rossi, L; Shurshakov, V; Sorbi, M

    2007-01-01

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is problematic, because of the high energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of electromagnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. Active shielding concepts based on electrostatic fields, plasma, or magnetic fields have been proposed in the past years, and should be revised based on recent technological improvements. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team (TT) in 2002 including European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magn...

  11. Design for shielding kit for local irradiation in mice and test of its shielding effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to fulfill the immediate requirement for experimental studies on biological effect of low dose radiation. A shielding kit for local irradiation in mice is designed. Its advantages are: (1) several mice can be irradiated at the same time; (2) the radiation condition is identical; (3) it is easy to control and perform; (4) during irradiation, the animals don't need any special treatments such as anaesthesia. It was proved by TLD test, that absorbed dose in areas of spleen and head in mice after shielding has decreased to 0.85% and 0.5% of the original dose in the center of radiation field respectively. The results suggest that the kit was able to satisfy the needs of the experimental studies on radiation biology

  12. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0νDBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed

  13. Planar Shielded-Loop Resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Brian B.; Grbic, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The design and analysis of planar shielded-loop resonators for use in wireless non-radiative power transfer systems is presented. The difficulties associated with coaxial shielded-loop resonators for wireless power transfer are discussed and planar alternatives are proposed. The currents along these planar structures are analyzed and first-order design equations are presented in the form of a circuit model. In addition, the planar structures are simulated and fabricated. Planar shielded-loop ...

  14. Walls shielding against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These specifications are to help the users of lead bricks as under DIN 25407, leaf 1, with the construction of walls shielding against ionizing radiation by examples for the uses of the different types of lead bricks and by recommendations for the construction of shielding walls and for the determination of the wall thickness necessary for shielding against γ-radiation as a function of energy. (orig./AK)

  15. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This standard shall be applied to closed shielding facilities which, together with the lead bricks according to DIN 25 407 part 1 and the functional elements according to this standard, are designed to make possible the setting-up of complete shieldings for hot cells in beta-gamma-technique (see DIN 25 407 part 3) according to modular principles. This standard is intended to facilitate the design and construction of hot cells with shielding walls made of lead as well as the interchangeability of individual constructional elements in existing shielding walls. (orig./HP)

  16. SHIELD verification and validation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, C.

    1992-02-01

    This document outlines the verification and validation effort for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system code. Along with its predecessors, SHIELD has been in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for more than ten years. During this time the code has been extensively tested and a variety of validation documents have been issued. The primary function of this report is to specify the features and capabilities for which SHIELD is to be considered validated, and to reference the documents that establish the validation.

  17. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  18. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  19. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  20. Testing the integrity of packaging radiation shielding by scanning with radiation source and detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This specification deals with the radiological scanning method of inspection for biological shielding (to be used in transport packaging for gamma emitting sources of radiation), of regular thickness, when the sections are to be checked for integrity and homogeneity; it does not establish the adequacy of design. The shielding materials may be lead, iron, steel, heavy alloy (tungsten), and depleted uranium. (author)

  1. Mobile xeroradiographic suite with independent shielding for monitoring light-alloy castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive testing with ionizing radiation in industry requires economical systems with independent shielding. Descriptions are given of the design, working principles, and advantages of a xerographic suite having an independent biological shield for monitoring light-alloy castings. The technical characteristics and working modes are given

  2. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  3. The shield effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Søren; Albo, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Several not mutually exclusive functions have been ascribed to nuptial gifts across different taxa. Although the idea that a nuptial prey gift may protect the male from pre-copulatory sexual cannibalism is attractive, it has previously been considered of no importance based on indirect evidence and...... rejected by experimental tests. We reinvestigated whether nuptial gifts may function as a shield against female attacks during mating encounters in the spider Pisaura mirabilis and whether female hunger influences the likelihood of cannibalistic attacks. The results showed that pre-copulatory sexual...... cannibalism was enhanced when males courted without a gift and this was independent of female hunger. We propose that the nuptial gift trait has evolved partly as a counteradaptation to female aggression in this spider species....

  4. Sulphate resistant shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shielding material of the present invention is provided with sulfuric acid resistance and contains bentonite put to ion exchange treatment with barium ions as an effective ingredient. When mortars and concretes are exposed to the circumstance of sulfate, the effective ingredient functions to take place reaction between intruding sulfate and the barium ions to form insoluble barium sulfate thereby reducing chemical corrosion of mortars and concretes caused by sulfate. Cement materials, water and aggregates can optionally be contained in addition to bentonite and bentonite put to ion exchange treatment. Chemical corrosion of concretes and mortars due to intrusion of the sulfate can be prevented, and it is useful as an artificial barrier, for example, in radioactive active waste processing facilities. (T.M.)

  5. Aladdin upgrade design study: shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this shielding is to examine all aspects of Aladdin operation to ensure that adequate shielding is provided to meet the design objectives. To do this, we will look at shielding necessary for radiation produced during the injection process, during normal loss of the stored beam and during accidental loss of the stored beam. It will therefore be necessary to specify shielding not only at the ring, but also along the injection line and the optical beam lines. We will also give special attention to the occupation of the accelerator Vault during injection as this may be a desirable design option. In effect, two shielding plans will be presented, permitting estimates of cost and space requirements for both

  6. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h-1, independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  7. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  8. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author)

  9. Design experience: CRBRP radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is being designed as a fast breeder demonstration project in the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Radiation shielding design of the facility consists of a comprehensive design approach to assure compliance with design and government regulatory requirements. Studies conducted during the CRBRP design process involved the aspects of radiation shielding dealing with protection of components, systems, and personnel from radiation exposure. Achievement of feasible designs, while considering the mechanical, structural, nuclear, and thermal performance of the component or system, has required judicious trade-offs in radiation shielding performance. Specific design problems which have been addressed are in-vessel radial shielding to protect permanent core support structures, flux monitor system shielding to isolate flux monitoring systems for extraneous background sources, reactor vessel support shielding to allow personnel access to the closure head during full power operation, and primary heat transport system pipe chaseway shielding to limit intermediate heat transport system sodium system coolant activation. The shielding design solutions to these problems defined a need for prototypic or benchmark experiments to provide assurance of the predicted shielding performance of selected design solutions and the verification of design methodology. Design activities of CRBRP plant components an systems, which have the potential for radiation exposure of plant personnel during operation or maintenance, are controlled by a design review process related to radiation shielding. The program implements design objectives, design requirements, and cost/benefit guidelines to assure that radiation exposures will be ''as low as reasonably achievable''

  10. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.)

  11. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  12. Noise Shielding Using Acoustic Metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We exploit theoretically a class of rectangular cylindrical devices for noise shielding by using acoustic metamaterials. The function of noise shielding is justified by both the far-field and near-field full-wave simulations based on the finite element method. The enlargement of equivalent acoustic scattering cross sections is revealed to be the physical mechanism for this function. This work makes it possible to design a window with both noise shielding and air flow. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  14. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  15. AP600 Shield building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to minimize capital costs and save time in the global construction time schedule for the AP600 Nuclear Power Plant, planned in 36 months from excavation up to the fuel charging, ANSALDO has developed an innovative Shield Building Conical Roof design having the following basic characteristics: i) can be erected approximately in less than two months; ii) allows the functionality of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCSS) located in the PCCS tank and in the Valve Room anchored directly to the conical roof itself; iii) satisfies the structural loads design as Safe Shutdown Earthquake, or the Aircraft Crash and both integrated with the sloshing analysis for the tank located at the top of the conical roof. The most important aspects of this new roof are: a) use of prefabricated precast panels; b) address the erection of the formworks using temporary structures having the capability of becoming final elements; c) develop a modular rebars sizing and design in order to perform the most important portion of the job in the workshop; d) second pouring construction sequence assuring full integration with the formwork function; e) modular construction of the PCSS tank at the top of the conical roof. An interesting evaluation has been also performed in calculating sloshing phenomenon in the PCSS tank by comparing detailed 3D Finite Element Model approach and simplified qualified formulas dedicated to this phenomenon. (author). 2 figs

  16. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersez, T. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: tez@ansto.gov.au; Braoudakis, G. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Osborn, J.C. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  17. Shielding of moving line charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Youmei; He, Bingyu [Department of Physics, School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, M.Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-07-03

    A charged object moving in plasma can excite plasma waves that inevitably modify its Debye shielding characteristics. When the excited waves propagate sufficiently fast, the shielding can even break down. Here the properties of finite amplitude plasma waves excited by a moving line charge are investigated. It is found that when the speed of the latter is close to but less than the thermal speed of the background plasma electrons, only a localized disturbance in the form of a soliton that moves together with the line charge is excited. That is, the line charge is well shielded even though it is moving at a high speed and has generated a large local electrostatic field. However, for a pair of line charges moving together, such complete shielding behavior could not be found.

  18. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

  19. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan

  20. Performance test on shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cylinder of the shielding concrete is made from common Portland cement and home-made coarse or fine aggregates. Orthogonal design experiment and regression analysis are adopted to study the effects of the water content, sand percentage and water-cement ratio on the property of shielding concrete and the difference between them. The test shows that the tensile strength is in inverse proportion with water-cement ratio, and the influence is quite significant. Another factor is the type of aggregates. The effect of the age on its density is not obvious. Similarly, the concrete shielding γ rays shares the same influencing factors with that shielding neutron rays on density, slump and tensile strength. And both have the same change rules regarding to mechanical property. (authors)

  1. Shielding vacuum fluctuations with graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Scheel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction of ground-state and excited atoms with graphene is investigated with the aim to establish whether graphene systems can be used as a shield for vacuum fluctuations of an underlying substrate. We calculate the zero-temperature Casimir-Polder potential from the reflection coefficients of graphene within the framework of the Dirac model. For both doped and undoped graphene we show limits at which graphene could be used effectively as a shield. Additional results are...

  2. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  3. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest

  4. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  5. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  6. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Narayana, Supradeep; Sato, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  7. The optimum shielding for a power reactor using local components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some local concrete mixtures have been picked out (selected) to be studied as shielding concrete for prospective nuclear power reactor in Syria. This research has interested in the attenuation of gamma radiation and neutron fluxes by these local concretes in the ordinary conditions. In addition to the heat effect on the shielding and physical properties of local concrete. Furthermore the neutron activation of the elements of the local concrete mixtures have been studied that for selection the low-activation materials (low dose rate and short half life radioisotopes). In this way biological shielding for nuclear reactor can be safe during operation of nuclear power reactor, in addition to be low radioactive waste after decommissioning the reactor. (author)

  8. Upgrading the Neutron Radiography Facility in South Africa (SANRAD): Concrete Shielding Design Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, F. C.; Radebe, M. J.; Schillinger, B.; Nshimirimana, R.; Ramushu, M. A.; Modise, T.

    A common denominator of all neutron radiography (NRAD) facilities worldwide is that the perimeter of the experimental chamber of the facility is a radiation shielding structure which,in some cases, also includes flight tube and filter chamber structures. These chambers are normally both located on the beam port floor outside the biological shielding of the neutron source. The main function of the NRAD-shielding structure isto maintain a radiological safe working environment in the entire beam hall according to standards set by individual national radiological safety regulations. In addition, the shielding's integrity and capability should not allow, during NRAD operations, an increase in radiation levels in the beam port hall and thus negatively affectadjacent scientific facilities (e.g. neutron diffraction facilities).As a bonus, the shielding for the NRAD facility should also prevent radiation scattering towards the detector plane and doing so, thus increase thecapability of obtaining better quantitative results. This paper addresses Monte Carlo neutron-particletransport simulations to theoretically optimize the shielding capabilities of the biological barrierfor the SANRAD facility at the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor in South Africa. The experimental process to develop the shielding, based on the principles of the ANTARES facility, is described. After casting, the homogeneity distribution of these concrete mix materials is found to be near perfect and first order experimental radiation shielding characteristicsthrough film badge (TLD) exposure show acceptable values and trends in neutron- and gamma-ray attenuation.

  9. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005. (authors)

  10. Shielding design of the beam tube in the KMRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) has a core of honeycomb form surrounded by a cylindrical reflector of D2O and will be operated at maximum thermal power of 30 MW. Seven beam tubes tangentially placed to the reactor core penetrate the reflector and extend to the biological shield end. In neutronics and shielding analysis, this complex geometry usually requires a three-dimensional treatment to obtain data with reasonable accuracy. However, computer implementation of transport or Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic three-dimensional beam tube model is not easy in regard to its problem size. This paper describes a KMRR beam tube shielding design method using coupling of Monte Carlo code MORSE-CG and two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT4.2 with VITAMIN-C nuclear data base. The evaluated dose rate at the outside of shield turns out to be 0.135 mrem/hr, which is well within the shielding design criteria 1.25 mrem/hr

  11. Shielding analysis for ITER equatorial bio-shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER equatorial port cell outside bio-shield plug is a place for allowing free personnel access after shutdown which accommodates various sensitive equipment and pipes. To ensure the personnel safety in port cell after shutdown, the distribution of dose rate in port cell was studied. Based on VisualBUS (CAD-Based Multi-Functional 4D Neutronics Simulation System), dose rate calculations were completed in port cell after shutdown. The result showed that dose rates in port cell are still 2 orders of magnitude more than desired limit (10 μSv/h) after one day shutdown. The optimization of bio-shield was needed. (authors)

  12. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  14. Radiation shield for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reusable radiation shield for use in a reactor installation comprises a thin-walled, flexible and resilient container, made of plastic or elastomeric material, containing a hydrogenous fluid with boron compounds in solution. The container can be filled and drained in position and the fluid can be recirculated if required. When not in use the container can be folded and stored in a small space. The invention relates to a shield to span the top of the annular space between a reactor vessel and the primary shield. For this purpose a continuous toroidal container or a series of discrete segments is used. Other forms can be employed for different purposes, e.g. mattress- or blanket-like forms can be draped over potential sources of radiation or suspended from a mobile carrier and placed between a worker and a radiation source. (author)

  15. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard contains specifications for the shape and requirements set for lead bricks such that they can be used to construct radiation-shielding walls according to the building kit system. The dimensions of the bricks are selected in such a way as to permit any modification of the length, height and thickness of said shielding walls in units of 50 mm. The narrow side of the lead bricks juxtaposed to one another in a wall construction to shield against radiation have to form prismatic grooves and tongues; in this way, direct penetration by radiation is prevented. Only cuboid bricks (serial nos. 55-60 according to Table 10) do not have prismatic tongues and grooves. (orig.)

  16. Survivor shielding. Part B. Improvements in building shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most atomic-bomb survivor doses are affected by the shielding provided by wooden structures, either in which the survivor resides or which lie between him or her and the epicenter. In the dosimetry system, this shielding of survivors can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio of the dose with and without the structures being present. The TF typically ranges between 0.3 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, several of the shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, a large bimodal uncertainty in the 9-parameter category 'FS=0' was identified. Corrective action was proposed and is now implemented in DS02. In 2002, a dose bias in large wooden buildings, such as schools, was identified and a correction is implemented in DS02. A correction is also implemented in DS02 to take care of a large uncertainty in the globe-house shielding. (J.P.N.)

  17. Neutron production, shielding and activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter contains information on neutron cross-sections, production, spectra and yields; detection and detectors; shielding with various materials, particularly with ordinary concrete; and neutron activation products of interest to health physicists. Neutron energy terminology as well as neutron energy spectrum calculations are included

  18. Using glass as a shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  19. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced...

  20. Neutron shielding properties of boron-containing ore and epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag as studying object, the starting materials were got after the specific green ore containing boron dressing in China and blast furnace separation respectively. Monte-Carlo method was used to study the effect of the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag and their composites with epoxy on the neutron shielding abilities. The reasons that affecting the shielding materials properties was discussed and the suitable proportioning of boron-containing ore to epoxy composites was confirmed; the 14.1 MeV fast neutron removal cross section and the total thermal neutron attenuation coefficient were obtained and compared with that of the common used concrete. The results show that the shielding property of 14.1 MeV fast neutron is mainly concerned with the low-Z elements in the shielding materials, the thermal neutron shielding ability is mainly concerned with boron concentrate in the composite, the attenuation of the accompany γ-ray photon is mainly concerned with the high atom number elements content in the ore and the density of the shielding material. The optimum Janume fractions of composites are in the range of 0.4-0.6 and the fast neutron shielding properties are similar to concrete while the thermal neutron shielding properties are higher than concrete. The composites are expected to be used as biological concrete shields crack injection and filling of the anomalous holes through the concrete shields around the radiation fields or directly to be prepared as shielding materials.(authors)

  1. Effect of cosmic-ray shielding on the ultraweak bioluminescence emitted by cultures of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neither the growth of Escherichia coli nor its associated luminescence was significantly affected when cultures were shielded from the soft component of cosmic rays. The study included experiments in which the cultures were shielded intermittently during their two periods of luminescence emission and experiments in which the cultures were continuously shielded throughout their entire growth cycle. These results do not support previous suggestions that the ultraweak bioluminescences from living organisms might be cosmic-ray-excited fluorescences induced in certain biological molecules synthesized during the various stages of growth

  2. Technical Requirements for Fabrication and Installation of Removable Shield for CNRF in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo; Cho, Yeong Garp; Lee, Jung Hee; Shin, Jin Won

    2008-04-15

    This report details the technical requirements for the fabrication and installation of the removable shield for the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) in HANARO reactor hall. The removable shield is classified as non-nuclear safety (NNS), seismic category II, and quality class T. The main function of the removable shield is to do the biological shielding of neutrons and gamma from the CN port and the guides. The removable shield consists of block type walls and roofs that can be necessarily assembled, disassembled and moveable. These will be installed between the reactor pool wall and the CNS guide bunker in. This report describes technical requirements for the removable shield such as quality assurance, seismic analysis requirements, configuration, concrete compositions, fabrication and installation requirements, test and inspection, shipping, delivery, etc. Appendix is the technical specification of structural design and analysis. Attachments are composed of the technical specification for the fabrication of the removable shield, shielding design drawings and procurement quality requirements. These technical requirements will be provided to a contract for the manufacturing and installation.

  3. Shielding calculational system for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer calculational system has been developed and assembled specifically for calculating dose rates in AEC plutonium fabrication facilities. The system consists of two computer codes and all nuclear data necessary for calculation of neutron and gamma dose rates from plutonium. The codes include the multigroup version of the Battelle Monte Carlo code for solution of general neutron and gamma shielding problems and the PUSHLD code for solution of shielding problems where low energy gamma and x-rays are important. The nuclear data consists of built in neutron and gamma yields and spectra for various plutonium compounds, an automatic calculation of age effects and all cross-sections commonly used. Experimental correlations have been performed to verify portions of the calculational system. (23 tables, 7 figs, 16 refs) (U.S.)

  4. New facility shield design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources

  5. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  6. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  7. Light shield for solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  8. How Concentration Shields Against Distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Sörqvist, Patrik; Marsh, John E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we outline our view of how concentration shields against distraction. We argue that higher levels of concentration make people less susceptible to distraction for two reasons. One reason is that the undesired processing of the background environment is reduced. For example, when people play a difficult video game, as opposed to an easy game, they are less likely to notice what people in the background are saying. The other reason is that the locus of attention becomes more st...

  9. Paramagnetism shielding in drilling fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    In drilling operations, drilling fluid containing magnetic materials is used when drilling a well. The materials can significantly shield the Earth’s magnetic field as measured by magnetic sensors inside the drilling strings. The magnetic property of the drilling fluid is one of the substantial error sources for the determination of magnetic azimuth for wellbores. Both the weight material, cuttings, clay and other formation material plus metal filings from the tubular wear m...

  10. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  11. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  12. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  13. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  14. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  15. Water shielding nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor container of the present invention contains a reactor pressure vessel, and has double steel plate walls endurable to elevated inner pressure and keeping airtightness, and shielding water is filled inside from a water injection port. It is endurable to a great inner pressure satisfactorily and keep airtightness by the two spaced relatively thin steel plates. It exhibits radiation shielding effect by filling water substantially the same as that of a conventional reactor container made of iron reinforced concretes. Then, it is no more necessary to use concretes for the construction of the reactor container, which shortens the term of the construction, and saves the construction cost. In addition, a cooling effect for the reactor container is provided. Syphons are disposed contiguously to a water injection port and the top end of the syphon is immersed in an equipment temporarily storage pool, and further, pipelines are connected to the double steel plate walls or the syphons for supplying shielding water to enhance the cooling effect. (N.H.)

  16. Seal device for shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To surely seal cover gases at a position nearer to the reactor core of a shield plug in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A shield plug is formed with through holes for insertion of a stopper or a through-cylinder. A step is provided to the through hole at the interium of the thickness of the shield plug and a seal ring is disposed on the step. The seal ring is retained on the side of the stopper or the through-cylinder by means of a holding member. The seal ring is urged to the step of the stopper by the own weight of the stopper or the through-cylinder to thereby seal the cover gases. Since the seal ring is retained on the side of the stopper or the through-cylinder, the seal ring is pulled up together with the extraction of the stopper or the through-cylinder and can be maintained or repaired with ease. (Ikeda, J.)

  17. RF-transparent solar shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining durable Kapton films with quartz fibers, an effective solar shield or blanket is produced which also serves as an efficient RF-transparent window. The window consists of a series of Kapton film envelopes sandwiching thin quartz paper. Not only must the window prevent the sun from overheating the electronics and distorting mechanically aligned antennas, it must also prevent radiant heat loss from inside the satellite when it is in shadow and radiating to space at approx. 40K. The guidelines for achieving an effective high-frequency RF window are a low dielectric constant to keep reflections down, a low loss tangent so RF absorption and molecular movement will be minimal, and low mass with tin and lightweight materials. Because these guidelines were followed, the RF insertion loss of the multiple envelope shield is less than 1/4 dB at high frequency. This paper concentrates on the material and processing aspects of an RF-transparent solar shield

  18. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed

  19. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  20. Shielding calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed: one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and walls of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m are sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/DT pulse

  1. Custom shielding blocks - a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In delivering radiation to the cancer patients, we need to shield the critical organs which come in the way of the radiation treatment portal. To avoid critical organs getting more than the tolerable dose, we use shielding blocks, which restrict the radiation to the tumour volume. Various metals are being used as shielding materials. The transmission through the shielding block should be less than 5% and the thickness of the material needed to achieve this transmission is 5 HVL. Lead is commonly used for shielding. Another material called Cerrobend (Low Melting Alloy) is used to prepare custom shielding blocks. The standard lead blocks supplied is of 5 cm thickness and for Cerrobend (LMA), the equivalent thickness required is 7.5 cm. In this paper, a comparison between the standard lead and LMA is described

  2. Highly heat-removing radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly heat-removing radiation shielding material is constituted with fine particles prepared by coating metals of high heat conductivity to fine particles comprising materials having excellent radiation shielding performance. Then, the fine particles applied with the coating are mixed and filled in a shielding container or applied with hot press into a layerous form and used as a shielding member. In view of the above, since the coated fine particles provide the shielding performance against radiation such as neutrons and gamma rays, and the coating metals provide the heat removing performance, they act as a shielding material having heat removing performance as a whole. The combination of the coated fine particles and the coating metals are selected depending on the respective conditions for use. With such a constitution, radioactive wastes involving a problem of heat generation can be transported or stored safely. (T.M.)

  3. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and 192Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci192Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D

  4. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  5. Shielding design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first describes the basic design philosophy of radiation shields for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next step machine to JT-60. Next, geometrical models and calculation parameters for shielding calculations were investigated to establish the standard design calculation methods, and accuracy of the calculation was evaluated. Further, irradiation properties of in-vessel components and bulk shielding properties were summarized in the useful form for the future design works. (author)

  6. Shielding of medically used proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several standards of the standards committee radiology (NRA) the shielding of proton accelerators (cyclotrons) for medical utilization is described. Proton beams can be used in nuclear medicine for PET (proton emission tomography) isotope production or for radiotherapeutic use. The dominating radiation from proton induced nuclear reactions is fast neutron radiation. The calculation procedure for appropriate shielding measures according to the NAR standards is described step-by-step. AN adequate shielding of fast neutrons is also sufficient for the generated gamma radiation.

  7. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  8. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  9. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINBAD (Shielding integral benchmark archive and database) is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity. It has been designed to be able to include data from nuclear reactor shielding, fusion blankets and accelerator shielding experiments. (authors)

  10. Neutron shielding for a 252 Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a 252Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the 252Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare 252Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  11. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  12. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional open-quotes hands-onclose quotes procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and Plasma Facing Components (PFC) structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  13. Substituent effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in chemistry arises largely from the consequences of nuclear shielding. The fact that nuclei in different electronic environments have different nuclear shieldings, and hence different chemical shifts, makes NMR a powerful probe of electronic structure. Empirical rules relating chemical shifts to substituent (σ) constants, electron densities, electronegativities, and a variety of other empirical parameters have proven of great benefit to problems of organic structural elucidation, and to fundamental studies of molecular electron distributions. This review focuses on one specific application in the latter category -the study of substituent electronic effects on chemical shifts. The aim is not to provide a compendium of substituent effects on chemical shifts to aid in structural assignments, but to show how fine detail relating to the distribution and polarization of electrons in molecules may be determined from chemical shift studies. Chapters are devoted to 1H, 11B, 13C, 15N, 17O, 19F, 31P, 33S, 77Se, 95Mo and 199Hg chemical shifts. (U.K.)

  14. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  15. Radiation shielding design calculation of gamma knife for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reports the method and results of radiation shielding calculation of the gamma knife for therapy which is composed of thirty 60Co sources each with 7.4 EBq, semi-spherical shield, lateral shielding cupboard and the shielding door. The shielding thicknesses of the back shield, the lateral shielding cupboard and the shielding door were calculated. The leakage radiation by test indicates that the shielding is sufficient safety for this Gamma knife and the Kerma rate of control calculated agrees with that by test

  16. Molecular biology. Shielding broken DNA for a quick fix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    A fast-acting DNA repair mechanism involves a protein complex that blocks an alternative process that requires a cell to wait for repair.......A fast-acting DNA repair mechanism involves a protein complex that blocks an alternative process that requires a cell to wait for repair....

  17. The removal of concrete layers from biological shields by microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete blocks reinforced with steel bars have been subjected to microwave attack at a frequency of 896 MHz at power levels up to 25 kW. The surface concrete has been explosively removed to the depth of the reinforcement, 10 cm, at a rate of about 2 litres per kWh. Heating was localized around the point of attack, with temperatures up to 3000C at the fractured face being attained. A simple mathematical model of the propagation and absorption of micro-waves was used to estimate the temperature rise of concrete at microwave frequencies of 896 wand 2450 MHz, at different power levels with and without the presence of reinforcing bars. This demonstrated that reinforcement is expected to significantly increase the temperature rise in the concrete between the irradiated surface and the reinforcement, and that near-surface heating should be more rapid at the higher frequency. There was reasonable agreement between predicted and observed temperature at the higher power levels. Further desk and laboratory studies are proposed before proceeding to a fullscale practical demolition machine and the requirements for a prototype remotely-operated demonstration system have been identified. This consists of a static generator of high power (at least 50 kW) transmitting microwaves via a steerable waveguide to a remote applicator mounted on a simple three-axis manipulator capable of traversing realistically large concrete test panels

  18. Shielding research at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The original three plutonium production reactors (B, D, and F) constructed at the Hanford Site in 1943--1944 had shields consisting of alternate layers of iron and a high-density pressed-wood product called Masonite *. This design was the engineering response to the scientific request for a mixture of iron and hydrogen. The design mix was based on earlier studies using iron and water or iron and paraffin; however, these materials did not have satisfactory structural characteristics. Although the shields performed satisfactorily, the fabrication cost was high. Each piece had to be machined precisely to fit within structural webs, so as not to introduce cracks through the shield. Before 1950, two additional reactors (DR and H) were built using the same shield design. At the request of R.L. Dickeman, an experimental facility was included in the top of the DR Reactor to permit evaluation of shield materials. Concurrent with the measurement of attenuation properties of materials in this facility, a program was undertaken to investigate the structural characteristics of various high-density Portland cement concretes. This research effort continued for over a decade, and led to the use of these concretes in subsequent reactor shields at the Hanford Site and elsewhere with significant savings in construction costs. Completion of the attenuation and structural measurements on the various high-density concretes provided a database that could be used in the design of shields for new reactors. At the Hanford Site, the top shield of the C Reactor was constructed of concrete, whereas the sides were constructed of iron-Masonite. As more and more data were acquired, the later rectors, KE, KW, and NPR, had shields of various tested concretes. Using concrete in these shields materially reduced the cost of the facilities. Additionally, studies on heat damage to the masonite resulted in changes that permitted increases in production, while at the same time maintaining shield integrity

  19. Optimization of multi-layered metallic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We investigated the problem of optimization of a multi-layered metallic shield. → The maximum ballistic limit velocity is a criterion of optimization. → The sequence of materials and the thicknesses of layers in the shield are varied. → The general problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming. → Analytical solutions are obtained for two- and three-layered shields. - Abstract: We investigate the problem of optimization of multi-layered metallic shield whereby the goal is to determine the sequence of materials and the thicknesses of the layers that provide the maximum ballistic limit velocity of the shield. Optimization is performed under the following constraints: fixed areal density of the shield, the upper bound on the total thickness of the shield and the bounds on the thicknesses of the plates manufactured from every material. The problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming which can be solved numerically using known methods. For the most interesting in practice cases of two-layered and three-layered shields the solution is obtained in the explicit analytical form.

  20. ITER cryostat thermal shield detailed design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural design and study on fabrication and assembly of the cryostat thermal shield for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been conducted. The cryostat thermal shield is attached to cover the cryostat inner wall in order to reduce the radiation heat loads applied to the superconducting coils operation at 4 K. The thermal shield consists of low-emissivity foils which are passively cooled and shield plates which are actively cooled with low temperature helium gas. The foils are multi-layered assemblies and are attached on both surfaces of the shield plates. The material of the foils are silver coated 304 stainless steel, polyimide or polyester. The silver coated stainless steel foils should be adopted to the foils at the locations where radiation dose is over 10 MGy. The route of coolant pipes for the shield plates is designed so as to keep the surface temperature of the shield plates below 100 K. This report describes the detailed design of the cryostat thermal shield, and outlines the fabrication and assembly procedures. (J.P.N.)

  1. ITER cryostat thermal shield detailed design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Akira; Nakahira, Masataka; Hamada, Kazuya; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tada, Eisuke; Kato, Takashi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikawa, Akira

    1999-03-01

    The structural design and study on fabrication and assembly of the cryostat thermal shield for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been conducted. The cryostat thermal shield is attached to cover the cryostat inner wall in order to reduce the radiation heat loads applied to the superconducting coils operation at 4 K. The thermal shield consists of low-emissivity foils which are passively cooled and shield plates which are actively cooled with low temperature helium gas. The foils are multi-layered assemblies and are attached on both surfaces of the shield plates. The material of the foils are silver coated 304 stainless steel, polyimide or polyester. The silver coated stainless steel foils should be adopted to the foils at the locations where radiation dose is over 10 MGy. The route of coolant pipes for the shield plates is designed so as to keep the surface temperature of the shield plates below 100 K. This report describes the detailed design of the cryostat thermal shield, and outlines the fabrication and assembly procedures. (J.P.N.)

  2. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  3. Study of the concrete shielding properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis was performed of chemical composition, production technology and operating temperature influencing the shielding properties of a number of ordinary concrete types. Computation results of radiation transmission proved the significance of detailed knowledge of all these factors in the reactor shield production. (author)

  4. Shielding augmentation of roll-on shield from NAPS to Kaiga-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive radiation field surveys were conducted in NAPS and KAPS reactor buildings as a part of commissioning checks on radiation shielding. During such surveys, dose rate higher than the expected values were noticed in fuelling machine service areas. A movable shield, separating high field area fuelling machine vault and low field area fuelling machine service area, known as roll-on shield was identified as one of the causes of high field in fuelling machine service area along with weaker end-shield. This paper discusses systematic approach adopted in bringing down the dose rates in fuelling machine service area by augmentation of roll-on shield. (author)

  5. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  6. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. Shielding superconductors with thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, Sam; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias U; Sethna, James P

    2015-01-01

    Determining the optimal arrangement of superconducting layers to withstand large amplitude AC magnetic fields is important for certain applications such as superconducting radiofrequency cavities. In this paper, we evaluate the shielding potential of the superconducting film/insulating film/superconductor (SIS') structure, a configuration that could provide benefits in screening large AC magnetic fields. After establishing that for high frequency magnetic fields, flux penetration must be avoided, the superheating field of the structure is calculated in the London limit both numerically and, for thin films, analytically. For intermediate film thicknesses and realistic material parameters we also solve numerically the Ginzburg-Landau equations. It is shown that a small enhancement of the superheating field is possible, on the order of a few percent, for the SIS' structure relative to a bulk superconductor of the film material, if the materials and thicknesses are chosen appropriately.

  8. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Ki Yeong; Kim, Taek Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Seong Wook; Kim, Joung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-11-16

    We report the first experimental results on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of monolayer graphene. The monolayer CVD graphene has an average SE value of 2.27 dB, corresponding to ~40% shielding of incident waves. CVD graphene shows more than seven times (in terms of dB) greater SE than gold film. The dominant mechanism is absorption rather than reflection, and the portion of absorption decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. Our modeling work shows that plane-wave theory for metal shielding is also applicable to graphene. The model predicts that ideal monolayer graphene can shield as much as 97.8% of EMI. This suggests the feasibility of manufacturing an ultrathin, transparent, and flexible EMI shield by single or few-layer graphene. PMID:23085718

  9. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  10. Shield verification and validation action matrix summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, C.

    1992-02-01

    WSRC-RP-90-26, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification are integral part of the certification process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system, it is not certification of the complete SHIELD system. Complete certification will follow at a later date. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but can be found in the references. The validation and verification effort for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system computer code is completed.

  11. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina eChow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  12. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  13. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding...

  14. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  15. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  16. Shielding pebble transfer system for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a system for supplying shielding pebbles to a vacuum vessel filled with the shielding pebbles in a gap of a double-walled structure, a supply port for the shielding pebbles is formed in a diverging shape, and a corny object is disposed at the center of the flow channel, or protrusions are formed in the vicinity of the supply port. Alternatively, a small object is disposed at the center of the flow channel of the supply port, and the small object is supported swingably and tiltably by elastic members. In addition, the upper plate of the vacuum vessel is slanted having the supply port of the shielding pebbles as a top, and a slanting angle relative to a horizontal axis is made greater than the resting angle of the shielding pebble accumulation layer. The shielding pebbles are jetted out from the supply port and spread to the peripheries, abut against the inner surface of the vacuum vessel, jump up and then accumulate. Accordingly, they can be accumulated dispersingly without being localized. An uniform accumulation layer is obtained to form a vacuum vessel having uniform and high shielding performance. (N.H.)

  17. Shielding options for the ITER conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several shield options were analyzed for the ITER conceptual design to minimize the nuclear responses in the toroidal field (TF) coils. The total nuclear heating in the physics phase and the insulator dose in the technology phase are the most critical parameters in the design process. The first shield option has type 316 stainless steel and water shielding material. Steel and water also serve as structural material and coolant, respectively. The second option is similar to the first except that borated water is used instead of ordinary water. The other two options include a small layer of lead or boron carbide (B4C) at the back of the shield. The last three shield options were considered to reduce the nuclear heating in the toroidal field coils relative to the steel/water shield. An optimization process was performed taking into consideration the thermal-hydraulics and the engineering- requirements to define the shield configuration. A careful integration was performed to calculate the total nuclear heating in the toroidal field coils which account for the neutron wall loading distribution, the change in the shield thickness in the poloidal direction, and the space between the toroidal field coils in the divertor zone. The results show that the steel/water/Pb and the steel/borated water shield options are very close in terms of the total nuclear heating in the toroidal field coils and the dose in the insulator material. The other two options, steel/water and steel/water/B4C deposit more nuclear heating in the toroidal field coils. 5 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  18. MFTF-α + T shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MFTF-α+T is a DT upgrade option of the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to study better plasma performance, and test tritium breeding blankets in an actual fusion reactor environment. The central cell insert, designated DT axicell, has a 2-MW/m2 neutron wall loading at the first wall for blanket testing. This upgrade is completely shielded to protect the reactor components, the workers, and the general public from the radiation environment during operation and after shutdown. The shield design for this upgrade is the subject of this paper including the design criteria and the tradeoff studies to reduce the shield cost

  19. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  20. Safety assessment of ETRR-2 shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ETRR-2 is the second Egyptian research reactor. The reactor is of an open pool type and shielding and dose calculation is one of the most important scopes of the reactor safety. The core radiation source has been calculated using the Madland-Nix model (MNM) for a prompt fission neutron spectrum. The ANISN code has been used to determine the flux and dose through the axial and radial layers of the reactor shielding. It has been found that the calculated dose in the outer area of the reactor shield does not exceed the maximum allowable dose level which is in a good agreement with the measurement. (author)

  1. Gamma Ray Shielding from Saudi White Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Al-horayess OKLA; Al-Dayel OMAR; Hefne JAMEEL; Al-Ajyan TURKI; Bagazi ALI

    2010-01-01

    This study is a comparison of gamma ray linear attenuation coefficient of two typs of shielding materials made of Saudi white and red sand. Each shield was consisted of one part of cement two parts of sand in addi-tion to water. Different thicknesses were tested. The concentrations of all elements in each shield material were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results obtained from the ICP-MS were used in MCNP4B (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Computer ...

  2. Planetary surface reactor shielding using indigenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exploration and development of Mars will require abundant surface power. Nuclear reactors are a low-cost, low-mass means of providing that power. A significant fraction of the nuclear power system mass is radiation shielding necessary for protecting humans and/or equipment from radiation emitted by the reactor. For planetary surface missions, it may be desirable to provide some or all of the required shielding from indigenous materials. This paper examines shielding options that utilize either purely indigenous materials or a combination of indigenous and nonindigenous materials

  3. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data

  4. Thermal design of top shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type fast reactor. The top shield forms the top cover for the main vessel (MV) and includes roof slab (RS), large rotatable plug (LRP), small rotatable plug (SRP) and control Plug (CP). RS, LRP and SRP are box type structures consisting of top and bottom plates stiffened by radial stiffeners and vertical penetration shells. TS is exposed to argon cover gas provided above sodium pool on the bottom side and reactor containment building air at the top. Heat transfer takes place through the argon cover gas to the bottom plate of TS. Annular gaps are formed between the components supported on TS and the component penetrations through which cellular convection takes place. A single thermal shield provided below TS reduces the heat flux to the bottom plate to 1.15 kW/m2. The MV (SS 316 LN) is welded to RS (carbon steel A48 P2) through a dissimilar metal weld. A step in RS and an anti convection barrier (ACB) outside RS are provided to limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction. The MV is surrounded by safety vessel (SV) and reactor vault made of concrete. Thermal insulation is provided outside SV to limit the heat transfer to the reactor vault. The design requirements of TS are to maintain the operating temperature at 383-393 K, limit the temperature difference (ΔT) across the height of TS to 20 / 100 K under normal operation/loss of cooling, provide minimum annular gap size at the component penetrations, provide a nearly linear temperature gradient in the CP portion within the height of TS, maintain the temperature of top plate of CP > 383 K, limit the ΔT across the top plate of CP to 2 K, limit the temperature near the inflatable / backup seal to 393 K, limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction and the heat flux to the reactor vault. The total heat transferred to TS is estimated to be 210 kW. A dedicated closed loop cooling system with a total flow rate of 10 m

  5. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal...

  6. Shielding benchmark test for JENDL-3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Akira (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki. Tokai Research Establishment)

    1988-03-01

    The results of the shielding benchmark tests for JENDL-3T (testing stage version of JENDL-3), performed by JNDC Shielding Sub-working group, are summarized. Especially, problems of total cross-section in MeV range for O, Na, Fe, revealed from the analysis of the Broomstick's experiment, are discussed in details. For the deep penetration profiles of Fe, which is very important feature in shielding calculation, ASPIS benchmark experiment is analysed and discussed. From the study overall applicability of JENDL-3T data for the shielding calculation is confirmed. At the same time some problems still remained are also pointed out. By the reflection of this feedback information applicability of JENDL-3, forth coming official version, will be greatly improved.

  7. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important consideration of the use of superconducting magnets in ADR applications is shielding of the other instruments in the vicinity of the superconducting...

  8. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  9. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  10. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  11. Shielding design for better plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design methods are described for providing a shield system for nuclear power plants that will facilitate maintenance and inspection, increase overall plant availability, and ensure that man-rem exposures are as low as practicable

  12. Specification for lead bricks for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specification with metric dimensions for two systems of interlocking lead bricks for building permanent or temporary shielding walls including numbering system with illustrations, and schedule for ordering purposes. (author)

  13. Resonance self-shielding near zone interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A practical methodology is developed to treat the resonance self-shielding transition near zone interfaces. Based on the narrow resonance approximation, a space- and energy-dependent self-shielding factor for a single interface system is derived from the integral transport theory. Using the Wigner rational approximation, the self-shielding factor for a fine region near a zone interface is factorized into a linear combination of individual homogeneous and heterogeneous self-shielding factors. The method has been implemented in a widely used cross-section processing code that is based on the Bondarenko f-factor method. The result of the analysis was applied to a fast reactor blanket mock-up to improve the calculations near a converter-blanket interface. Comparisons of the calculation with /sup 238/U capture experimental data measured in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility are also discussed

  14. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  15. Limiting currents in shielded source configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limiting currents for laminar flow equilibria of relativistic electron beams in shielded source configurations are discussed. Results are presented for the constant applied magnetic field case, and for the case of constant beam radius

  16. Influence of the shielding on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to high-energy iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer code calculations based on biophysical models are commonly used to evaluate the effectiveness of shielding in reducing the biological damage caused by cosmic radiation in space flights. Biological measurements are urgently needed to benchmark the codes. We have measured the induction of chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 56Fe-ion beams accelerated at the Heavy for Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) synchrotron in Chiba. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to the 500 MeV/n iron beam (dose range 0.1-1 Gy)after traversal of 0 to 8 g/cm2 of either polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (lucite, a common plastic material) or aluminum. Three PMMA shield thickness and one Al shield thickness were used. For comparison, cells were exposed to 200 MeV/n iron ions and to X-rays. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by a phosphatase inhibitor (calyculin A) to avoid cell-cycle selection produced by the exposure to high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion beams. Aberrations were scored in chromosomes 1, 2,and 4 following fluorescence in situ hybridization. The yield of chromosomal aberrations per unit dose at the sample position was poorly dependent on the shield thickness and material. However, the yield of aberrations per unit ion incident on the shield was increased by the shielding. This increase is associated to the increased dose-rate measured behind the shield as compared to the direct beam. These preliminary results prove that shielding can increase the effectiveness of heavy ions, and the damage is dependent upon shield thickness and material. (author)

  17. Electromagnetic shielding with polypyrrole-coated fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Avloni, J.; L. De Florio; Henn, A. R.; R. Lau; Ouyang, M.; Sparavigna, A.

    2006-01-01

    Several shielding applications, to protect human health and electronic devices against dangerous effects of electromagnetic radiation, require solutions that fabrics can suitably fulfill. Here, we will investigate the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polypyrrole-coated polyester textiles, in the frequency range 100-1000 MHz. Insertion losses for several conductive fabrics with different surface resistivity ranging from 40 Ohm till the very low value of 3 Ohm were evalua...

  18. Evaluation of tube shielding; Utvaerdering av tubskyddsmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjoernhede, Anders; Westberg, Stig-Bjoern; Henderson, Pamela; Wetterstroem, Jonas; Jonasson, Anna

    2007-12-15

    Problems with soot-blowing have increased recently because of the poor fuel quality. Studies show that removing all the deposit by soot-blowing increases the metal loss of the superheaters, which drastically shortens component lifetimes. A simple, effective and common way of increasing the lifetime is to use tube shielding. Austenitic stainless steels seem to be the type of material most commonly used for tube shielding. It is thought that they give better protection against material removal than ferritic steels, but the cost of austenitics is several times greater than ferritic steels. It is clear that there is a significant economic advantage in choosing the right material for tube shielding, even though it might be expected that the cheaper materials do not perform as well as the more expensive ones. The reason for the study reported here is that very little material data exists in the literature. Few, if any tests have been performed to study the choice of material for tube shielding. The goal was to compare and evaluate a number of materials in a boiler to see if it is possible to replace the shielding material presently used with cheaper alternatives. About a dozen different shielding materials were installed and exposed for 4000 hours on primary- and secondary superheaters in a waste-fired boiler in Norrkoeping (Haendeloe Boiler 14.75MW). In total, 130 m of test material were installed and measured in several positions: a least 150 thickness measurements, before and after, were made on every tube shield. The results showed that the greatest attack was found on the secondary superheater shielding, where both the gas- and steam temperatures were higher. When considering cost and lifetime Sicromal 10 and 12 (however not Sicromal 8) and 15Mo3 are recommended as being better than 253 MA. The results should be of interest to most plants firing biomass or waste

  19. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimian, M.H.; Shabani, M.R. [Univ. of Tehran, Faculty of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: rahimyan@ut.ac.ir; shubani@me.ut.ac.ir

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  20. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  1. APOLLO2 code self-shielding formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the various self-shielding methods used in the APOLLO2 code for treating one resonant nucleus or a mixture of resonant nuclei. The methods are expounded in chronological order. First of all, the methods dealing with one resonant isotope are explained. Then an original method dealing directly with a resonant mixture is detailed. This new method is also convenient for one resonant nucleus and leads, in that case, to interesting improvements in the self-shielding modeling. (author)

  2. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  3. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases

  4. Shielding calculations for ETRR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flux and dose through ETRR-1 reactor shielding are calculated using ANISN code. The neutron and gamma radiation sources in the reactor core are determined by using Madland Nix Model (MNM Model ). The results show that the flux in the core is in good agreement with the reactor flux. The dose in the radial and axial shields at outside boundary is less than the maximum allowable dose

  5. Measurement accuracy in shielded magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement error due to both the probe size averaging effect and the coil arrangement is investigated when magnetic field measurements are performed in close proximity to different planar shields. The analysis is carried on through a hybrid FEM/BEM model which employs the 'thin shield' technique. Ferromagnetic, pure conductive and multilayer screens are taken into consideration and an estimation of the errors for concentric and non-concentric coil probes is given. The numerical results are validated by experiments

  6. Foamed Nanocomposites for EMI Shielding Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Molenberg, Isabel; Huynen, Isabelle; Baudouin, Anne-Christine; Bailly, Christian; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Throughout this chapter, we have seen that foamed polymer/CNTs nanocomposites make very good EMI shielding materials. They exhibit a high conductivity and a relatively low dielectric constant, leading to a high Shielding Effectiveness and a relatively low Reflectivity, although a compromise in CNT content must be found between a high SE and a low R. This was confirmed by measurement results and rheological measurements but also using a simple electrical equivalent model.

  7. Influence of Shielding Arrangement on ECT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Fernandez Marron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full 3D study of a shielded ECT sensor. The spatialresolution and effective sensing field are obtained by means of Finite Element Methodbased simulations and are the compared to a conventional sensor's characteristics. Aneffective improvement was found in the sensitivity in the pipe cross-section, resulting inenhanced quality of the reconstructed image. The sensing field along the axis of the sensoralso presents better behaviour for a shielded sensor.

  8. Radiation shielding facility and using method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plurality of radiation shielding members are suspended and supported from a horizontally circular suspending beam by way of S-like suspending hooks. Wires are hung between the plurality of suspending fittings on the upper surface of the beam and a hook of a ceiling crane. The ceiling crane is an existent crane movably disposed to the ceiling in a building of a nuclear power plant containing a cylindrical vessel as a radiation source which is a member to be shielded. The radiation shielding member is a bag member formed by using a synthetic resin fabric or a rubber plate or a composite member thereof. A predetermined amount of a shielding material such as water is charged and kept in the bag member. The beam is suspended by the ceiling crane to transport the beam and each of the radiation shielding members altogether and lowered while being suspended so as to surround the outer circumference of the cylindrical vessel by each of the radiation shielding members. (I.N.)

  9. ITER blanket, shield and material data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the summary of the Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), this document describes the ITER blanket, shield, and material data base. Part A, ''ITER Blanket and Shield Conceptual Design'', discusses the need for ITER of a tritium breeding blanket to supply most of the tritium for the fuel cycle of the device. Blanket and shield combined must be designed to operate at a neutron wall loading of 1MW/m2, and to provide adequate shielding of the magnets to meet the neutron energy fluence goal of 3MWa/m2 at the first wall. After a summary of the conceptual design, the following topics are elaborated upon: (1) function, design requirement, and critical issues; (2) material selection; (3) blanket and shield segmentation; (4) blanket design description; (5) design analysis; (6) shield; (7) radiation streaming analysis; and (8) a summary of benchmark calculations. Part B, ''ITER Materials Evaluation and Data Base'', treats the compilation and assessment of the available materials data base used for the selection of the appropriate materials for all major components of ITER, including (i) structural materials for the first wall, (ii) Tritium breeding materials for the blanket, (iii) plasma facing materials for the divertor and first wall armor, and (4) electric insulators for use in the blanket and divertor. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015–15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design. - Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of superconductors were investigated. • µ/ρ, mean free path, and exposure buildup factor were calculated. • CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 were found superior for γ-ray shielding. • Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 was found superior for fast neutron shielding

  11. Shielding Effectiveness of Composites Containing Flaky Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; QU Zhaoming; WANG Yilong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative relationship between the electromagnetic-shielding property of composites and the distribution of inclusions,a scheme for predicting the shielding effectiveness of composites containing variously-distributed flaky inclusions is proposed.The scheme is based on equivalent parameters of homogeneous comparison materials and the plane-wave shielding theory.It leads to explicit formulas for the shielding effectiveness of multi-layered composites in terms of microstructural parameters that characterize the shape,distribution and orientation of the inclusions.For single layer composite that contains random and aligned flaky silver-coated carbonyl-iron particles with fractions of different volume,the predicted shielding effectiveness agrees well with the experimental data.As for composites containing aligned flaky particles,the shielding effectiveness obtained by the proposed scheme and experiment data is higher than that the random case,e.g.about 20 dB higher at 750 MHz.The proposed scheme is a straightforward method for optimizing future composite designs.

  12. Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured

  13. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  14. Verification of shielding calculation on the DIII-D facility at La Jolla, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations were performed for the DIII-D facility at La Jolla to independently assess the biological dose from radiation emitted during operation. These calculations for both the fully shielded and bare configurations are in essential agreement with those done by Gulf. In addition to the basic test problems run by Gulf, a bare configuration with additional air outside the facility area was calculated. The addition of air to the bare configuration caused the dose at 100 meters from the DIII-D center-line to increase by fifty five percent. The inclusion of the various elemental constituents in the soil composition may change the calculated dose, but will not change the shielding factor nor invalidate the overall conclusion of this report. The overall conclusion is that Gulf and LLNL results are in general agreement. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Study and installation of concrete shielding in the civil engineering of nuclear construction (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this report is to give technical information about high density concretes which have become very important for radiation biological shielding. The most generally used heavy aggregates (barytes, ilmenite, ferrophosphorus, limonite, magnetite and iron punching) to make these concretes are investigated from the point of view prospecting and physical and chemical characteristics. At first, a general survey of shielding concretes is made involving the study of components, mixing and placing methods, then, a detailed investigation of some high density concretes: barytes concrete, with incorporation of iron punching or iron shot, ferrophosphorus concrete, ilmenite concrete and magnetite concrete, more particularly with regard to grading and mix proportions and testing process. To put this survey in concrete form, two practical designs are described such as they have been carried out at the Saclay Nuclear Station. Specifications are given for diverse concretes and for making the proton-synchrotron 'Saturne' shielding blocks. (author)

  16. Progress and prospects of calculation methods for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in calculation methods for radiation shielding are reviewed based on the activities of research committees related to radiation shielding fields established in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. A technological roadmap for the field of radiation shielding; progress and prospects for specific shielding calculation methods such as the Monte Carlo, discrete ordinate Sn transport, and simplified methods; and shielding experiments used to validate calculation methods are presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Shielding integrity testing of radioactive material transport packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although this Code of Practice is intended primarily to cover shielding integrity test requirements for off-site shielded radioactive material transport packaging, it may also be partly applicable to containers and specialised handling equipment (e.g. fuelling machines) used only on site, and to radiation shielding generally. The code is not concerned with proving adequacy of shielding design or with its absolute shielding value. (author)

  18. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  19. Shorter Life Span of Microorganisms and Plants as a Consequence of Shielded Magnetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, I. M.; Bathory, D.

    The geomagnetic field is an essential environmental factor for life and health on this planet. In order to survey how magnetic fields affect the life span and the nitrogenase (an iron-sulphur enzyme) activity of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as the life span, the main organic synthesis and the water balance of plants (22 species), the biological tests were incubated under shielded magnetic field and also in normal geo-magnetic environment. The shielding level was about 10-6 of the terrestrial magnetic field.Life cycles of all organisms require the co-ordinated control of a complex set of interlocked physiological processes and metabolic pathways. Such processes are likely to be regulated by a large number of genes. Our researches suggest that the main point in biological structures, which seems to be affected by the low magnetic environment, is the water molecule. Magnetic field induces a molecular alignment. Under shielded conditions, unstructured water molecules with fewer hydrogen bonds, which are producing a more reactive environment, are occurring. As compared to control, the life span of both microorganisms and plants was shorter in shielded environment. A higher nitrogenase affinity for the substrate was recorded in normal geo-magnetic field compared to low magnetic field. The synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes was modified under experimental conditions. The stomatal conductance was higher between 158 and 300% in shielded environment indicating an important water loss from the plant cells.Our results support the idea that the shielded magnetic environment induces different reactions depending on the time of exposure and on the main metabolic pathways of the cells.

  20. Under the Rape Shield: Constitutional and Feminist Critiques of Rape Shield Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Roman, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses constitutional and feminist critiques of present rape shield laws in the United States, and ends with a comparative perspective throughout the Anglo-American legal space today. Finally, although the rape shield laws can be approached from a variety of discourses, this article engages specifically with a discourse that intersects legal and feminist analyses

  1. Verification of effectiveness of borated water shield for a cyclotron type self-shielded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technological advances in positron emission tomography (PET) in conventional clinic imaging have led to a steady increase in the number of cyclotrons worldwide. Most of these cyclotrons are being used to produce 18F-FDG, either for themselves as for the distribution to other centers that have PET. For there to be safety in radiological facilities, the cyclotron intended for medical purposes can be classified in category I and category II, ie, self-shielded or non-shielded (bunker). Therefore, the aim of this work is to verify the effectiveness of borated water shield built for a cyclotron accelerator-type Self-shielded PETtrace 860. Mixtures of water borated occurred in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, as well as the results of the radiometric survey in the vicinity of the self-shielding of the cyclotron in the conditions established by the manufacturer showed that radiation levels were below the limits. (author)

  2. Comparison of eye shields in radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Both MeV electrons and kV photons are used in the treatment of superficial cancers. The advantages and disadvantages for each of these modalities have been widely reported in the literature (See for example [1-2]). Of particular note in the literature is the use of lead and tungsten eye shields to protect ocular structures during radiotherapy. An investigation addressing issues raised in the literature that are relevant to the Wellington Cancer Centre method of treatment of lesions near the eye shall be summarised. Various small sized fields were irradiated to determine depth dose and profile curves in a water phantom shielded by various commercially available eye shields. Transmission factors relevant to critical ocular structures and particle distribution theories are used to further elucidate the comparison between the use of MeV electrons and kV photons in the treatment of superficial cancers. Superficial X-rays from a Pantak Therapax unit SXT 150 model of HVL 4.90mm Al were used for the lead eye shield measurements and electrons from a Varian Clinac 2100C nominal energies 6MeV and 9MeV (Rp 3.00cm and 4.34cm respectively) were used for the tungsten eye shield measurements. For the photon measurements circular applicators of 3cm, 4cm and 5cm diameter were used and for the electrons standard 6x6cm and 10x 10cm applicators were used, with no custom inserts. A Scanditronix RFA-300 water phantom and Scanditronix RFAplus version 5.3 software application were used to collect and collate all data. The eye shields were the Radiation Products Design Inc. medium lead eye shield (item 934-014) and the MED-TEC tungsten eye shields MT-T-45 M and MT-T-45 S. It is demonstrated that electron fields have appreciably greater scatter into the area directly under the eye shields than the photon fields. Similarly at the region of dmax for the electron fields the relative dose is appreciably greater than the photon fields at similar depth. The relative merits for electron

  3. Shielding design to obtain compact marine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Akio; Sako, Kiyoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1994-06-01

    The marine reactors equipped in previously constructed nuclear ships are in need of the secondary shield which is installed outside the containment vessel. Most of the weight and volume of the reactor plants are occupied by this secondary shield. An advanced marine reactor called MRX (Marine Reactor X) has been designed to obtain a more compact and lightweight marine reactor with enhanced safety. The MRX is a new type of marine reactor which is an integral PWR (The steam generator is installed in the pressure vessel.) with adopting a water-filled containment vessel and a new shielding design method of no installation of the secondary shield. As a result, MRX is considerably lighter in weight and more compact in size as compared with the reactors equipped in previously constructed nuclear ships. For instance, the plant weight and volume of the containment vessel of MRX are about 50% and 70% of those of the Nuclear Ship MUTSU, in spite of the power of MRX is 2.8 times as large as the MUTSU's reactor. The shielding design calculation was made using the ANISN, DOT3.5, QAD-CGGP2 and ORIGEN codes. The computational accuracy was confirmed by experimental analyses. (author).

  4. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  5. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The dual-wall, Whipple shield is the shield of choice for lightweight, long-duration flight. The shield uses an initial sacrificial wall to initiate fragmentation and melt an impacting threat that expands over a void before hitting a subsequent shield wall of a critical component. The key parameters to this type of shield are the rear wall and its mass which stops the debris, as well as the minimum shock wave strength generated by the threat particle impact of the sacrificial wall and the amount of room that is available for expansion. Ensuring the shock wave strength is sufficiently high to achieve large scale fragmentation/melt of the threat particle enables the expansion of the threat and reduces the momentum flux of the debris on the rear wall. Three key factors in the shock wave strength achieved are the thickness of the sacrificial wall relative to the characteristic dimension of the impacting particle, the density and material cohesion contrast of the sacrificial wall relative to the threat particle and the impact speed. The mass of the rear wall and the sacrificial wall are desirable to minimize for launch costs making it important to have an understanding of the effects of density contrast and impact speed. An analytic model is developed here, to describe the influence of these three key factors. In addition this paper develops a description of a fourth key parameter related to fragmentation and its role in establishing the onset of projectile expansion.

  6. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  7. Evaluation of Spacecraft Shielding Effectiveness for Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    The potential for serious health risks from solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a critical issue in the NASA strategic plan for the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS). The excess cost to protect against the GCR and SPE due to current uncertainties in radiation transmission properties and cancer biology could be exceedingly large based on the excess launch costs to shield against uncertainties. The development of advanced shielding concepts is an important risk mitigation area with the potential to significantly reduce risk below conventional mission designs. A key issue in spacecraft material selection is the understanding of nuclear reactions on the transmission properties of materials. High-energy nuclear particles undergo nuclear reactions in passing through materials and tissue altering their composition and producing new radiation types. Spacecraft and planetary habitat designers can utilize radiation transport codes to identify optimal materials for lowering exposures and to optimize spacecraft design to reduce astronaut exposures. To reach these objectives will require providing design engineers with accurate data bases and computationally efficient software for describing the transmission properties of space radiation in materials. Our program will reduce the uncertainty in the transmission properties of space radiation by improving the theoretical description of nuclear reactions and radiation transport, and provide accurate physical descriptions of the track structure of microscopic energy deposition.

  8. Space reactor shielding: an assessment of the technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space power reactor systems require shielding to protect payload and reactor shielding components, and also maintenance and operating personnel. Shield composition, size, and shape are important design considerations, since the shield can dominate the overall weight of the system. Techniques for space reactor shield design analysis and optimization and experimental test facilities are available for design verification. With these tools, a shielding technology in support of current and future space power reactor systems can be developed. Efforts in this direction should begin with a generic shielding program to provide information on materials properties and geometric effects and should be followed by project-specific shielding programs to provide design optimization and prototype shield verification

  9. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are more complicated than those for ground structures because of their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must combine low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. EMI shielding characteristics were calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compare to preliminary experimental results for these materials and to the characteristics of shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that effective EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding characteristics alone.

  10. Manufacture of blanket shield modules for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: Patrick.Lorenzetto@tech.efda.org; Boireau, B. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Boudot, C. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, BP181, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Bucci, P. [CEA, DTEN/S3ME/LMIC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Furmanek, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ioki, K. [ITER IT, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Liimatainen, J. [Metso Powdermet, P.O. Box 306, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Peacock, A. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sherlock, P. [NNC Ltd., Booths Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Taehtinen, S. [VTT Industrial Systems, P.O. Box 1704, Espoo, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    A research and development programme for the ITER blanket shield modules has been implemented in Europe to provide input for the design and the manufacture of the full-scale production components. It involves in particular the fabrication and testing of mock-ups (small scale and medium scale) and full-scale prototypes of shield blocks (SB) and first wall (FW) panels. The manufacturing feasibility of FW panels has been demonstrated for two copper alloy candidates. Two designs have been developed for the manufacture of the SB, one for a conventional fabrication route and one for a fabrication route based on the hot isostatic press technology. This paper presents the fabrication routes developed in Europe for the manufacture of the ITER Shield modules.

  11. Radiation safety shield for a syringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety apparatus for use in administering radioactive serums by a syringe, without endangering the health and safety of the medical operators is described. The apparatus consists of a sheath and a shield which can be retracted into the sheath to assay the radioactive serum in an assay well. The shield can be moved from the retracted position into an extended position when the serum is to be injected into the patient. To protect the operator, the shield can be constructed of tantalum or any like high density substance to attenuate the radiation, emanating from the radioactive serums contained in the syringe, from passing to the atmosphere. A lead glass window is provided so that the operator can determine the exact quantity of the radioactive serum which is contained in the syringe

  12. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation. Lead bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard contains specifications for the shape and requirements set for lead bricks such that they can be used to construct radiation-shielding walls according to the building kit system. The dimensions of the bricks are selected in such a way as to permit any modification of the length, height and thickness of said shielding walls in units of 50 mm. The narrow side of the lead bricks juxtaposed to one another in a wall construction to shield against radiation have to form prismatic grooves and tongues: in this way, direct penetration by radiation is prevented. Only cuboid bricks (serial nos. 55-60 according to Table 10) do not have prismatic tongues and grooves. (orig.)

  13. Calculation system analysis for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work consists of the computational system implementation for nuclear reactor shielding analysis. The system has as objectives to facilitate the installation of the calculation framework, problem set-up, and results analysis. Several computational programmes commonly used for cross-section preparation and radiation transport were chosen for the system. This work represents the capacity necessary for nuclear reactor and particle accelerator shielding design, to aid in nuclear experiments and in the utilization of nuclear techniques that require the radiation field calculation. The system was implemented in PC-DOS environment and consists of the necessary and sufficient programs and data for generation of the cross sections, groups constants, self-shielding factors, activation sources, for the calculation of neutron and gamma-ray fluence, dose rates, and other types of response functions. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs

  14. Calculated shielding factors for selected European houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding factors for gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces have been calculated with the computer model DEPSHIELD for single-family and multi-storey buildings in France, United Kingdom and Denmark. For all three countries it was found that the shielding factors for single-family houses are approximately a factor of 2 - 10 higher that those for buildings with five or more storeys. Away from doors and windows the shielding factors for French, British, and Danish single-family houses are in the range 0.03 - 0.1, 0.06 - 0.4, and 0.07 - 0.3, respectively. The uncertainties of the calculations are discussed and DEPSHIELD-results are compared with other methods as well as with experimental results. (author)

  15. Radiation shielding performance of some concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy consumption is increasing with the increased population of the world and thus new energy sources were discovered such as nuclear energy. Besides using nuclear energy, nuclear techniques are being used in a variety of fields such as medical hospital, industry, agriculture or military issue, the radiation protection becomes one of the important research fields. In radiation protection, the main rules are time, distance and shielding. The most effective radiation shields are materials which have a high density and high atomic number such as lead, tungsten which are expensive. Alternatively the concrete which produced using different aggregate can be used. The effectiveness of radiation shielding is frequently described in terms of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). These are the thicknesses of an absorber that will reduce the radiation to half, and one tenth of its intensity respectively. In this study the radiation protection properties of different types of concrete will be discussed

  16. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  17. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  18. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 102–104 are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays

  19. A low cost automatic shielding block cutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many radiotherapy treatments it is necessary to shield certain internal organs from the radiation beam covering an area of cancer. Shields may be required to match the anatomy and shape or the region to be protected from radiation, and consequently need to be customised for individual patients. A common method of producing customised shields is to pour low melting-point alloy into polystyrene foam moulds. The moulds are produced by cutting the polystyrene shapes with a heated wire. Traditionally, foam moulds have been cut by tracing a pointer, attached to a suspended heated wire, around the required shield area on a radiograph. This suspended unit was bulky and cumbersome to use. One of the major benefits of the low cost computer-controlled shielding block cutter is the improvement in the block cutting accuracy. Using the PC to digitise the shape and regulate the temperature and speed of the wire produces accurate results independent of operator skills. Computer contol permits the use of a finer wire which further increases the precision. The speed and efficiency of block production is also better due to the rejection of fewer moulds and the ability to cut multiple moulds from a single blank. The ergonomics of the computer-controlled system greatly benefits the operator. Whilst seated, the operator is able to trace shapes on radiographs and accommodate different shielding tray heights. This contrasts with the manual system which requires physical adjustment of the block to film distance. We have built three of these units for use at each of our metropolitan centres. (author)

  20. Shielded canister transporter equipment acceptance test operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defense waste processing facility (DWPF) processes high level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) by vitrifying the waste and placing it in stainless stell canisters for long term storage. The shielded canister transporter (SCT) is a diesel powered mobile rubber tired self-propelled vehicle which transports the canisters from the DWPF processing facility to the on-site waste storage building. The SCT has a system of automatic programmable logic controls (PLC) which provides operational handling control with a shielded transfer cask and associated canister positional equipment

  1. Using ordinary crystals for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small volumes with lead brick and lead glass shielding are used, and in nuclear technology we call them ''hot cell''. Furthermore for separating the exposure rooms from the operator rooms lead glassed windows of heavy concreate walls can be used. Unfortunately, these glasses can not be produced in Turkey. ordinary crystals which have lead-oxide in them, can be produced in Turkey, in this essay we have investigated the usage of ordinary crystals for the radiation shielding. Crystals have been tested with different types of radiation and ''radiation absorbtion'' curves, ''half thickness'' and ''tenth value thickness'' have been calculated. (author)

  2. Novel Concepts for Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that safety factors be maximized with respect to long duration, extraterrestrial space flight. Any significant improvement in radiation protection will be critical in ensuring the safety of crew and hardware on such missions. The project goal is to study novel concepts for radiation shielding materials that can be used for long-duration space missions. As part of this project we will investigate the use of thin films for the evaluation of a containment system that can retain liquid hydrogen and provide the necessary hydrogen density for effective shielding.

  3. Alpha particle problems in shielded support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle confinement is considered in the case of internal conductor systems with magnetically shielded supports. The treatment includes problems of energy transfer to the background plasma, the balance between radiation losses and alpha particle heating, mirror confinement in the main poloidal field, the cut-off and shielding conditions at the supports, ambipolar electric fields, wall interaction, and support location. With a proper and technically realizable choice of parameter values, it should become possible to achieve alpha particle heating as well as to manage the reactor technological problems due to alpha particle interaction with the supports. (Auth.)

  4. Shielding in electron beams used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions of electron beams with initial energies between 7 and 30 MeV have been studied in various materials including polystyrene, aluminium, copper and lead. The following experimental results have been found: estimation of measurement point displacement in a cylindrical chamber and of its variations with electron beam energy, empirical relations between the energy at the surface and the practical range of the electrons in various materials, an estimation of the relative ionisation due to the 'bremsstrahlung' measured behind different materials with beam complete shielding. Improvement of electron beam collimation is suggested after analysis of the dose distribution behind partial shielding

  5. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications

  6. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design

  7. Development and application of high performance liquid shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tried to manufacture gel shielding materials of 1mm width with good shielding performance for neutron and γ-rays using five kinds of monomers with high hydrogen density such as long chain fatty acid acrylate, isodecyl methacrylate, lauryl acrylate, stearyle acrylate and stearyle methacrylate, and then lead borate, lead nitrate and lead as lead compounds, and boric acid as neutron adsorbed materials. Some kinds of shielding materials were produced by experiments. Lamination of shielding materials with practical width was obtained. One of three kinds of high performance shielding materials in the fiscal year 1996 was selected. The compensated shielding was designed for double refracted cylindrical duct using one. (S.Y.)

  8. Compilation of the computing methods in radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to update the KAERI radiation shielding technology, the calculational shielding methods were surveyed throughly. Computer codes and data libraries for radiation shielding calculation were collected and some model calculations were carried out with them. So far the following materials were ensured for our future use: 23 shielding codes, 7 data libraries, 7 data processing codes and 11 peripheral shielding codes. All of these were compiled again for the CYBER-73 computer system, and will be widely used in shielding analysis of accelerators, shipping casks as well as nuclear power plant. (author)

  9. Design of ITER vacuum vessel neutron shielding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron shielding structure of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) will be applied to shielding neutron and gamma-ray and reducing the toroidal field ripple. The features of ITER vacuum vessel and the material selection for shielding structures are briefly discussed. A shielding conceptual design and some correlative support structures have been developed. The layout of ferromagnetic inserts was performed. Filling ratios of shielding materials between VV shells were acquired according to ITER VV physics calculation results. In term of the ITER VV design criteria, the detailed design work for library of the shielding blocks and the emulational structure have been finished based on the 3D modeling software. (authors)

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxin Is Shielded by NTNHA in an Interlocked Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Shenyan; Rumpel, Sophie; Zhou, Jie; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Bigalke, Hans; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (Cornell); (Tufts); (Hannover-MED); (Sanford-Burnham)

    2012-03-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly poisonous substances that are also effective medicines. Accidental BoNT poisoning often occurs through ingestion of Clostridium botulinum-contaminated food. Here, we present the crystal structure of a BoNT in complex with a clostridial nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) protein at 2.7 angstroms. Biochemical and functional studies show that NTNHA provides large and multivalent binding interfaces to protect BoNT from gastrointestinal degradation. Moreover, the structure highlights key residues in BoNT that regulate complex assembly in a pH-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings define the molecular mechanisms by which NTNHA shields BoNT in the hostile gastrointestinal environment and releases it upon entry into the circulation. These results will assist in the design of small molecules for inhibiting oral BoNT intoxication and of delivery vehicles for oral administration of biologics.

  11. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M and O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations

  12. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  13. Advances in self-shielded accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of lead in lieu of concrete for shielding has enabled a significant segment of the electron beam (EB) processing industry to continue to grow. Self-shielded accelerators of 300 kV or less are used in the curing of environmentally-friendly thin-film coatings and in crosslinking extruded polymeric films. New low-voltage accelerator systems have been developed, including very economic modular units, which are expanding market interests. Transportable systems based on placing self-shielded accelerators on vans have found only minor interest for use in environmental remediation, with no commercial success to date. Higher-voltage, around 600 to 800 kV, self-shielded systems have found minimal acceptance in historic markets as in the crosslinking wire insulation and processing of tire components. However, new developments in higher energy, 2.5 MeV, modest current, self-contained systems may find use for in-house sterilization and treatment of products. (author)

  14. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  15. Internally shielded beam transport and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to environmental concerns, the Advanced Photon Source has a policy that disallows any exposed lead within the facility. This creates a real problem for the beam transport system, not so much for the pipe but for the flexible coupling (bellows) sections. A complete internally shielded x-ray transport system, consisting of long transport lines joined by flexible coupling sections, has been designed for CARS sector 14 to operate either at high vacuum or as a helium flight tube. It can effectively shield against air scattering of wiggler or undulator white beam with proper placement of apertures, collimators, and masks for direct beam control. The system makes use of male- and female-style fittings that create a labyrinth allowing for continuous shielding through the flexible coupling sections. These parts are precision machined from a ternary hypereutectic lead alloy (cast under 15 inches of head pressure to assure a pinhole-free casting) then pressed into either end (rotatable vacuum flanges) of the bellows assembly. The transport pipe itself consists of a four part construction using a stepped transition ring (Z-ring) to connect an inner tube to the vacuum flange and also to a protective and supportive outer tube. The inner tube is wrapped with 1/16 double-prime pure lead sheet to a predetermined thickness following the shape of the stepped transition ring for continuous shielding. This design has been prototyped and radiation tested. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Bose-Einstein Condensate and Gravitational Shielding

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2014-01-01

    In this work we show that when possible transform some types of substance into a Bose-Einstein condensate at room temperature, which exists long enough to be used in practice then will be possible to use these substances in order to create efficient Gravitational Shieldings.

  17. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports

  18. Technical specifications: Tower Shielding Reactor II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II) and an envelope of operation within which there is reasonable assurance that these limits cannot be exceeded. The specifications were written to satisfy the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0540, September 1, 1972

  19. Neutron shielding for particle astrophysics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, J E

    2005-01-01

    Particle astrophysics experiments often require large volume neutron shields which are formed from hydrogenous material. This note reviews some of the available materials in an attempt to find the most cost effective solution. Raw polymer pellets and Water Extended Polyester (WEP) ae discussed in detail. Suppliers for some materials are given.

  20. Design and analysis of ITER shield blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes electromagnetic analyses for ITER shielding blanket modules, fabrication methods for the blanket modules and the back plate, the design and the fabrication methods for port limiter have been investigated. Studies on the runaway electron impact for Be armor have been also performed. (J.P.N.)

  1. EMP coupling to multiconductor shielded cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for calculating EMP coupling to multiconductor shielded cables by electromagnetic pulse. The induced voltage of inner conductor of the SYV-50-7 cable and SYVZ-9 cable placed on the ground are computed. The computed results agree with those measured

  2. Methods for calculating radiation attenuation in shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the development of high-speed digital computers of large capacity has revolutionized the field of reactor shield design. For compact special-purpose reactor shields, Monte-Carlo codes in two- and three dimensional geometries are now available for the proper treatment of both the neutron and gamma- ray problems. Furthermore, techniques are being developed for the theoretical optimization of minimum-weight shield configurations for this type of reactor system. In the design of land-based power reactors, on the other hand, there is a strong incentive to reduce the capital cost of the plant, and economic considerations are also relevant to reactors designed for merchant ship propulsion. In this context simple methods are needed which are economic in their data input and computing time requirements and which, at the same time, are sufficiently accurate for design work. In general the computing time required for Monte-Carlo calculations in complex geometry is excessive for routine design calculations and the capacity of the present codes is inadequate for the proper treatment of large reactor shield systems in three dimensions. In these circumstances a wide range of simpler techniques are currently being employed for design calculations. The methods of calculation for neutrons in reactor shields fall naturally into four categories: Multigroup diffusion theory; Multigroup diffusion with removal sources; Transport codes; and Monte Carlo methods. In spite of the numerous Monte- Carlo techniques which are available for penetration and back scattering, serious problems are still encountered in practice with the scattering of gamma rays from walls of buildings which contain critical facilities and also concrete-lined discharge shafts containing irradiated fuel elements. The considerable volume of data in the unclassified literature on the solution of problems of this type in civil defence work appears not to have been evaluated for reactor shield design. In

  3. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  4. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone?, a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory

  5. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analyses , for information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL and Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project

  6. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T. (comp.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Ingersoll, J.K. (comp.) (Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  7. A new ceramic material for shielding pulsed neutron scattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new ceramic composite, based on boron carbide, to use as a shielding material for pulsed neutron scattering instrumentation. The measured transmission data show characteristics equivalent to crispy mix, a common shielding material used at ISIS (UK)

  8. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  9. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  10. Shielding consideration for the SSCL experimental halls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Superconducting Super Collider which is being designed and built in Waxahachie, Texas consists Of series of proton accelerators, culminating in a 20 Te proton on proton collider. The collider will be in a tunnel which will be 87 km in circumference and. on average about 30 meters underground. The present design calls for two large interaction halls on the east side of the ring. The shielding for these halls is being designed for an interaction rate of 109 Hz or 1016 interactions per year, based on 107 seconds per operational year. SSC guidelines require that the shielding be designed to meet the criterion of 1mSv per year for open areas off site 2mSv per year for open areas on site, and 2mSv per year for controlled areas. Only radiation workers will be routinely allowed to work in controlled areas. It should be pointed that there is a potential for an accidental full beam loss in either of the experimental halls, and this event would consist of the loss of the full circulating beam up to 4 x 1014 protons. With the present design. the calculated dose equivalent for this event is about 10% of the annual dose equivalent for the normal p-p interactions, so that die accident condition does not control the shielding. If, for instance, local shielding within the experimental hall is introduced into the calculations, this could change. The shielding requirements presented here are controlled by the normal p-p interactions. Three important questions were addressed in the present calculations. They are (1) the thickness of the roof over the experimental halls, (2) the configuration of the shafts and adits which give access to the halls, and (3) the problem of ground water and air activation

  11. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior.

  12. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior

  13. Shielding of the child's head during x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three devices for X-ray shielding of child's head are suggested; the first one is a protective attachment for shielding a child being in horizontal position on an X-ray table; the second one is a protective stand for shielding head and body at roentgenofraphy of upper extremities of a child sitting near the X-ray table; the third one is a prot ctive suspension for shielding the head of a child being in vertical position

  14. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  15. Proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics held on Feb. 22 and 23 in 1978 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo. The reports includes the following items (1) studies on neutronics with accelerators (2) radiation damage (3) shielding design (4) radiation streaming (5) shielding experiments from a point of view of radiation measurements (6) shielding benchmark experiments (7) prospects on the study of neutronics. All items are written in Japanese. (auth.)

  16. Development of radiation shielding standards in the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) is a standards-writing organization-member of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The ANS Standards Committee has a subcommittee denoted ANS-6, Shielding, whose charge is to establish standards in connection with radiation protection and shielding, to provide shielding information to other standards writing groups, and to prepare recommended sets of shielding data and test problems. This paper is a progress report of this subcommittee

  17. On New Limits of the Coefficient of Gravitation Shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michele Caputo

    2006-12-01

    New limits of the shielding coefficients in the supposed phenomenon of gravitation shielding have recently become available. The new values are briefly reviewed and discussed in order to update the state of art since some new limits for gravitation shielding are not necessarily the lowest ones which, instead, are those of interest when planning new experimental research or studying theoretically the possible effects of gravitation shielding.

  18. Combination of self-shielded and gas-shielded flux-cored arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Lian, Atle Korsnes

    2011-01-01

    This master thesis have consisted of experimental and theoretical studies of the change in microstructure and mechanical properties in intermixed weld metal from self-shielded and gas-shielded flux-cored welding wires. The main objective of the present thesis has been to do detailed metallographic analysis on different weld metal combinations, and find out and give an explanation why satisfying values were achieved or not achieved.The report is divided into four parts. Part one consists of re...

  19. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  20. Advanced materials and design for electromagnetic interference shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the role of EMI shielding in EMC design, this book introduces the design guidelines, materials selection, characterization methodology, manufacturing technology, and future potential of EMI shielding. It covers an array of issues in advanced shielding materials and design solutions, including enclosures and composites.

  1. System for detecting and processing abnormality in electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting and processing an abnormality in electromagnetic shielding of an intelligent building which is constructed using an electromagnetic shielding material for the skeleton and openings such as windows and doorways so that the whole of the building is formed into an electromagnetic shielding structure. (author). 4 figs

  2. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  3. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  4. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  5. Magnetic shielding effect from multiple configurations of open-type magnetic shielding walls compared to solid plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was determined that a wall composed of aligned strips with gaps could achieve almost the same magnetic shielding effect as a conventional solid plate wall. This new shielding system is called the 'open-type magnetic shielding method.' This study reports the experimental results for the magnetic shielding effect of open-type magnetic shielding walls in comparison with conventional solid plates. The magnetic field generator of the experimental model is an approximately 1/15 scale reduced train system. The magnetic shielding structure is composed of a maximum of four walls around this train model. The magnetic flux density leakage from the structures was measured. In the case of multiple walls, the results show that the open-type magnetic shielding method has a little better shielding performance than the conventional method.

  6. Determination of shielding parameters for different types of concretes by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chose of a suitable concrete composition for a biological reactor shield remain as a research target up to now. In the present study the attempts has been made to estimate the influence of the concrete aggregates on the shielding parameters for three type of ordinary, serpentine and steel magnetite concrete by Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP ) transport code. MCNP calculations have been performed in order to obtain the leakage of neutrons, photons and electrons from dry shield. Also the mass attenuation coefficients and the liner attenuation coefficient are estimated for neutron and photon in those energies in range of actual energy which exist out of pressure vessel of power reactor in the cavity for the investigated concretes. The concrete densities ranged from 2.3 to 5.11 g/cm3. These calculations were done in the condition of a typical commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The results show that Steel-magnetite concrete, with high density (5.11 g/cm3) and constituents of relatively high atomic number, is an effective shield for both photons and neutrons

  7. Attenuation of X and Gamma Rays in Personal Radiation Shielding Protective Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovska, Michaela; Cerny, Radek; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    A collection of personal radiation shielding protective clothing, suitable for use in case of accidents in nuclear facilities or radiological emergency situations involving radioactive agents, was gathered and tested at the Nuclear Protection Department of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection, Czech Republic. Attenuating qualities of shielding layers in individual protective clothing were tested via spectra measurement of x and gamma rays, penetrating them. The rays originated from different radionuclide point sources, the gamma ray energies of which cover a broad energy range. The spectra were measured by handheld spectrometers, both scintillation and High Purity Germanium. Different narrow beam geometries were adjusted using a special testing bench and a set of various collimators. The main experimentally determined quantity for individual samples of personal radiation shielding protective clothing was x and gamma rays attenuation for significant energies of the spectra. The attenuation was assessed comparing net peak areas (after background subtraction) in spectra, where a tested sample was placed between the source and the detector, and corresponding net peak areas in spectra, measured without the sample. Mass attenuation coefficients, which describe attenuating qualities of shielding layers materials in individual samples, together with corresponding lead equivalents, were determined as well. Experimentally assessed mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were compared to the referred ones for individual heavy metals. PMID:26425983

  8. ANS shielding standards for light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the American Nuclear Society Standards Subcommittee, ANS-6, Radiation Protection and Shielding, is to develop standards for radiation protection and shield design, to provide shielding information to other standards-writing groups, and to develop standard reference shielding data and test problems. A total of seven published ANS-6 standards are now current. Additional projects of the subcommittee, now composed of nine working groups, include: standard reference data for multigroup cross sections, gamma-ray absorption coefficients and buildup factors, additional benchwork problems for shielding problems and energy spectrum unfolding, power plant zoning design for normal and accident conditions, process radiation monitors, and design for postaccident radiological conditions

  9. Shield Insertion to Minimize Noise Amplitude in Global Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana.A.B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shield insertion is an effective technique for minimise crosstalk noise and signal delay uncertainty .To reduce the effects of coupling uniform or simultaneous shielding may be used on either or both sides of a signal line. Shields are ground or power lines placed between two signal wires to prevent direct coupling between them as the shield width increases, the noise amplitude decreases, in this paper inserting a shield line between two coupled interconnects is shown to be more effective in reducing crosstalk noise for different technology nodes .

  10. Calculating tax shields from financial expenses with losses carried forward

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Velez Pareja

    2010-01-01

    When calculating the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC), the well-known textbook formula includes tax shields with the (1-T) factor affecting the contribution of debt to WACC. In this work we develop a procedure for properly calculating tax shields including the case when Losses Carried Forward are allowed and there is Other Income. The proper calculation of tax shields is relevant because the value of tax shields might be a substantial part of firm value. We show that tax shields depend...

  11. A study on the shielding mechanisms of SOI pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhigang; Ouyang, Qun; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In order to tackle the charge injection issue that had perplexed the counting type SOI pixel for years, two successive chips CPIXTEG3 and CPIXTEG3b were developed utilizing two shielding mechanisms, Nested-well and Double-SOI, in the LAPIS process. A TCAD simulation showed the shielding effectiveness influenced by the high sheet resistance of shielding layers. Test structures specially designed to measure the crosstalk associated to charge injection were implemented in CPIXTEG3/3b. Measurement results proved that using shielding layer is indispensable for counting type pixel and Double-SOI is superior to Nested-well in terms of shielding effectiveness and design flexibility.

  12. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Cox, Rachel E.; Calle, Carlos I.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  13. SHIELD II: VLA HI Spectral Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eojin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from low-resolution D-configuration VLA HI spectral line observations of 6 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from SDSS and WIYN. These data allow us to localize the HI gas and to study the bulk neutral gas kinematics.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  14. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  15. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  16. Symbolic math for computation of radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation transport calculations for shielding studies in the field of accelerator technology often involve intensive numerical computations. Traditionally, radiation transport equation is solved using finite difference scheme or advanced finite element method with respect to specific initial and boundary conditions suitable for the geometry of the problem. All these computations need CPU intensive computer codes for accurate calculation of scalar and angular fluxes. Computation using symbols of the analytical expression representing the transport equation as objects is an enhanced numerical technique in which the computation is completely algorithm and data oriented. Algorithm on the basis of symbolic math architecture is developed using Symbolic math toolbox of MATLAB software. Present paper describes the symbolic math algorithm and its application as a case study in which shielding calculation of rectangular slab geometry is studied for a line source of specific activity. Study of application of symbolic math in this domain evolves a new paradigm compared to the existing computer code such as DORT. (author)

  17. Grounding and shielding circuits and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Applies basic field behavior in circuit design and demonstrates how it relates to grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design This book connects the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory to the problems of interference in all types of electronic design. The text covers power distribution in facilities, mixing of analog and digital circuitry, circuit board layout at high clock rates, and meeting radiation and susceptibility standards. The author examines the grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design and applies basic physics to circuit behavior. The sixth edition of this book has been updated with new material added throughout the chapters where appropriate. The presentation of the book has also been rearranged in order to reflect the current trends in the field.

  18. HTS SQUID gradiometer for application without shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An HTS SQUID gradiometer consisting of a series gradiometer pickup loop in flip-chip configuration with a small washer SQUID is presented. The series gradiometer configuration is advantageous for applications without shielding because of the avoidance of circulating shielding currents in the pickup loop. With a 20 mm x 10 mm substrate for the pickup loop a large effective area of 1.25 mm2 and a gradiometer baseline of 9.6 mm are achieved. The balance of the gradiometer impaired by the washer read-out SQUID can significantly be enhanced by the weighted subtraction of a reference SQUID's signal. With this a balance of 5x104 is reached. The noise-limited magnetic field gradient resolution of the balanced SQUID gradiometer is 38 fT cm-1 Hz-1/2. (author)

  19. Benchmark calculation of CANDU end shielding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyuhong; Choi, Hangbok [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    A shielding analysis was performed for the end shield of CANDU 6 reactor. The one-dimensional discrete ordinate code ANISN with a 38-group neutron-gamma library, extracted from DLC-37D library, was used to estimate the dose rate for the natural uranium CANDU reactor. For comparison, MCNP-4B calculation was performed for the same system using continuous, discrete and multi-group libraries. The comparison has shown that the total dose rate of the ANISN calculation agrees well with that of the MCNP calculation. However, the individual dose rate (neutron and gamma) has shown opposite trends between ANISN and MCNP estimates, which may require a consistent library generation for both codes.

  20. Methodology of shielding calculation for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology of calculation that coupling a serie of computer codes in a net that make the possibility to calculate the radiation, neutron and gamma transport, is described, for deep penetration problems, typical of nuclear reactor shielding. This net of calculation begining with the generation of constant multigroups, for neutrons and gamma, by the AMPX system, coupled to ENDF/B-IV data library, the transport calculation of these radiations by ANISN, DOT 3.5 and Morse computer codes, up to the calculation of absorbed doses and/or equivalents buy SPACETRAN code. As examples of the calculation method, results from benchmark n0 6 of Shielding Benchmark Problems - ORNL - RSIC - 25, namely Neutron and Secondary Gamma Ray fluence transmitted through a Slab of Borated Polyethylene, are presented. (Author)

  1. Radioisotope Power System Facility shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of calculations for the Radioisotope Power System Facility have been performed. These analyses have determined the shielding required for storage, testing, and transport of 238Pu heat source modules using the Monte Carlo code MCNP3B. The source terms and the assumptions used have been verified by comparison of calculated dose rates with measured ones. This paper describes the methodology used for shielding designs and the utilization of available variance reduction techniques to improve the computational efficiency. The new version of MCNP (MCNP3B) with a repeated structure capability was used. It decreased the chance for computer model errors and greatly decreased the model setup time. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. In-Beam Background Suppression Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Santoro, V; DiJulio, D D; Ansell, S; Bentley, P M

    2015-01-01

    The long (3ms) proton pulse of the European Spallation Source (ESS) gives rise to unique and potentially high backgrounds for the instrument suite. In such a source an instrument capabilities will be limited by it's Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. The instruments with a direct view of the moderator, which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative to the background suppression. This shielding configuration has been worked into a beam line model using Geant4. We study particularly the advantages of single crystal sapphire and silicon blocks .

  3. Shielding performance of metal fiber composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; WU Bin; CHEN Ze-fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal fibers have been applied to construct composites with desirable electromagnetic interference shiel ding effectiveness and mechanical properties. Copper and stainless steel fibers were prepared with micro-saw fiberpulling combined cutting method. The cross section of the fibers is hook-like, which is beneficial to the improvement of bonding strength. Cement-based composites with copper and stainless steel fibers were fabricated and their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness was measured in the frequency range of 1 - 5 GHz. The results show that the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of those composites is enhanced by the addition of metal fibers,which functions mainly due to the absorption. At some frequencies, 20 dB or more difference is obtained between the materials with and without metal fibers.

  4. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  5. Shielding analyses of the IFMIF test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full 3-D shielding calculations of the IFMIF test cell were performed using a computational scheme for coupled Monte Carlo/deterministic transport calculations that enables the use of a detailed geometry model of the test cell in the Monte Carlo calculation and is suitable, at the same time, to handle the deep penetration transport through the thick surrounding concrete walls. Calculations for the test cell cover, which includes numerous penetrations through which neutrons stream, were performed by the Monte Carlo method. The results demonstrate that the dose rate limit for work personnel access to the access/maintenance room can be safely met during IFMIF operation assuming the test modules are surrounded by a horseshoe shield and the back heavy concrete wall is no less than 250 cm thick. No work personnel access to the room above the cover will be permitted during IFMIF operation due to the strong neutron streaming through the cover penetrations

  6. SINBAD: Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINBAD is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily retrieve and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity

  7. Adopting Number Sequences for Shielding Information

    OpenAIRE

    Mrs. Sandhya Maitra; Manish Bansal; Ms. Preety Gupta

    2014-01-01

    The advancement of technology and global communication networks puts up the question of safety of conveyed data and saved data over these media. Cryptography is the most efficient and feasible mode to transfer security services and also Cryptography is becoming effective tool in numerous applications for information security. This paper studies the shielding of information with the help of cryptographic function and number sequences. The efficiency of the given method is examined,...

  8. Deployable Debris Shields For Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Crews, Jeanne

    1993-01-01

    Multilayer shields made of lightweight sheet materials deployed from proposed Space Station Freedom for additional protection against orbiting debris. Deployment mechanism attached at each location on exterior where extra protection needed. Equipment withdraws layer of material from storage in manner similar to unfurling sail or extending window shade. Number of layers deployed depends on required degree of protection, and could be as large as five.

  9. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls

  10. Shielding calculations for the antiproton target area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations performed in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab antiproton target hall are summarized. The following radiological considerations were examined: soil activation, residual activity of components, and beam-on radiation. In addition, at the request of the designers, the energy deposition in the proposed graphite beam dump was examined for several targeting conditions in order to qualitatively determine its ability to survive

  11. Hypervelocity impact simulations of Whipple shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segletes, Steven B.; Zukas, Jonas A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem associated with protecting space vehicles from space debris impact is described. Numerical simulation is espoused as a useful complement to experimentation: as a means to help understand and describe the hypervelocity impact phenomena. The capabilities of a PC-based hydrocode, ZeuS, are described, for application to the problem of hypervelocity impact. Finally, results of ZeuS simulations, as applied to the problem of bumper shield impact, are presented and compared with experimental results.

  12. Spallation Neutron Source Radiation Shielding Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes results of Spallation Neutron Source calculations to estimate radiation hazards and shielding requirements for activated Mercury, target components, target cooling water, and 7Be plateout. Dose rates in the accelerator tunnel from activation of magnets and concrete were investigated. The impact of gaps and other streaming paths on the radiation environment inside the test cell during operation and after shutdown were also assessed

  13. Shielding design for ETOILE hadron therapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ion Beam Applications Company is developing a compact superconducting cyclotron for hadron therapy able to deliver various ion beams with an energy of 400 MeV per nucleon and proton beams with an energy of 260 MeV. This system is being proposed to equip ETOILE hadron therapy centre in Lyon. Shielding design based on PHITS and MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation codes is presented, together with some performance figures for the energy degrader. (authors)

  14. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  15. SINBAD: Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Roussin, R.W. [and others

    1996-04-01

    SINBAD is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily retrieve and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity.

  16. Overview of CSEWG shielding benchmark problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerker, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental philosophy behind the choosing of CSEWG shielding benchmarks is that the accuracy of a certain range of cross section data be adequately tested. The benchmarks, therefore, consist of measurements and calculations of these measurements. Calculations for which there are no measurements provide little information on the adequacy of the data, although they can perhaps indicate the sensitivity of results to variations in data.

  17. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  18. Shielding benchmark test of JENDL-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, M. (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)); Hasegawa, A.; Ueki, K. (and others)

    1990-02-01

    The integral test of JENDL-3 for shielding application was made on a cross sections of carbon, sodium and iron by analyzing the various shielding benchmark experiments: Broomstick experiments at ORNL for iron and sodium, neutron transmission experiments for sodium at ORNL, iron and carbon, ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, measurements of leakage spectrum from iron spheres at KfK, angular neutron spectrum measurements in graphite block at RPI. Analyses were made with radiation transport codes ANISN (1D, Sn), DIAC (1D, Sn), DOT-3.5 (2D, Sn) and MCNP (3D, point Monte Carlo). It was observed that revising JENDL-3T iron data resulted in an improvement in reproducing the experimental data, particularly in the MeV neutron energy region. For sodium, JENDL-3 gave better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV. For carbon, JENDL-3 gave better agreement, compared to ENDF/B-IV. The conclusion is that JENDL-3 is highly applicable to the reactor shielding analyses. (author).

  19. Active Muon Shield - Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, Victoria; Rawlings, T

    2015-01-01

    This report summarises the initial design study which was carried out for the SHiP magnetic muon shield – which is proposed to consist of a 40m beamline of seven magnets generating a 1.8T By field over defined cross-section. This is intended to sweep unwanted muons off the beamline to prevent them reaching the detector. The magnetic shield is an alternative to a passive tungsten shield. This work was carried out in three sections. Initially the magnets were considered in isolation to establish whether they were theoretically feasible to build and the impact of the iron yoke shape and material was considered. Next the beamline was considered as a whole; this included issues such as the impact of neighbouring magnets and the hadrons stopper, and also building a model of the complete beamline whose magnetic fields could be exported for use in particle modelling. Finally, some consideration was given to the manufacture and operational issues, including costs.

  20. Shielded electron microprobe analyzer for plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, construction and performance test of a shielded electron microprobe analyzer for plutonium fuel are described. In the analyzer, the following modifications were made to Shimadzu ASM-SX (analyzer): (1) a shield of tungsten alloy is incorporated between the sample and the X-ray detector to examine highly radioactive fuel, (2) a magnetic shield against β-rays from the fuel is fitted to the electron detector, (3) a small sample-loading glove box is installed to transfer plutonium fuel safely to the analyzer, (4) a glove box containing a sample-surface treatment apparatus and a balance is connected to the sample-loading glove box, (5) for maintenance and repair of the analyzer by means of closed method, about thirty modifications are made. The performance test with nonradioactive materials showed that despite the above modifications, abilities of the original analyzer are all retained. And furthermore, the simulation test for irradiated fuel with 226Ra of dose rate 40 mR/hr at 30 cm showed that the X-ray peaks to noise ratios are unchanged by using a pulse height selector of the X-ray detector. (author)

  1. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 300 S, 2460 W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation. 9 references

  2. Development of flexible neutron-shielding resin as an additional shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soft-type neutron-shielding resin has been developed by improving an existing hard-type neutron-shielding material using the epoxy-based resin as an additional shielding material. A flexible heat-resistant neutron-shielding material has been developed, which consists of a new polymer-based resin with boron. The neutron shielding performance of the developed flexible heat-resistant resin with the 252Cf neutron source is almost the same as that of polyethylene. The outgases of H, H2, NH4, H2O, CO, O2, C4H10, and CO2 from the developed resin have been measured at high temperature (up to 250degC) by thermal desorption spectroscopy methods. The soft-type resin and the newly developed heat-resistant resin will be applied to prevent the effects of neutron streaming and to control the movement of a vibrated pipe as the seal material around the plumbing in the future fast reactor and innovative fission reactor. (author)

  3. Photon attenuation characteristics of radiation shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design and construction of installation housing high intensity radiation sources and other radiation generating equipment, a variety of shielding materials are used to minimise exposure to individual. Among the materials, lead is best known for radiation shielding characteristics due to their high density and atomic number. Commercial and barium enriched cement, apart from better compressive strength, smoother surface finish and high abrasion resistance, offers adequate shielding to gamma radiations. Although photon attenuation data are available in literature, it is necessary to test these commercially available material experimentally for their radiation shielding efficiency before putting them in to regular use. In the present work, attenuation characteristics of lead. commercial cement and barium enriched cement supplied by a manufacturing firm have been studied for photons of 662 and 1250keV from Cs-137 and Co-60. The radiographic sources of Cs-137 and Co-60 of radioactive strength of 260 and 30 mCi respectively were utilised in the present investigation. Experimental measurements were done with gamma radiography survey meter MR 4500A placed at a distance of 2 meters from the source. Attenuation coefficients for photons in commercial cement, barite and lead were determined experimentally through photon transmission measurements performed under broad beam counting geometry. The absorbers used were in form of thin sheets of lead, commercial cements and barite of uniform thicknesses. These thin sheets were weighed accurately on an analytical balance and from their measured area, thicknesses proportional to area density in gram.cm-2 were determined. The average thickness of each absorber varied from a few milligram to several gram per cm-2. Higher thicknesses were obtained by stacking the absorbers with each other. Each absorber of specified thickness was interposed between the source and detector such that the primary beam is incident normally on its

  4. Shielding Contributions of Mono-Energetic Source Neutrons Attenuated by Most Common Shielding Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of neutron fluxes and dose rates of plane mono-energetic source neutrons attenuated by most common shielding materials have been carried out in this work by using two methods; ANISN computer codes (VAX version) and the three group method. The attenuation behaviour of neutron from thermal energies up to 14.9 MeV in finite and infinite shield of water, paraffin wax, ordinary concrete, graphite, iron and lead were examined by the two methods at deep penetrations. The obtained results in both cases were compared with some available data. Almost all the earlier works were concerned with the study of finite thickness (from 5 to 100 cm)of the shielding made from the local materials beside water and iron, but the present work is concerned with the study of previous materials besides paraffin, lead and graphite. Moreover, the thicknesses studied here are from 30 to 500 cm for all the above mentioned materials

  5. Shielding calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed, one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and wall of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m is sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/D-T pulse

  6. Re-evaluation of the shielding adequacy of the brachytherapy treatment room at Korle-Bu teaching hospital, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staff and the general public's safety during the operation of the 137Cs brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching hospital depends on the adequacy of the shielding of the facility. Shielding design of the brachytherapy unit at the hospital was based on postulated workload and postulated occupancy factors to critical locations at the facility where the public and staff may occupy. This facility has been in existence for the past twelve (12) years and has accumulated operational workload data which differs from the postulated one. A study was carried out to re-evaluate the integrity of the biological shielding of the 137Cs brachytherapy unit. This study analyzed the accumulated workload data and used the information to perform shielding calculations to verify the adequacy of the biological shielding thicknesses to provide sufficient protection of staff and the public. Dose rate calculations were verified by measurements with calibrated dose rate meters. This provided the basis for determining the current state of protection and safety for staff and the general public. The results show that despite the variation in actual and postulated workloads, the dose rates were below the reference values of 0.5μSv/h for public areas and 7.5μSv/h for controlled areas. It was confirmed that the present shielding thickness of 535 mm can accommodate a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source with activity in the range 370 - 570 GBq with an operational workload of 30 patients per week and an average treatment time of 10 minutes.

  7. Critical Dimensionless Shields Values for Bankfull Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    The critical dimensionless shear stress τ*c (depicted in the Shields curve as a function of the Reynolds particle number Rep) quantifies the slope - flow depth product at which particles from a relatively well-sorted bed with a mean particle size Dm visually start to move. Contrary to many applications of the Shields curve, τ*c was not designed to predict the bed particle size becoming mobile at bankfull flow. This study sketches a bankfull and a critical bankfull Shields-type curve needed to predict the bankfull mobile particle size. Most studies on bedmaterial entrainment are performed in streams that are wadeable at low flow, but exceed wadeability around bankfull flow. Within the bounds of these stream dimensions, the study drafts a relationship of τ*bf versus Rep (bankfull Shields curve) for a sequence of stream types (in sensu Montgomery and Buffington 1997) ranging from steep cobble headwater streams to plane-bed and pool-riffle gravel-beds to low gradient valley streams with sand and silt beds. Probable values of stream gradient, bed D50 size, and a (roughness corrected) hydraulic radius can be assigned to each stream type. The resulting bankfull curve takes values of τ*bf near 10 for silt and 1 for sand-bedded streams, drops to around 0.05 - 0.02 for mobile gravel-bed streams and then increases towards 0.1 and 0.2 for the steepest streams. Transforming τ*bf into the critical bankfull curve τ*cbf from which to predict the bankfull entrainable particle size requires information on the bedload particle size that becomes mobile at bankfull flow. To estimate τ*cbf over a variety of coarse gravel- and cobble-bed mountain streams, the authors used flow competence curves measured with bedload traps at 10 sites. Bedload traps have a 0.3 m by 0.2 m opening, and 1-1.6 m long trailing net with a 4 mm mesh; mounting traps onto ground plates anchored to the stream bottom permits 1-hr sampling times; 4 to 6 traps are typically installed across the stream width

  8. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author)

  9. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Masayoshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Hasegawa, Akira; Ueki, Kohtaro; Yamano, Naoki; Sasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Morio; Ohtani, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1994-03-01

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author).

  10. Structural Monitoring of Metro Infrastructure during Shield Tunneling Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  11. Development of neutron shielding material using metathesis-polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron shielding material using a metathesis-polymer matrix, which is a thermosetting resin, was developed. This shielding material has characteristics that can be controlled for different mixing ratios of neutron absorbers and for formation in the laboratory. Additionally, the elastic modulus can be changed at the hardening process, from a flexible elastoma to a mechanically tough solid. Experiments were performed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor in order to determine the important characteristics of this metathesis-polymer shielding material, such as neutron shielding performance, secondary gamma-ray generation and activation. The metathesis-polymer shielding material was shown to be practical and as effective as the other available shielding materials, which mainly consist of thermoplastic resin

  12. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T. [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Textile Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Üncü, I. S. [Suleyman Demirel University, Technological Fac. Electrical-Electronic Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Kılıncarslan, S., E-mail: seref@tef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Civil Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Akkurt, I. [Suleyman Demirel University, Art and Science Fac., Physics Dep., Isparta (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  13. RADSHI: shielding calculation program for different geometries sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code written in pascal language for IBM/Pc is described. The program calculates the optimum thickness of slab shield for different geometries sources. The Point Kernel Method is employed, which enables the obtention of the ionizing radiation flux density. The calculation takes into account the possibility of self-absorption in the source. The air kerma rate for gamma radiation is determined, and with the concept of attenuation length through the equivalent attenuation length the shield is obtained. The scattering and the exponential attenuation inside the shield material is considered in the program. The shield materials can be: concrete, water, iron or lead. It also calculates the shield for point isotropic neutron source, using as shield materials paraffin, concrete or water. (authors). 13 refs

  14. Radiation shielding analysis for conceptual design of HIC transport package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Ltd., Co.) is developing a HIC transport package which is satisfying domestic and IAEA regulations and NETEC(Nuclear Environment Technology Institute) is conducting a conceptual design. In this study, the shielding thickness was calculated using the data from radionuclide assay program which is currently using in nuclear sites and Micro Shield code. Considering the structural safety, carbon steel was chosen as shielding material and the shielding thickness was calculated for 500 R/hr and 100 R/hr at HIC surface, respectively. Through the shielding analysis, it was evaluated that the regulation limit is satisfied when the shielding thickness is 22 cm for 500 R/hr and 17 cm for 100/hr

  15. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained

  16. Cross Section Evaluation Group shielding benchmark compilation. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    At the time of the release of ENDF/B-IV in 1974, the Shielding Subcommittee had identified a series of 12 shielding data testing benchmarks (the SDT series). Most were used in the ENDF/B-IV data testing effort. A new concept and series was begun in the interim, the so-called Shielding Benchmark (SB) series. An effort was made to upgrade the SDT series as far as possible and to add new SB benchmarks. In order to be designated in the SB class, both an experiment and analysis must have been performed. The current recommended benchmark for Shielding Data Testing are listed. Until recently, the philosophy has been to include only citations to published references for shielding benchmarks. It is now our intention to provide adequate information in this volume for proper analysis of any new benchmarks added to the collection. These compilations appear in Section II, with the SB5 Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark as the first entry.

  17. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  18. Shield design development of nuclear propulsion merchant ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding design both in Japan and abroad for nuclear propulsion merchant ships is explained, with emphasis on the various technological problems having occurred in the shield design for one-body type and separate type LWRs as conceptual design. The following matters are described: the peculiarities of the design as compared with the case of land-based nuclear reactors, problems in the design standards of shielding, the present status and development of the design methods, and the instances of the design; thereby, the trends of shielding design are disclosed. The following matters are pointed out: Importance of the optimum design, of shielding, significance of radiation streaming through large voids, activation of the secondary water in built-in type steam generators, and the need of the guides for shield design. (Mori, K.)

  19. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 10$^{7}$~K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  20. ORNL fusion reactor shielding integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integral experiments that measure the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra resulting from the attenuation of approx. 14 MeV T(D,n) 4He reaction neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and a tungsten alloy (Hevimet) and from neutrons streaming through a 30-cm-diameter iron duct (L/D = 3) imbedded in a concrete shield have been performed. The facility, the NE-213 liquid scintillator detector system, and the experimental techniques used to obtain the measured data are described. The two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport codes, calculational models, and nuclear data used in the analysis of the experiments are reviewed

  1. Radiation-Shielding Polymer/Soil Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed to fabricate polymer/ soil composites primarily from extraterrestrial resources, using relatively low-energy processes, with the original intended application being that habitat structures constructed from such composites would have sufficient structural integrity and also provide adequate radiation shielding for humans and sensitive electronic equipment against the radiation environment on the Moon and Mars. The proposal is a response to the fact that it would be much less expensive to fabricate such structures in situ as opposed to transporting them from Earth.

  2. Near zero magnetic fields with superconducting shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's original motivation for developing the ultra low magnetic shielding was for an experiment to precisely determine h/me using rotating superconducting rings. The author first used the technique for precise magnetic charge measurements of the niobium sphere fractional electrical charge candidates from the Fairbank--Hebard--LaRue--Phillips experiments. A brief description of the technique is presented, together with a summary of work on absolute magnetometry using SQUID sensors and its application to the design of other instruments which use the ultra low field environment. Prospects for future improvements are discussed

  3. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O; Nelson, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness $\\ell$ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter $\

  4. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  6. X-ray shielding considerations in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammography is the imaging of the breast used for the diagnosis of the breast cancer or in other conditions. Most mammography installations, due to the unit's low energy do not require wall shielding in addition to the conventional 12 cm brick of density 1.6 gm/cc. However, this does not mean that the mammography, unit can be installed along with other medical units without any radiation safety consideration to staff and public. The patient workload sometimes may be of the order of 1000 mA-min/week. It is therefore, important to take into account, the staff and public protection issues in a mammography installation

  7. Two dimensional shielding benchmark analysis for sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the analysis of a shielding benchmark experiment on 'fast reactor source' neutron transport through 1.8 metres of sodium is presented in this paper. The two dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and DLC 37 coupled neutron-gamma multigroup cross sections were used in the analyses. These calculations are compared with measurements on: (i) neutron spectral distribution given by activation detector response, and (ii) gamma ray doses. The agreement is found to be within ± 30 per cent in the fast spectrum region, and within a factor 3.5 in thermal region. For gammas these calculations overpredict the dose rate by a factor of four. (author)

  8. Boron-containing neutron shielding building ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data are presented on the composition of raw materials as well as on the properties and chemical composition of finished products of ceramics intended for neutron shielding. It is shown that 0.8 % content of B2O3 in bricks of ceramic mass proposed halves neutron radiation from the source of 106 neutr·s-1 close rate compared to bricks of boron free ceramic mass. Results of tests on water absorption and compression strength make it possible to recommend new ceramics to be used as tiles and facade building materials

  9. Studies of magnetic shielding for phototubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S.; Dickey, J.; Dzierba, A.; Gohn, W.; Heinz, R.; Howell, D.; Mikels, M.; O'Neill, D.; Samoylenko, V.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.; Teige, S.

    2004-11-01

    Phototubes associated with a Cherenkov counter, with a wall of scintillation counters for time-of-flight measurements and with a wall of lead glass blocks of an electro-magnetic calorimeter will operate in the fringe field of a superconducting solenoid in the GlueX experiment. The solenoid will be operated with a central magnetic field of ≈ 2.5 T. The maximum fringe field in the vicinity of the phototubes will be approximately 150 G. Various techniques for magnetic shielding of phototubes were studied using a 1-m diameter Helmholtz coil arrangement operated with a maximum central field of 200 G. Results are presented.

  10. Studies of magnetic shielding for phototubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phototubes associated with a Cherenkov counter, with a wall of scintillation counters for time-of-flight measurements and with a wall of lead glass blocks of an electro-magnetic calorimeter will operate in the fringe field of a superconducting solenoid in the GlueX experiment. The solenoid will be operated with a central magnetic field of ∼2.5T. The maximum fringe field in the vicinity of the phototubes will be approximately 150G. Various techniques for magnetic shielding of phototubes were studied using a 1-m diameter Helmholtz coil arrangement operated with a maximum central field of 200G. Results are presented

  11. Inner Shielding of the COMET Cosmic Veto System

    OpenAIRE

    Markin, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A simulation of neutrons traversing a shield beneath the COMET scintillator strip cosmic-veto counter is accomplished using the Geant4 toolkit. A Geant4 application is written with an appropriate detector construction and a possible spectrum of neutron's energy. The response of scintillator strips to neutrons is studied in detail. A design of the shield is optimized to ensure the time loss concerned with fake veto signals caused by neutrons from muon captures is tolerable. Materials of shield...

  12. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  13. Methods and procedures for shielding analyses for the SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations are presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well. (author)

  14. A study on the shielding mechanisms of SOI pixel detector

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yunpeng; Liu, Yi; Wu, Zhigang; Ouyang, Qun; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In order to tackle the charge injection issue that had perplexed the counting type SOI pixel for years, two successive chips CPIXTEG3 and CPIXTEG3b were developed utilizing two shielding mechanisms, Nested-well and Double-SOI, in the LAPIS process. A TCAD simulation showed the shielding effectiveness influenced by the high sheet resistance of shielding layers. Test structures specially designed to measure the crosstalk associated to charge injection were implemented in CPIXTEG3/3b. Measuremen...

  15. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, Robert D. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  16. Using natural local materials for developing special radiation shielding concretes, and deduction of its shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete is considered as the most important material to be used for radiation shielding in facilities contain radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the construction of the concrete, which is highly relative to the composing aggregates i.e. aggregates consist about 70 - 80% of the total weight of normal concrete. In this project tow types of concrete used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) had been studied and their shielding properties were defined for gamma ray from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, and for neutrons from Am-Be source. About 10% reduction in HVL was found in the comparison between the tow concrete types for both neutrons and gammas. Some other types of concrete were studied using aggregates from different regions in Syria, to improve the shielding properties of concrete, and another 10% of reduction was achieved in comparison with Damascene concrete (20% in comparison with the concrete from Aleppo) for both neutrons and gamma rays. (author)

  17. Revised neutral gas shielding model for pellet ablation - combined neutral and plasma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablation and penetration of pellets in early ORMAK and ISX-A experiments were reliably predicted by the neutral gas shielding model of Milora and Foster. These experiments demonstrated that the principle components of the model - a self-generated shield which reduces the heat flux at the plasma surface - were correct. In more recent experiments with higher temperature plasmas, this model consistently predicts greater penetration than observed in the experiments. Upgarding known limitations of the original model brings the predicted and observed penetration values into agreement. These improvements include: (1) treating the incident electrons as having distribution in energy rather than being monoenergetic; (2) including the shielding effects of cold, dense plasma extending along the magnetic field outside the neutral shield; and (3) modifying the finite plasma, self-limiting incident heat flux so that it represents a collisionless plasma limit rather than a collisional limit. Comparisons are made between the models for a selection of ISX-B Alcator-C, and TFTR shots. The net effect of the changes in the model is an increase in pellet ablation rates and decrease in penetration for current and future experiments

  18. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the Oppenheim Electrical Networkmethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  19. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  20. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  1. Thermal top shield for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed is a thermal top shield for gas-cooled nuclear reactors which together with the thermal side and bottom shield forms an almost gas-tight room for taking up the core structure and which protects the top of the concrete vessel sufficiently against overheating. The thermal top shield consists of top shield elements put closely together, which are made of at least two horizontal metal layers and at least one moderator layer located between the metal layers and which are fixed to the top liner by means of drawbars. (orig.)

  2. Effects of realistic satellite shielding on SEE rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic models of satellite shielding have been used to calculate SEE rates for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and solar flare protons. The results are compared with those obtained with a nominal 0.1 inch spherical shield. The rates for GCR (solar minimum) are systematically lower than those calculated with the nominal shield. The ratio of rates is greater than 75% for lightly shielded devices, but may be as high as a factor of two where there is shielding by other circuit boards. A more nearly realistic estimate of the rates would be obtained with a spherical shield with a thickness of at least 0.4 inches (3 gm/cm2) for the typical satellites considered. The calculation of the SEE rate due to protons was reformulated to expedite shielding calculations. When the method was applied to the 93L422 RAM for various flare spectra, it was apparent that shielding has a first order effect on rate predictions. The calculated flare upset rates for the TDRS satellite were within 20% of the observed rates. A spherical shield of thickness 0.3 inches (2 gm/cm2) would reproduce the rates. The method was also applied to a trapped proton environment predicted from standard models for CRRES. The predicted rate was consistent with the uncertainties of the environment

  3. Shielding of the contralateral breast during tangential irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Miller, Michael; Laronga, Christine; Oliver, Shelly; Wong, Ping

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate both optimal and practical contralateral breast shielding during tangential irradiation in young patients. A shaped sheet of variable thickness of lead was tested on a phantom with rubber breasts, and an optimized shield was created. Testing on 18 consecutive patients 50 years or younger showed shielding consistently reduced contralateral breast dose to at least half, with small additional reduction after removal of the medial wedge. For younger patients in whom radiation exposure is of considerable concern, a simple shield of 2 mm lead thickness proved practical and effective. PMID:15289741

  4. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  5. Investigation of shielding analysis method for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been made, at the shielding laboratory, into the status of shielding analysis method for fusion reactor based on conceptual designs of a variety of fusion power reactors and fusion experimental facilities, in cooperation with the Fusion Reactor Shielding Working Group in the Research Committee on Fast Neutron Shielding of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The reactors and facilities considered are CULHAM MKII(U.K), SPTR (Japan), TFTR(U.S.A.), STARFIRE(U.S.A.) and INTOR-USA(U.S.A.). (author)

  6. Multifunctional B/C Fiber Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding is an enabling technology required for extended manned missions to the Moon, Mars and the planets beyond. Multifunctional structural must...

  7. Measurement of Neutron Tissue Dose Outside the Reactor Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermediate neutrons form an important part of the neutron-tissue dose outside the reactor shielding. Equipment developed in the RUS series makes it possible to measure the flux and the tissue dose rate of intermediate neutrons. In experiments on the 1RT-1000 reactor the neutron-dose composition was studied and it was shown that this depends greatly on the composition of the shielding. It was found that the neutron-tissue dose calculated from data obtained by means of RPN-1 apparatus is in reality too low by a factor of up to 1.5 for water shielding and 5 for concrete shielding. (author)

  8. Polyolefin-Nanocrystal Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — EIC Laboratories Inc. is proposing a lightweight multifunctional polymer/nanoparticle composite for radiation shielding during long-duration lunar missions....

  9. 14-MeV neutron streaming through shield gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to determine the neutron streaming through straight and single-bend gaps for three different shield thicknesses. A uniform plane source emitting 14-MeV neutrons with a cosine angular distribution was used in the analyses. The results obtained are discussed in terms of how they might be used in the early stages of a shield design to obtain approximate solutions to design questions. These results have direct implications regarding neutron-streaming problems that will be encountered in the shielding analyses of tokamak fusion reactors which are constructed from pie-shaped shield/vacuum chamber segments

  10. Aircraft shielding experiments at general dynamics Fort Worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Aircraft Research Facility was established by Convair, Fort Worth, in 1950 under U.S. Air Force auspices to support the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program in the areas of shielding and radiation effects problems affecting the airframe. The company subsequently became General Dynamics, Fort Worth. In 1954, an experimental shielding program was developed by B.P. Leonard and N.M. Schaeffer that incorporated air, ground, and structure scattering experiments with three sources: a large Co source, the gorund test reactor (GTR), and finally, the aircraft shield test reactor (ASTR). Shield penetration measurements were also planned with the GTR. Principal elements of this program are summarized in the paper

  11. Neutron shielding calculation for VVER NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two methods for neutron transport (shielding) calculation used in Energoproject, Prague, the method of discrete ordinates (code TORT-DORT) and the Monte Carlo method (codes MCNP and module within the code SCALE). The task concerning neutron dose rates calculation near casks with VVER spent fuel are presented as an example. Measured neutron dose rates of real loaded C-30 casks for VVER spent fuel assemblies are compared with calculated values in the frame of the international benchmark calculation task. A part of the task realized by the Atomic Energy Research (AER) organization concerning neutron shielding is calculated. The cask C-30 is used in Slovak Jaslovske Bohunice NPP for transport of spent fuel assemblies to the storage facility. The benchmark task has been calculated by the two-dimensional code DORT originated from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The code solves transport problems using the method of discrete ordinates (SN - method). Calculated neutron dose rates in azimuth and vertical directions show good agreement with the experiment within the range of the measurement errors. In comparison with the other codes the results of DORT are approximately 20% lower. There have been analysed differences between one- and two- dimensional approach and influence of the flux-to-dose rate conversion factors set

  12. The AA disappearing under concrete shielding

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    When the AA started up in July 1980, the machine stood freely in its hall, providing visitors with a view through the large window in the AA Control Room. The target area, in which the high-intensity 26 GeV/c proton beam from the PS hit the production target, was heavily shielded, not only towards the outside but also towards the AA-Hall. However, electrons and pions emanating from the target with the same momentum as the antiprotons, but much more numerous, accompanied these through the injection line into the AA ring. The pions decayed with a half-time corresponding to approximately a revolution period (540 ns), whereas the electrons lost energy through synchrotron radiation and ended up on the vacuum chamber wall. Electrons and pions produced the dominant component of the radiation level in the hall and the control room. With operation times far exceeding original expectations, the AA had to be buried under concrete shielding in order to reduce the radiation level by an order of magnitude.

  13. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  14. A superconducting shield to protect astronauts

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Superconductors team in the Technology department is involved in the European Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) project, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using superconducting magnetic shielding technology to protect astronauts from cosmic radiation in the space environment. The material that will be used in the superconductor coils on which the project is working is magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor developed in the form of wire for CERN for the LHC High Luminosity Cold Powering project.   Image: K. Anthony/CERN. Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it wi...

  15. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we present new results of detailed kinematic analyses of these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (˜300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we produce velocity fields and dispersion maps using different spatial and spectral resolution representations of the data in order to attempt derivation of an inclination-corrected rotation curve. While both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make multiple position-velocity cuts across each galaxy to determine the maximum circular rotation velocity (≤ 30 km-1 for the survey population). Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are contextualized on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  16. Earth pressure balance control for EPB shield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly deals with the critical technology of earth pressure balance (EPB) control in shield tunneling. On the assumption that the conditioned soil in the working chamber of the shield is plasticized, a theoretical principle for EPB control is proposed. Dynamic equilibrium of intake volume and discharge volume generated by thrust and discharge is modeled theoretically to simulate the earth pressure variation during excavating. The thrust system and the screw conveyor system for earth pressure control are developed based on the electro-hydraulic technique. The control models of the thrust speed regulation of the cylinders and the rotating speed adjustment of the screw conveyor are also presented. Simulation for earth pressure control is conducted with software AMESim and MATLAB/Simulink to verify the models. Experiments are carried out with intake control in clay soil and discharge control in sandy gravel section, respectively. The experimental results show that the earth pressure variations in the working chamber can be kept at the expected value with a practically acceptable precision by means of real-time tuning the thrust speed or the revolving speed of discharge system.

  17. Oxidative shielding and the cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jonathan D; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Stott, Iain; Cant, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction and lifespan are constrained by trade-offs which prevent their simultaneous increase. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that this cost of reproduction is mediated by oxidative stress. However, empirical tests of this theory have yielded equivocal support. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine associations between reproduction and oxidative damage across markers and tissues. We show that oxidative damage is positively associated with reproductive effort across females of various species. Yet paradoxically, categorical comparisons of breeders versus non-breeders reveal that transition to the reproductive state is associated with a step-change reduction in oxidative damage in certain tissues and markers. Developing offspring may be particularly sensitive to harm caused by oxidative damage in mothers. Therefore, such reductions could potentially function to shield reproducing mothers, gametes and developing offspring from oxidative insults that inevitably increase as a consequence of reproductive effort. According to this perspective, we hypothesise that the cost of reproduction is mediated by dual impacts of maternally-derived oxidative damage on mothers and offspring, and that mothers may be selected to diminish such damage. Such oxidative shielding may explain why many existing studies have concluded that reproduction has little or no oxidative cost. Future advance in life-history theory therefore needs to take account of potential transgenerational impacts of the mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. PMID:25765468

  18. Shielding analysis of the advanced voloxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W.; Shin, J. M.; Park, G. I.; Song, K. C

    2008-09-15

    This report deals describes how much a shielding benefit can be obtained by the Advanced Voloxidation process. The calculation was performed with the MCNPX code and a simple problem was modeled with a spent fuel source which was surrounded by a concrete wall. The source terms were estimated with the ORIGEN-ARP code and the gamma spectrum and the neutron spectrum were also obtained. The thickness of the concrete wall was estimated before and after the voloxidation process. From the results, the gamma spectrum after the voloxidation process was estimated as a 67% reduction compared with that of before the voloxidation process due to the removal of several gamma emission elements such as cesium and rubidium. The MCNPX calculations provided that the thickness of the general concrete wall could be reduced by 12% after the voloxidation process. And the heavy concrete wall provided a 28% reduction in the shielding of the source term after the voloxidation process. This can be explained in that there lots of gamma emission isotopes still exist after the advanced voloxidation process such as Pu-241, Y-90, and Sr-90 which are independent of the voloxidation process.

  19. Concrete enclosure to shield a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagrana M, L. E.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Soto B, T. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: emmanuelvillagrana@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the aim to design a shielding for a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source several Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using MCNP5 code. First, a point-like source was modeled in vacuum and the neutron spectrum and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated at several distances ranging from 5 up to 150 cm, these calculations were repeated including air, and a 1 x 1 x 1 m{sup 3} enclosure that was shielded with 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50 and 80 cm-thick Portland type concrete walls. At all the points located inside the enclosure neutron spectra from 10{sup -8} up 0.5 MeV were the same regardless the distance from the source showing the room-return effect, for energies larger than 0.5 MeV neutron spectra are diminished as the distance increases. Outside the enclosure it was noticed that neutron spectra becomes -softer- as the concrete thickness increases due to reduction of mean neutron energy. With the ambient dose values the attenuation curve in terms of concrete thickness was calculated. (Author)

  20. Development of spatially dependent resonance shielding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new spatially dependent resonance self-shielding method (SDDM: Spatially Dependent Dancoff Method) was developed based on the generalization of the conventional Dancoff method to multi-regions in a fuel pellet based on the Stoker/Weiss technique. SDDM correctly accounts for radial power distribution within fuel rods in a fuel assembly. SDDM is fully consistent with the conventional method if the pellet is not sub-divided. It also has the advantage of being less computing time consuming when compared to more rigorous resonance shielding method such as sub-group and special fine energy mesh methods. Moreover, it can be installed easily into the lattice physics code widely used in commercial LWR design. To validate the method, spatial concentration of isotopes and burnup distribution within a rod are evaluated using SDDM and the results are compared to the destructive measurement data. From the comparison, it is concluded that the spatially dependent Dancoff method, SDDM, is appropriate for generating the effective cross-sections in the fuel rings. (author)

  1. Deep saline groundwater within the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwaters have been sampled from depths greater than 1000 m within the Canadian Shield. The samples were obtained from boreholes in mines and from test drilling programs carried out as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. At the depths explored, water is found in fractures, shear zones and similar structural features. The salinity of the water is frequently very high, with total dissolved solids often exceeding 200 g.L-1. These saline waters can be classified as Ca-Na-Cl brines. Isotopic analyses for 2H and 18O show that these fluids are not modern, local meteoric waters which dissolve salts in sedimentary, metasedimentary or metamorphic rocks. The chemical and isotopic data suggest that all saline waters analyzed to date have a similar origin. This source is not well-understood but could be highly modified Paleozoic seawater, residual metamorphic fluids, or less likely, groundwaters that have been in contact with the rocks in the Canadian Shield for millions of years. In all cases the fluids appear to have been isolated from the biosphere for geological time periods. The existence of these highly saline fluids influences the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program in several areas. A major concern is the corrosion resistance of the radioactive waste containers. Saline waters may also influence the buffer and backfill and vault sealing materials, the rock mass and the waste form itself, although the effects may not always be deleterious. Corrosion of underground test equipment during the geoscience research phase is also a concern

  2. System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi 57Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% 240Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures

  3. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  4. Deoxyribonucleic acid-Ag nanoparticles for EMI Shielding: the effect of nanoparticle size, shape and distribution on the shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchen, Fahima; Wilson, Benjamin G.; Yaney, Perry P.; Salour, Michael M.; Grote, James G.

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the use of silver based nanoparticle as fillers in DNA host materials to form nancomposites for applications in Electro-Magnetic Interferences (EMI) shielding. For relatively low-conductivity EMI shielding nanocomposites, silver-oxide coated cenospheres are investigated as fillers. The filler loadings are varied to determine a percolation threshold for the desired low conductivity and shielding effectiveness. Microwave absorption as well as DC surface resistivity measurements are undertaken to characterize the obtained films.

  5. Guidebook on radiation shielding safety for nuclear fuel facilities Q and A volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Q and A volume of 'Guidebook on Radiation Shielding Safety for Nuclear Fuel Facilities' describes questions and answers which are commonly raised by the novices of shielding design and shielding safety evaluation. In this report, there are about 40 sets of Q and A which are classified by 7 different subjects, namely, (1) outlines of shielding, (2) methodology of shielding design, (3) shielding materials, (4) bulk shielding, (5) streaming, (6) skyshine, and (7) certification of shielding performance. The draft of the report has been discussed and summarized by the members of the specialists group for demonstration of shielding safety by analysis, committee for safety research on nuclear facilities. (author)

  6. Polymer Nanocomposite Based Multi-layer Neutron Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to shield radiations generated from the various radiation sources including nuclear reactors, transportation and storage systems for the radioactive wastes, accelerator, hospital, and defense systems etc. In this regard, development of efficient, light and durable radiation shielding materials has been an issue for many years. High energy neutrons (fast neutrons) can be thermalized by colliding with the light elements such as hydrogen, and thermalized neutrons can be efficiently captured by neutron absorbers such as boron, lithium, or gadolinium, etc. To shield neutrons, it is common to use hydrogen rich polymer based shields containing thermal neutron absorbers. It is also necessary to shield secondary gamma radiations produced from nuclear reaction of neutrons with various materials. Hence, high density elements such as Fe, Pb, or W might be dispersed in the polymer base as well as with neutron absorbers at the same time. However, the particle sizes of these elements are in the range of several tens and hundreds micrometers causing possible leakage of radiation. To enhance radiation shielding efficiency, it is useful to use ultrafine particles to increase collision probability of radiation with the particles. Furthermore, it is theoretically possible to enhance radiation shielding efficiency by using the multi-layer structured shields whose constituents are different for each layer depending upon the shielding purpose under the same overall density. Also, material properties of the nanocomposites can be enhanced compared to the normal composites. This investigation is focused on characterization of the nanocomposite based multi-layer structured radiation shields compared to the conventional radiation shields

  7. Metallogeny of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, G.; Sundblad, K.

    1990-12-01

    Gold occurs in a number of different ore types in the Fennoscandian Shield ranging in age from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic. Until recently, the metal was exploited primarily as a byproduct in volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits but during the 1980s more gold mines have been opened than during any other episode in the mining history of northern Europe. The occurrence of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield is reviewed in the context of the major tectonostratigraphic units: 1. In the Karelian Province, gold is hosted by greenstone belts of the Archean basement complex e.g. at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland. Greenstone belts of the Nordkalott Province, which are interpreted as part of an Early Proterozoic cover sequence, contain gold deposits associated with copper (Bidjovagge, Saattopora and Pahtohavare). Gold is also associated with cobalt in the metasomatically altered Early Proterozoic cover in north-eastern Finland (Meurastuksenaho and Juomasuo). 2. In the Svecofennian Domain, the major gold deposits were generated during the emplacement of 1.92 1.87 Ga old accretional magmatism. These deposits occur in the northeastern part of the Svecofennian Domain, close to the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. They comprise two major types: (a) the porphyry-type and shear-zone gold hosted by tonalite at Tallberg, Laivakangas, Kopsa and Osikonmäki; (b) as a component of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits (e.g. Holmtjärn, Boliden and Pyhäsalmi). Other types are: (c) gold-bearing quartz-alumina alteration zones formed during the 1.92 1.87 Ga magmatic period (Enåsen); (d) gold in massive sulphide and iron ore deposits in Bergslagen. 3. Gold associated with 1.84 1.54 Ga granites has been reported from several sites in the Shield, including quartz veins and contact-metasomatic deposits. In addition, shear-zone-related gold deposits post-dating these granites have been identified in southeastern Sweden (Ädelfors). 4. In the Sveconorwegian Domain, the gold deposits at Bleka

  8. The design study of the JT-60SU device. No.8. Nuclear shielding and safety design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of nuclear shielding design study and safety analysis for the steady-state tokamak device JT-60SU are described. D-T operation (option) for two years is adopted in addition to ten years operation using deuterium. Design work has been done in accordance with general laws for radioisotopes handling in Japan as a guideline of safety evaluation, which is applied to the operation of present JT-60U device. Optimization of the shielding design for the device structure including vacuum vessel has been presented to meet with allowable limits of biological shielding determined in advance. It is shown that JT-60SU can be operated safely in the present JT-60 experimental building. It is planed to use 100g/year of tritium in D-T operation phase. A concept of multiple -barrier system is applied to the facility design to prevent propagation of tritium, in which the torus hall and the tritium removal room provide the tertiary confinement. From the design of atmosphere detritiation system for accidental tritium release, it is shown that tritium concentration level can be reduced to the allowable level after two weeks with reasonable compact size components. Safety assessment related to activation of coolant/air, and atmospheric tritium effluents are discussed. (author)

  9. Characterization of TFTR shielding penetrations of ITER-relevance in D-T neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D-T operation of TFTR began successfully with trace tritium discharges in mid-November 1993. During the next year, the TFTR plasma tritium fraction is scheduled to be increased to at least 50%. The availability of larger amounts of D-T fusion neutrons in the high power D-T plasma phase of TFTR provides a useful opportunity to characterize tokamak shielding-penetration geometries of potential interest to ITER. These types of measurements can provide direct experimental data on the degree of enhancement of transmitted neutron flux along or across a realistic penetration and, as such, can be used to validate, calculational methods and to meet fusion reactor licensing requirements. The enhancement of neutron streaming in the shielding penetrations has the following significant consequences from the ITER viewpoint: (1) increased radiation damage to plasma diagnostics/detectors, (2) increased biological dose rates behind the shield, (3) increased radiation damage to the superconducting magnet on the inboard side. TFTR has penetrations of different varieties inside the vacuum vessel, the test cell, and the adjoining hot cell. In the initial stage, the authors have chosen to characterize three different types of penetrations in and around the TFTR test cell: (1) a straight hollow pipe coming out of the test cell concrete wall on east side of the test cell into the hot cell, (2) a bent pipe coming out of the test cell through the north concrete wall, and (3) a labyrinth in the north-west end of the test cell

  10. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations

  11. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  12. Shielding effect of mineral schungite during electromagnetic irradiation of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotchenko, S P; Subbotina, T I; Tuktamyshev, I I; Tuktamyshev, I Sh; Khadartsev, A A; Yashin, A A

    2003-11-01

    We studied the effect of nonthermal 37-GHz radiation on hemopoiesis in schungite-shielded Wistar rats. Radiation with right-handed or left-handed rotation of the polarization plane of electromagnetic wave was used. Shielding with schungite decreased the severity of damage produced by high-frequency electromagnetic radiation. PMID:14968159

  13. Radiation shielding phenolic fibers and method of producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation shielding phenolic fiber is described comprising a filamentary phenolic polymer consisting predominantly of a sulfonic acid group-containing cured novolak resin and a metallic atom having a great radiation shielding capacity, the metallic atom being incorporated in the polymer by being chemically bound in the ionic state in the novolak resin. A method for the production of the fiber is discussed

  14. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  15. 21 CFR 892.6500 - Personnel protective shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personnel protective shield. 892.6500 Section 892.6500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 892.6500 Personnel protective shield....

  16. Analysis and evaluation of a shielding for scum mensurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the evaluation of a shielding is presented developed by the Nuclear Technology Center of carry out scum mensurations in systems of mensuration gamma spectrometric. The evaluation of the capacity of attenuation of the shielding one carries out starting from the comparisons of the count rates with systems used by anteriority by the Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Surveillance

  17. Optimized Design of the Shielded-Loop Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anders

    1996-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have low capacitive sample loss due to perfect balancing. We present a new analysis of the unbalanced driven shielded-loop resonator that calculates the resonance frequencies and also determines some design considerations. The analysis enables us to optimize...

  18. Planar quadrature coil design using shielded-loop resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have a low capacitive sample loss due to a perfect balancing. In this paper, it is demonstrated that shielded-loop technology also can be used to improve design of planar quadrature coils. Both a dual-loop circuit and especially a dual-mode circuit may...

  19. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  20. Building with electromagnetic shield structure for individual floors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a building having a floor-by-floor electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system in which an electromagnetically shielded space is divided by individual floors and electric waves are utilized within the building on a floor-by-floor basis. (author). 8 figs

  1. The sword-shield strategy of the early 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sword and shield strategy of the post WWII German Federal Republic is discussed. The effort to rebuild the German air force following WWII is outlined. This effort was initiated in 1956 with material furnished by the US through the Nash Plan. The debate surrounding the validity of the sword-shield concept is described

  2. Analysis and improvement of cyclotron thallium target room shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of high neutron and gamma ray intensities during thallium-203 target bombardment, thallium target room shield and its improvement have been investigated. Leakage neutron and gamma-ray dose rates in various points behind the shield are calculated by simulating the transport of neutrons and photons using Monte Carlo MCNP4C computer code. By considering target room geometry, its associated shield, neutron and gamma rays source strengths and spectra, three designs for enhancing shield performance have been analyzed; A door as a shield in maze entrance, covering maze walls with layers of some effective materials and adding a shadow shield in target room in front of the radiation source, have been considered as the parallel to the maze. Dose calculations carried out for each kind of suggested shields separately for different materials and dimensions, then the shield with better than has been constructed and It has been found that the deviation between calculated and measured dose values after upgrading is less than 20%

  3. 30 CFR 57.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 57.14213... welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to persons. (b) All welding operations shall be well-ventilated....

  4. MOSFET Dosimetry for Evaluation of Gonad Shielding during Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwi Young; Choi, Yun Seok; Park, So Yeon; Park, Yang Kyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    In order to confirm feasibility of MOSFET modality in use of in vivo dosimetry, evaluation of gonad shielding in order to minimize gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy by using MOSFET modality was performed. Gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the department of radiation oncology of Seoul National University Hospital since 2009 was measured. 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams emitted from Varian 21EX LINAC were used for radiotherapy. In order to minimize exposed dose caused by the scattered ray not only from collimator of LINAC but also from treatment region inside radiation field, we used box.shaped lead shielding material. The shielding material was made of the lead block and consists of 7.5 cm x 9.5 cm x 5.5 cm sized case and 9 cm x 9.5 cm x 1 cm sized cover. Dosimetry for evaluation of gonad shielding was done with MOSFET modality. By protecting with gonad shielding material, average gonadal dose of patients was decreased by 23.07% compared with reference dose outside of the shielding material. Average delivered gonadal dose inside the shielding material was 0.01 Gy. By the result of MOSFET dosimetry, we verified that gonadal dose was decreased by using gonad shielding material. In compare with TLD dosimetry, we could measure the exposed dose easily and precisely with MOSFET modality.

  5. Discussions for the shielding materials of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many synchrotron radiation facilities are now under operation such as E.S.R.F., APS, and S.P.ring-8. New facilities with intermediated stored electron energy are also under construction and designing such as D.I.A.M.O.N.D., S.O.L.E.I.L., and S.S.R.F.. At these third generation synchrotron radiation facilities, the beamline shielding as well as the bulk shield is very important for designing radiation safety because of intense and high energy synchrotron radiation beam. Some reasons employ lead shield wall for the synchrotron radiation beamlines. One is narrow space for the construction of many beamlines at the experimental hall, and the other is the necessary of many movable mechanisms at the beamlines, for examples. Some cases are required to shield high energy neutrons due to stored electron beam loss and photoneutrons due to gas Bremsstrahlung. Ordinary concrete and heavy concrete are coming up to shield material of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches. However, few discussions have been performed so far for the shielding materials of the hutches. In this presentation, therefore, we will discuss the characteristics of the shielding conditions including build up effect for the beamline hutches by using the ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, and lead for shielding materials with 3 GeV and 8 GeV class synchrotron radiation source. (author)

  6. VHF Injector Pumping Slot RF Shielding Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-08-08

    The effectiveness of the shielding of the pumping slots is calculated for two radial depths of the slots with Mafia-2 and compared to a simple recipe that calculates the RF attenuation in a slot. CBP Technical Note 378 describes the pumping configuration of the 100 MHz VHF photoinjector. The cavity is surrounded by 36 slots, 4.9 cm wide, separated by bars, also 4.9 cm wide. The radial depth of the bars controls the attenuation of the RF from the cavity proper to the annular plenum outside the bars where the getter pumps are located. This note describes calculations of the level of RF fields in the plenum for two different values of the radial depth of the bars and two different values of the spacing between the outer dimension of the bars and the outer plenum wall.

  7. Response to Jakobsson on Human Body Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Block

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A grabs B and uses him as a body shield. That is, A hides behind B (A renders B helpless to resist his grasp, and from that vantage point, shoots at C. According to libertarian theory, may B shoot at C, or, is it proper that C pull the trigger at B? In the view of Rothbard (1984, the former is correct: B is entitled to gun down C. In my (Block, forthcoming view, this is incorrect. Rather, it would be lawful to C to properly kill B. (Both Rothbard and I assume that neither B nor C can end A’s reign of terror. Jakobsson (2010 supports the Rothbardian position. The present paper is at an attempt of mine to refute Jakobsson, and, thus, also, Rothbard (1984, once again.

  8. Preliminary Shielding Analysis for HCCB TBM Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Zhao, Fengchao; Cao, Qixiang; Zhang, Guoshu; Feng, Kaiming

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary shielding analysis on the transport of the Chinese helium cooled ceramic breeder test blanket module (HCCB TBM) from France back to China after being irradiated in ITER is presented in this contribution. Emphasis was placed on irradiation safety during transport. The dose rate calculated by MCNP/4C for the conceptual package design satisfies the relevant dose limits from IAEA that the dose rate 3 m away from the surface of the package containing low specific activity III materials should be less than 10 mSv/h. The change with location and the time evolution of dose rates after shutdown have also been studied. This will be helpful for devising the detailed transport plan of HCCB TBM back to China in the near future. supported by the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2013GB108000)

  9. Graphene: the ultimately thin sputtering shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Michely, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy methods are applied to investigate the potential of monolayer graphene as a sputtering shield for the underlying metal substrate. To visualize the effect, a bare and a graphene protected Ir(111) surface are irradiated with 500 eV Xe+, as well as 200 eV Xe+ and Ar+ ions, all at 1000 K. By quantitatively evaluating the sputtered material from the surface vacancy island area, we find a drastic decrease in metal sputtering for the graphene protected surface. It is demonstrated that efficient sputter protection relies on self-repair of the ion damage in graphene, which takes place efficiently in the temperature range of chemical vapor deposition growth. Based on the generality of the underlying principles of ion damage, graphene self-repair, and graphene growth, we speculate that efficient sputter protection is possible for a broad range of metals and alloys.

  10. On the accuracy of the Debye shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Fuentes, M A

    2012-01-01

    The expression for the Debye shielding in plasma physics is usually derived under the assumptions that the plasma particles are weakly coupled, so their kinetic energy is much larger than the potential energy between them, and that the velocity distributions of the plasma species are Maxwellian. The first assumption also establishes that the plasma parameter ND, the number of particles within a sphere with a Debye radius should be greater than 1, and determines the difference between weakly and strongly coupled plasmas. Under such assumptions, Poisson's equation can be linearised, and a simple analytic expression obtained for the electrostatic potential. However, textbooks rarely discuss the accuracy of this approximation. In this work we compare the linearised solution with the exact one, obtained numerically, and show that the linearisation, which underestimates the exact solution, is reasonably good even for ND ~ 40. We give quantitative criteria to set the limit of the approximation when the number of par...

  11. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L.; Grove, R.E. [Radiation Safety Information Computational Center RSICC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6171 (United States); Kodeli, I. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gulliford, J.; Sartori, E. [OECD NEA Data Bank, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-07-01

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  12. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL; Kodeli, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Sartori, Enrico [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  13. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  14. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  15. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  16. Overview of the SHIELDS Project at LANL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Godinez, H. C.; Jeffery, C. A.; Lawrence, E. C.; Meierbachtol, C.; Moulton, D.; Vernon, L.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Yu, Y.; Birn, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Albert, J.; Horne, R. B.; Lemon, C. L.; Markidis, S.; Young, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The near-Earth space environment is a highly dynamic and coupled system through a complex set of physical processes over a large range of scales, which responds nonlinearly to driving by the time-varying solar wind. Predicting variations in this environment that can affect technologies in space and on Earth, i.e. "space weather", remains a big space physics challenge. We present a recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program that is developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to specify the dynamics of the hot (keV) particles (the seed population for the radiation belts) on both macro- and micro-scale, including important physics of rapid particle injection and acceleration associated with magnetospheric storms/substorms and plasma waves. This challenging problem is addressed using a team of world-class experts in the fields of space science and computational plasma physics and state-of-the-art models and computational facilities. New data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites are developed in addition to physics-based models. This research will provide a framework for understanding of key radiation belt drivers that may accelerate particles to relativistic energies and lead to spacecraft damage and failure. The ability to reliably distinguish between various modes of failure is critically important in anomaly resolution and forensics. SHIELDS will enhance our capability to accurately specify and predict the near-Earth space environment where operational satellites reside.

  17. SUBURFACE SHIELDING-SPECIFIC SOURCE TERM EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to provide supporting calculations for determination of the radiation source terms specific to subsurface shielding design and analysis. These calculations are not intended to provide the absolute values of the source terms, which are under the charter of the Waste Package Operations (WPO) Group. Rather, the calculations focus on evaluation of the various combinations of fuel enrichment, burnup and cooling time for a given decay heat output, consistent with the waste package (WP) thermal design basis. The objective is to determine the worst-case combination of the fuel characteristics (enrichment, burnup and cooling time) which would give the maximum radiation fields for subsurface shielding considerations. The calculations are limited to PWR fuel only, since the WP design is currently evolving with thinner walls and a reduced heat load as compared to the viability assessment (VA) reference design. The results for PWR fuel will provide a comparable indication of the trend for BWR fuel, as their characteristics are similar. The source term development for defense high-level waste and other spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is the responsibility of the WPO Group, and therefore, is not included this work. This work includes the following items responsive to the stated purpose and objective: (1) Determine the possible fuel parameters (initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time), that give the same decay heat value as specified for the waste package thermal design; (2) Obtain the neutron and gamma source terms for the various combinations of the fuel parameters for use in radiation field calculations; and (3) Calculate radiation fields on the surfaces of the waste package and its transporter to quantify the effects of the fuel parameters with the same decay heat value for use in identifying the worst-case combination of the fuel parameters

  18. Characteristics simulation of wireless power transfer system considering shielding distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless power transfer technology is using the magnetic resonance recently drawing increased attention. It uses the resonance between transmitter and receiver coils to transfer power. Thus, it can improve the transfer distance and efficiency compared with the existing magnetic induction technique. The authors found from the previous study that the application of the superconductor coil to the magnetic resonance wireless power transfer system improved its efficiency. Its application to real life, however, requires the additional study on the effects of adjacent materials. In this study, the two resonance coils made by superconductor coils were used to aluminum and plastic shielding materials was placed between the coils. S-parameters were analyzed according to the position of the shielding material between the transmitter and receiver coils. As a result, the plastic of shielding material had no effect, but the aluminum of shielding material affected the wireless power transfer due to the shielding effectiveness

  19. Experimental Tests of Neutron Shielding for the ATLAS Forward Region

    CERN Document Server

    Pospísil, S; Cechák, T; Cermák, P; Jakubek, J; Kluson, J; Konícek, J; Kubasta, J; Linhart, V; Sinor, M; Leroy, C; Dolezal, Z; Leitner, R; Lukianov, G A; Soustruznik, K; Lokajícek, M; Némécek, S; Pálla, G; Sodomka, J

    1999-01-01

    Experimental tests devoted to the optimization of the neutron shielding for the ATLAS forward region were performed at the CERN-PS with a 4 GeV/c proton beam. Spectra of fast neutrons, slow neutrons and gamma rays escaping a block of iron (40$\\times$40$\\times$80 cm$^3$) shielded with different types of neutron and gamma shields (pure polyethylene - PE, borated polyethylene - BPE, lithium filled polyethylene - LiPE, lead, iron) were measured by means of plastic scintillators, a Bonner spectrometer, a HPGe detector and a slow neutron detector. Effectiveness of different types of shielding agaisnt neutrons and $\\gamma$-rays were compared. The idea of a segmented outer layer shielding (iron, BPE, iron, LiPE) for the ATLAS Forward Region was also tested.

  20. Design of ITER vacuum vessel in-wall shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X., E-mail: xiaoyu.wang@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ioki, K. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Morimoto, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Choi, C.H.; Utin, Y.; Sborchia, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); TaiLhardat, O. [Assystem EOS, ZAC SAINT MARTIN, 23 rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Mille, B.; Terasawa, A.; Gribov, Y.; Barabash, V.; Polunovskiy, E.; Dani, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H.; Raval, J. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Liu, S.; Lu, M.; Du, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with in-wall shielding (IWS) and cooling water. The main purpose of the in-wall shielding is to provide neutron shielding together with the blanket and VV shells and water during ITER plasma operation and to reduce the ripple of the Toroidal magnetic field. Based on ITER vacuum vessel structure and related requirements, in-wall shielding are designed as about 8900 individual blocks with different sizes and several different materials distributed over nine vessel sectors and nine field joints of vessel sectors. This paper presents the design of the IWS, considering loads, structural stresses and assembly method, and also shows neutron shielding effect and TF ripple reduced by the IWS.

  1. Shielding body for a ducts through prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation shielding for breaking-through or taking-out part of a wall in nuclear reactors, in particular in gas-cooled nuclear reactors in prestressed concrete containments is to be developed providing safe shielding of the radiation diffusing through gaps between components. Furthermore, such shielding must be simple in its structure and easy to apply, irrespective of the shape of the gap. This is achieved by providing the gap between the penetration liner covering the lateral sides of the break-through and the component introduced into it with a chase to be filled with shielding matter, and by introducing several bolts into the chase in order to displace the shielding matter. (orig./RW)

  2. Design of ITER vacuum vessel in-wall shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with in-wall shielding (IWS) and cooling water. The main purpose of the in-wall shielding is to provide neutron shielding together with the blanket and VV shells and water during ITER plasma operation and to reduce the ripple of the Toroidal magnetic field. Based on ITER vacuum vessel structure and related requirements, in-wall shielding are designed as about 8900 individual blocks with different sizes and several different materials distributed over nine vessel sectors and nine field joints of vessel sectors. This paper presents the design of the IWS, considering loads, structural stresses and assembly method, and also shows neutron shielding effect and TF ripple reduced by the IWS

  3. Magnetic shielding and exotic spin-dependent interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Li, Y; Thulasi, S; Pustelny, S; Budker, D; Zolotorev, M

    2016-01-01

    Experiments searching for exotic spin-dependent interactions typically employ magnetic shielding between the source of the exotic field and the interrogated spins. We explore the question of what effect magnetic shielding has on detectable signals induced by exotic fields. Our general conclusion is that for common experimental geometries and conditions, magnetic shields should not significantly reduce sensitivity to exotic spin-dependent interactions, especially when the technique of comagnetometry is used. However, exotic fields that couple to electron spin can induce magnetic fields in the interior of shields made of a soft ferro- or ferrimagnetic material. This induced magnetic field must be taken into account in the interpretation of experiments searching for new spin-dependent interactions and raises the possibility of using a flux concentrator inside magnetic shields to amplify exotic spin-dependent signals.

  4. Benchmark calculations of the shielding constants in the water dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecul, Magdalena; Lewandowski, Józef; Sadlej, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    The NMR shielding constants in (H 2O) 2 have been calculated using GIAO-SCF, MP2, MP4 and CCSD methods and for a range of basis sets. According to the obtained results the 6-311++G ** or aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets are recommended for SCF calculations, and the aug-cc-pVXZ series is suggested for correlated calculations of the interaction-induced changes in the shielding constants. The counterpoise correction improves the results towards the basis set limit and is essential in the case of 17O shielding. Correlation effects are substantial for the changes in 17O shielding, less so for 1H shielding. They are overestimated by the MP2 method.

  5. Analytic flux formulas and tables of shielding functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand calculations of radiation flux and dose rates are often useful in evaluating radiation shielding and in determining the scope of a problem. The flux formulas appropriate to such calculations are almost always based on the point kernel and allow for at most the consideration of laminar slab shields. These formulas often require access to tables of values of integral functions for effective use. Flux formulas and function tables appropriate to calculations involving homogeneous source regions with the shapes of lines, disks, slabs, truncated cones, cylinders, and spheres are presented. Slab shields may be included in most of these calculations, and the effect of a cylindrical shield surrounding a cylindrical source may be estimated. Detector points may be located axially, laterally, or interior to a cylindrical source. Line sources may be tilted with respect to a slab shield. All function tables are given for a wide range of arguments

  6. Optimal selection for shielding materials by fuzzy linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An application of fuzzy linear programming methods to optimization of a radiation shield is presented. The main purpose of the present study is the choice of materials and the search of the ratio of mixture-component as the first stage of the methodology on optimum shielding design according to individual requirements of nuclear reactor, reprocessing facility, shipping cask installing spent fuel, ect. The characteristic values for the shield optimization may be considered their cost, spatial space, weight and some shielding qualities such as activation rate and total dose rate for neutron and gamma ray (includes secondary gamma ray). This new approach can reduce huge combination calculations for conventional two-valued logic approaches to representative single shielding calculation by group-wised optimization parameters determined in advance. Using the fuzzy linear programming method, possibilities for reducing radiation effects attainable in optimal compositions hydrated, lead- and boron-contained materials are investigated

  7. Onboard radiation shielding estimates for interplanetary manned missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of space related shielding design is to protect operating systems, personnel and key structural components from outer space and onboard radiation. This paper summarizes the feasibility of a lightweight neutron radiation shield design for a nuclear powered, manned space vehicle. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 is used to determine radiation transport characteristics of the different materials and find the optimized shield configuration. A phantom torso encased in air is used to determine a dose rate for a crew member on the ship. Calculation results indicate that onboard shield against neutron radiation coming from nuclear engine can be achieved with very little addition of weight to the space vehicle. The selection of materials and neutron transport analysis as presented in this paper are useful starting data to design shield against neutrons generated when high-energy particles from outer space interact with matter on the space vehicle. (authors)

  8. Homogeneity test on heavy concrete shield wall for ACP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot cell facility for research activities related to the electrolytic reduction of spent fuel, which is designed to permit a safe handling of radioactive materials up to 1,385 TBq, is scheduled to be constructed in 2005. The design features of the radiation safety are reviewed for the shield wall, rear door, shielding window, penetrations, toboggan, and the storage vault. The calculations by QAD-CGGP and MCNP-4C are used to evaluate the proposed engineering design concepts and the gamma scanning test is described to examine the integrity of the shielding structure for the hot cell. The gamma scanning test is especially good at detecting any void and cracks in a heavy concrete wall and finding crevices between the wall and the devices frames. The shielding effectiveness and homogeneity of the hot cell wall, shield window, rear door etc., shall be measured by reading the activity level of the radiation

  9. GCFR radial blanket and shield experiment: objectives, preanalysis, and specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral experiment has been designed for the verification of radiation transport methods and nuclear data used for the design of the radial shield for the proposed 300 MW(e) gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR). The scope of the experiment was chosen to include a thorium oxide radial blanket mockup as well as several shield configurations in order to reduce the uncertainties in the calculated source terms for the radial shield, and to reduce the uncertainties in the calculated radiation damage to the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Additionally, the measurements are intended to bound the uncertainties in calculated gamma-ray heating rates within the blanket and shield. Although designed specifically for the GCFR, the experiment will provide generic data regarding deep penetration in ThO2 and common shield materials, which should also benefit LMFBR designers

  10. Analytic flux formulas and tables of shielding functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, O.J.

    1981-06-01

    Hand calculations of radiation flux and dose rates are often useful in evaluating radiation shielding and in determining the scope of a problem. The flux formulas appropriate to such calculations are almost always based on the point kernel and allow for at most the consideration of laminar slab shields. These formulas often require access to tables of values of integral functions for effective use. Flux formulas and function tables appropriate to calculations involving homogeneous source regions with the shapes of lines, disks, slabs, truncated cones, cylinders, and spheres are presented. Slab shields may be included in most of these calculations, and the effect of a cylindrical shield surrounding a cylindrical source may be estimated. Detector points may be located axially, laterally, or interior to a cylindrical source. Line sources may be tilted with respect to a slab shield. All function tables are given for a wide range of arguments.

  11. Calculation of parameters for an iron shield experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this text is carreid out the evaluation of radiation transport methodology, comparying the calculated reactions and dose rates, for neutrons and gama-rays, with the experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in YAYOI reactor. Were employed the ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system for generation of cross sections, collapsed by the ANISN code. The tranpsort calculations were made by using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the spectrum of the iron shield boundary source to the reaction and doses rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The distributions calculated for neutrons and gamma-rays, on iron shield, presented reasonable concordance with the experimental measurements. Finally, is presented a proposal for setting up of an experimental arrangement, using the IEA-R1 reactor, with the purpose of lay down a shielding benchmark. (Author)

  12. Development of Multifunctional Radiation Shielding Materials for Long Duration Human Exploration Beyond the Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Bhattacharya, M.; Schofield, E.; Carranza, S.; O'Dell, S.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major challenges for long duration human exploration beyond the low Earth orbit and sustained human presence on planetary surfaces would be development of materials that would help minimize the radiation exposure to crew and equipment from the interplanetary radiation environment, This radiation environment consists primarily of a continuous flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and transient but intense fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEP). The potential for biological damage by the relatively low percentage of high-energy heavy-ions in the GCR spectrum far outweigh that due to lighter particles because of their ionizing-power and the quality of the resulting biological damage. Although the SEP spectrum does not contain heavy ions and their energy range is much lower than that for GCRs, they however pose serious risks to astronaut health particularly in the event of a bad solar storm The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss our recent efforts in development and evaluation of materials for minimizing the hazards from the interplanetary radiation environment. Traditionally, addition of shielding materials to spacecrafts has invariably resulted in paying a penalty in terms of additional weight. It would therefore be of great benefit if materials could be developed not only with superior shielding effectiveness but also sufficient structural integrity. Such a multifunctional material could then be considered as an integral part of spacecraft structures. Any proposed radiation shielding material for use in outer space should be composed of nuclei that maximize the likelihood of projectile fragmentation while producing the minimum number of target fragments. A modeling based approach will be presented to show that composite materials using hydrogen-rich epoxy matrices reinforced with polyethylene fibers and/or fabrics could effectively meet this requirement. This paper will discuss the fabrication of such a material for a crewed vehicle. Ln addition

  13. Modelling human exposure to space radiation with different shielding: the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astronauts' exposure to the various components of the space radiation field is of great concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible travel to Mars. Simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help in view of risk evaluation and shielding optimisation, which is therefore a crucial issue. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code can be coupled with two types of anthropomorphic phantom (a mathematical model and a 'voxel' model) to calculate organ-averaged absorbed dose, dose equivalent and 'biological' dose under different shielding conditions. Herein the 'biological dose' is represented by the average number of 'Complex Lesions' (CLs) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated by means of event-by-event track structure simulations at the nm level and integrated on-line into FLUKA, which adopts a condensed-history approach; such lesions have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction, which in turn can be correlated with carcinogenesis. Examples of calculation results will be presented relative to Galactic Cosmic Rays, as well as to the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The contributions from primary ions and secondary particles will be shown separately, thus allowing quantification of the role played by nuclear reactions occurring in the shield and in the human body itself. As expected, the SPE doses decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding thickness; nuclear reaction products, essentially due to target fragmentation, are of minor importance. A 10 g/cm2 Al shelter resulted to be sufficient to respect the 30-day limits for deterministic effects recommended for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPEs, the calculated GCR doses are almost independent of the Al shield thickness, and the GCR doses to internal organs are not significantly lower than the skin

  14. ARIES-ST nuclear analysis and shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A power plant design based on the spherical torus (ST) concept has been developed by the ARIES team. This paper documents the results of the nuclear and radiation protection analyses carried out for the ARIES-ST design. The nuclear analysis addresses the key neutronics issues, such as the neutron wall loading profile, radiation damage to structural components and their lifetimes, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and nuclear heat loads to in-vessel components. The main theme of the shielding analysis is to develop guidance and recommendations on radiation protection for the TF magnet, in particular, the center-post. The need for an inboard shield, the selection of an optimal shield, the rationale for the shielding material choices, and the consequences of the shielding material choices on the overall design are reported herein. During the course of the ARIES-ST study, the design has been analyzed rigorously with a set of 3-D nuclear analyses to guide the developing design. The results of the assessment had a major impact on the design choices. For instance, the insufficient breeding along with other design constraints have ruled out the use of several attractive solid breeder blankets, the excessive neutron damage to the center-post provided strong incentives to shield the center-post, and the high radiation damage to the plasma facing components has limited the service lifetime of the ferritic steel (FS) structure to a few full power years. Furthermore, the high heat load to the inboard shield (400 MW, 10% of thermal power) forced the design to recover the inboard heating as high-grade heat to enhance the power balance. Also, the sensitivity of the outboard-only LiPb breeding blanket to the inboard shielding materials has limited the shielding options and excluded several high performance inboard-shielding materials. The performed analyses and results are reported and discussed in relation to the integrated design and the established top-level requirements for the

  15. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology; SHIELD 1.0: desenvolvimento de um programa de calculo de blindagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  16. Production of a datolite-based heavy concrete for shielding nuclear reactors and megavoltage radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological shielding of nuclear reactors has always been a great concern and decreasing the complexity and expense of these installations is of great interest. In this study, we used datolite and galena minerals for production of a high performance heavy concrete. Materials and Methods: Datolite and galena minerals which can be found in many parts of Iran were used in the concrete mix design. To measure the gamma radiation attenuation of the Datolite and galena concrete samples, they were exposed to both narrow and wide beams of gamma rays emitted from a cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit. An Am-Be neutron source was used for assessing the shielding properties of the samples against neutrons. To test the compression strengths, both types of concrete mixes (Datolite and galena and ordinary concrete) were investigated. Results: The concrete samples had a density of 4420-4650 kg/m3 compared to that of ordinary concrete (2300-2500 kg/m3) or barite high density concrete (up to 3500 kg/m3). The measured half value layer thickness of the Datolite and galena concrete samples for cobalt-60 gamma rays was much less than that of ordinary concrete (2.56 cm compared to 6.0 cm). Furthermore, the galena concrete samples had a significantly higher compressive strength as well as 20% more neutron absorption. Conclusion: The Datolite and galena concrete samples showed good shielding/engineering properties in comparison with other reported samples made, using high-density materials other than depleted uranium. It is also more economic than the high-density concretes. Datolite and galena concrete may be a suitable option for shielding nuclear reactors and megavoltage radiotherapy rooms.

  17. Normalization of shielding structure quality and the method of its studying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method for evaluation of nuclear facility radiation shield quality is suggested. Indexes of shielding structure radiation efficiency and face efficiency are used as the shielding structure quality indexes. The first index is connected with radiation dose rate during personnel irradiation behind the shield, and the second one - with the stresses in shielding structure introduction of the indexes presented allows to evaluate objectively the quality of nuclear facility shielding structure quality design construction and operation and to economize labour and material resources

  18. One-dimensional gamma-ray shielding analysis for EBT-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.

    1981-11-01

    A one-dimensional scoping study was performed for the gamma ray shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle (EBT-P) device. The objective was to define appropriate shielding material and determine the required shielding thickness for EBT-P. The dose equivalent results as a function of the radiation shield thickness for different shielding options are presented. A sensitivity analysis for the pessimistic case is given. The recommended shielding option based on the performance and cost is discussed.

  19. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  20. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are enabling to shield humans in aerospace transportation vehicles and other human habited spaces....

  1. Shielding design calculation of a 50 MW research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code ANISN/PC has been applied to calculate the group flux distribution across different shield layers of a 50 MW light water research reactor. The code has been run in P3 approximation and S8 discrete ordinates. The calculated group fluxes multiplied by appropriate flux-to-dose rate conversion factors have been used to give the dose distribution across the shield layers. The thickness of the concrete shield has been determined to give the dose rate at the outer surface of the shield as 0.5 nSv/sec. The same calculation have been also performed in axial direction to determine the thickness of water needed above the core to reduce the dose level to 25 nSv/sec. The result of calculation shows that the contribution of capture gamma rays to the total dose at the outer surface of the shield is more than 50 percent. This simplifies the calculations to determine the shield layer thickness, especially in preliminary stages of the shield design. (author)

  2. Dose buildup factor formula for double-layered shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation shielding, health physics, and radioactive waste management, it is very important to know buildup factors for various materials and their combinations used as multilayer shields. In this work, a general formula that computes buildup factors for double-layer shields was developed on the basis of Monte Carlo photon transport using the MCNP code. Formulas for buildup factors for double-layer shields have been developed in the past with various degrees of success and limitations. The GP formula is excellent but applies to single-layer materials only. In this work, gamma-ray dose buildup factors for double-layer shields have been computed using the MCNP code. A point monoenergetic isotropic source was used with energy from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The source was placed at the center of the first spherical materials, surrounded by a second one. Detectors were placed on the surface of the second material and used to tally the photon flux in a six-energy-group structure. The shielding materials considered were water, lead, steel, concrete, and some of their combinations for double-layered shields ranging in thickness from 1 to 10 mean free paths (mfp)

  3. The assembly of the disk shielding is finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Hedberg

    At the end of March, the shielding project engineer, Jan Palla, could draw a sigh of relief when the fourth and final rotation of the disk shielding was carried out without incident. The two 80-ton heavy shielding assemblies were built in a horizontal position and they had to be first turned upside-down and then rotated to a vertical position during the assembly. The relatively thin disk plate with a diameter of 9 meters, made this operation quite delicate and a lot of calculation work and strengthening of the shielding was carried out before the rotations could take place. The disk shielding is being turned upside-down. The stainless steel cylinder in the centre supports the shielding as well as the small muon wheel. The two disk shielding assemblies consist of different materials such as bronze, gray steel, cast iron, stainless steel, boron doped polyethylene and lead. The project is multinational with the major pieces having been made by companies in Armenia, Serbia, Spain, Bulgaria, Italy, Slovaki...

  4. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  5. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different

  6. DNA-based nanoparticle composite materials for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, De Yu; Grote, James

    2012-03-01

    Composite materials, such as polymer-matrix containing conductive fillers, are very attractive for shielding electromagnetic interference (EMI) due to their high shielding efficiency and seamlessness, processability, flexibility, light-weight and low-cost. Here, we report a development of novel, DNA-based EMI-shielding materials (DESM), consisting of DNA and metal nanoparticles. It has been shown that a thin DESM layer (typically ~30 - 50 μm) could block EMI radiations up to 60 dB effectively over an RF frequency range from KHz to tens GHz, exhibiting excellent EMI shielding efficiency. A wide selection of metal nanoparticle fillers for DESM has been tested for their performance in EMI shielding efficiency. Among them, silver and carbon-based nanoparticles have demonstrated the best performance and were selected for further investigation. The silver-doped DESM films could be also non-conductive while their EMI shielding efficiency is still well-preserved. The nonconductive DESM could have a great potential in the microelectronics industries for EMI shielding on electronic devices and circuit boards.

  7. The construction of radiation shielding for baby ebm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of radiation shielding for electron beam machine, Baby EBM is necessary for prevention from x-ray (Bremstrahlung) that produced when electron bombarded the target material. The strength of produced x-ray is depending on electron energy and the atomic number of target material. In the construction process of radiation shielding, a few aspects need to be considered such as shielding material and its thickness to be used, mainframe for radiation shielding and the way fabrication to be done. In this project, the thickness of radiation shielding is calculated manually following the NCRP 51 guidelines whereas for frame design, shielding walls and fabrication is considered that the accelerator devices (accelerating tube, focusing device and neck) is vertically and the whole weight of Baby EBM. From the calculations, the thickness and the material for radiation shielding is to be used are 6mm lead. This radiation shielding has been tested (using the parameters that have been considered) to know the leak of radiation (at all surfaces) and direct radiation below 5 cm from the window. The value of high voltage that applied at accelerating tube is 80 kV and the voltage, current supply at electron gun is 3.0 V, 7.1 A respectively. The result of the testing found that dose rate under the window foil is more than 2000 mSv/hr and at all shielding surfaces are less than 0.5 mSv/hr, which is background reading and this is acceptable as compared to the theoretical calculation. The measurement was done using a survey meter typed Ludlum-model 3. (Author)

  8. A Monitoring System for the Assessment of Reactor Shield Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the objectives of a shield survey, presents the results of intercomparisons and makes recommendations on the selection of a monitoring system. The performance of a reactor shield must be assessed efficiently to enable immediate repairs to be made to defective shields. Correlation of survey results with shield designer's predictions has proved difficult and the factors contributing to the disagreement have been examined. The shield designer uses flux to dose conversion factors which neglect the radiation equilibrium situation at the shield-air interface and the effect of attenuation and scattering external to the shield. The presence of the operator can significantly influence a measurement. The use of the ''maximum exposure dose'' (MED) concept is recommended for gamma photon predictions and this is compared with absorbed dose measurements in phantoms. Shield survey instruments must have a flat response over a wide range of energies. For example, many gamma dosimeters are designed for use at energies up to about 2 MeV whereas around most reactors a proportion of dose is due to 6 MeV gamma photons, with some contribution from higher energies. Tests were carried out to select suitable detectors using actual reactor operating conditions and simulated conditions at specific energies, notably 6 MeV. In practice discrepancies exceeding a factor of 3 were frequently found. A comparison was made between thermoluminescent dosimeters and film badges for the purpose of fixed position integrating dosimeters. The film dosimeter (AERE/RPS) was found to over-estimate by a factor of 2 for 6 MeV gamma radiation and in practical situations over-estimated by 20 to 80%. Thermoluminescent dosimetry is recommended for shield surveys provided that a build-up cap is used to achieve charged particle equilibrium. (author)

  9. CHESS upgrade 1995: Improved radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) stores electrons and positrons at 5.3 GeV for the production and study of B mesons, and, in addition, it supplies synchrotron radiation for CHESS. The machine has been upgraded for 300 mA operation. It is planned that each beam will be injected in about 5 minutes and that particle beam lifetimes will be several hours. In a cooperative effort, staff members at CHESS and LNS have studied sources in CESR that produce radiation in the user areas. The group has been responsible for the development and realization of new tunnel shielding walls that provide a level of radiation protection from 20 to approx-gt 100 times what was previously available. Our experience has indicated that a major contribution to the environmental radiation is not from photons, but results from neutrons that are generated by particle beam loss in the ring. Neutrons are stopped by inelastic scattering and absorption in thick materials such as heavy concrete. The design for the upgraded walls, the development of a mix for our heavy concrete, and all the concrete casting was done by CHESS and LNS personnel. The concrete incorporates a new material for this application, one that has yielded a significant cost saving in the production of over 200 tons of new wall sections. The material is an artificially enriched iron oxide pellet manufactured in vast quantities from hematite ore for the steel-making industry. Its material and chemical properties (iron and impurity content, strength, size and uniformity) make it an excellent substitute for high grade Brazilian ore, which is commonly used as heavy aggregate in radiation shielding. Its cost is about a third that of the natural ore. The concrete has excellent workability, a 28 day compressive strength exceeding 6000 psi and a density of 220 lbs/cu.ft (3.5 gr/cc). The density is limited by an interesting property of the pellets that is motivated by efficiency in the steel-making application. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs.

  11. Optimisation of solar cell shielding for geostationary missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent 1MeV electron fluences, end of life output powers and power to weight ratios are estimated for solar cells in a five year geostationary mission beginning in 1975. The study covers cell thicknesses from 125μm to 300μm, coverslip thicknesses from 25μm to 300μm, rear shielding typical of rigid and lightweight flexible arrays, and infinite rear shielding. It is concluded that the thinnest cells and shielding give the best power-to-weight ratio, although the choice for a particular spacecraft will be influenced by considerations of availability, cost, fragility and array area

  12. Simplified shielding calculation system for high-intensity proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified shielding calculation system is developed for applying conceptual shielding design of facilities in the joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators. The system is composed of neutron transmission calculation part for bulk shielding using simplified formulas: Moyer model and Tesch's formula, and neutron skyshine calculation part using an empirical formula: Stapleton's formula. The system is made with the Microsoft Excel software for user's convenience. This report provides a manual for the system as well as calculation conditions used in the calculation such as Moyer model's parameters. In this report preliminary results based on data at December 8, 1999, are also shown as an example. (author)

  13. Face shield system for semi-steep seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betting, B.

    1981-01-01

    About 25% of the coal produced by the HBL coalfield comes from longwall rise faces and is won using double-drum shearers and powered supports for semi-steep workings (30 to 40 degrees). Face spills present a hazard to personnel. Describes tests with a shield system for rise faces with a worked thickness of 2.20 m (seam thickness 2.06 m). Explains how the system operates : a prop, set automatically from inside the support unit, is used to support a shield plate which is anchored between the roof and the floor, thereby supporting the coal face. This shield system effectively protects the solid, even when weakened. (In French)

  14. Fusion reactor design towards radwaste minimum with advanced shield material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed to minimize the radioactive waste of the reactor. The main point of the concept is to clear massive structural components located outside the neutron shield from regulatory control. The concept requires some reinforcement of shielding with an advanced shield material such as a metal hydride, detriation, and tailoring of a detrimental element from the superconductor. Our assessment confirmed a large impact of the concept on radwaste reduction, in that it reduces the radwaste fraction of a fusion reactor A-SSTR2 from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%. (author)

  15. Capacitive Sensor With Driven Shields And Bridge Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Like other capaciflectors described in prior articles in NASA Tech Briefs, this one includes sensing electrode driven by alternating voltage, giving rise to electric field in vicinity of electrode; object entering electric field detected by its effect on capacitance between sensing electrode and electrical ground. Also includes shielding electrode (in this case, driven shield 1), excited via voltage follower at same voltage as that applied to sensing electrode to concentrate more of electric field outward from sensing electrode, increasing sensitivity and range of sensor. Because shielding electrode driven via voltage follower, it does not present significant electrical load to source of alternating voltage.

  16. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  17. Technical Aspect of Shielded SIMS Installation in CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shielded IMS 6f has been installed in the LECA facility, CEA Cadarache France. The nuclearization was performed by CAMECA Company, which sells the standard IMS 6f. Working on nuclear materials requires in depth modifications of the apparatus itself. Despite these modifications, the shielded SIMS has the same level of performance as the standard apparatus. The design of the modified apparatus is presented and the safety aspects are emphasised. The shielded SIMS should be allowed to handle irradiated samples at the end of 2001. (Author)

  18. Benchmark problems for intermediate and high energy accelerator shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yukio; Tanaka, Shun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Six kinds of benchmark problems were selected for evaluating the model codes and the nuclear data for the intermediate and high energy accelerator shielding by the Shielding Subcommittee in the Research Committee on Reactor Physics. The benchmark problems contain three kinds of neutron production data from thick targets due to proton, alpha and electron, and three kinds of shielding data for secondary neutron and photon generated by proton. Neutron and photoneutron reaction cross section data are also provided for neutrons up to 500 MeV and photons up to 300 MeV, respectively. (author).

  19. ZZ IHEAS-BENCHMARKS, High-Energy Accelerator Shielding Benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of program or function: Six kinds of Benchmark problems were selected for evaluating the model codes and the nuclear data for the intermediate and high energy accelerator shielding by the Shielding Subcommittee in the Research Committee on Reactor Physics. The benchmark problems contain three kinds of neutron production data from thick targets due to proton, alpha and electron, and three kinds of shielding data for secondary neutron and photon generated by proton. Neutron and photo-neutron reaction cross section data are also provided for neutrons up to 500 MeV and photons up to 300 MeV, respectively

  20. Plasma shield dynamics and target erosion in disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamics of carbon plasma shields and graphite target erosion experimentally studied at the recently upgraded plasma gun facility MK-200 UG at TRINITI Troitsk are compared with numerical results from FOREV-2 which allows a 2-D modeling of hot plasma target interaction. It is shown that turbulent processes are absent in the experimental plasma shields. Anomalous lateral losses of plasma mass are not occurring and plasma shield dynamics can be described by the multidimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamics (R-MHD) equations together with a consistent solution of the multidimensional magnetic field equations with classical magnetic field diffusion coefficient