WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological services fish

  1. US Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Boundaries of the management Regions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is organized into 8 geographic Regions.

  2. Fishing for ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin L; Pegg, Mark A; Cole, Nicholas W; Siddons, Stephen F; Fedele, Alexis D; Harmon, Brian S; Ruskamp, Ryan L; Turner, Dylan R; Uerling, Caleb C

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystems are commonly exploited and manipulated to maximize certain human benefits. Such changes can degrade systems, leading to cascading negative effects that may be initially undetected, yet ultimately result in a reduction, or complete loss, of certain valuable ecosystem services. Ecosystem-based management is intended to maintain ecosystem quality and minimize the risk of irreversible change to natural assemblages of species and to ecosystem processes while obtaining and maintaining long-term socioeconomic benefits. We discuss policy decisions in fishery management related to commonly manipulated environments with a focus on influences to ecosystem services. By focusing on broader scales, managing for ecosystem services, and taking a more proactive approach, we expect sustainable, quality fisheries that are resilient to future disturbances. To that end, we contend that: (1) management always involves tradeoffs; (2) explicit management of fisheries for ecosystem services could facilitate a transition from reactive to proactive management; and (3) adaptive co-management is a process that could enhance management for ecosystem services. We propose adaptive co-management with an ecosystem service framework where actions are implemented within ecosystem boundaries, rather than political boundaries, through strong interjurisdictional relationships. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Fishing for ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin L.; Pegg, Mark A.; Cole, Nicholas W.; Siddons, Stephen F.; Fedele, Alexis D.; Harmon, Brian S.; Ruskamp, Ryan L.; Turner, Dylan R.; Uerling, Caleb C.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems are commonly exploited and manipulated to maximize certain human benefits. Such changes can degrade systems, leading to cascading negative effects that may be initially undetected, yet ultimately result in a reduction, or complete loss, of certain valuable ecosystem services. Ecosystem-based management is intended to maintain ecosystem quality and minimize the risk of irreversible change to natural assemblages of species and to ecosystem processes while obtaining and maintaining long-term socioeconomic benefits. We discuss policy decisions in fishery management related to commonly manipulated environments with a focus on influences to ecosystem services. By focusing on broader scales, managing for ecosystem services, and taking a more proactive approach, we expect sustainable, quality fisheries that are resilient to future disturbances. To that end, we contend that: (1) management always involves tradeoffs; (2) explicit management of fisheries for ecosystem services could facilitate a transition from reactive to proactive management; and (3) adaptive co-management is a process that could enhance management for ecosystem services. We propose adaptive co-management with an ecosystem service framework where actions are implemented within ecosystem boundaries, rather than political boundaries, through strong interjurisdictional relationships.

  4. Editorial note on reproductive biology of fishes

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. TSIKLIRAS; K. I. STERGIOU; Froese, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Fish reproductive biology (onset and duration of spawning, sex ratio, maturity stages, length and age at maturity, and fecundity) is important in fisheries research, stock assessment, and management. In this editorial note, we provide some criteria and recommendations on issues of fish reproductive biology, which may be useful in research planning, data analysis and presentation, as well as in manuscript preparation.

  5. [Biological value of protein from raw fish and canned fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganoviak, Z M; Lipka, E M

    1983-01-01

    The authors evaluated the nutritive value of protein from 4 kinds of raw fish (herring, cod, mackerel, sprat) and its preserves. Experiments were made on rats fed the diets containing fish protein (8-10% of the total diet). Experiments included the determination of apparent and genuine digestibility, net protein utilization, and net dietary protein caloric value. Evidence was obtained that protein from fish and its preserves is characterized by high digestibility coefficient as compared with casein and egg powder. The highest net protein utilization was noted in animal groups fed the diet containing protein from raw fish. Protein assimilability from fish preserves was on the average 15% lower than that from raw fish.

  6. Rapid Ecological Assessment of Forests in the Laurentian Mixed Forest-Great Lakes Coastal Biological Network, Midwest Region, National Wildlife Refuge System, US Fish & Wildlife Service: Forest Community Analysis: Seney NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Using relative basal area (%) by species of the 112 plots sampled across 11 stands at Seney NWR as part of the Rapid Ecological Assessment (Corace et al. 2011), we...

  7. Rapid Ecological Assessment Methods for Forests in the Laurentian Mixed Forest-Great Lakes Coastal Biological Network, Midwest Region, National Wildlife Refuge System, US Fish & Wildlife Service Midwest Region - Survey Protocol Framework: First Edition (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This protocol framework provides guidance for conducting Inventories of forests at multiple stations within a region. During 2010 and 2011, six refuges of the...

  8. Rapid Ecological Assessment of Forests in the Laurentian Mixed Forest-Great Lakes Coastal Biological Network, Midwest Region, National Wildlife Refuge System, US Fish & Wildlife Service: Summary Tables & Figures: Seney NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following are summary tables and figures associated with the 2010 rapid ecological assessment of sampled forest stands and associated earthworms at Seney...

  9. Biological ensilage of fish : optimization of stability, safety and functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enes Dapkevicius, M.L.N.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis deals with stability, safety, and functionality aspects of biological fish silage (BFS) obtained by lactic acid fermentation. BFS may provide an economically viable, environment friendly way of upgrading fish waste.

    BFS has been found advantageous when compared to the

  10. Biological ensilage of fish - optimization of stability, safety and functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enes Dapkevicius, M.L.N.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis deals with stability, safety, and functionality aspects of biological fish silage (BFS) obtained by lactic acid fermentation. BFS may provide an economically viable, environment friendly way of upgrading fish waste.BFS has been found advantageous when compared to the so-called acid proce

  11. Parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service parking lot inventory includes parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on National Wildlife Refuges,...

  12. Parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service parking lot inventory includes parking lots owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on National Wildlife Refuges,...

  13. Using image analysis to monitor biological changes in consume fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Frosch, Stina; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    The quality of fish products is largely defined by the visual appearance of the products. Visual appearance includes measurable parameters such as color and texture. Fat content and distribution as well as deposition of carotenoid pigments such as astaxanthin in muscular and fat tissue are biolog...

  14. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service orders endangered watercress darter pond restored in Birmingham

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article on emergency orders by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to rebuild the Roebuck Spring pond after a significant fish kill in 2008.

  15. Fish gelatin thin film standards for biological application of PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Jack E.; Rout, Bibhudutta; Szilasi, Szabolcs Z.; Bohara, Gyanendra; Deaton, James; Luyombya, Henry; Briski, Karen P.; Glass, Gary A.

    2014-08-01

    There exists a critical need to understand the flow and accumulation of metallic ions, both naturally occurring and those introduced to biological systems. In this paper the results of fabricating thin film elemental biological standards containing nearly any combination of trace elements in a protein matrix are presented. Because it is capable of high elemental sensitivity, particle induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXE) is an excellent candidate for in situ analysis of biological tissues. Additionally, the utilization of microbeam PIXE allows the determination of elemental concentrations in and around biological cells. However, obtaining elemental reference standards with the same matrix constituents as brain tissue is difficult. An excellent choice for simulating brain-like tissue is Norland® photoengraving glue which is derived from fish skin. Fish glue is water soluble, liquid at room temperature, and resistant to dilute acid. It can also be formed into a thin membrane which dries into a durable, self-supporting film. Elements of interest are introduced to the fish glue in precise volumetric additions of well quantified atomic absorption standard solutions. In this study GeoPIXE analysis package is used to quantify elements intrinsic to the fish glue as well as trace amounts of manganese added to the sample. Elastic (non-Rutherford) backscattered spectroscopy (EBS) and the 1.734 MeV proton-on-carbon 12C(p,p)12C resonance is used for a normalization scheme of the PIXE spectra to account for any discrepancies in X-ray production arising from thickness variation of the prepared standards. It is demonstrated that greater additions of the atomic absorption standard cause a viscosity reduction of the liquid fish glue resulting in thinner films but the film thickness can be monitored by using simultaneous PIXE and EBS proton data acquisition.

  16. U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Corporate Master Table Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Corporate Master Table, CMT, is the official source of Service organization codes and related information. Information in the CMT...

  17. U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Corporate Master Table Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Corporate Master Table, CMT, is the official source of Service organization codes and related information. Information in the CMT...

  18. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  19. Paradigm shifts in fish conservation: moving to the ecosystem services concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowx, I G; Portocarrero Aya, M

    2011-12-01

    Various factors constrain the existence and development of inland fishes and fisheries, such as pollution, habitat degradation, alien invasive species, local user conflicts, low social priority and inadequate research and funding. In many cases, however, degradation of the environment and loss of aquatic habitat are the predominant concerns for the conservation of freshwater aquatic biota. The need for concerted effort to prevent and reduce environmental degradation, as well as protection of freshwater fishes and fisheries as renewable common pool resources or entities in their own right, are the greatest challenges facing the conservation of fishes in inland waters. Unfortunately, traditional conservation practices such as regulation of exploitation, protected areas and habitat restoration have failed to arrest the alarming increase in number of threatened freshwater fish species worldwide. This paper examines the shifting paradigm of fisheries management from rule-based regulation, through fishery enhancement towards the ecosystem approach to fisheries, with reference to inland waters, and how the emerging concept of ecosystem services coupled with traditional fish conservation management practices, institutional restructuring and integrated management planning should provide a more sustainable thrust to formulation and promotion of fish conservation initiatives. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Development and application of biological technologies in fish genetic breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kang; Duan, Wei; Xiao, Jun; Tao, Min; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun; Liu, ShaoJun

    2015-02-01

    Fish genetic breeding is a process that remolds heritable traits to obtain neotype and improved varieties. For the purpose of genetic improvement, researchers can select for desirable genetic traits, integrate a suite of traits from different donors, or alter the innate genetic traits of a species. These improved varieties have, in many cases, facilitated the development of the aquaculture industry by lowering costs and increasing both quality and yield. In this review, we present the pertinent literatures and summarize the biological bases and application of selection breeding technologies (containing traditional selective breeding, molecular marker-assisted breeding, genome-wide selective breeding and breeding by controlling single-sex groups), integration breeding technologies (containing cross breeding, nuclear transplantation, germline stem cells and germ cells transplantation, artificial gynogenesis, artificial androgenesis and polyploid breeding) and modification breeding technologies (represented by transgenic breeding) in fish genetic breeding. Additionally, we discuss the progress our laboratory has made in the field of chromosomal ploidy breeding of fish, including distant hybridization, gynogenesis, and androgenesis. Finally, we systematically summarize the research status and known problems associated with each technology.

  1. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ... varied spatially and temporally but were generally within safe ranges for freshwater habitats. ... and depressed zooplankton diversity at WC suggested impacts from the fish ...

  2. Oil and Gas Wells - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This geospatial dataset contains oil and gas wells that intersect either the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service interest or approved boundary or both. Oil and gas wells...

  3. Workshop report: Developing a Citizen Science framework for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This workshop report summarizes the development of a citizen science framework for use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The report details the desired outcomes...

  4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Midwest Region easements manual

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This manual provides pollices, establishes procedures and sets guidelines to administer easement interests for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Midwest Region. It is...

  5. Trail Line and Point Features - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains a baseline inventory and condition assessment of all non-motorized trails on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands as part of the National...

  6. Oil and Gas Wells - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This geospatial dataset contains oil and gas wells that intersect either the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service interest or approved boundary or both. Oil and gas wells...

  7. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sponsored Projects : 1987-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document offers a list, as well as a timeline, of projects which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has sponsored since establishing a field station at Rocky...

  8. Cooperative agreement between U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and The Great Basin Society

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Great Basin Society to establish a Regional Environmental Education and Research Center on...

  9. Intra-service section 7 biological evaluation form

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document examines the effects that the Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance and Management Plan is likely to have on endangered and threatened species at Neal...

  10. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Final Environmental Assessment for Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary purpose of the proposed action is to consider recreational fishing opportunities on Cypress Creek NWR. This EA analyzes four different fishing...

  11. Roads owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Road Inventory include location, road classification, road condition, sign information, date of visit and additional information. In a phased...

  12. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fishery Resources Project Panama City, Florida Visitation Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Santee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) has been identified by the Division ofWildlife Refuges for expansion of fishing activity. The Office of FisheriesAssistance,...

  13. Roads owned and maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Road Inventory include location, road classification, road condition, sign information, date of visit and additional information. In a phased...

  14. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System: Annual Report, 1985-1986.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Park, D.L.; Flagg, T.A.; McCutcheon, S.

    1986-12-01

    An ongoing cooperative project between the Bonneville Power Administration and the National Marine Fisheries Service was initiated in 1983 to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids. The system is based upon the passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed in 1985 and is divided into laboratory and field studies. All studies were conducted with the tag implanted into the body cavity of the test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle.

  15. Feeding biology of the introduced fish roi, and its impact on Hawaiian reef fishes, January 2004 and January 2005, (NODC Accession 0002172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Feeding biology of the introduced fish roi (Cephalopholis argus), and its impact on Hawaiian reef fishes and fisheries between January 2004 and January 2005. Roi...

  16. Environmental Assessment: Land Exchange between the City of Virginia Beach and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment (EA) will identify and evaluate the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service's (Service)...

  17. Biological reference points for fish stocks in a multispecies context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collie, J.S.; Gislason, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    variation. For a prey species like sprat, fishing mortality reference levels should be conditioned on the level of predation mortality. For a predator species, a conservative level of fishing mortality can be identified that will prevent growth overfishing and ensure stock replacement. These first- order...

  18. Biology of Herbivorous Fish in the Coastal Areas of Western Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Furumitsu, Keisuke; Yagishita, Naoki; KUME, Gen

    2010-01-01

    Seaweed beds in Japanese coastal waters have significantly declined in recent years and feeding by herbivorous fish has been identified as one of the potential causes of this decline. In the western coastal areas of Kyushu, seaweed consumption by fish species such as the mottled spinefoot (Siganus fuscescens), sea chubs (Kyphosus spp.), and the Japanese parrotfish (Calotomus japonicus) has become a matter of concern. Our research group has been investigating the biology of herbivorous fish in...

  19. Challenge cost share agreement between U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Owl Mountain Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Challenge Cost Share Agreement is for the Service and the OMP to enter into a cooperative effort to determine and evaluate how to best manage...

  20. Management of Black-tailed praire dogs on Fish and Wildlife Service lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the conservation and management of the black-tailed prairie dog on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service land, in regards to black-tailed prairie dogs...

  1. Biologically Inspired Behaviour Design for Autonomous Robotic Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Dong Liu; Huosheng Hu

    2006-01-01

    Behaviour-based approach plays a key role for mobile robots to operate safely in unknown or dynamically changing environments. We have developed a hybrid control architecture for our autonomous robotic fish that consists of three layers: cognitive, behaviour and swim pattern. In this paper, we describe some main design issues of the behaviour layer, which is the centre of the layered control architecture of our robotic fish. Fuzzy logic control (FLC) is adopted here to design individual behaviours. Simulation and real experiments are presented to show the feasibility and the performance of the designed behaviour layer.

  2. Fish and logger summaries - Physical and biological effects of fish-friendly tide gates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this one-time stand-alone study is to evaluate how effective "fish-friendly" or self-regulating tide gates (SRTs) are at increasing connectivity for...

  3. Using image analysis to monitor biological changes in consume fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Frosch, Stina; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    The quality of fish products is largely defined by the visual appearance of the products. Visual appearance includes measurable parameters such as color and texture. Fat content and distribution as well as deposition of carotenoid pigments such as astaxanthin in muscular and fat tissue...

  4. [Memorandum of agreement between the Bureau of Reclamation and Fish and Wildlife Service concerning Kirwin dam and reservoir

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum of agreement between the Bureau of Reclamation and Fish and Wildlife Service concerns the operation and maintenance of the Kirwin reservoir and dam,...

  5. Grassland breeding bird use of managed grasslands on National Wildlife Refuges in Region 5 of the Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The overall purpose of this project is to understand the likely capacity of Fish and Wildlife Service land managers to affect grassland bird populations in Region 5....

  6. Involvement of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the New York State Bald Eagle Reintroduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In July, 1981, Region 7 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), a permit to take 21 young...

  7. Proposal P-94129 : Technical Support to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Argonne National Laboratory proposed, in this document, to provide the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service technical support in establishing a National Wildlife Refuge at...

  8. Acid rain publications by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Rita F.

    1989-01-01

    Pollution of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems has been a concern to society since the burning of fossil fuels began in the industrial revolution. In the past decade or so, this concern has been heightened by evidence that chemical transformation in the atmosphere of combustion by-products and subsequent long-range transport can cause environmental damage in remote areas. The extent of this damage and the rates of ecological recovery were largely unknown. "Acid rain" became the environmental issue of the 1980's. To address the increasing concerns of the public, in 1980 the Federal government initiated a 10-year interagency research program to develop information that could be used by the President and the Congress in making decisions for emission controls. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been an active participant in acid precipitation research. The Service provided support to a number of scientific conferences and forums, including the Action Seminar on Acid Precipitation held in Toronto, Canada, in 1979, an international symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Fishery Impacts in Northeastern North America in 1981, and a symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Atmospheric Deposition: A Western Perspective in 1982. These meetings as well as the growing involvement with the government's National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program placed the Service in the lead in research on the biological effects of acidic deposition. Research projects have encompassed water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Water quality surveys have been conducted to help determine the extent of acid precipitation effects in the northeast, Middle Atlantic, and Rocky Mountain regions. In addition to lake and stream studies, research in wetland and some terrestrial habitats has also been conducted. Specific projects have addressed important sport species such as brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and striped bass (Morone

  9. MIXOTROPHIC GROWTH OF THE MICROALGAE NANNOCHLOROPSIS OCULATA (EUSTIGMATALES: MONODOPSIDACEAE ON BIOLOGICAL FISH ENSILAGE MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Torres, H.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannochloropsis oculata was grown in batch culture during 12 days until stationary phase, under constant temperature and illumination 24 h per day, using three different culture media (T1 – Guillard F/2, T2 – Yashima and T3 –biological fish ensilage. We found that N. oculata reached high cellular densities in treatment T3, although it showed low chlorophyll concentrations per biomass unit, which is inconsistent with autotrophic growth. It suggests that N. oculata could growth mixotrophically in biological fish ensilage.

  10. Ecology of wolverines in northwest Alaska: Report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In response to proposed oil and gas exploration and development activities in the National Petroleum Reserve- Alaska (NPR-A), a study of wolverine ecology was...

  11. Big Muddy National Fish & Wildlife Refuge Hunting Chapter of Visitor Services Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Refuge staff developed this Hunting Plan to guide hunting on the Refuge and fulfill the purposes for which the Refuge was established. This plan provides...

  12. Moist-soil Management Guidelines for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Provides general guidelines for management of moist-soil habitats to waterfowl. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide the moist-soil manager on national...

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : Interim Plan for Weekend Visitor Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an interim plan for weekend visitors designed to provide for the safety of visitors to the Rocky Mountain Arsenal during its remediation and transition to a...

  14. Trail Line and Point Features - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains a baseline inventory and condition assessment of all non-motorized trails and features along trails (e.g. trailheads, signs, benches, etc.) on...

  15. Fish diversity in southern California using trawl data from the National Marine Fisheries Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Shannon Index of diversity was calculated from National Marine Fisheries Service Groundfish Survey Program (NMFS GSP) fish trawl data. Data from 477 fishery...

  16. Trail Line and Point Features - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains a baseline inventory and condition assessment of all non-motorized trails and features along trails (e.g. trailheads, signs, benches, etc.) on...

  17. Management of bison in the National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report, from the region 6 Wildlife Health Office, discusses management of bison (Bison bison) within the National Wildlife Refuge System, and future management...

  18. The Trail Inventory of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stations in Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to summarize the baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on National Wildlife Refuges in Wisconsin. Trails in this inventory are...

  19. The Trail Inventory of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stations in Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to summarize the baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on National Wildlife Refuges in Michigan. Trails in this inventory are...

  20. Fish assemblages in southern California using trawl data from the National Marine Fisheries Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish benthic trawls were completed by the National Marine Fisheries Service Groundfish Survey Program (NMFS GSP). Data from 477 fishery independent trawls ranging...

  1. The Trail Inventory of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stations in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to summarize the baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on National Wildlife Refuges in Iowa. Trails in this inventory are...

  2. The Trail Inventory of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stations in California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to summarize the baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on National Wildlife Refuges in California. Trails in this inventory...

  3. Forest development in Southeast Alaska: Issues concerning the Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper provides an overview of forest development in southeast Alaska and examines the trends in FWS opportunities for affecting forest development decisions.

  4. Pollinator Monitoring Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There is growing evidence that pollinators are declining world-wide. In order to address the growing concern for pollinators, their needs in a changing climate and...

  5. The Trail Inventory of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stations in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to summarize the baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on National Wildlife Refuges in New Mexico. Trails in this inventory...

  6. Reproductive biology of freshwater fishes from the Venezuelan floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, H Y; Cardillo, E; Poleo, G; Marcano, D

    2009-03-01

    This review describes the endocrine changes that occur during the annual reproductive cycle of Pygocentrus cariba, Pimelodus blochii, and Oxydoras sifontesi and their relationships with the environmental characteristics of Venezuelan floodplains. Most reproductive studies of teleosts have focused on changes that occur during annual cycles in temperate species but, in tropical fish, this has been examined less frequently. P. cariba, P. blochii, and O. sifontesi are seasonal breeders widely distributed along the Orinoco River. Under natural conditions they have an annual gonadal cycle closely related to changes in the annual hydrology cycle of the Orinoco River which defines two seasons on the floodplain: inundation and isolation. The reproductive cycle of these species seems to be controlled by cues from the external environment. Relevant data about gonadal maturation, for example gonadosomatic index and sexual hormones secretion, are contrasted. The role of catecholamines in neuroendocrine control of the reproductive axis is also considered in this work.

  7. 77 FR 13624 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ....S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, that meet the definition of sacred objects... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, Lakewood, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice....

  8. 77 FR 13623 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, that meet the definition of sacred... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, Lakewood, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ]...

  9. Biology and management of fish stocks in Bahir Dar Gulf, Lake Tana, Ethiopia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wudneh, T.

    1998-01-01

    The biology of the fish stocks of the major species in the Bahir Dar Gulf of Lake Tana, the largest lake in Ethiopia, has been studied based on data collected during August 1990 to September 1993. The distribution, reproduction patterns, growth and mortality dynamics and gillnet selectivity of these

  10. BILIARY PAH METABOLITES AS A BIOLOGICAL INDICATOR OF FISH EXPOSURE IN TRIBUTARIES OF LAKE ERIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biliary polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites have been studied as a biological indicator of fish exposure to PAHs since the mid 1980's. Brown bullheads were collected from the following Lake Erie tributaries: Buffalo River (BUF), Niagara River at Love Canal (NIA)...

  11. Biology and management of fish stocks in Bahir Dar Gulf, Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wudneh, T.

    1998-01-01

    The biology of the fish stocks of the major species in the Bahir Dar Gulf of Lake Tana, the largest lake in Ethiopia, has been studied based on data collected during August 1990 to September 1993. The distribution, reproduction patterns, growth and mortality dynamics and gillnet selectivity

  12. Perception and discrimination of movement and biological motion patterns in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluessel, V; Kortekamp, N; Cortes, J A Ortiz; Klein, A; Bleckmann, H

    2015-09-01

    Vision is of primary importance for many fish species, as is the recognition of movement. With the exception of one study, assessing the influence of conspecific movement on shoaling behaviour, the perception of biological motion in fish had not been studied in a cognitive context. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the discrimination abilities of two teleost species in regard to simple and complex movement patterns of dots and objects, including biological motion patterns using point and point-light displays (PDs and PLDs). In two-alternative forced-choice experiments, in which choosing the designated positive stimulus was food-reinforced, fish were first tested in their ability to distinguish the video of a stationary black dot on a light background from the video of a moving black dot presented at different frequencies and amplitudes. While all fish succeeded in learning the task, performance declined with decreases in either or both parameters. In subsequent tests, cichlids and damselfish distinguished successfully between the videos of two dots moving at different speeds and amplitudes, between two moving dot patterns (sinus vs. expiring sinus) and between animated videos of two moving organisms (trout vs. eel). Transfer tests following the training of the latter showed that fish were unable to identify the positive stimulus (trout) by means of its PD alone, thereby indicating that the ability of humans to spontaneously recognize an organism based on its biological motion may not be present in fish. All participating individuals successfully discriminated between two PDs and two PLDs after a short period of training, indicating that biological motions presented in form of PLDs are perceived and can be distinguished. Results were the same for the presentation of dark dots on a light background and light dots on a dark background.

  13. Assessment of the Impact of Extension Services on Fish Farming in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbebi, F. O.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to assess the impact of access to extension services on fish farming in Ekiti State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study investigated the socio – economic characteristics of fish farmers, information disseminated to fish farmers, attributes of extension agents, and farmers’ access to extension services and farmers profitability. A well-structured questionnaire was used to collect information from the farmers and a sample size of 90 fish farmers was selected from the six local government selected. Analysis of data was carried out using frequency and percentage tables and Gross Margin analysis was used to determine the profitability of the farmers. There was relationship between farmers’ access to extension services and their profitability. It was recommended that extension agents should intensify their efforts in reaching farmers and passing useful information to them in order to increase farmers’ profitability.

  14. Chromium oxide (51Cr2O3 used as biological marker was not absorbed by fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Z. Sakita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate absorption of radio-labeled chromium oxide (51Cr2O3, used as biological marker in nutrition studies with Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. An experimental diet with approximately 58 µCi of specific activity of the element was encapsulated and fed daily to 35 adult Nile tilapia; a group of 35 fish was used as control feeding on a basal diet. At the beginning of the experiment five fish from each group were randomly selected and blood samples were drawn from control (BC and experimental fish (BE. Fish were then euthanized by anesthetic overdoses and samples of the liver tissue (LT, renal tissue (RT, stomach without content (S, intestine without content (I, gills tissue (GT, muscle tissue (fillet; MT, visceral fat (VF, content of the digestive tract (CTDE and water aquarium were collected from the experimental fish. The procedure was repeated daily for one week. Simple linear regressions were adjusted - days of collection vs. determination coefficients, and were established for statistical comparisons of the measured activity of 51Cr readings in sampled blood and tissues (logarithmic transformation for samples of the control and experimental fish. No differences (P>0.05 were detected between samples from BC fish and BE, RT, VF, MT and LT of treated fish, but samples of GT, I, S, CTDE and WA from the tanks holding fish which received the experimental diet differed from control (P<0.05. The experimental results indicate that the trivalent chromium in the form of 51Cr2O3 was not significantly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, gills or another possible route of absorption under these experimental conditions and with Nile tilapia. Therefore, this marker was shown to be inert and can be safely used in nutrition studies.

  15. Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge & Management Area Hunting and Fishing Plan : Intra-Service Section 7 Evaluation Form

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Section 7 Evaluation states that the Patoka River NWR Hunting and Fishing Plan is not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitats on the...

  16. 78 FR 28619 - Proposed Information Collection; Fish and Wildlife Service Conservation Banking Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Banking Survey AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY... impediments to the habitat conservation banking program, and develop possible options for encouraging expanded... and purchasers of conservation banking credits. The surveys will benefit the Service by helping to...

  17. Mining biological pathways using WikiPathways web services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kelder

    Full Text Available WikiPathways is a platform for creating, updating, and sharing biological pathways [1]. Pathways can be edited and downloaded using the wiki-style website. Here we present a SOAP web service that provides programmatic access to WikiPathways that is complementary to the website. We describe the functionality that this web service offers and discuss several use cases in detail. Exposing WikiPathways through a web service opens up new ways of utilizing pathway information and assisting the community curation process.

  18. Mining biological pathways using WikiPathways web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, Thomas; Pico, Alexander R; Hanspers, Kristina; van Iersel, Martijn P; Evelo, Chris; Conklin, Bruce R

    2009-07-30

    WikiPathways is a platform for creating, updating, and sharing biological pathways [1]. Pathways can be edited and downloaded using the wiki-style website. Here we present a SOAP web service that provides programmatic access to WikiPathways that is complementary to the website. We describe the functionality that this web service offers and discuss several use cases in detail. Exposing WikiPathways through a web service opens up new ways of utilizing pathway information and assisting the community curation process.

  19. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in

  20. Ecological and biological determinants of methylmercury accumulation in tropical coastal fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Tércia G; Moreira, Isabel; Malm, Olaf; Kehrig, Helena A

    2013-02-01

    This research investigated whether environmental conditions, biological fish characteristics and anthropogenic impacts influenced mercury (Hg) assimilation into the muscle tissue of two fish species from two Brazilian bays, Ilha Grande Bay and Guanabara Bay. Fish and superficial water were collected in different periods. Hg was determined by CV-AAS. Methylmercury (MeHg) was identified and quantified by ECD-GC. Chlorophyll a concentrations in the water column indicated that Ilha Grande Bay and Guanabara Bay were oligotrophic and eutrophic, respectively. Hg in fish ranged from 2.10 to 870.17 μg kg(-1) dry wt. in Ilha Grande Bay and 40.90 to 809.24 μg kg(-1) dry wt. in Guanabara Bay. Slight differences were found between the length-normalized Hg concentrations and its percent of Hg in a voracious predator from the bays. In Guanabara Bay, where the presence of a chlor-alkali plant causes Hg input, the iliophagous fish species showed the highest length-normalized Hg concentrations and the voracious predator the lowest. Iliophagous fish is consumed by voracious predator and, consequently, acts as their MeHg food supply. Iliophagous fish from Ilha Grande Bay presented a higher percent of MeHg (80.0 %) than specimens from Guanabara Bay (54.5 %). This fact suggests that more MeHg was transferred from iliophagous fish to voracious predator in Ilha Grande Bay. At Guanabara Bay, the bioproduction is greater than that at Ilha Grande Bay, presenting the highest biomass in it ecosystem, which may subsequently dilute Hg and reduce its availability to the biota; i.e., influencing in Hg and MeHg availability throughout the food chain. Consequently, more MeHg is available in the aquatic environment of Ilha Grande Bay.

  1. All in the ears: unlocking the early life history biology and spatial ecology of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrs, Danswell; Ebner, Brendan C; Fulton, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Obtaining biological and spatial information of the early life history (ELH) phases of fishes has been problematic, such that larval and juvenile phases are often referred to as the 'black box' of fish population biology and ecology. However, a potent source of life-history data has been mined from the earstones (otoliths) of bony fishes. We systematically reviewed 476 empirical papers published between 2005 and 2012 (inclusive) that used otoliths to examine fish ELH phases, which has been an area of increasing attention over this period. We found that otolith-based research during this period could be split into two broad themes according to whether studies examined: (i) biological objectives related to intrinsic processes such as larval and juvenile age, growth and mortality, and/or (ii) spatial objectives, such as habitat use, dispersal and migration. Surprisingly, just 24 studies (5%) explored a combined biological-spatial objective by simultaneously exploiting biological and spatial information from otoliths, suggesting much more scope for such integrated research objectives to be answered via the use of multiple otolith-based techniques in a single study. Mapping otolith analytical techniques across these two approaches revealed that otolith structural analysis was mainly used to investigate biological processes, while otolith chemical analyses were most often applied to spatial questions. Heavy skew in research effort was apparent across biomes, with most (62%) publications specific to marine species, despite comparable levels of species richness and the importance of freshwater taxa (just 15% of papers). Indeed, around 1% (380 species) of a possible 31400+ extant species were examined in our surveyed papers, with a strong emphasis on temperate marine species of commercial value. Potential model species for otolith-based ELH ecology research are arising, with the eel genus Anguilla (24 studies) and the European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolis (14 studies

  2. A multi-indicator framework for mapping cultural ecosystem services: The case of freshwater recreational fishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamagna, Amy M.; Mogollon, Beatriz; Angermeier, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent interest, ecosystem services are not yet fully incorporated into private and public decisions about natural resource management. Cultural ecosystem services (CES) are among the most challenging of services to include because they comprise complex ecological and social properties and processes that make them difficult to measure, map or monetize. Like others, CES are vulnerable to landscape changes and unsustainable use. To date, the sustainability of services has not been adequately addressed and few studies have considered measures of service capacity and demand simultaneously. To facilitate sustainability assessments and management of CES, our study objectives were to (1) develop a spatially explicit framework for mapping the capacity of ecosystems to provide freshwater recreational fishing, an important cultural service, (2) map societal demand for freshwater recreational fishing based on license data and identify areas of potential overuse, and (3) demonstrate how maps of relative capacity and relative demand could be interfaced to estimate sustainability of a CES. We mapped freshwater recreational fishing capacity at the 12-digit hydrologic unit-scale in North Carolina and Virginia using a multi-indicator service framework incorporating biophysical and social landscape metrics and mapped demand based on fishing license data. Mapping of capacity revealed a gradual decrease in capacity eastward from the mountains to the coastal plain and that fishing demand was greatest in urban areas. When comparing standardized relative measures of capacity and demand for freshwater recreational fishing, we found that ranks of capacity exceeded ranks of demand in most hydrologic units, except in 17% of North Carolina and 5% of Virginia. Our GIS-based approach to view freshwater recreational fishing through an ecosystem service lens will enable scientists and managers to examine (1) biophysical and social factors that foster or diminish cultural ecosystem

  3. [Book review] Developments in biological standardization (Vol. 49): Fish Biologics: Seriodiagnostics and Vaccines, edited by W. Hennessen and D. P. Andersen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Review of: Developments in Biologicals, Vol. 49. Fish Biologics: Serodiagnostics and Vaccines. International Symposium, Leetown, W.Va., April 1981. Editor(s): Hennessen, W. (Bern); Andersen, D.P. (Leetown, W.Va.); Society/Societies: International Association of Biological Standardization, XII + 496 p., 90 fig., 110 tab., soft cover, 1981. ISBN: 978-3-8055-3471-0.

  4. Summary Report for 2003-2004 Phase 1 Archaeological Survey of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service's Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In February 2004, the United States National Park Service (USNPS) recognized the significance of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service's Great Dismal Swamp...

  5. Population and biological parameters of selected fish species from the middle Xingu River, Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M; Giarrizzo, T; Isaac, V J

    2015-08-01

    This study estimates the main biological parameters, including growth rates, asymptotic length, mortality, consumption by biomass, biological yield, and biomass, for the most abundant fish species found on the middle Xingu River, prior to the construction of the Belo Monte Dam. The specimens collected in experimental catches were analysed with empirical equations and length-based FISAT methods. For the 63 fish species studied, high growth rates (K) and high natural mortality (M) were related to early sexual maturation and low longevity. The predominance of species with short life cycles and a reduced number of age classes, determines high rates of stock turnover, which indicates high productivity for fisheries, and a low risk of overfishing.

  6. BioMOBY: an open source biological web services proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark D; Links, Matthew

    2002-12-01

    BioMOBY is an Open Source research project which aims to generate an architecture for the discovery and distribution of biological data through web services; data and services are decentralised, but the availability of these resources, and the instructions for interacting with them, are registered in a central location called MOBY Central. BioMOBY adds to the web services paradigm, as exemplified by Universal Data Discovery and Integration (UDDI), by having an object-driven registry query system with object and service ontologies. This allows users to traverse expansive and disparate data sets where each possible next step is presented based on the data object currently in-hand. Moreover, a path from the current data object to a desired final data object could be automatically discovered using the registry. Native BioMOBY objects are lightweight XML, and make up both the query and the response of a simple object access protocol (SOAP) transaction.

  7. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Edmiston, C. Scott; Taylor, Michelle L.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11. The hydrology of Fish Creek is strongly affected by groundwater contributions from the area known as the Snake River west bank, which lies east of Fish Creek and west of Snake River. Because of this continuous groundwater discharge to the creek, land-use activities in the west bank area can affect the groundwater quality. Evaluation of nitrate isotopes and dissolved-nitrate concentrations in groundwater during the study indicated that nitrate was entering Fish Creek from groundwater, and that the source of nitrate was commonly a septic/sewage effluent or manure source, or multiple sources, potentially including artificial nitrogen fertilizers, natural soil organic matter, and mixtures of sources. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphate, which are key nutrients for growth of aquatic plants, generally were low in Fish Creek and occasionally were less than reporting levels (not detected). One potential reason for the low nutrient concentrations is that nutrients were being consumed by aquatic plant life that increases during the summer growing season, as a result of the seasonal increase in temperature and larger number of daylight hours. Several aspects of Fish Creek’s hydrology contribute to higher productivity and biovolume of aquatic plants in Fish Creek than typically observed in streams of its size in

  8. Parasites as biological tags of fish stocks: a meta-analysis of their discriminatory power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Robert; Kamiya, Tsukushi

    2015-01-01

    The use of parasites as biological tags to discriminate among marine fish stocks has become a widely accepted method in fisheries management. Here, we first link this approach to its unstated ecological foundation, the decay in the similarity of the species composition of assemblages as a function of increasing distance between them, a phenomenon almost universal in nature. We explain how distance decay of similarity can influence the use of parasites as biological tags. Then, we perform a meta-analysis of 61 uses of parasites as tags of marine fish populations in multivariate discriminant analyses, obtained from 29 articles. Our main finding is that across all studies, the observed overall probability of correct classification of fish based on parasite data was about 71%. This corresponds to a two-fold improvement over the rate of correct classification expected by chance alone, and the average effect size (Zr = 0·463) computed from the original values was also indicative of a medium-to-large effect. However, none of the moderator variables included in the meta-analysis had a significant effect on the proportion of correct classification; these moderators included the total number of fish sampled, the number of parasite species used in the discriminant analysis, the number of localities from which fish were sampled, the minimum and maximum distance between any pair of sampling localities, etc. Therefore, there are no clear-cut situations in which the use of parasites as tags is more useful than others. Finally, we provide recommendations for the future usage of parasites as tags for stock discrimination, to ensure that future applications of the method achieve statistical rigour and a high discriminatory power.

  9. Comments of the State of Colorado on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Rocky Mountain National Wildlife Area Fish and Wildlife Management Plans Fiscal Year 1995 and Biomonitoring Program for Rocky Mountain Arsenal Aquatic Ecosystems March, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Colorado Division of Wildlife reviewed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Rocky Mountain Arsenal...

  10. Biomonitoring and assessment of environmental contaminants in fish-eating birds of the upper Niagara River: A contribution to the Niagara River Environmental Contaminants Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Niagara River Environmental Contaminants Study is an ongoing effort by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) emphasizing the use of biological indicators...

  11. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  12. Economic valuation of gas regulation as a Service by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Weiling; Cao Cougui; Wang Jinping

    2008-01-01

    Valuating the function of ecosystem services is crucial for accounting green GDP, making a conserva-tion policy of ecological environment and the decision of regional development as well as sustainable development strategy. Rice-duck-fish symbiosis has been promoted in several developing countries as a way of&creasing incomes for rice farmers, but investigations of its value have mainly focused on direct economic benefits, such as food and raw material production. Few studies have been conducted on the estimation of indirect services provided by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem. The gas regulation service and its economic values provided by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem were studied in Wuhan, China. The major components of gas regulation are O2 emission and greenhouse, gases (GHGs, CO2) regulation. The results show that O2 emission from different treatments (including rice-duck (RD) rice-fish (RF), rice-duck-fish (RDF) and rice (CK)) ranged from 26,370 kg/ha to 33,910 kg/ha per year, with an eco- nomic value of 10,050-12,920 yuan/ha per year (Chinese currency: I euro=10.2475 yuan, August 28, 2007). The net GHGs exchange varied from 1,200 to 3,320 kg/ha per year, and its economic value ranged.from 1,040 yuan/ha to 2, 900 yuan/ha per year Consequently, the total economic value of gas regulation provided by symbiosis complex ecosystems ranged from 11,090 yuan/ha to 15,820 yuan/ha per year, and the maximum overall economic value of gas regulation was provided by RDF complex ecosystem. The work will be useful for further understanding of the func tions of rice-duek-fish complex ecosystem services and supplying the theoretical references to agricultural policy.

  13. 50 CFR 222.309 - Permits for listed species of sea turtles involving the Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for listed species of sea turtles involving the Fish and Wildlife Service. 222.309 Section 222.309 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE... species of sea turtles involving the Fish and Wildlife Service. (a) This section establishes...

  14. Biological Activities of Tetrodotoxin-Producing Enterococcus faecium AD1 Isolated from Puffer Fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Hoang Khue Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Puffer fishes were collected from the central sea in Vietnam from spring to summer season. The eggs were incubated in MRS broth that was used to test the toxicity in mice and isolate the lactic acid bacteria community that could produce tetrodotoxin (TTX. Thin layer chromatography (TLC and high performance lipid chromatography (HPLC were used to detect and quantify TTX. As a result, Enterococcus faecium AD1 which was identified by biochemical test and 16S rRNA analysis could produce TTX 0.3 mg/mL when cultured in MRS broth. The bacterium was optimized for TTX production and gave 0.18 mg/mL, 0.07 mg/mL, and 0.15 mg/mL in media prepared from the meat-washing water of freshwater fishes (Pangasius bocourti, Oreochromis sp. and sea fish (Auxis thazard, respectively, that are also hopeful to answer some poisoning cases related to eating fishes. Enterococcus faecium also showed the wide antimicrobial activities on yeast, Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Extracted exopolysaccharide (EPS that reacted with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl to give IC50 at 5 mg/mL equaled 11 mg/mL ascorbic acid which could show effects on Hela-6 and Hep G2 using sulforhodamine B test. Enterococcus faecium can be claimed as a promising source in tetrodotoxin and biological compounds.

  15. Implications of biological factors on accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in Antarctic notothenioid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, J M; Lana, N B; Ciocco, N F; Covaci, A; Barrera-Oro, E; Moreira, E; Altamirano, J C

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the possible associations between selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and biological factors were assessed in different tissues of two Antarctic notothenioid fish: Notothenia rossii (NOR) and Trematomus newnesi (TRN) collected at Potter Cove, King George Island/Isla 25 de Mayo, South Shetland Islands. Specifically, association patterns between biological factors (body size, lipid content, body condition) and POP concentrations (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordanes (CHLs) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs)), were explored by using two approaches: multivariate analyses (principal component analysis: PCA) and intraspecific correlations. Integrating results suggest that biological factors such as size, KI and tissue type seemed to be associated to selective accumulation of POPs for immature specimens of N. rossii, and KI and tissue type for mature specimens of T. newnesi. Each particular factor should be considered when choosing N. rossii or T. newnesi as sentinels for POPs pollution in Antarctic marine environments. Further, both nototheniids showed a selective accumulation pattern in their gonads of penta-chlorinated biphenyls (penta-CBs; 55.5 and 29ngg(-1) lw for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively) and organochlorine pesticides such as DDTs (199 and 13.3ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi respectively), and of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in gills (97.2 and 22.1 for ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively), highlighting the importance of these tissues in monitoring studies of pollution in fish. The current study expands the knowledge concerning the biological factors to be investigated when specific pollutants are monitored and supports the importance of tissue type for the selective accumulation of POPs in Antarctic

  16. Environmental Assessment of Sport Fishing : Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment considers the biological, environmental, and socioeconomic effects of establishing a sport fishing program at Meredosia National...

  17. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasability of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report, 1986-1987.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Flagg, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    In 1983, a multi-year project to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids was established. The system is based upon a miniaturized passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed and is divided into laboratory studies, field studies, and systems development. All studies were conducted using a glass-encapsulated tag implanted into the body cavity of test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle. Laboratory studies with juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, showed that retention of glass-encapsulated PIT tags was 99-100% in fish weighing 3 g (mean weight) or larger. No adverse tissue response to the tag was noted. The survival of fish 5 g (mean weight) or larger was usually greater than 99%. However, fish ranging in weight from 2 to 4 g, or fish undergoing a physiological change such as smoltification may have a low mortality (usually less than 5.0%) after tagging. The mortality rate in the smaller fish was dependent upon tagging skill whereas mortality in smolting fish seemed dependent upon the level of stress. Growth comparisons between tagged and control fish indicated PIT-tagged fish had a slightly depressed growth rate at some measurement periods. The operational life of glass-encapsulated PIT tags implanted in fish was good, with 100% of the tags operating after 401 days. No tags were rejected from the fish during the observation period.

  18. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasability of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report, 1986-1987.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Flagg, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    In 1983, a multi-year project to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids was established. The system is based upon a miniaturized passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed and is divided into laboratory studies, field studies, and systems development. All studies were conducted using a glass-encapsulated tag implanted into the body cavity of test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle. Laboratory studies with juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, showed that retention of glass-encapsulated PIT tags was 99-100% in fish weighing 3 g (mean weight) or larger. No adverse tissue response to the tag was noted. The survival of fish 5 g (mean weight) or larger was usually greater than 99%. However, fish ranging in weight from 2 to 4 g, or fish undergoing a physiological change such as smoltification may have a low mortality (usually less than 5.0%) after tagging. The mortality rate in the smaller fish was dependent upon tagging skill whereas mortality in smolting fish seemed dependent upon the level of stress. Growth comparisons between tagged and control fish indicated PIT-tagged fish had a slightly depressed growth rate at some measurement periods. The operational life of glass-encapsulated PIT tags implanted in fish was good, with 100% of the tags operating after 401 days. No tags were rejected from the fish during the observation period.

  19. Bacterial production, primary production, phytoplankton, zooplankton, biological analysis of fish, and massive fish length data from the EVRIKA and other platforms in the Antarctic from 23 February 1980 to 09 December 1988 (NODC Accession 9600039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacterial production, primary production, phytoplankton, zooplankton, biological analysis of fish, and massive fish length data were collected from the EVRIKA and...

  20. Be Healthy as a Fish Educational Program at the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goś, Daria; Szymańska, Ewelina; Białek-Wyrzykowska, Urszula; Wiweger, Małgorzata; Kuźnicki, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the Be Healthy as a Fish educational program that is organized by the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IIMCB) in Warsaw, Poland, is to educate children about the ways in which zebrafish can be used as a model organism to help scientists understand the way the human body works. We introduce Be Healthy as a Fish workshops to children in fourth to sixth grades of primary school (9-11 years old), together with two kinds of materials under the same title: a book and a movie. We focus on the field of biology in a way that complements the children's classroom curriculum and encourages them to broaden their interests in biology in the future. The Be Healthy as a Fish educational program was inaugurated in 2014 at the Warsaw Science Festival. As of October 31, 2015, 526 primary school students participated in 27 workshops. Approximately 2000 people have received the book and nearly 1700 people have watched the movie. Be Healthy as a Fish: Origin of the Title There is a popular saying in Poland that someone is "healthy as a fish" meaning that one enjoys good health. Does this imply that fish are really that healthy? Obviously, some fish may not be healthy. Just like other animals and humans, they can and do get sick. However, this common and deceptive impression of "healthy fish" results from the fact that people hardly ever have an opportunity to observe a fish that is sick. Why does our educational program have such a possibly misleading title that may not always be true? We took advantage of this provocative title and commonly known expression and assigned to it a completely new meaning: fish can get sick, but they are important for human health. Notably, this catchy sentence intrinsically combines two keywords-health and fish-which, in our opinion, makes it a good title for a successful educational program.

  1. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service : Environmental Assessment : Final (1/2011) for Proposed Hunting Plan for Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to provide hunting opportunities on Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Little Falls, Minnesota that...

  2. The Status and Distribution of Birds Surveyed on Missouri's Four National Wildlife Refuges with Special Emphasis to Ten United States Fish and Wildlife Service Species of Management Concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1988 the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) began a project to determine the distribution,...

  3. Environmental assessment, proposal by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop reporting and sealing regulations for harvested walrus, polar bear, and sea otter

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fish and Wildlife Service proposes reporting and sealing regulations for the Native take of walrus, polar bear, and sea otter by amending 50 CFR Part 18.23. The...

  4. Challenge cost-share agreement between Polk County Conservation Board, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, and the U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Neal Smith NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a cost-share agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Polk County Conservation Board, and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources in support...

  5. Salmon research cruises of five vessels operated by the fish and wildlife service in the North Pacific and Bering Sea during the 1956 season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service as a research agency of the International North Pacific Fisheries Commission, is engaged in a study to determine the...

  6. Biological treatment of fish processing wastewater: A case study from Sfax City (Southeastern Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Meryem; Karray, Fatma; Feki, Firas; Loukil, Slim; Mhiri, Najla; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-04-01

    The present work presents a study of the biological treatment of fish processing wastewater at salt concentration of 55 g/L. Wastewater was treated by both continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) during 50 and 100 days, respectively. These biological processes involved salt-tolerant bacteria from natural hypersaline environments at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The phylogenetic analysis of the corresponding excised DGGE bands has demonstrated that the taxonomic affiliation of the most dominant species includes Halomonadaceae and Flavobacteriaceae families of the Proteobacteria (Gamma-proteobacteria class) and the Bacteroidetes phyla, respectively. The results of MBR were better than those of CSTR in the removal of total organic carbon with efficiencies from 97.9% to 98.6%. Nevertheless, salinity with increasing OLR aggravates fouling that requires more cleaning for a membrane in MBR while leads to deterioration of sludge settleability and effluent quality in CSTR.

  7. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea. CONCLUSION: It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  8. Valuing multiple eelgrass ecosystem services in Sweden: fish production and uptake of carbon and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glenn Cole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valuing nature’s benefits in monetary terms is necessary for policy-makers facing trade-offs in how to spend limited financial resources on environmental protection. We provide information to assess trade-offs associated with the management of seagrass beds, which provide a number of ecosystem services, but are presently impacted by many stressors. We develop an interdisciplinary framework for valuing multiple ecosystem services and apply it to the case of eelgrass (Zostera marina, a dominant seagrass species in the northern hemisphere. We identify and quantify links between three eelgrass functions (habitat for fish, carbon and nitrogen uptake and economic goods in Sweden, quantify these using ecological endpoints, estimate the marginal average value of the impact of losing one hectare of eelgrass along the Swedish northwest coast on welfare in monetary terms, and aggregate these values while considering double-counting. Over a 20 to 50 year period we find that compared to unvegetated habitats, a hectare of eelgrass, including the organic material accumulated in the sediment, produces an additional 626 kg cod fishes and 7,535 wrasse individuals and sequesters 98.6 ton carbon and 466 kg nitrogen. We value the flow of future benefits associated with commercial fishing, avoided climate change damages, and reduced eutrophication at 170,000 SEK in 2014 (20,700 US$ or 11,000 SEK (1,300 US$ annualized at 4%. Fish production, which is the most commonly valued ecosystem service in the seagrass literature, only represented 25% of the total value whereas a conservative estimate of nitrogen regulation constituted 46%, suggesting that most seagrass beds are undervalued. Comparing these values with historic losses of eelgrass we show that the Swedish northwest coast has suffered a substantial reduction in fish production and mineral regulation. Future work should improve the understanding of the geographic scale of eelgrass functions, how local variables

  9. Intra-Service Section 7 Biological Evaluation Form - Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document analyzes the effect that spraying for noxious weeds would have on creatures in the refuge. Specifically, it analyzes the effect herbicides would have...

  10. Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek have been increasing in recent years. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the water quality and biological communities in Fish Creek. Water-quality samples were collected for analyses of physical properties and water chemistry (nutrients, nitrate isotopes, and wastewater chemicals) between March 2007 and October 2008 from seven surface-water sites and three groundwater wells. During this same period, aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate samples were collected and habitat characteristics were measured at the surface-water sites. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate nutrient concentrations (that influence biological indicators of eutrophication) and potential sources of nutrients by using stable isotope analysis and other indicator chemicals (such as caffeine and disinfectants) that could provide evidence of anthropogenic sources, such as wastewater or septic tank contamination in Fish Creek and adjacent groundwater, and (2) characterize the algal, macrophyte, and macroinvertebrate communities and habitat of Fish Creek. Nitrate was the dominant species of dissolved nitrogen present in all samples and was the only bioavailable species detected at concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level in all surface-water samples. Average concentrations of dissolved nitrate in surface water were largest in samples collected from the two sites with seasonal flow near Teton Village and decreased downstream; the smallest concentration was at downstream site A-Wck. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in groundwater were consistently greater than concentrations in corresponding surface-water sites during the same sampling event

  11. Fishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜群山

    2002-01-01

    @@ Last Saturday my cousin (表兄) came to my home. We were very happy to see each other. We decided that the next day we went to fish. We got up very early that day. When we left home,the moon could still be seen in the sky.

  12. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remuneration for services performed on a boat... Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed... receive, any cash remuneration, other than remuneration that is described in subparagraph (1) of...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6050A-1 - Information returns regarding services performed by certain crewmen on fishing boats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information returns regarding services... ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6050A-1 Information returns regarding services... information regarding services performed by certain crewmen on fishing boats, see § 1.6050A-1 of this...

  14. Biological Monitoring Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Biological Monitoring Team (BMT) was a pilot project focused on addressing NWRS inventory and monitoring needs in Regions 3 and 5. The BMT was a precursor to the...

  15. Mobile Bat Acoustical Survey Protocol, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 4, Division of Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Contains draft protocol for conducting road based mobile acoustical surveys for bats using Anabat detectors. Protocol is designed for regional or landscape analysis...

  16. Dorris dam reinspection report (formal) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Modoc National Wildlife refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this inspection was to make a general assessment of the structural integrity and operational adequacy of the dam and its appurtenant structures. This...

  17. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Concerns and Issues about Mosquito Control on National Wildlife Refuges in the Northeast

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan guides the long-range development of the Refuges by identifying and integrating appropriate habitats, management strategies, program elements, and...

  18. Evidence of market-driven size-selective fishing and the mediating effects of biological and institutional factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sheila M. W.; Wentz, Allison; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio; Maxey, Martin; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Leslie, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Market demand is often ignored or assumed to lead uniformly to the decline of resources. Yet little is known about how market demand influences natural resources in particular contexts, or the mediating effects of biological or institutional factors. Here, we investigate this problem by examining the Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) fishery around La Paz, Mexico, where medium or “plate-sized” fish are sold to restaurants at a premium price. If higher demand for plate-sized fish increases the relative abundance of the smallest (recruit size class) and largest (most fecund) fish, this may be a market mechanism to increase stocks and fishermen’s revenues. We tested this hypothesis by estimating the effect of prices on the distribution of catch across size classes using daily records of prices and catch. We linked predictions from this economic choice model to a staged-based model of the fishery to estimate the effects on the stock and revenues from harvest. We found that the supply of plate-sized fish increased by 6%, while the supply of large fish decreased by 4% as a result of a 13% price premium for plate-sized fish. This market-driven size selection increased revenues (14%) but decreased total fish biomass (−3%). However, when market-driven size selection was combined with limited institutional constraints, both fish biomass (28%) and fishermen’s revenue (22%) increased. These results show that the direction and magnitude of the effects of market demand on biological populations and human behavior can depend on both biological attributes and institutional constraints. Fisheries management may capitalize on these conditional effects by implementing size-based regulations when economic and institutional incentives will enhance compliance, as in the case we describe here, or by creating compliance enhancing conditions for existing regulations. PMID:23865225

  19. Evidence of market-driven size-selective fishing and the mediating effects of biological and institutional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sheila M W; Wentz, Allison; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio; Maxey, Martin; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Leslie, Heather M

    2013-06-01

    Market demand is often ignored or assumed to lead uniformly to the decline of resources. Yet little is known about how market demand influences natural resources in particular contexts, or the mediating effects of biological or institutional factors. Here, we investigate this problem by examining the Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) fishery around La Paz, Mexico, where medium or "plate-sized" fish are sold to restaurants at a premium price. If higher demand for plate-sized fish increases the relative abundance of the smallest (recruit size class) and largest (most fecund) fish, this may be a market mechanism to increase stocks and fishermen's revenues. We tested this hypothesis by estimating the effect of prices on the distribution of catch across size classes using daily records of prices and catch. We linked predictions from this economic choice model to a staged-based model of the fishery to estimate the effects on the stock and revenues from harvest. We found that the supply of plate-sized fish increased by 6%, while the supply of large fish decreased by 4% as a result of a 13% price premium for plate-sized fish. This market-driven size selection increased revenues (14%) but decreased total fish biomass (-3%). However, when market-driven size selection was combined with limited institutional constraints, both fish biomass (28%) and fishermen's revenue (22%) increased. These results show that the direction and magnitude of the effects of market demand on biological populations and human behavior can depend on both biological attributes and institutional constraints. Fisheries management may capitalize on these conditional effects by implementing size-based regulations when economic and institutional incentives will enhance compliance, as in the case we describe here, or by creating compliance enhancing conditions for existing regulations.

  20. Reproductive biology of the Neotropical electric fish Brachyhypopomus draco (Teleostei: Hypopomidae from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B. Schaan

    Full Text Available The reproductive biology of a population of the weakly electric fish Brachyhypopomus draco from southern Brazil is described. Information is provided on the establishment of the reproductive period in this species and its relations with environmental and feeding factors, as well as on the absolute and relative fecundities, spawning type, sex ratio and sexual dimorphism. The species exhibits a relatively long reproductive period, a relative fecundity of 0.173 oocytes per mg of female total weight, and fractional spawning. The sex ratio did not differ from 1:1 during all sampled months. Sexual dimorphism related to hypertrophy of the male's distal portion of caudal filament was observed and males grew to greater lengths than females. Male gonadosomatic index (GSI was significantly related to water depth, oxygen saturation and temperature. Female GSI was significantly related to water depth and hepatosomatic index.

  1. Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1983.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Park, D.L.

    1984-05-01

    Pacific salmon are tagged or marked as a critical part of numerous research and management studies. A new tag called the PIT (passive integrated transponder) tag measuring 7.5 mm long by 1.5 mm in diameter has a great potential for marking fish if it proves to be biologically compatible. A study was conducted to evaluate the potential of the PIT tag for marking salmonids. The objectives of the first year's research were to determine: (1) the anatomical areas in which the tag could be placed; (2) tissue response to the tag; and (3) tag retention. Juvenile coho, Oncorhynchus kisutch, and chinook O. tshawytscha, salmon and adult chinook salmon held at Manchester or Big Beef Creek, Washington, were used as test animals. Juvenile salmon were injected with sham PIT tags in the body cavity and opercular, dorsal, and caudal masculature. The fish ranged in length from 126 to 212 mm. Observations based on three tests, from 44 to 102 days long, indicated that the dorsal musculature and body cavity were the best locations to inject the tag from biological and social standpoints. Sham PIT tags were injected into the nose; body cavity; and opercular, dorsal, and caudal musculature of jack chinook salmon. The test was conducted for 23 days. Although all five anatomical areas were acceptable from a technical standpoint, the body cavity appeared to be the best area for tag placement. Initial test results with the Sham PIT tag were very encouraging. Apparently the PIT tag can be successfully injected into and carried by salmon, making it a potentially useful tool for fisheries biologists. 5 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. A transcriptomics-based biological framework for studying mechanisms of endocrine disruption in small fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Lin; Bencic, David; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Lazorchak, Jim; Edwards, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to construct a transcriptomics-based framework of signal transduction pathways, transcriptional regulatory networks, and the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to facilitate formulation of specific, testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of endocrine disruption in fish. For the analyses involved, we used data from a total of more than 300 microarrays representing 58 conditions, which encompassed 4 tissue types from zebrafish of both genders exposed for 1 of 3 durations to 10 different test chemicals (17alpha-ethynyl estradiol, fadrozole, 17beta-trenbolone, fipronil, prochloraz, flutamide, muscimol, ketoconazole, trilostane, and vinclozolin). Differentially expressed genes were identified by one class t-tests for each condition, and those with false discovery rates of less than 40% and treatment/control ratios > or =1.3-fold were mapped to orthologous human, mouse, and rat pathways by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to look for overrepresentation of known biological pathways. To complement the analysis of known biological pathways, the genes regulated by approximately 1800 transcription factors were inferred using the ARACNE mutual information-based algorithm. The resulting gene sets for all transcriptional factors, along with a group of compiled HPG-axis genes and approximately 130 publicly available biological pathways, were analyzed for their responses to the 58 treatment conditions by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and its variant, Extended-GSEA. The biological pathways and transcription factors associated with multiple distinct treatments showed substantial interactions among the HPG-axis, TGF-beta, p53, and several of their cross-talking partners. These candidate networks/pathways have a variety of profound impacts on such cellular functions as stress response, cell cycle, and apoptosis.

  3. Julia Butler Hansen National Wildlife Refuge: Assessment of fishes, habitats, and tide gates in sloughs on the mainland: 2007, 2008 progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In spring 2007 and 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office monitored biological and physical attributes of eight sloughs on...

  4. Performance of biological phosphorus removal and characteristics of microbial community in the oxic-settling-anaerobic process by FISH analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-fang WANG; Qing-liang ZHAO; Wen-biao JIN; Shi-jie YOU; Jin-na ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Performance of biological phosphorus removal in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process was investigated. Cell staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to analyze characteristics and microbial community of sludge.Experimental results showed that phosphorus removal efficiency was near 60% and the amount of biological phosphorus accumulation in aerobic sludge of the OSA system was up to 26.9 mg/g. Biological phosphorus removal efficiency was partially inhibited by carbon sources in the continuous OSA system. Contrasted to the OSA system, biological phosphorus removal efficiency was enhanced by 14% and the average total phosphorus (TP) contents of aerobic sludge were increased by 0.36 mg/g when sufficient carbon sources were supplied in batch experiments. Staining methods indicated that about 35% of microorganisms had typical characteristics of phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs). FISH analysis demonstrated that PAOMIX-binding bacteria were predominant microbial communities in the OSA system, which accounted for around 28% of total bacteria.

  5. Fishing cod in the Baltic Sea - Gambling with the ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Sven; Nordlöf, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The population of cod in the Baltic sea has over the last decades decreased due to overfishing. To make the students aware of this problem and also to find a solution they are introduced to a game. The purpose of the game is to let the students know how to use renewable natural resources in these aspects; 1 Fishing cod without using it up 2 That solidarity is needed if you are sharing a resource 3 That cooperation is the key to keeping a natural resource healthy. The students are fishermen in group of four and are equipped with a boat. The playing board is a map over the Baltic sea. The rules of the game include the carrying capacity of the sea, how much fish one fishing boat is allowed to pick up, how much it costs to have a boat, and possibilities to buy a bigger boat. The game has two rounds: In round one the students in the group are competing against each other, they are not allowed to talk to each other and they are supposed to get as much fish as they can. As a consequence after round one the sea will become empty. In round two the groups compete with each other and they are coworking within the group. After this round the result is different from the first round. The catches are bigger than in round one and still there are cod left in the sea, which will generate a good fishing in the future.. The discussions after the game can be about why the two rounds ended so different, general discussion about "tragedy of the commons", sustainable use of ecosystem services and discussions about resources in common.

  6. AVERAGE BIOLOGICAL INDICES OF THE MAJOR FISH SPECIES OF THE ZAPORIZHZHIA RESERVOIR AND OTHER FISHERY WATER BODIES OF DNEPROPETROVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fedonenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate, analyze and summarize the biological indices of commercial fish species in the main fishery water bodies of Dnіpropetrovsk region for the last 10 years. Methodology. Field data were collected in the Zaporizhzhia reservoir during 2003 – 2013 using a standard set of monitoring fishing gears (gill nets with mesh size a=30–120 mm. Juvenile fish were caught in third decade of June - first decade of August using the juvenile fish beach seine with a length of 10 m. Processing of ichthyological materials was conducted according to generally accepted methods. Findings. When comparing the biological indices of fish in the Zaporіzhzhia reservoir with the data for the past decade reflected in the normative documents, we found significant changes in the population of pikeperch (Sander lucioperca and gibel carp (Carassius gibelio, which concern the average fish weight, fertility and the relative proportion of females in the spawning stock. Roach (Rutilus rutilus, perch (Perca fluviatilis, and gibel carp are characterized a reduced number of spawning events. The biological indices of bream (Abramis brama, common carp (Cyprinus, pike (Esox lucius and catfish (Silurus glanis populations remain virtually unchanged during the study period. As for biological indices of Black and Caspian Sea sprat, rudd, gobies and crayfish, the information on these species in the relevant regulatory documents is missing, so it is not possible to assess the dynamics of their changes. Due to an inventory of small fishery water bodies we received the information on the biological indicators of major species, which can also be used for updating the normative database. Originality. For the first time we summarized the characteristic of fish fauna in major fishery water bodies of Dnepropetrovsk region and analyzed main indices, which define the conditions of fish stock development and exploitation of aquatic living aquatic resources in fishery water bodies

  7. Banks Lake NWR: Biological Review Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers a biological review undertaken in 2007/08 at Banks Lake National Wildlife Refuge. On November 14-15, 2007, a Biological Review was conducted at...

  8. Potential biological hazard of importance for HACCP plans in fresh fish processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltić Milan Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP system is scientifically based and focused on problem prevention in order to assure the produced food products are safe to consume. Prerequisite programs such as GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices, GHP (Good Hygienic Practices are an essential foundation for the development and implementation of successful HACCP plans. One of the preliminary tasks in the development of HACCP plan is to conduct a hazard analysis. The process of conducting a hazard analysis involves two stages. The first is hazard identification and the second stage is the HACCP team decision which potential hazards must be addressed in the HACCP plan. By definition, the HACCP concept covers all types of potential food safety hazards: biological, chemical and physical, whether they are naturally occurring in the food, contributed by the environment or generated by a mistake in the manufacturing process. In raw fish processing, potential significant biological hazards which are reasonably likely to cause illness of humans are parasites (Trematodae, Nematodae, Cestodae, bacteria (Salmonella, E. coli, Vibrio parahemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium botulinum, Staphyloccocus aureus, viruses (Norwalk virus, Entero virusesi, Hepatitis A, Rotovirus and bio-toxins. Upon completion of hazard analysis, any measure(s that are used to control the hazard(s should be described.

  9. Historical freshwater fish ecology: a long-term view of distribution changes and biological invasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Clavero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Past processes and events may have an important influence on contemporaneous ecological patterns, including current human impacts on landscapes and organisms. In spite of that, most of the ecological knowledge has been built upon short-term studies, which very rarely exceed one decade. Ecology and Conservation Biology have an important lack of historical approaches, a deficiency that may become a hindrance for the management of natural systems. In this talk I will present examples of how historical information on the distribution of freshwater fish and other aquatic organisms can be used to address ecological questions. Most analyses are based on two important Spanish historical written sources: the Relaciones de Felipe II (16th century and the Madoz Dictionary (19th century. The examples considered include the European eel (Anguilla anguilla, the brown trout (Salmo trutta, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio and the white clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius italicus, among other species, as well as questions related to biological invasions, habitat loss and the impacts of global warming. The outputs of ecological research based on historical data often become useful tools for present-day biodiversity conservation planning and actions.

  10. Cahaba River: Biological and Water Quality Studies, Birmingham, AL,

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Excessive sedimentation and nutrient enrichment are affecting the biology of the Cahaba Riverwatershed. Deleterious effects of sediment deposition on the fish and...

  11. Recreational fishing and grazing issues [CMP

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a summarization of biological trend information for, and information applicable to, Valentine NWR. Specifically, the information addresses...

  12. The FISH chromosome painting technique in Biological Dosimetry : Evolution and applicability; La Tecnica de Pintado Cromosomico mediante FISH en Dosimetria Biologica: Evolucion y Aplicabilidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oteo, M.; Real, A.

    2005-07-01

    The capacity of ionising radiation to induce chromosomal aberrations has been used during decades to assess doses in persons accidentally exposed, giving rise to the discipline Biological Dosimetry. the Biological Dosimetry is a complement to the physical methods of dosimetry and in the situations where those are not available represent the only way to asses the doses received. During decades biological dosimetry has used the dicentric score to determine doses, since a good correlation between in vitro and in vivo irradiation results exists and the background yields are low. However, dicentrics yields decrease with time after irradiation. The translocations and insertions represent stable aberrations what means that they do not decrease in further cell divisions. The development at the end of the 80s of the FISH technique (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), represented a great step for the applicability of translocations score for biological dosimetry. In this paper, a review of the FISH chromosome painting technique is presented, addressing the facts that have needed to be solve before its routine use in retrospective dosimetry, as well as the aspects that will need further research in the near future. (Author) 54 refs.

  13. 77 FR 13622 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items These items came into the possession and... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office... Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items listed below meet the definition of sacred...

  14. 78 FR 51735 - Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    .../fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-28/pdf/2013-15465.pdf . Statutory Authority: Sections 412(c)(1)(B) of the... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement,...

  15. 77 FR 52752 - Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. CFDA Number: 93.566. SUMMARY: The Office of Refugee...

  16. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  17. Page 1 Tropical Freshwater Biology, 7 (1998) 37-51 37 FISH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: fish diversity - distribution - abundance - River Jamieson -. Nigeria. ... The river flows all year round with the highest level and discharge during .... Mormyridae O 50 6 40 .... Studies On the fish community of River Ase, Bendel.

  18. Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People' s Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

  19. The feediIlg biology of four predatory reef fishes off the south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    authors recorded only four positively identified fish prey species while a large .... Petrus rupestris. Petrus rupestris is a large demersal carnivore associated with ..... False Bay and possible effects of pelagic purse-seining on their food supply. Fish. .... Food and feeding ecology of piscivorous fishes at Lake St Lucia, Zululand.

  20. Coral Reef Health Indices versus the Biological, Ecological and Functional Diversity of Fish and Coral Assemblages in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; Ortiz, Marco; Cupul-Magaña, Amílcar Leví; Carriquiry, Jose D; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Troncoso, Alma Paola; García-Rivas, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the indices known as the Reef Health Index (RHI) and two-dimensional Coral Health Index (2D-CHI) and different representative metrics of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals in 101 reef sites located across seven zones in the western Caribbean Sea. Species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were used to asses biological estimation; while ecological diversity was evaluated with the indices of Shannon diversity and Pielou´s evenness, as well as by taxonomic diversity and distinctness. Functional diversity considered the number of functional groups, the Shannon diversity and the functional Pielou´s evenness. According to the RHI, 57.15% of the zones were classified as presenting a "poor" health grade, while 42.85% were in "critical" grade. Based on the 2D-CHI, 28.5% of the zones were in "degraded" condition and 71.5% were "very degraded". Differences in fish and coral diversity among sites and zones were demonstrated using permutational ANOVAs. Differences between the two health indices (RHI and 2D-CHI) and some indices of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals were observed; however, only the RHI showed a correlation between the health grades and the species and functional group richness of fish at the scale of sites, and with the species and functional group richness and Shannon diversity of the fish assemblages at the scale of zones. None of the health indices were related to the metrics analyzed for the coral diversity. In general, our study suggests that the estimation of health indices should be complemented with classic community indices, or should at least include diversity indices of fish and corals, in order to improve the accuracy of the estimated health status of coral reefs in the western Caribbean Sea.

  1. Coral Reef Health Indices versus the Biological, Ecological and Functional Diversity of Fish and Coral Assemblages in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Ortiz, Marco; Cupul-Magaña, Amílcar Leví; Carriquiry, Jose D.; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Troncoso, Alma Paola; García-Rivas, María del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the indices known as the Reef Health Index (RHI) and two-dimensional Coral Health Index (2D-CHI) and different representative metrics of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals in 101 reef sites located across seven zones in the western Caribbean Sea. Species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were used to asses biological estimation; while ecological diversity was evaluated with the indices of Shannon diversity and Pielou´s evenness, as well as by taxonomic diversity and distinctness. Functional diversity considered the number of functional groups, the Shannon diversity and the functional Pielou´s evenness. According to the RHI, 57.15% of the zones were classified as presenting a "poor" health grade, while 42.85% were in "critical" grade. Based on the 2D-CHI, 28.5% of the zones were in "degraded" condition and 71.5% were "very degraded". Differences in fish and coral diversity among sites and zones were demonstrated using permutational ANOVAs. Differences between the two health indices (RHI and 2D-CHI) and some indices of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals were observed; however, only the RHI showed a correlation between the health grades and the species and functional group richness of fish at the scale of sites, and with the species and functional group richness and Shannon diversity of the fish assemblages at the scale of zones. None of the health indices were related to the metrics analyzed for the coral diversity. In general, our study suggests that the estimation of health indices should be complemented with classic community indices, or should at least include diversity indices of fish and corals, in order to improve the accuracy of the estimated health status of coral reefs in the western Caribbean Sea. PMID:27579575

  2. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart G of... - Locations and Telephone Numbers of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Wetland Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Wildlife Service's Wetland Coordinators K Exhibit K to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of... Part 1940—Locations and Telephone Numbers of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Wetland Coordinators The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is presently preparing the National Wetlands Inventory....

  3. Butter blend containing fish oil improves the level of n-3 fatty acids in biological tissues of hamster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsgaard, Trine; Overgaard, Jesper; Krogh, Anne Louise

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have shown beneficial effects of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on human health. Regardless of the positive effects of n-3 PUFA, the intake of these fatty acids remains low. An approach to increase the intake of n-3 PUFA in the population is to incorporate fish oil......, erythrocytes, and liver. The incorporation of n-3 PUFA was significantly higher in phospholipids than in triacylglycerols. The results suggest that enriching butter blends with small amounts of fish oil can be used as an alternative method for improving the level of n-3 PUFA in biological tissues....

  4. [Comments of the State of Colorado on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Biomonitoring Program for Rocky Mountain Arsenal - Aquatic Ecosystems : Addendum to Amendment 5 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : September, 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reviewed the USFWS's draft plan for the aquatic portion of the Service's biomonitoring program, dated...

  5. Persistence and availability of Web services in computational biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian J Schultheiss

    Full Text Available We have conducted a study on the long-term availability of bioinformatics Web services: an observation of 927 Web services published in the annual Nucleic Acids Research Web Server Issues between 2003 and 2009. We found that 72% of Web sites are still available at the published addresses, only 9% of services are completely unavailable. Older addresses often redirect to new pages. We checked the functionality of all available services: for 33%, we could not test functionality because there was no example data or a related problem; 13% were truly no longer working as expected; we could positively confirm functionality only for 45% of all services. Additionally, we conducted a survey among 872 Web Server Issue corresponding authors; 274 replied. 78% of all respondents indicate their services have been developed solely by students and researchers without a permanent position. Consequently, these services are in danger of falling into disrepair after the original developers move to another institution, and indeed, for 24% of services, there is no plan for maintenance, according to the respondents. We introduce a Web service quality scoring system that correlates with the number of citations: services with a high score are cited 1.8 times more often than low-scoring services. We have identified key characteristics that are predictive of a service's survival, providing reviewers, editors, and Web service developers with the means to assess or improve Web services. A Web service conforming to these criteria receives more citations and provides more reliable service for its users. The most effective way of ensuring continued access to a service is a persistent Web address, offered either by the publishing journal, or created on the authors' own initiative, for example at http://bioweb.me. The community would benefit the most from a policy requiring any source code needed to reproduce results to be deposited in a public repository.

  6. [Safety evaluation of food from transgenic fish and the molecular biological mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichun; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2004-03-01

    More progresses have been made in the studying of transgenic fish in China, but the studying work of safety evaluation of food from transgenic fish are started up just now. Compared to plants and animals on the land, it is more difficult to control the mobility of fish and fish can give birth to a large number of offsprings, so the ecological risk or hazard about transgenic fish is more critical than others. Another safety problem is the chimerism which is initiated by the gene transfer methods used in the transgenic fish. Getting sterile triploid transgenic fish and fixed point integration are efficient to solve the two problems above respectively. The solution of the two problems are also the basis of safety evaluation and detection of food from transgenic fish. Up to now, there are little reports on the safety evaluation of transgenic fish including nutritional evaluation and allergic reaction, and there are no basic research on the detection of transgenic fish for the aim of food safety. In brief, it is very urgent to start up the research on the safety evaluation and detection of transgenic fish for the control of food safety.

  7. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System; Annual Report 1994-1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Frost, Deborah A.; Jonasson, Bruce F.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Prentice, Earl F.; Snell, Glen A.

    1998-11-01

    A multiyear program to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of a new identification system for salmonids established between the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in 1983.

  8. Extraction of high added value biological compounds from sardine, sardine-type fish and mackerel canning residues--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Carvalho, Ana P; Piccirillo, Clara; Santos, Manuela M; Castro, Paula M L; Pintado, Manuela E

    2013-08-01

    Different valuable compounds, which can be employed in medicine or in other industries (i.e. food, agrochemical, pharmaceutical) can be recovered from by-products and waste from the fish canning industries. They include lipids, proteins, bio-polymers, minerals, amino acids and enzymes; they can be extracted from wastewaters and/or from solid residues (head, viscera, skin, tails and flesh) generated along the canning process, through the filleting, cooking, salting or smoking stages. In this review, the opportunities for the extraction and the valorisation of bioactive compounds from sardine, sardine-type fish and mackerel canning residues are examined and discussed. These are amongst the most consumed fishes in the Mediterranean area; moreover, canning is one of the most important and common methods of preservation. The large quantities of by-products generated have great potentials for the extraction of biologically desirable high added value compounds.

  9. Quivira NWR biological baseline data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset is biological baseline data for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge as of January 2016. It contains data on species found on the refuge, when and where...

  10. Spatial and temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dereje Tewabe Kokebe

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To know spatial, temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana. Methods:Distribution of fish species in Lake Tana was studied from November 2009 to October 2012 based on samples collected every other month using gillnets of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm stretched mesh sizes. Labeobarbus species, Clarias gariepinus, Oreochromis niloticus, and Varicorhinus beso are commercially important fish species and form 68%, 18%, 14%and 0.5%of the pooled experimental fish catch. There was significant variability among years and sampling sites of both temporal and spatial aspects;Mann-Whitney U tests were used for pair wise comparisons of sites and years. Results:The composition of Labeobarbus spp. and Varicorhinus beso shows significant decline. On the other hand, the composition of Oreochromis niloticus did not change, but Clarias gariepinus increased by 100%by catch composition. The most likely explanations for the total decline in abundance of fish species are the increase of the illegal commercial gillnet fishery targeting their spawning aggregations in the wetlands and river mouths, and the increasing trend of the degradation of spawning and nursery habitats both in the lake and major tributary rivers of the catchment area. Conclusions:There should be a need for urgent development of a management plan focusing on ensuring sustainable utilization of a resource by fishing effort, gear mesh size and gear type restrictions, and controlling the spawning grounds from different types of human encroachment and designing closing seasons and spawning grounds during the breeding seasons of different fish species of Lake Tana.

  11. Spatial and temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Tewabe Kokebe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know spatial, temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana. Methods: Distribution of fish species in Lake Tana was studied from November 2009 to October 2012 based on samples collected every other month using gillnets of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm stretched mesh sizes. Labeobarbus species, Clarias gariepinus, Oreochromis niloticus, and Varicorhinus beso are commercially important fish species and form 68%, 18%, 14% and 0.5% of the pooled experimental fish catch. There was significant variability among years and sampling sites of both temporal and spatial aspects; Mann-Whitney U tests were used for pair wise comparisons of sites and years. Results: The composition of Labeobarbus spp. and Varicorhinus beso shows significant decline. On the other hand, the composition of Oreochromis niloticus did not change, but Clarias gariepinus increased by 100% by catch composition. The most likely explanations for the total decline in abundance of fish species are the increase of the illegal commercial gillnet fishery targeting their spawning aggregations in the wetlands and river mouths, and the increasing trend of the degradation of spawning and nursery habitats both in the lake and major tributary rivers of the catchment area. Conclusions: There should be a need for urgent development of a management plan focusing on ensuring sustainable utilization of a resource by fishing effort, gear mesh size and gear type restrictions, and controlling the spawning grounds from different types of human encroachment and designing closing seasons and spawning grounds during the breeding seasons of different fish species of Lake Tana.

  12. A comparative study on biologically and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles induced Heat Shock Proteins on fresh water fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girilal, M; Krishnakumar, V; Poornima, Paramasivan; Mohammed Fayaz, A; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2015-11-01

    The wide applicability of silver nanoparticles in medicine and pharmaceutical industries leads to its over exploitation and thus contaminating our environment. Majority of these nanoscale dimension particles finally accumulates in fresh water and marine ecosystem. As the nanoparticles behave entirely different from its corresponding bulk material, a better understanding of their environmental impacts in aquatic ecosystems is inevitable. The study was focused on a comparative stress physiology analysis of chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles and biogenic silver nanoparticles. Half maximal inhibitory concentration of biologically synthesized and chemically synthesized nanoparticles was found out (30μg/mL and 20μg/mL respectively). The Heat Shock Protein (HSP70) secretion was analysed in the fresh water fish Oreochromis niloticus after exposing to different concentrations of biologically and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles along with the silver in its ionic form. The intense immune-histochemical staining of fish tissues (muscle, kidney and liver) analyzed proportionately reflected the stress created. The colour intensity was directly proportional to the stress created or the stress protein released. High level of HSP70 expression was observed in all of the fish tissues exposed to silver ions and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles, when compared to that of biologically synthesized. The results revealed the significance of comparatively safe and less toxic biogenic nanoparticles compared to the chemically synthesized.

  13. An adaptive approach to invasive plant management on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-owned native prairies in the Prairie Pothole Region: decision support under uncertainity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Jill J.; Moore, Clinton T.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Flanders-Wanner, Bridgette

    2011-01-01

    Much of the native prairie managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is extensively invaded by the introduced cool-season grasses smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). The central challenge to managers is selecting appropriate management actions in the face of biological and environmental uncertainties. We describe the technical components of a USGS management project, and explain how the components integrate and inform each other, how data feedback from individual cooperators serves to reduce uncertainty across the whole region, and how a successful adaptive management project is coordinated and maintained on a large scale. In partnership with the Service, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing an adaptive decision support framework to assist managers in selecting management actions under uncertainty and maximizing learning from management outcomes. The framework is built around practical constraints faced by refuge managers and includes identification of the management objective and strategies, analysis of uncertainty and construction of competing decision models, monitoring, and mechanisms for model feedback and decision selection. Nineteen Service field stations, spanning four states of the PPR, are participating in the project. They share a common management objective, available management strategies, and biological uncertainties. While the scope is broad, the project interfaces with individual land managers who provide refuge-specific information and receive updated decision guidance that incorporates understanding gained from the collective experience of all cooperators.

  14. Refuge land acquisition biological reconnaissance report Franklin Lake Nevada ( proposed addition to Ruby Lake NWR )

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the history and general description, biological characteristics, recreational use, acquisition and development potential, proposed development...

  15. 78 FR 68041 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Energy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Energy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regarding... Department of Energy (DOE) is informing the public of the availability of its Memorandum of Understanding... habitats. ADDRESSES: The MOU is available at http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/memorandum-understanding...

  16. Concentration of organic contaminants in fish and their biological effects in a wastewater-dominated urban stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Nuria; Rice, Clifford P; Pagano, James; Zintek, Larry; Barber, Larry B; Murphy, Elizabeth W; Nettesheim, Todd; Minarik, Tom; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2012-03-15

    Data are presented on the concentrations of alkylphenol and alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) and persistent organic compounds in largemouth bass collected from a waste-water dominated stream in downtown Chicago. The fish residue concentrations of APEs are compared to concentrations of the APEs in the water that were collected at weekly intervals over two months bracketing the fall (2006) and a spring (2007) fish collection. The concentrations of APEs were significantly higher in the spring-collected fish (5.42μg/g) versus the fall (0.99μg/g) tand these differences were shared by differences in the water concentrations (spring - 11.47 versus fall - 3.44μg/L). The differences in water concentration were negatively correlated with water temperatures observed over the two sampling times. Fish residue concentrations of persistent organic compounds (PCBs, PBDEs, toxaphene, and many legacy pesticides including the DDT family) did not vary from fall to spring. Some of these residue concentrations were comparable to the highest NPE (nonylphenol ethoxylate) homologue concentrations, e.g. NP1EO was 3.5μg/g in the bass for the spring, the PBDE-congener 47 and p,p'-DDE averaged 1.0μg/g and 0.5μg/g, respectively, over both seasons. All the other persistent single-analyte concentrations were lower. Biological endpoints for endocrine effects measured in the same fish showed that there was an apparent positive correlation for physiological effects based on increased vitellogenin levels in males versus concentration of NPEs; however there were no observable histological differences in fall versus spring fish samples.

  17. Population growth, trophic level, and reproductive biology of two congeneric archer fishes (Toxotes chatareus, Hamilton 1822 and Toxotes jaculatrix, Pallas 1767) inhabiting Malaysian coastal waters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simon, K D; Bakar, Y; Samat, A; Zaidi, C C; Aziz, A; Mazlan, A G

    2009-01-01

    Population growth, trophic level, and some aspects of reproductive biology of two congeneric archer fish species, Toxotes chatareus and Toxotes jaculatrix, collected from Johor coastal waters, Malaysia, were studied...

  18. Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge Biological Review (2002-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 2002-2003 biological review at Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge with list of priority biological recommendations. These include need for control of invasive aquatic...

  19. Bear River Biological Review : The First 36 Years

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Biological Review contains an assemblage of information summarizing the highlights of the large amount of biological work that has been done on the Bear River...

  20. Data logger database - Physical and biological effects of fish-friendly tide gates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this one-time stand-alone study is to evaluate how effective "fish-friendly" or self-regulating tide gates (SRTs) are at increasing connectivity for...

  1. Freshwater fish internals as a promising source of biologically active lipid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samoilovа D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The research on development of technology of fat extraction from freshwater fish entrails has been carried out. The study of mass composition of freshwater fish internals has shown that the highest content of fat (averaged 13,8 % is typical for internals of fish like carp, perch, silver carp, pike. The higher content is typical for silver carp (14.4 % permitting the possibility of its use as a source of lipid complexes. The chemical composition of the internal organs of researched objects has been studied; to justify the rational modes of extracting lipid complexes from freshwater fish internals the methods of extracting fat (thermal, enzymatic and low temperature have been tested. The quality indicators of raw fat have been analyzed and the conclusion on possibility of combining the ways of oil extraction in order to increase its output and improve the quality characteristics has been made

  2. Feeding biology of a guild of benthivorous fishes in a sandy shore on south-eastern Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorcsak, P; Silvano, R A; Sazima, I

    2000-08-01

    The feeding biology of eight species of benthivorous fishes was studied in a sandy shore at Anchieta Island, south-eastern Brazilian coast. The fishes fed mainly on Amphipoda and Mysidacea crustaceans. The diet of the most abundant species, the drum Umbrina coroides, was analyzed in three standard length classes (20-55, 56-90 and 91-135 mm). This sciaenid showed an ontogenetic diet shift from Mysidacea to Amphipoda. The feeding behaviour of the sciaenid U. coroides and the gerreid Eucinostomus gula was recorded while snorkeling. During their foraging both species uncovered small organisms buried in the sand. Notwithstanding general similarities in diet, U. coroides and E. gula presented differences in feeding behaviour and morphology. Two carangid species of the genus Trachinotus differed in diet composition and consumed a larger array of food items than the remaining fish species. Differences in diet and feeding activity between the remaining benthivorous species were noted. These differences possibly reduce overlap in resource use and favour the coexistence of guilds of benthivorous fishes on sandy shores.

  3. Biological Assessment of the release of the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata on threatened, endangered and candidate species.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Biological Assessment proposes to release the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata on the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge (CMR) to combat...

  4. Evaluation of the hydraulic and biological performance of the portable floating fish collector at Cougar Reservoir and Dam, Oregon, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, John W.; Evans, Scott D.; Haner, Philip V.; Hansel, Hal C.; Hansen, Amy C.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Hatton, Tyson W.; Sprando, Jamie M.; Smith, Collin D.; Adams, Noah S.

    2016-01-12

    The biological and hydraulic performance of a new portable floating fish collector (PFFC) located in a cul-de-sac within the forebay of Cougar Dam, Oregon, was evaluated during 2014. The purpose of the PFFC was to explore surface collection as a means to capture juvenile salmonids at one or more sites using a small, cost-effective, pilot-scale device. The PFFC used internal pumps to draw attraction flow over an inclined plane about 3 meters (m) deep, through a flume at a design velocity of as much as 6 feet per second (ft/s), and to empty a small amount of water and any entrained fish into a collection box. Performance of the PFFC was evaluated at 64 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) (Low) and 109 ft3/s (High) inflow rates alternated using a randomized-block schedule from May 27 to December 16, 2014. The evaluation of the biological performance was based on trap catch; behaviors, locations, and collection of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tagged with acoustic transmitters plus passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags; collection of juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with only PIT tags; and untagged fish monitored near and within the PFFC using acoustic cameras. The evaluation of hydraulic performance was based on measurements of water velocity and direction of flow in the PFFC.

  5. A biological survey of the Hillside National Wildlife Refuge, Holmes and Yazoo Counties Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife staff conducted a biological reconnaissance of the Hillside National Wildlife Refuge; survey dates March 9-11, 28-31 1997. This document...

  6. Reproductive biology of weakly electric fish Eigenmannia trilineata López and Castello, 1966 (Teleostei, Sternopygidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Giora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study described the reproductive biology of a population of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia trilineata from southern Brazil, providing the information on the estimation of reproductive period, fecundity, spawning type, first maturation size, and analysis of gonadal morphology and histology of the species, relating these data to alimentary and abiotic characters. The species showed a relatively long reproductive period, a relative fecundity of 0.27 oocytes per mg of total weight and a parcelled spawning type. First maturation size estimated for the females was 80.5 mm and for the males 63.5 mm of total length. Sex ratio did not differ from 1:1 under a X²test (α= 0.01 during all the sampled months. Sexual dimorphism was related to total length, and males had larger total length than females. The abiotic factors photoperiod and water conductivity presented significant correlations with female GSI, while male GSI presented a significant correlation only with photoperiod.Este trabalho descreve a biologia reprodutiva de uma população do peixe elétrico Eigenmannia trilineata do Sul do Brasil. São apresentadas informações a respeito do período reprodutivo, fecundidade, tipo de desova, tamanho de primeira maturação, morfologia e histologia das gônadas da espécie, relacionando estes dados a caracteres alimentares e abióticos. A espécie apresentou período reprodutivo relativamente longo, com fecundidade relativa de 0,27 ovócito por miligrama do peso da fêmea e desova do tipo parcelada. O tamanho de primeira maturação gonadal estimado para fêmeas foi 80,5 mm e para machos, 63,5 mm de comprimento total. A proporção sexual, testada pelo teste X² (Α= 0.01, foi de 1:1 durante todos os meses amostrados; dimorfismo sexual relacionado ao comprimento total foi detectado, possuindo os machos um maior comprimento total. Dos fatores abióticos testados, fotoperíodo e condutividade da água mostraram correlação significativa com o

  7. Investigation of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Academic Self-Efficacy and Academic Motivation toward Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Hüseyin; Saylan, Asli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine pre-service science teachers' academic motivation and academic self-efficacy toward biology. The sample consisted of 369 pre-service science teachers who enrolled in the faculty of education of two universities in Turkey. Data were collected through Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) (Glynn & Koballa,…

  8. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge in the Physics, Chemistry, and Biology Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in the physics, chemistry, and biology topics. These topics were the light and sound, the physical and chemical changes, and reproduction, growth, and evolution. Qualitative research design was utilized. Data were collected from 33 pre-service science teachers…

  9. Diversity in Fish Auditory Systems: One of the Riddles of Sensory Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich eLadich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An astonishing diversity of inner ears and accessory hearing structures (AHS that can enhance hearing has evolved in fishes. Inner ears mainly differ in the size of the otolith end organs, the shape and orientation of the sensory epithelia, and the orientation patterns of ciliary bundles of sensory hair cells. Despite our profound morphological knowledge of inner ear variation, two main questions remain widely unanswered. (i What selective forces and/or constraints led to the evolution of this inner ear diversity? (ii How is the morphological variability linked to hearing abilities? Improved hearing is mainly based on the ability of many fish species to transmit oscillations of swim bladder walls or other gas-filled bladders to the inner ears. Swim bladders may be linked to the inner ears via a chain of ossicles (in otophysans, anterior extensions (e.g. some cichlids, squirrelfishes, or the gas bladders may touch the inner ears directly (labyrinth fishes. Studies on catfishes and cichlids demonstrate that larger swim bladders and more pronounced linkages to the inner ears positively affect both auditory sensitivities and the detectable frequency range, but lack of a connection does not exclude hearing enhancement. This diversity of auditory structures and hearing abilities is one of the main riddles in fish bioacoustics research. Hearing enhancement might have evolved to facilitate intraspecific acoustic communication. A comparison of sound-producing species, however, indicates that acoustic communication is widespread in taxa lacking AHS. Eco-acoustical constraints are a more likely explanation for the diversity in fish hearing sensitivities. Low ambient noise levels may have facilitated the evolution of AHS, enabling fish to detect low-level abiotic noise and sounds from con- and heterospecifics, including predators and prey. Aquatic habitats differ in ambient noise regimes, and preliminary data indicate that hearing sensitivities of fishes

  10. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  11. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service : Environmental Assessment for Opening Portions of Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge for Hunting as Proposed in the 1992 Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to open portions of the Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge for hunting of Canada geese, white-tailed deer, and other...

  12. Oil shale processing as a source of aquatic pollution: monitoring of the biologic effects in caged and feral freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvikene, A; Huuskonen, S; Koponen, K; Ritola, O; Mauer, U; Lindström-Seppä, P

    1999-09-01

    The biologic effects of the oil shale industry on caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as well as on feral perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) were studied in the River Narva in northeast Estonia. The River Narva passes the oil shale mining and processing area and thus receives elevated amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals, and sulfates. The effects of the chemical load were monitored by measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)-dependent monooxygenase (MO) activities [7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH)] as well as conjugation enzyme activities [glutathione S-transferase (GST) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase] in the liver of fish. CYP1A induction was further studied by detecting the amount and occurrence of the CYP1A protein. Histopathology of tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, and intestine) and the percentage of micronuclei in fish erythrocytes were also determined. Selected PAHs and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, and Pb) were measured from fish muscle and liver. In spite of the significant accumulation of PAHs, there was no induction of MO activities in any studied fish species. When compared to reference samples, AHH activities were even decreased in feral fish at some of the exposed sites. Detection of CYP1A protein content and the distribution of the CYP1A enzyme by immunohistochemistry also did not show extensive CYP1A induction. Instead, GST activities were significantly increased at exposed sites. Detection of histopathology did not reveal major changes in the morphology of tissues. The micronucleus test also did not show any evidence of genotoxicity. Thus, from the parameters studied, GST activity was most affected. The lack of catalytic CYP1A induction in spite of the heavy loading of PAHs was not studied but has been attributed to the elevated content of other compounds such as heavy metals, some of which can act as inhibitors for MOs. Another possible explanation of this lack of

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1979 wetland classification: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, L.M.; Golet, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1979 the US Fish and Wildlife Service published and adopted a classification of wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States. The system was designed for use in a national inventory of wetlands. It was intended to be ecologically based, to furnish the mapping units needed for the inventory, and to provide national consistency in terminology and definition. We review the performance of the classification after 13 years of use. The definition of wetland is based on national lists of hydric soils and plants that occur in wetlands. Our experience suggests that wetland classifications must facilitate mapping and inventory because these data gathering functions are essential to management and preservation of the wetland resource, but the definitions and taxa must have ecological basis. The most serious problem faced in construction of the classification was lack of data for many of the diverse wetland types. Review of the performance of the classification suggests that, for the most part, it was successful in accomplishing its objectives, but that problem areas should be corrected and modification could strengthen its utility. The classification, at least in concept, could be applied outside the United States. Experience gained in use of the classification can furnish guidance as to pitfalls to be avoided in the wetland classification process.

  14. Intra-Service Section 7 Biological Evaluation Form : [2010 Proposed Hunting Plan for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Section 7 Evaluation states that the Sherburne NWR Hunting Plan will have no effect on listed/proposed/candidate species or the critical habitat of these species.

  15. Intra-service section 7 biological evaluation : prescribed and wildfire suppression on the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This evaluation represents an assessment of potential effects to listed and candidate species from implementation of the Fire Management Plan for the Klamath Basin...

  16. Application of biological design criteria and computational fluid dynamics to investigate fish survival in Kaplan turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Laura A. [Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation, Inc., York, PA (United States); Fisher, Jr., Richard K. [Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation, Inc., York, PA (United States); Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cada, Glenn [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    One of the contributing factors to fish injury in a turbine environment is shear stress. This paper presents the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to display and quantify areas of elevated shear stress in the Wanapum Kaplan turbine operating at four different flow conditions over its operating range. CFD observations will be compared to field test observations at the same four flow conditions. Methods developed here could be used to facilitate the design of turbines and related water passages with lower risks of fish injury.

  17. Urban contaminants project: Fish and Hood Creeks, Anchorage, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Urbanization has decreased water quality and adversely impacted biological communities in the lakes and streams of Anchorage, Alaska (Hock, 1981; Brabets, 1987;...

  18. Parasites as biological tags of marine, freshwater and anadromous fishes in North America from the Tropics to the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcogliese, David J; Jacobson, Kym C

    2015-01-01

    Parasites have been considered as natural biological tags of marine fish populations in North America for almost 75 years. In the Northwest Atlantic, the most studied species include Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and the redfishes (Sebastes spp.). In the North Pacific, research has centred primarily on salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.). However, parasites have been applied as tags for numerous other pelagic and demersal species on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Relatively few studies have been undertaken in the Arctic, and these were designed to discriminate anadromous and resident salmonids (Salvelinus spp.). Although rarely applied in fresh waters, parasites have been used to delineate certain fish stocks within the Great Lakes-St Lawrence River basin. Anisakid nematodes and the copepod Sphyrion lumpi frequently prove useful indicators in the Northwest Atlantic, while myxozoan parasites prove very effective on the coast and open seas of the Pacific Ocean. Relative differences in the ability of parasites to discriminate between fish stocks on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts may be due to oceanographic and bathymetric differences between regions. Molecular techniques used to differentiate populations and species of parasites show promise in future applications in the field.

  19. The sensitivity of Turing self-organization to biological feedback delays: 2D models of fish pigmentation

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    © The authors 2013. Turing morphogen models have been extensively explored in the context of large-scale self-organization in multicellular biological systems. However, reconciling the detailed biology of morphogen dynamics, while accounting for time delays associated with gene expression, reveals aberrant behaviours that are not consistent with early developmental self-organization, especially the requirement for exquisite temporal control. Attempts to reconcile the interpretation of Turing\\'s ideas with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms driving zebrafish pigmentation suggests that one should reconsider Turing\\'s model in terms of pigment cells rather than morphogens (Nakamasu et al., 2009, PNAS, 106, 8429-8434; Yamaguchi et al., 2007, PNAS, 104, 4790-4793). Here the dynamics of pigment cells is subject to response delays implicit in the cell cycle and apoptosis. Hence we explore simulations of fish skin patterning, focussing on the dynamical influence of gene expression delays in morphogen-based Turing models and response delays for cell-based Turing models. We find that reconciling the mechanisms driving the behaviour of Turing systems with observations of fish skin patterning remains a fundamental challenge.

  20. The sensitivity of Turing self-organization to biological feedback delays: 2D models of fish pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, E A; Lee, S Seirin

    2015-03-01

    Turing morphogen models have been extensively explored in the context of large-scale self-organization in multicellular biological systems. However, reconciling the detailed biology of morphogen dynamics, while accounting for time delays associated with gene expression, reveals aberrant behaviours that are not consistent with early developmental self-organization, especially the requirement for exquisite temporal control. Attempts to reconcile the interpretation of Turing's ideas with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms driving zebrafish pigmentation suggests that one should reconsider Turing's model in terms of pigment cells rather than morphogens (Nakamasu et al., 2009, PNAS, 106: , 8429-8434; Yamaguchi et al., 2007, PNAS, 104: , 4790-4793). Here the dynamics of pigment cells is subject to response delays implicit in the cell cycle and apoptosis. Hence we explore simulations of fish skin patterning, focussing on the dynamical influence of gene expression delays in morphogen-based Turing models and response delays for cell-based Turing models. We find that reconciling the mechanisms driving the behaviour of Turing systems with observations of fish skin patterning remains a fundamental challenge. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydro biological Characteristics of Some Semi-intensive fish culture ponds of Lumding town of Nagaon district, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapashi Gupta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrobiological assessment is useful for assessing the ecological quality of aquatic ecosystem since biological communities integrate the environmental effects of water chemistry. Ten fish ponds from Lumding town, which were under semi-intensive culture practice, were selected for hydrobiological investigations. Physico-chemical properties were studied for a period of two years from July 2009 to June 2011.Some selected parameters like pH, dissolve oxygen, free carbon dioxide, TDS , total alkalinity, total hardness, sp. Conductivity, transparency and BOD were studied on some fish pond water. P H ranges from 6.1 to8.5. Temperature ranges from 18 0 C-32 0 C. Color shows light green to dirty green. Transparency ranges 17-42cm, dissolve oxygen ranges from 3.2-8.0 ppm, total alkalinity ranges from 7.9-20.0ppm, Hardness ranges from 60-135 ppm, sp.conductance ranges from123-247µmhos/cm and BOD ranges from3.1-5.0ppm. The phytoplankton belonging to division Chlorophycae and Cyanophycae are predominant over the others and zooplanktons belonging to group Protozoa, Rotifers are predominant. . A total of 30 species of belonging to Chlorophycae. Cyanophycae were identified and a total of 20 species of Rotifera, 2 species of Cladocera and 1 genus of Copepods were found. The present study is expected to help achieve better and higher yield of fish by the fish farmer with increasing awareness regarding the hydrobiological feature of the pond and implement scientific management practices accordingly

  2. Modoc National Wildlife Refuge biological narrative 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report content includes information on the refuge wildlife biologist, biological aide, wildlife surveys, banding program, restoration projects, annual habitat,...

  3. Biology and population dynamics of by-catch fish species of the bottom trawl fishery in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. ORDINES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The teleosts Chelidonichthys cuculus, Trigloporus lastoviza, Serranus cabrilla and Trachinus draco, are important by-catch species, in terms of landed biomass and commercial value, from the continental shelf bottom trawl fishery off the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean. The main biological parameters of these species were calculated from monthly biological samplings, and were used along with three years pseudo-cohorts (2008-2010 obtained from monitoring on-board of the bottom trawl fleet, to assess their exploitation level through Virtual Population Analysis (VPA and Yield per Recruit (Y/R analysis. Time series of fishery independent indicators based on MEDITS surveys data such as the evolution of the abundance and biomass, the distribution range, and the Conservation Status of Fish b (CSFb, were also analyzed. All four species analyzed showed growth overfishing. The reductions of the fishing effort required to reach the Y/RF0,1 reference point were lower, 66-73% depending on the species, to those reported for the target species M. merluccius (87%, but higher than that reported for M. surmuletus (53%, in the study area in the period 2000-2010. The abundance and biomass, and the distribution range did not show any trend for the period 2001-2011, whereas the CSFb showed signs of recovery that may be due to the displacement of the trawl fishing effort from the shelf to the slope during the last decade. Our results underline the necessary incorporation of monitoring and assessment of by-catch species to the management of fisheries as their populations can show a more pronounced overexploitation than target ones.

  4. Physical and biological processes controlling the distribution of fish larvae in the NW Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatés, A.; Olivar, M. P.; Salat, J.; Palomera, I.; Alemany, F.

    2007-08-01

    The Mediterranean is globally considered an oligotrophic sea. However, there are some places or certain seasons in which mechanisms that enhance fertility may occur. These mechanisms and related processes are especially relevant when they take place during the period of larval development. This study analyzes how environmental conditions occurring in the NW Mediterranean, at local and seasonal scales, contribute to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of fish reproductive activity in the region. The structure of the bathymetry, types of bottoms, diversity of adult fish habitats, as well as mechanisms conditioning the primary production of the region determine the location of spawning, whereas physical processes (e.g., shelf-slope density front and associated current, continental water inflows, winter mixing, stratification of the water column) determine the final distribution patterns of fish eggs and larvae. High larval concentrations occur over the edge of the continental shelf in relation to the presence of the shelf-slope front and its associated convergence. However, this pattern is subject to considerable spatio-temporal variability, due to frontal mesoscale activity. High larval abundance can also be observed near the coast in zones with topographic irregularities that can greatly modify circulation favouring penetration of slope waters into the shelf. Finally, larvae of large pelagic migratory species are mainly distributed in areas under the influence of recent Atlantic Water (AW) and near the frontal system between these inflowing AW and the more saline waters of the northern basin. A pronounced seasonal variability regarding both the number of species and the number of fish larvae in the plankton can be observed throughout the year. The two dominant species, sardine and anchovy, have non-overlapping spawning periods, autumn-winter and spring-summer, respectively. The diversity of feeding patterns as well as the fact that different fish species

  5. Synthesis of Biological Reports on Juvenile Fish Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam through 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Johnson, Richard L.; Stevenson, John R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Johnson, Peter N.; Patterson, Deborah S.

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a review of available literature on juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam from 1939 through 2005. Studies of interest included project-wide fish-passage efficiency (FPE) studies by radio telemetry and fixed-aspect hydroacoustics, fish survival studies (direct and indirect), FGE studies, powerhouse and unit (by netting, hydroacoustics, and radio telemetry), predation studies in the forebay and tailrace, behavioral studies on forebay approach and egress, and surface-bypass studies. The FPE effort will include a review of available distribution data (horizontal, diel, and vertical) for juvenile salmon. This study does not repeat the results of previous review and synthesis studies but cites them. Where no previous review exists for a subject area, all reports were reviewed and synthesized. The report includes an annotated bibliography summarizing each of the documents reviewed and a DVD disk containing all of the original papers and reports along with an HTML index to the documents.

  6. Sport Fishing Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The regulations for sport fishing on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are outlined in this document. Fishing is only permitted from sunrise to sunset, and only...

  7. Fish Springs pond snail

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Communication scenario between the branch of Listing and Recovery, Fish and Wildlife Enhancement, and Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), in regards to the...

  8. Making Connections: Service-Learning in Introductory Cell and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Gail S.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes service-learning in a first-year majors biology course in which students serve throughout the semester with community partners for an average of 25 hours/student. All of the partnerships are based on providing engaging hands-on biology activities for youth in underserved urban areas surrounding the campus. Students in the course have designed new lessons and activities, supported biology labs, mentored younger students, and facilitated afterschool science clubs. Throughout the course, integration between the students’ service experience in the community and their learning in the course is emphasized. This is accomplished in multiple ways including class discussion, group activities, feedback from the instructor and teaching assistant, and weekly blogs. A three-year average of anonymous university-wide course evaluations suggested that students in this service-learning course considered their biology course to be highly rigorous. In both blogs and anonymous surveys students reported that their service and its integration with the course not only advanced their professional skills and sense of community engagement, but also enhanced their learning in biology. PMID:24358385

  9. Secure encapsulation and publication of biological services in the cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhe; Wang, Xuehui; Lu, Bo; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2013-01-01

    Secure encapsulation and publication for bioinformatics software products based on web service are presented, and the basic function of biological information is realized in the cloud computing environment. In the encapsulation phase, the workflow and function of bioinformatics software are conducted, the encapsulation interfaces are designed, and the runtime interaction between users and computers is simulated. In the publication phase, the execution and management mechanisms and principles of the GRAM components are analyzed. The functions such as remote user job submission and job status query are implemented by using the GRAM components. The services of bioinformatics software are published to remote users. Finally the basic prototype system of the biological cloud is achieved.

  10. Report on the 2011 Wilderness Fellow Initiative : Implementing wilderness character monitoring in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the background, process, results, lessons learned, and recommendations from the 2011 Wilderness Fellows Initiative. This initiative was a new...

  11. Northern Great Plains piping plover recovery implementation conducted by the Fish and Wildlife Service in Region 6 (MT, ND, SD, NE, KS, CO) 1986-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Recovery efforts for the Northern Great Plains Population of the piping plover (Charadrius melodus) focus on achieving recovery goals established by the Great Lakes...

  12. [Review of the necropsy studies by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on animals from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — USFWS personnel recorded 244 instances of wildlife mortality at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). Since 1990, records of these animal mortalities were kept in the...

  13. Management-focused Research Needs of Refuges in the Midwest and Northeast Regions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, FY 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Land managers need information about how to improve their management practices to achieve their goals. We conducted a research needs assessment process for the U.S....

  14. United States Fish and Wildlife Service Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Assessment for the Management of conflicts associated with non-migratory (resident) Canada geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a long-term vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the resources of concern...

  15. Critique of the Ohio Division of Wildlife U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Cooperative, Managed Canada Goose Hunt on the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Managed Canada Goose Hunt on Ottawa NWR. Regulations, hunter selection, and results are discussed. A blind analysis is provided. Law...

  16. U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service Aquatic Invertebrate Community Study at Prime Hook NWR, Bombay Hook NWR, Long Island NWR Complex, Supawna Meadows NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The immediate goal of this study in the summer of 2000 was to collect baseline data on the aquatic invertebrate communities present in wetlands where mosquito...

  17. Monitoring habitat restoration projects: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Pacific Region Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program and Coastal Program Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Hollar, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Pacific Region (Region 1) includes more than 158 million acres (almost 247,000 square miles) of land base in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Hawai`i, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Region 1 is ecologically diverse with landscapes that range from coral reefs, broadleaf tropical forests, and tropical savannahs in the Pacific Islands, to glacial streams and lakes, lush old-growth rainforests, inland fjords, and coastal shoreline in the Pacific Northwest, to the forested mountains, shrub-steppe desert, and native grasslands in the Inland Northwest. Similarly, the people of the different landscapes perceive, value, and manage their natural resources in ways unique to their respective regions and cultures. The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program (Partners Program) and Coastal Program work with a variety of partners in Region 1 including individual landowners, watershed councils, land trusts, Soil and Water Conservation Districts, non-governmental organizations, Tribal governments, Native Hawaiian organizations, and local, State, and Federal agencies. The Partners Program is the FWS's vanguard for working with private landowners to voluntarily restore and conserve fish and wildlife habitat. Using non-regulatory incentives, the Partners Program engages willing partners to conserve and protect valuable fish and wildlife habitat on their property and in their communities. This is accomplished by providing the funding support and technical and planning tools needed to make on-the-ground conservation affordable, feasible, and effective. The primary goals of the Pacific Region Partners Program are to: Promote citizen and community-based stewardship efforts for fish and wildlife conservation Contribute to the recovery of at-risk species, Protect the environmental integrity of the National Wildlife

  18. Docks and Piers, Fishing Piers in, Published in unknown, Manatee County Information Services Dept..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Docks and Piers dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Fishing Piers in'. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate system; in a...

  19. The Persistence of FISH Translocations for Retrospective Biological Dosimetry after Simulated Whole or Partial Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Carbajal, Y.C.; Moquet, J.E.; Edwards, A.A.; Lloyd, D.C

    1998-07-01

    High acute whole and partial body accidental irradiations were simulated by in vitro irradiation of blood. Lymphocyte culture times were extended from 48 h to 72 h and 96 h to simulate the elimination of chromosomal damage that occurs over time in vivo following successive cell divisions. The yields of stable translocations involving chromosomes 2, 3 and 5 were scored by the FISH method together with full genome dicentrics. With simulated whole body irradiation the yieldsof dicentrics fell sharply with successive cell divisions whilst translocation frequencies remained constant. With partial irradiation both dicentric and translocation yields reduced. This may be explained by the hypothesis that with homogeneous irradiation at high doses the distributions of stable and unstable aberrations are Poisson and independent whilst with partial exposure their distributions are linked because both types are confined to the irradiated fraction of cells. This has highlighted a possible limitation in the use of FISH for retrospective dosimetry and may explain instances where the method has been reported to underestimate dose when compared with contemporary dosimetry. (author)

  20. Immobilization of fish chromatophores for use as a micro-biosensor for biological toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojović Ljiljana V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromatophores isolated from the Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens represent a class of living cells that provide a vivid color response to microbial pathogens and environmental toxins. The selection of the most appropriate microcarrier and the development of the optimal technique for the chromatophore immobilization in order to enable directed transport of the sensor cells throughout microchannels of the biosensor, as well to preserve the cell survival and its functionality was studied. Microcarriers derived from glass, polystyrene and gelatin (collagen were tested as substrates for chromatophore attachement. Gelatin microcarriers were found to be the most suitable, due to high attachment efficiency (95% of attached cells, preservation of the cell viability and enhanced cell sensitivity. The optimum conditions for fish cell immobilization on collagen microcarriers were determined based on the cell-to-microcarrier bead ratio and the pH of the solution. The rate of cell attachment to the gelatin microcarrier followed first-order kinetics. Pretreatment of the gelatin beads with fibronectin, known as a cell attachment-promoting agent, resulted in a 10% higher attachment rate constant (k.

  1. Occurrence and Biological Fate of Persistent Organic Contaminants in Yellow Sea Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Kannan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs, namely, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB, aldrin, endrin, dieldrin, endosulfan, heptachlors, mirex and chlordane compounds were investigated in muscle and liver tissues of Yellow Sea croakers (Collichthys niveatus and Pseudosciaena crocea from 16 stations on the off shore waters of South Korea within the Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem (YSLME. The sum concentration (minimum-maximum - ng/g lipid wt. was: PCBs: non-detectable to 21; Pesticides non-detectable to 63. Among the 26 individual pesticide compounds measured in fishes, except 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TCBZ, all the other compounds were determined in almost in all samples. The levels in Yellow Sea croakers were similar to levels reported in the Baltic fish. The differential ratios of isomers/congeners in biota in comparison to the original commercial mixtures suggest possible metabolism by cytochrome P450 isozymes. The induction of such drug metabolizing enzymes suggests an ecotoxicological stress. Principle Component Analysis identifies ‘hot spots’ within the sampled area including the Korean off shore sewage dumpsite.

  2. Fish health and fish quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian

    Aquaculture is an expanding worldwide industry producing an increasing amount of fish every year. The quality of the fish meat is dependent upon many biological and non-biological factors. Infectious diseases are known to cause bleedings and damage of the muscle tissue that may lead to scarring...... are poorly described in fish. The present work in this thesis focused on: 1) examination of potential changes in the quality regarding texture of the muscle tissue in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after previous infection with the bacterial pathogens Yersinia ruckeri and Vibrio anguillarum; 2...... of these studies showed that previous infections by Yersinia ruckeri and Vibrio anguillarum gave rise to subsequent changes regarding textural quality parameters in fresh fish meat, while no differences were seen for cold-smoked meat from the same fish. The texture in previous infected fish was less flaky and less...

  3. Investigation of the Nature of Metaconceptual Processes of Pre-Service Biology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Nejla; Selvi, Meryem; Yakisan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Study: The aim of this study is to investigate the nature of pre-service biology teachers' metaconceptual processes that were active as they participated in metaconceptual teaching activities. Methods: Several instructional activities, including poster drawing, concept mapping, group and class discussions, and journal writing, were…

  4. L-Lake fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The L Lake Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the re-start of L-Reactor and address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act, which requires an applicant for a discharge permit to provide scientific evidence that the discharge causes no significant impact on the indigenous ecosystem. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the discharge of L-Reactor effluent into L Lake will not inhibit the eventual establishment of a ``Balanced Biological Community`` (BBC) in at least 50% of the lake.

  5. Biological Review of the Refuges in the Lower Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To promote a more efficient and effective biological review process, a multi-refuge biological review was conducted at four National Wildlife Refuges: Erie,...

  6. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge general biological inventory, Eek River, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is about a general biological inventory done in June and July 1985. A three-person field crew completed a general biological inventory of the Eek Rivet...

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of imidazolium ionic liquids: biological effects in fish Channel Catfish Ovary (CCO) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radošević, Kristina; Cvjetko, Marina; Kopjar, Nevenka; Novak, Rudjer; Dumić, Jerka; Srček, Višnja Gaurina

    2013-06-01

    Increasing interest in the application of ionic liquids as green replacement for volatile organic solvents emphasized the need for the evaluation of their toxic effects at different biological systems in order to reduce the risk for human health and environment. To our knowledge, effects of imidazolium ionic liquids on cellular level of fish cell lines have not been studied yet. The cytotoxicity of imidazolium ionic liquids containing different anions and alkyl chain lengths as the substituent at the cation ring towards the fish CCO cell line was determined by WST-1 proliferation assay. Morphological alterations were examined by fluorescent microscopy using acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry analysis was also performed. The results showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of ionic liquids in CCO cells, related to the type of anion and alkyl chain length, while EC50 values showed moderate to high cytotoxicity of tested imidazolium ionic liquids. Distinct morphological changes observed under fluorescence microscope and data obtained by flow cytometry suggest that the toxicity of imidazolium ionic liquids with longer alkyl chains could be related to necrosis. Results presented in here may be helpful for filling existing gaps of knowledge about ionic liquids toxicity and their impact on aquatic environment.

  8. Virginia ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and brackishwater fish species in Virginia. Vector polygons in this data...

  9. Hawaii ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, marine, estuarine, and native stream fish species in coastal Hawaii. Vector polygons in this data...

  10. Alabama ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and freshwater fish species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  11. Louisiana ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for freshwater (inland) fish species in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent water-bodies and other...

  12. From transcriptome to biological function: environmental stress in an ectothermic vertebrate, the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Alister C

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the importance of transcriptional regulation for biological function is continuously improving. We still know, however, comparatively little about how environmentally induced stress affects gene expression in vertebrates, and the consistency of transcriptional stress responses to different types of environmental stress. In this study, we used a multi-stressor approach to identify components of a common stress response as well as components unique to different types of environmental stress. We exposed individuals of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis to hypoxic, hyposmotic, cold and heat shock and measured the responses of approximately 16,000 genes in liver. We also compared winter and summer responses to heat shock to examine the capacity for such responses to vary with acclimation to different ambient temperatures. Results We identified a series of gene functions that were involved in all stress responses examined here, suggesting some common effects of stress on biological function. These common responses were achieved by the regulation of largely independent sets of genes; the responses of individual genes varied greatly across different stress types. In response to heat exposure over five days, a total of 324 gene loci were differentially expressed. Many heat-responsive genes had functions associated with protein turnover, metabolism, and the response to oxidative stress. We were also able to identify groups of co-regulated genes, the genes within which shared similar functions. Conclusion This is the first environmental genomic study to measure gene regulation in response to different environmental stressors in a natural population of a warm-adapted ectothermic vertebrate. We have shown that different types of environmental stress induce expression changes in genes with similar gene functions, but that the responses of individual genes vary between stress types. The functions of heat

  13. Managing fish and wildlife habitat in the face of climate change: USDA Forest Service perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory D. Hayward; Curtis H. Flather; Erin Uloth; Hugh D. Safford; David A. Cleaves

    2009-01-01

    The spatial and temporal scope of environmental change anticipated during the next century as a result of climate change presents unprecedented challenges for fish and wildlife management. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC 2007) suggested impacts from climate change on natural systems will be more grave than earlier...

  14. Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery evaluation and anadromous fish study on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon: 1975-1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1975 the USFWS began studies designed to define the biological characteristics of wild spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) in the...

  15. How biological (fish) noise affects the performance of shallow water passive array system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.; Haris, K.; Vijayakumar, K.; Sundar, D.; Luis, R.A.A.; Mahanty, M.M.; Latha, G.

    strengths during 18:00 hr (dusk) and 06:00 hr (dawn) respectively (indicated in the figure), in order to determine whether the variations in the data can be attributed to biological activities. The data were analyzed by the time/ frequency spectrograms... to enhance element numbers (i.e., total seven elements) by reducing the inter-element spacing to 0.25m. C. Ancillary Data (Current meter, Wind) The recording current meter (RCM) deployed is based on the Sea Guard data logger (www...

  16. Biological effects of tritium on fish cells in the concentration range of international drinking water standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marilyne; Festarini, Amy; Schleicher, Krista; Tan, Elizabeth; Kim, Sang Bog; Wen, Kendall; Gawlik, Jilian; Ulsh, Brant

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether the current Canadian tritium drinking water limit is protective of aquatic biota, an in vitro study was designed to assess the biological effects of low concentrations of tritium, similar to what would typically be found near a Canadian nuclear power station, and higher concentrations spanning the range of international tritium drinking water standards. Channel catfish peripheral blood B-lymphoblast and fathead minnow testis cells were exposed to 10-100,000 Bq l(-1) of tritium, after which eight molecular and cellular endpoints were assessed. Increased numbers of DNA strand breaks were observed and ATP levels were increased. There were no increases in γH2AX-mediated DNA repair. No differences in cell growth were noted. Exposure to the lowest concentrations of tritium were associated with a modest increase in the viability of fathead minnow testicular cells. Using the micronucleus assay, an adaptive response was observed in catfish B-lymphoblasts. Using molecular endpoints, biological responses to tritium in the range of Canadian and international drinking water standards were observed. At the cellular level, no detrimental effects were noted on growth or cycling, and protective effects were observed as an increase in cell viability and an induced resistance to a large challenge dose.

  17. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Structural evidence of a fourth Gla residue in fish osteocalcin: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, Carlos; Simes, Dina C; Coelho, Ricardo; Alves, Dora; Williamson, Matthew K; Price, Paul A; Cancela, M Leonor; Carrondo, Maria A

    2005-02-01

    Osteocalcin is a small (45 amino acids) secreted protein found to accumulate in bone and dentin of many organisms by interacting with calcium and hydroxyapatite, through the presence of three gamma-carboxylated residues. In this work, we describe the first X-ray crystal structure for a nonmammalian osteocalcin, obtained at 1.4 A resolution, purified from the marine teleost fish Argyrosomus regius. The three-dimensional fit between the A. regius structure and that of the only other known X-ray structure, the porcine osteocalcin, revealed a superposition of the Calpha atoms of their metal chelating residues, Gla and Asp, showing that their spatial distribution is consistent with the interatomic distances of calcium cations in the hydroxyapatite crystals. In both structures, the protein forms a tight globular arrangement of their three alpha-helices while the remaining residues, at N- and C-terminal regions, have essentially no secondary structure characteristics. This study revealed the presence of a fourth gamma-carboxylation at Glu(25), not previously detected in the structure of the porcine osteocalcin or in any other of the sequentially characterized mammalian osteocalcins (human, cow, and rat). A confirmation of the fourth Gla residue in A. regius osteocalcin was achieved via LC-MS analysis. These four doubly charged residues are, together with Asp(24), concentrated in a common surface region located on the same side of the molecule. This further suggests that the known high affinity of osteocalcin for bone mineral may be derived from the clustering of calcium binding sites on this surface of the molecules.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acid fish oil dietary supplements contain saturated fats and oxidized lipids that may interfere with their intended biological benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Sherratt, Samuel C R

    2017-01-29

    Widely available fish oil dietary supplements (DS) may contain fats and oxidized lipids in addition to the beneficial omega-3 fatty acids (OM3FAs) for which they are purchased. Little is known about the potential biological effects of these oxidized lipids. The objective of this study was to assess the fatty acid content, oxidation products, and biological effects of leading fish oil DS available in the United States. Three top-selling fish oil DS in the US were included in this analysis. Fatty acid composition was measured using gas chromatography. Lipid oxidation (primary and secondary products) was measured by spectroscopy in both DS and a prescription OM3FA product. OM3FAs were also isolated and concentrated from DS and were tested for the ability to inhibit copper-induced oxidation of human small dense low-density lipoprotein particles (sdLDL) in vitro. Fish oil DS were found to contain more than 30 different fatty acids, including 10 to 14 different saturated species comprising up to 36% of the total fatty acid content. Levels of OM3FAs also varied widely among DS (33%-79%). Primary (peroxide), secondary (anisidine), and total oxidation products exceeded maximum levels established by international standards of quality in the DS but not the prescription OM3FA product. Oxidation of sdLDL was inhibited by >95% (P saturated fat and oxidized OM3FAs found in common DS may interfere with their intended/potential biological benefits.

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-25

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  1. Consequences of Environmental Service Payments for Forest Retention and Recruitment in a Costa Rican Biological Corridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Hollenhorst

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Compensation to landowners for forest-derived environmental services has gained international recognition as a mechanism to combat forest loss and fragmentation. This approach is widely promoted, although there is little evidence demonstrating that environmental service payments encourage forest stewardship and conservation. Costa Rica provides a unique case study in which a 1996 Forestry Law initiated environmental service payments and prohibited forest conversion to other land uses. We examined these novel policies to determine their influence on landowner decisions that affect forest change, carbon services, and connectivity in a 2425 km² biological corridor. We used Landsat images to compare land-cover changes before and after 1996, and linked these data to landowner surveys investigating land-use decisions. Carbon stocks and storage in secondary forests were also examined. Forest change observations were corroborated by landowner survey data, indicating that the 1996 Forestry Law and environmental service payments contributed positively to forest retention and recruitment. Socioeconomic conditions also favored forest protection. Rates of natural forest loss declined from -1.43% to -0.10%/yr after 1996. Forest cover and connectivity were maintained through tree plantations and secondary forest recruitment, although forest heterogeneity increased as these forest types sometimes replaced natural forest. Carbon storage in secondary forest approached levels in primary forest after 25–30 yr of succession, although few landowners retained natural regeneration. Secondary forests will persist as minor landscape components without legal or financial incentives. The Costa Rican experience provides evidence that environmental service payments can be effective in retaining natural forest and recruiting tree cover within biological corridors.

  2. Ecosystem Services in Biologically Diversified versus Conventional Farming Systems: Benefits, Externalities, and Trade-Offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albie Miles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that biological diversification across ecological, spatial, and temporal scales maintains and regenerates the ecosystem services that provide critical inputs--such as maintenance of soil quality, nitrogen fixation, pollination, and pest control--to agriculture. Agrobiodiversity is sustained by diversified farming practices and it also supplies multiple ecosystem services to agriculture, thus reducing environmental externalities and the need for off-farm inputs. We reviewed the literature that compares biologically diversified farming systems with conventional farming systems, and we examined 12 ecosystem services: biodiversity; soil quality; nutrient management; water-holding capacity; control of weeds, diseases, and pests; pollination services; carbon sequestration; energy efficiency and reduction of warming potential; resistance and resilience to climate change; and crop productivity. We found that compared with conventional farming systems, diversified farming systems support substantially greater biodiversity, soil quality, carbon sequestration, and water-holding capacity in surface soils, energy-use efficiency, and resistance and resilience to climate change. Relative to conventional monocultures, diversified farming systems also enhance control of weeds, diseases, and arthropod pests and they increase pollination services; however, available evidence suggests that these practices may often be insufficient to control pests and diseases or provide sufficient pollination. Significantly less public funding has been applied to agroecological research and the improvement of diversified farming systems than to conventional systems. Despite this lack of support, diversified farming systems have only somewhat reduced mean crop productivity relative to conventional farming systems, but they produce far fewer environmental and social harms. We recommend that more research and crop breeding be conducted to improve diversified farming

  3. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge Biological Program Evaluation 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a written evaluation of the biological program at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge conducted in July, 1992 by a regional management team. It outlines...

  4. Biological control of weeds release sites : Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Table of release sites of insects for biological control of invasive plants at Kulm Wetland Management District (WMD). Insects were released on Kulm WMD to...

  5. A biological survey of Nunivak Island, June 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Results of a biological survey of Nunivak Island, June 5-30, 1985. 594 birds, comprising 25 species, were recorded on six bird transects. Waterfowl and shorebirds...

  6. Biological Considerations in Land Use Planning for a Federal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document presents biological considerations of land use planning for the United States Department of Agriculture Beltsville Agricultural Research Center and for...

  7. Annual Biology Report for Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This outlines the results of biological efforts at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge in 2005. The report covers water management, waterfowl breeding and counts,...

  8. Benton Lake NWR Biological Inspection, June 20-21, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum is on the biological inspection and review at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana. It reviews the stations goals, objectives and plans...

  9. Biological Data Summary : Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Biological Data Summary contains various data sets organized according to topic. The following topics are included and prefaced by a title/divider page. -...

  10. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Summary of biological data 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of biological data collected at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge for the year 1992. Data is summarized in tables, charts, graphs and written summaries. Data...

  11. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Summary of biological data 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of biological data collected at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge for the year 1994. Data is summarized in tables, charts, graphs and written summaries....

  12. A biological survey of Nunivak Island, July 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Results of a biological survey of Nunivak Island, July 2-25, 1985. 755 birds, comprising 24 species were recorded on 12 bird transects. Waterfowl and shorebirds were...

  13. Some Biological Effects Of Ditching Tidewater Marshes Research Report 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies conducted over a 12-year period, 1935-47, of the biological effects of ditching tidewater marshes in Delaware for mosquito control showed that marked...

  14. Biological Review of Wapanocca and Big Lake National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers and summarizes a biological review of Wapanocca and Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge in 1999. Topics include Wapanocca Lake, cropland,...

  15. [Biological Advisory Subcommittee Sampling Methods : Results, Resolutions, and Correspondences : 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a variety of information concerning Biological Advisory Subcommittee sampling methods at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Refuge in 2002. Multiple...

  16. Ecological Dynamics of Wetlands at Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The study documented the interaction between hydrology and the biological dynamics within a single spring season at Lisbon Bottom in 1999. The study goal was to...

  17. Toxicity of certain heavy metals on fish in the aquatic environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On the earth's crust there are 59 heavy metals of which 17 are considered toxic to biological communities. Here in Alaska, we have thus far considered the following...

  18. Urban contaminants project: Data for sediment, fish and eggs collected from Chester Creek, Anchorage, Alaska 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Urbanization has degraded the water quality and adversely impacted biological communities in the lakes and streams of Anchorage. Pollution from point and nonpoint...

  19. Contaminants in fish and game animals on Rocky Mountain Arsenal 1983-1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A biological monitoring program was begun on Rocky Mountain Arsenal in 1977. Phase 1 of this program was a screening study to determine the general extent of...

  20. Contaminants in fish and game animals on Rocky Mountain Arsenal 1977-1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A biological monitoring program was begun on Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in 1977. Phase I of this program was a screening study to determine the general extent of...

  1. An ecosystem services perspective for the oceanic eastern tropical Pacific: commercial fisheries, carbon storage, recreational fishing, and biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer Lynn Martin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ocean provides ecosystem services (ES that support humanity. Traditional single-issue management largely failed to protect the full suite of ES. Ecosystem-based management (EBM promotes resilient social-ecological systems that provide ES. To implement EBM, an ES approach is useful: 1 characterize major ES provided (magnitude, geographic extent, monetary value, trends, and stakeholders, 2 identify trade-offs, 3 determine desired outcomes, and 4 manage anthropogenic activities accordingly. Here we apply the ES approach (steps 1-2 to an open ocean ecosystem, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, an area of 21 million km2 that includes waters of 12 nations and the oceanic commons, using 35 years (1975-2010 of fisheries and economic data, and 20 years (1986-2006 of ship-based survey data. We examined commercial fisheries, carbon storage, biodiversity, and recreational fishing as the major provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural ES, respectively. Average catch value (using U.S. import prices for fish for the 10 most commercially fished species was $2.7 billion yr-1. The value of carbon export to the deep ocean was $12.9 billion yr-1 (using average European carbon market prices. For two fisheries-depleted dolphin populations, the potential value of rebuilding carbon stores was $1.6 million (cumulative; for exploited fish stocks it was also $1.6 million (an estimated reduction of 544,000 mt. Sport fishing expenditures totaled $1.2 billion yr-1, from studies of three popular destinations. These initial, conservative estimates do not represent a complete summary of ETP ES values. We produced species richness maps for cetaceans, seabirds, and ichthyoplankton, and a sightings density map for marine turtles. Over 1/3 of cetacean, seabird, and marine turtle species occur in the ETP, and diversity (or density hotspots are widespread. This study fills several gaps in the assessment of marine and coastal ES by focusing on an oceanic habitat

  2. Efficacy of indigenous larvivorous fishes against Culex quinquefasciatus in the presence of alternative prey: implications for biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Pal, Santanu; Saha, Nabaneeta; Saha, Goutam

    2012-12-01

    Indigenous larvivorous fishes bear potential for regulating vector mosquitoes through trophic interactions. The mosquito prey preference of five indigenous larvivorous fishes in the presence of alternative food items was assessed to highlight their use in mosquito vector management. Laboratory experiments were carried out using the larvivorous fishes Ambassis (=Chanda) nama, Parambassis (=Chanda) ranga, Colisa fasciatus, Esomus danricus and Aplocheilus panchax, as predators and IV instar Culex quinquefasciatus larvae as target prey. Mosquito prey preference of these fishes in the presence of chironomid larvae, tubificid worms and artificial fish foods, in varied proportions, were assessed using preference index. The fishes consumed considerable amount of mosquito larvae both in absence and presence of alternative food items. However, the positive selectivity for mosquito larvae at all densities were significantly (p control by these fishes.

  3. Use of fish functional traits to associate in-stream suspended sediment transport metrics with biological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, John S; Simon, Andrew; Klimetz, Lauren

    2011-08-01

    Loss of ecological integrity due to excessive suspended sediment in rivers and streams is a major cause of water quality impairment in the USA. Current assessment protocols for development of sediment total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) lack a means to link temporally variable sediment transport rates with specific losses of ecological functions as loads increase. In order to accomplish this linkage assessment, a functional traits-based approach was used to correlate site occurrences of 17 fish species traits in three main groups (preferred rearing habitat, trophic feeding guild, and spawning behavior) with suspended sediment transport metrics. The sediment transport metrics included concentrations, durations, and dosages for a range of exceedance frequencies; and mean annual suspended sediment yields (SSY). In addition, this study in the Northwestern Great Plains Ecoregion examined trait relationships with three environmental gradients: channel stability, drainage area, and elevation. Potential stressor responses due to elevated suspended sediment concentration (SSC) levels were correlated with occurrences of five traits: preferred pool habitat; feeding generalists, omnivores, piscivores, and nest-building spawners; and development of ecologically based TMDL targets were demonstrated for specific SSC exceedance frequencies. In addition, reduced site occurrences for preferred pool habitat and nest-building spawners traits were associated with unstable channels and higher SSY. At an ecoregion scale, a functional traits assessment approach provided a means to quantify relations between biological impairment and episodically elevated levels of suspended sediment, supporting efforts to develop ecologically based sediment TMDLs.

  4. Contribution to the biology of the endangered Mexican fish, Zoogoneticus tequila, and suggestions for its indoor management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Arbuatti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The endangered Mexican fish, Zoogoneticus tequila Webb & Miller, 1998, represents a newchallenge for scientists: its biology, quite unknown, could perhaps explain the reason for its extremelylow consistency in natural environments. An experimental setting was prepared where four pairs ofyoung Z. tequila from the only Italian colony were bred in two different (biotope and enriched tanks.Breeding results showed that the animals have grown and presented a positive reproductiveperformance, in both the environmental conditions confirming that the choice of substrata, of thevegetable layout, of food administration and of breeding of fry, resulted optimal for the indoor breeding.Aggressive behavior was extremely low and, although inter-male interactions were unstable, no injurieswere observed among the animals, apart from a few episode of cannibalism towards the young. Thebehavior of animals in stressful situation were also recorded, namely the encounter with a maledisplaying enhanced sexual characters or with a predator. The behavioral responses toward the malewere mainly noticed in the enriched tank, where flicks of tail and display of fins were recorded comparedto the biotope. On the other hand, the predator snake Thamnophis sp. elicited an innate flight responsein both the experimental conditions and in both genders. All together those results seem to encouragethe breeding of Z. tequila in captive condition, although more studies on the cognitive skills of thespecies are needed before its reintroduction in natural environment.

  5. One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, You Fish!

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine; Timmons, Maryellen; Medders, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The recreational fishing activity presented in this article provides a hands-on, problem-based experience for students; it unites biology, math, economics, environmental policy, and population dynamics concepts. In addition, the activity allows students to shape environmental policy in a realistic setting and evaluate their peers' work. By…

  6. Biology of the harlequin fish Othos dentex (Serranidae), with particular emphasis on sexual pattern and other reproductive characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, B; Potter, I C; Hesp, S A; Coulson, P G; Hall, N G

    2014-01-01

    Key biological characteristics of the harlequin fish Othos dentex, a representative of a monospecific genus of the Anthiinae (Serranidae), were determined from samples collected around reefs on the south coast of Western Australia. The females of this relatively long-lived species (maximum recorded age in this study = 37 years) attained only a slightly greater maximum total length and age than males and neither the length nor the age-frequency distributions showed a conspicuous sex-based bimodality. Furthermore, gonads from a wide size and age range of O. dentex were shown by histology, at several locations along their length, to always comprise exclusively either ovarian or testicular tissues. Thus, O. dentex is a gonochorist, a sexual pattern only previously recorded definitively for one other anthiine serranid, i.e. Epinephelides armatus, which also occurs in south-western Australia. Similar to E. armatus, O. dentex possesses 'solid' testes with a central sperm duct, thereby differing in structure from those typically found in serranids, in which there is a central membrane-bound 'ovarian' lumen and peripherally located sperm sinuses. The gonadal characteristics and sexual pattern of these two gonochoristic anthiines are not consistent with a recent proposal for the trends exhibited by the evolution of gonochorism and protogyny within the Serranidae. Othos dentex has indeterminate fecundity and a protracted spawning period (7 months) and, on the basis of underwater observations and a low gonado-somatic index (I(G)) for males, is a pair spawner, which is unusual for a gonochorist of a serranid or member of a related family. While the large spots on the lower half of the body of O. dentex are shown quantitatively to be similarly yellow in juveniles and adult females, they then become blue in males at maturity and this intensifies during the spawning period, when they presumably play an important role in agonistic interactions among males and courtship with

  7. Fish Springs NWR mammal, fish, amphibian, and reptile list

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a species list for mammals, fishes, amphibians, and reptiles found on or adjacent to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, as of October, 1996.

  8. The use of fish parasites as biological indicators of anthropogenic influences in coral-reef lagoons: a case study of Apogonidae parasites in New-Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasal, Pierre; Mouillot, David; Fichez, Renaud; Chifflet, Sandrine; Kulbicki, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Parasite species have been widely used as fish host migration tag or as indicators of local pollution. In this paper our approach is to consider the entire parasite community as a biological indicator of the fish environmental conditions. Seven fish species belonging to the Apogonidae, Apogon bandanensis, A. cookii, A. doderleini, A. norfolkensis, A. trimaculatus, Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus and Fowleria variegata, were sampled on six stations in two bays (Grand-Rade and Sainte-Marie) around Nouméa (New-Caledonia). The two bays are submitted to urban wastewater inputs alone or combined with additional industrial inputs which influences decrease from the inner part to the entrance of each bay. A total of 592 fish were dissected for macro parasite examination. Parasites were grouped according to their taxonomical rank and development stage for the analysis. We found an inconsistent effect of the confinement between the two bays, revealing that the parasite community is not the same in the two bays. Moreover, the encysted metacercariae found in the pericardic cavity were found to be significant indicators of the specific anthropogenically impacted environmental conditions prevailing in the inner parts of the two bays. Other parasite taxa were found to be significant indicators of specific environmental conditions in one or two stations among the six sampled. Results on parasite specificity and biological life cycle of the parasite taxa found in sampled Apogonid were further compared with environmental parameters.

  9. Reynolds shear-stress and velocity: positive biological response of neotropical fishes to hydraulic parameters in a vertical slot fishway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Alan de Freitas Duarte

    Full Text Available The barriers created by dams can cause negative impacts to aquatic communities, and migratory fish species are directly affected. Fishways have been developed to allow the upstream passage of fishes through dams. In Brazil, after the implementation of environmental laws, these structures have been built based on European and American fishway designs. Studies have shown selectivity for different neotropical fishes in some Brazilian fishways, and the main challenge has been to promote upstream passage of a large number of diverse fish species. The patterns of flow circulation within the fish ladder may explain fish selectivity although few studies detail the fish response to hydraulic characteristics of fish ladder flow. This paper presents a laboratory study, where a vertical slot fishway was built in a hydraulic flume and the behavior of two neotropical fish species (Leporinus reinhardti and Pimelodus maculatus were analyzed. The structure of flow was expressed in terms of mean velocity, Reynolds shear-stress and velocity fluctuation fields. The individuals of Leporinus reinhardti had higher passage success than Pimelodus maculatus in the laboratory flume. Both species preferred areas of low to zero Reynolds shear-stress values. In addition, different preferences were observed for these species concerning the horizontal components of velocity fluctuation.

  10. Environmental and biological factors influence the relationship between a predator fish, Gambusia holbrooki, and its main prey in rice fields of the Lower Mondego River Valley (Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, J.; Mieiro, C.; Marques, J.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract We studied the relationships between a predator fish, Gambusia holbrooki, and its main food prey, within the content of a rice field food web. The influence of some environmental and biological factors on these trophic interactions, in combination with existent quantitative information, allowed us to evaluate the ecological viability of using a non-ionic surfactant, Genapol OXD-080, to control a plague caused by crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) populations in the rice fields. In the L...

  11. Biannual Fish Survey, Spring 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The biannual fish survey was initiated in 1989 to monitor population trends of federally endangered fish species at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Item 421 of...

  12. Umatilla - Rough Fish Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In order to enhance environmental conditions in the McCormack Slough on Umatilla NWR, the population of rough fish, including common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and...

  13. Section 7 intra-service consultation, Fort Niobrara-Valentine National Wildlife Refuge Complex, bullsnake control [American burying beetle

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This biological opinion is provided in response to your request for an Intra-Service Section 7 consultation on a proposal to continue bullsnake (Pituophis catenifer)...

  14. 78 FR 53138 - South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Meeting to Discuss Santee-Cooper Biological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...-Cooper Biological Opinion On July 15, 2010, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) filed its Biological Opinion (BO) on the relicensing of the Santee- Cooper Hydroelectric Project No. 199. The document... representatives of NMFS and SCPSA, the Commission's non-federal representative for the Santee-Cooper Project,...

  15. Genetic signatures of historical dispersal of fish threatened by biological invasions: the case of galaxiids in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaecke, Delphine; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Dunham, Jason; Giannico, Guillermo; Consegura, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Aim The ecological effects of biological invasions are well documented, but little is known about the effects of invaders on the genetic structure of native species. We examined the phylogeography, genetic variation and population structuring of two galaxiid fishes, Aplochiton zebraand A. taeniatus, threatened by non-native salmonids, and whose conservation is complicated by misidentification and limited knowledge of their genetic diversity. Location Chile and the Falkland Islands. Methods We combined microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (16S rDNA and COI) markers to compare genetic diversity, effective population size and gene flow of Aplochiton spp. populations differentially affected by salmonid presence. Results We identified two 16S rDNA haplotypes among A. zebra – one dominant in coastal populations and another dominant in inland populations. Populations living on the island of Chiloé displayed a mixture of coastal and inland haplotypes, as well as high microsatellite diversity, as one would expect if the island had been a refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum, or a contact zone among populations. Microsatellite data revealed strong population structuring, indicative of current isolation patterns, and a negative correlation between the genetic diversity of A. zebra and the relative abundance of invasive salmonids. Main conclusions Our study indicates that population structuring of A. zebra reflects the influence of historical patterns of migration, but also the current levels of reduced gene flow among watersheds. Invasive salmonids, known to compete with and prey on native galaxiids, may have had negative impacts on the genetic diversity of Aplochiton spp. The low genetic variation found in some populations, coupled with potential biases in abundance estimates due to species misidentification, highlight the urgent need for more research into the conservation status of the two species of Aplochiton.

  16. North Atlantic demersal deep-water fish distribution and biology: present knowledge and challenges for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstad, O A

    2013-12-01

    This paper summarizes knowledge and knowledge gaps on benthic and benthopelagic deep-water fishes of the North Atlantic Ocean, i.e. species inhabiting deep continental shelf areas, continental and island slopes, seamounts and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. While several studies demonstrate that distribution patterns are species specific, several also show that assemblages of species can be defined and such assemblages are associated with circulatory features and water mass distributions. In many subareas, sampling has, however, been scattered, restricted to shallow areas or soft substrata, and results from different studies tend to be difficult to compare quantitatively because of sampler differences. Particularly, few studies have been conducted on isolated deep oceanic seamounts and in Arctic deep-water areas. Time series of data are very few and most series are short. Recent studies of population structure of widely distributed demersal species show less than expected present connectivity and considerable spatial genetic heterogeneity and complexity for some species. In other species, genetic homogeneity across wide ranges was discovered. Mechanisms underlying the observed patterns have been proposed, but to test emerging hypotheses more species should be investigated across their entire distribution ranges. Studies of population biology reveal greater diversity in life-history strategies than often assumed, even between co-occurring species of the same family. Some slope and ridge-associated species are rather short-lived, others very long-lived, and growth patterns also show considerable variation. Recent comparative studies suggest variation in life-history strategies along a continuum correlated with depth, ranging from shelf waters to the deep sea where comparatively more species have extended lifetimes, and slow rates of growth and reproduction. Reproductive biology remains too poorly known for most deep-water species, and temporal variation in recruitment has

  17. Bioremediation of oil contaminated soil from service stations. Evaluation of biological treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, J.; Jorgensen, K.S.; Strandberg, T.; Suortti, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    Biological treatment of contaminated soil has received much attention during the last decade. Microbes are known to be able to degrade many oil hydrocarbons. However, research is needed to ensure that new technologies are implemented in a safe and reliable way under Finnish climatic conditions. The main points of interest are the rate of the degradation as well as the survival and efficiency of microbial inoculants possibly introduced during the treatment. During 1993 the biotreatability of oil-contaminated soil from service stations was investigated in cooperation with the Finnish Petroleum Federation. The goal of this field-scale study was to test how fast lubrication oil can be composted during one Finnish summer season and to find out whether microbial inoculants would enhance the degradation rate. The soil was excavated from three different service stations in the Helsinki metropolitan area and was transported to a controlled composting area. The soil was sieved and compost piles, also called biopiles, were constructed on the site. Bark chips were used as the bulking agent and nutrients and lime were added to enhance the biological activity. Two different commercial bacterial inoculants were added to two of the piles. The piles were turned by a tractor-drawn screw-type mixer at two to four weeks interval. Between the mixings, the piles were covered with tarpaulins to prevent evaporation and potential excessive wetting. Several microbiological parameters were determined during the test period as well as the temperature and mineral oil content

  18. Fish passage report : Baca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fish passage report was prepared for the Colorado Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office to inform them of possible fish passage issues on streams that provide...

  19. Biological Assessment of Aquaculture Effects on Effluent-Receiving Streams in Ghana Using Structural and Functional Composition of Fish and Macroinvertebrate Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Yaw Boamah; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.; Amisah, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Biological assessment of aquatic ecosystems is widely employed as an alternative or complement to chemical and toxicity testing due to numerous advantages of using biota to determine ecosystem condition. These advantages, especially to developing countries, include the relatively low cost and technical requirements. This study was conducted to determine the biological impacts of aquaculture operations on effluent-receiving streams in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. We collected water, fish and benthic macroinvertebrate samples from 12 aquaculture effluent-receiving streams upstream and downstream of fish farms and 12 reference streams between May and August of 2009, and then calculated structural and functional metrics for biotic assemblages. Fish species with non-guarding mode of reproduction were more abundant in reference streams than downstream ( P = 0.0214) and upstream ( P = 0.0251), and sand-detritus spawning fish were less predominant in reference stream than upstream ( P = 0.0222) and marginally less in downstream locations ( P = 0.0539). A possible subsidy-stress response of macroinvertebrate family richness and abundance was also observed, with nutrient (nitrogen) augmentation from aquaculture and other farming activities likely. Generally, there were no, or only marginal differences among locations downstream and upstream of fish farms and in reference streams in terms of several other biotic metrics considered. Therefore, the scale of impact in the future will depend not only on the management of nutrient augmentation from pond effluents, but also on the consideration of nutrient discharges from other industries like fruit and vegetable farming within the study area.

  20. Evaluation of the biological and hydraulic performance of the portable floating fish collector at Cougar Reservoir and Dam, Oregon, September 2015–January 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, John W.; Evans, Scott D.; Haner, Philip V.; Hansel, Hal C.; Hansen, Amy C.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Hatton, Tyson W.; Kofoot, Eric E.; Sprando, Jamie M.

    2016-11-28

    The biological and hydraulic performance of a portable floating fish collector (PFFC) located in the cul-de-sac of Cougar Dam and Reservoir, Oregon, was evaluated during 2015–16. The PFFC, first commissioned in May 2014, was modified during winter 2014–15 to address several deficiencies identified during operation and testing in 2014. These modifications included raising the water inflow structures to reduce the depth and volume of inflow to improve the internal hydraulic profiles, and moving the anchors so the PFFC could be positioned closer to the existing reservoir outlet, a water temperature control tower. The PFFC was positioned about 18 meters (m) upstream of the intake of the water temperature control tower and faced into the prevailing water current. Like several floating surface collectors operating in the Pacific Northwest at the time, the PFFC used pumps to draw water and fish over an inclined plane, past dewatering screens, and into a collection area. The portable and experimental nature of the PFFC required a smaller size, shallower entrance (about 2.5-m deep), and smaller inflow rate (72 cubic feet per second [ft3/s] inflow during the Low treatment, 122 ft3/s during the High treatment) than other collectors in the region.The collection of the target species, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), during 2015–16 was an order of magnitude larger than in 2014. Subyearling-age Chinook salmon comprised most of the catch (2,616 subyearling compared to 258 yearling) and was greatest during the spring during the High inflow treatment. Bycatch consisted predominantly of cyprinids and centrarchids. Trap mortality (fish found dead in the trap) of juvenile Chinook salmon, at 9.2 percent of the subyearlings and 5.0 percent of yearlings, was about 30 percent of the level in 2014. Fish mortality from handling the live catch was about 1 percent.Data from fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and those with acoustic+PIT tags

  1. Local Knowledge of Pond Fish-Farming Ecosystem Services: Management Implications of Stakeholders’ Perceptions in Three Different Contexts (Brazil, France and Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syndhia Mathé

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses ecosystem service perceptions in the case of pond fish-farming systems in Brazil, France and Indonesia. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment vision suggests a more integrated reflection on environmental policies with greater adaptability to local knowledge and the development of social learning processes, which tend to promote more sustainable changes in behavior and practice than do sanctions. This study considers a part of the identification of ecosystem services. It shows that perceptions differ with the context, and found few differences depending on the type of stakeholders (fish farmers and other stakeholders. From a methodological viewpoint, this paper opens up new prospects for valuing ecosystem services through a perception study.

  2. CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Reproductive biology of Puntius denisonii, an endemic and threatened aquarium fish of the Western Ghats and its implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Solomon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents fundamental information on the reproductive biology of Puntius denisonii, an endemic and threatened aquarium fish of the Western Ghats Hotspot. Results are based on the observations from three river systems, Chandragiri, Valapattannam and Chaliyar. Maximum observed total length in P. denisonii was 162mm and 132mm for males and females, respectively. Males attained sexual maturity at a lower size than females with mean size at first maturity determined as 85.33 plus or minus 1.52 mm for males and 95.66 plus or minus 1.15 mm for females. Puntius denisonii spawned from October to March with minor differences in the peak breeding months between the three river systems, which were studied. Sex ratio deviated significantly from 1:1 and was skewed in favour of males. Absolute fecundity varied from 376 (fish of 102mm total length to 1098 (fish of 106mm total length eggs. Currently, the closed seasons for P. denisonii have been put in place during June, July and October based on the (misassumption that the species breeds during these three months. However, the results of the present study have helped us to understand more about the reproductive biology of the species so as to recommend more appropriate seasonal closures. The months from October until March need to be designated as a closed season for protecting the breeding population of P. denisonii.

  3. Epistemological Predictors of "Self Efficacy on Learning Biology" and "Test Anxiety Related to Evaluation of Learning on Biology" for Pre-service Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2011-11-01

    The degree to which pre-service teachers learn biology is related to both motivational factors of self-regulation and factors regarding epistemological beliefs. At the same time, self-regulation and epistemological beliefs are also associated with one another. Based on this relationship, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between components of epistemological beliefs and self-refulation (self-efficacy and test-anxiety) on learning biology. The study was conducted with 411 pre-service elementary and pre-service elementary science teachers by using a predictive research approach. Collected data was analyzed by the multiple linear regression technique. The results showed that only the belief about "existence of one truth" was a significant predictor of test anxiety while there was no epistemological predictor of self-efficacy. Conclusions and implications of the study will be discussed.

  4. Cooperative agreement between the Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior and Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri for the purpose of conducting an historic weapons deer hunt on certain lands within the Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri to allow an historic weapons deer hunt on...

  5. Integrating Distributed Physical and Biological Marine data using OGC Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Blower, J. D.; Haines, K.; Price, M.; Millard, K.; Harpham, Q.

    2008-12-01

    Earth scientists use highly diverse sources of data, including in-situ measurements, remotely-sensed information and the results of numerical simulations. The ability to access, visualize, combine and compare these datasets is at the core of scientific investigation, but such tasks have hitherto been very difficult or impossible due to a fundamental lack of harmonization of data products. As a result, much valuable data remains underused. We present a web portal that visualizes and compares physical and biological marine data from both numerical models and in-situ observations. The model data are obtained via an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compatible Web Map Service (WMS), and the observed data are obtained via an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS). The physical model WMS, the biological model WMS and the WFS are located at three different institutes. This ability to display in-situ point observations alongside model data facilitates much valuable work on model validation. As models become increasingly complex, and sources of observed data become more numerous, it is important to be able to access and compare this growing amount of data efficiently, to ensure cross-checking and consistency between models and observations. The web portal is being applied in a large European operational oceanography project (ECOOP), where it is used to provide support to ecosystem modellers, and specifically to aid detection of potentially harmful algal blooms in coastal areas. The development of this system has been enabled by the conceptual framework of the Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML), which provides a common view onto all these datasets, independent of their storage format or physical location. CSML is based upon emerging international standards, enabling interoperability with other standards-based infrastructures. By creating a reusable Java library that embodies the CSML concepts we are able to apply these techniques to a number of other projects.

  6. Preparation of biological fish silage and its effect on the performance and meat quality characteristics of quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carmen Ramírez Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to produce fish silage by lactic acid fermentation and evaluate its use in feeding of quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica. An oven-dried mixture of fish silage and soybean meal (1:1 w/w was used to prepare the diets with different levels of inclusion (0, 10, 20 and 30% and evaluate its effect on the performance and meat quality of 160 quails. The inclusion level did not affect the growth and feed conversion ratio. The carcass yield (70.3% and sensory quality of breast meat were not significantly different among the treatments (p>0.05. However, the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic (C18:1n9C, linoleic (C18:2n6C, linolenic (C18:3n3, arachidonic (C20:4n6, cis eicosapentaenoic (C20:5n3 and cis docosahexaenoic (C22:6n3 increased in quail breast meat with the inclusion of fish silage:soybean mixture in the diet (p<0.05. Fish silage and its use in quail diets could offer a good alternative for fish waste utilization as feedstuff component for the improvement of fatty acid composition in its breast meat.

  7. Subtle effects of biological invasions: cellular and physiological responses of fish eating the exotic pest Caulerpa racemosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Felline

    Full Text Available The green alga Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea has invaded Mediterranean seabed including marine reserves, modifying the structure of habitats and altering the distributional patterns of associated organisms. However, the understanding of how such invasion can potentially affect functional properties of Mediterranean subtidal systems is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that C. racemosa changes foraging habit of the native white seabream, Diplodus sargus. In invaded areas, we found a high frequency of occurrence of C. racemosa in the stomach contents of this omnivorous fish (72.7 and 85.7%, while the alga was not detected in fish from a control area. We also found a significant accumulation of caulerpin, one of the main secondary metabolites of C. racemosa, in fish tissues. The level of caulerpin in fish tissues was used here as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the invasive pest and related with observed cellular and physiological alterations. Such effects included activation of some enzymatic pathways (catalase, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, total glutathione and the total oxyradical scavenging capacity, 7-ethoxy resorufin O-deethylase, the inhibition of others (acetylcholinesterase and acylCoA oxidase, an increase of hepatosomatic index and decrease of gonadosomatic index. The observed alterations might lead to a detrimental health status and altered behaviours, potentially preventing the reproductive success of fish populations. Results of this study revealed that the entering of alien species in subtidal systems can alter trophic webs and can represent an important, indirect mechanism which might contribute to influence fluctuations of fish stocks and, also, the effectiveness of protection regimes.

  8. Subtle effects of biological invasions: cellular and physiological responses of fish eating the exotic pest Caulerpa racemosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felline, Serena; Caricato, Roberto; Cutignano, Adele; Gorbi, Stefania; Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Mollo, Ernesto; Regoli, Francesco; Terlizzi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The green alga Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea has invaded Mediterranean seabed including marine reserves, modifying the structure of habitats and altering the distributional patterns of associated organisms. However, the understanding of how such invasion can potentially affect functional properties of Mediterranean subtidal systems is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that C. racemosa changes foraging habit of the native white seabream, Diplodus sargus. In invaded areas, we found a high frequency of occurrence of C. racemosa in the stomach contents of this omnivorous fish (72.7 and 85.7%), while the alga was not detected in fish from a control area. We also found a significant accumulation of caulerpin, one of the main secondary metabolites of C. racemosa, in fish tissues. The level of caulerpin in fish tissues was used here as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the invasive pest and related with observed cellular and physiological alterations. Such effects included activation of some enzymatic pathways (catalase, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, total glutathione and the total oxyradical scavenging capacity, 7-ethoxy resorufin O-deethylase), the inhibition of others (acetylcholinesterase and acylCoA oxidase), an increase of hepatosomatic index and decrease of gonadosomatic index. The observed alterations might lead to a detrimental health status and altered behaviours, potentially preventing the reproductive success of fish populations. Results of this study revealed that the entering of alien species in subtidal systems can alter trophic webs and can represent an important, indirect mechanism which might contribute to influence fluctuations of fish stocks and, also, the effectiveness of protection regimes.

  9. Linking fishery management and conservation in a tropical estuarine lagoon: biological and physical effects of an artisanal fishing gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, M.; Defeo, O.

    2003-04-01

    Information coming from fishery monitoring, surveys and experimental fishing with participation of fishers was employed to determine the impact of an artisanal gear, 'boliche', on the biodiversity of the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta (CGSM), an estuarine lagoon on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Fishery monitoring (catch data) included landings before (1968 and 1978) and after (1994-1996) the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM (1985), whereas surveys were conducted seasonally during 1993-1994. Fishing experiments involved evaluating different mesh sizes and the short-term effect of physical disturbance by the boliche. Monitoring suggested potential trophic effects of this fishing gear: the catch of large, long-lived, carnivorous species declined after the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM, whereas catch rates of smaller, shorter-lived, and lower trophic level species increased. Surveys revealed that the boliche retained 41 species. The by-catch made up 62% of the total catch and the remaining 38% involved the three target species Eugerres plumieri, Mugil incilis and Cathorops spixii. Selectivity experiments showed that 2.5 in. stretched mesh size gill nets caught more species than the 3.0-in. mesh. The smaller mesh also increased the risk of a critical reduction in the spawning stock of target species (notably E. plumieri); a situation that could affect the fish community if mesh sizes lower than 2.5 in. were intensively used. Suspended particulate matter significantly increased after fishing activity, with higher resuspension on mud-shells and mud substrata, whereas dissolved oxygen showed no appreciable changes after fishing operations. Notwithstanding, the activity of the boliche would generate sediment resuspension between 382 and 470 t day -1, which could lead to potential cascade impacts on water quality. We propose a framework of redundancy in management measures in order to simultaneously reach management and conservation goals.

  10. Biology of nesting crested, least, and whiskered auklets at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During avifaunal investigations at Buldir Island 1974-1976, some aspects of the biology of Crested, Least, and Whiskered Auklets were investigated in a colony where...

  11. [Biological Advisory Subcommittee : Review and Recommendations of Dioxin/Furan Issue on RMA : 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The first three pages of this document consist of the Biological Advisory Subcommittee's review and recommendations of the dioxin and furan issue on Rocky Mountain...

  12. Biological Advisory Subcommittee (BAS) Minutes, Members, & Agendas : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record contains a variety of documents produced by the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR's Biological Advisory Subcommittee (BAS) in 1998, from June 3, 1998 to...

  13. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for November 1940 - January 1941 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  14. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for May - July 1941 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  15. North Mississippi Refuges Complex Biological Program 'Pulse-Check' Review - DRAFT REPORT

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biological review for the three refuges of the North Mississippi Refuges Complex is presented. Review is based on an assessment of addressing goals and objectives...

  16. Breeding biology and productivity of geese on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The breeding biology of most goose species has been described. Investigations on the Yukon Delta by Mickelson (1975) and Eisenhauer and Kirkpatrick (1977) provide...

  17. [Draft] Biological review : Ouray National Wildlife refuge : 10-11 October 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Draft biological review report for Ouray National Wildlife Refuge, located along the Green River near Vernal, Utah. The review focuses on historical and present...

  18. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  19. Winter report on biological projects : Des Lacs and Lostwood Migratory Bird Refuge : 1935-1936

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on biological projects taking place during the winter of 1935-1936 on Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge and Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge. Activities...

  20. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for February - April 1941 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  1. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for August - October 1939 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  2. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for August - October 1941 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  3. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for February - April 1940 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  4. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for February - April 1942 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  5. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for August - October 1938 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  6. [Quarterly Biological narrative report for August - October 1940 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  7. French Frigate Shoals (Kanemiloha'i) Biological Monitoring SOP Supplement: Field Guide to Data Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This supplement provides a summary version of the FFS Biological Program Standard Operating Procedures (January 2012 version) specifically focusing on key points and...

  8. Population age composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and Yukon Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the population age, composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and the Yukon territory. Life history, physical...

  9. A preliminary biological assessment of Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex, North Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report represents an initial biological assessment of wetland conditions on Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Slade NWR, and Florence Lake NWR that was...

  10. Biological workshop : Using native grass and forb mixtures to restore refuge lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is for the 2009 biological workshop at the Sullys Hill National Game Preserve, and includes important information regarding tours of management areas...

  11. Design and implementation of a library-based information service in molecular biology and genetics at the University of Pittsburgh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Tannery, Nancy Hrinya; Silverman, Deborah A. L.; Bergen, Phillip; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    Setting: In summer 2002, the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) at the University of Pittsburgh initiated an information service in molecular biology and genetics to assist researchers with identifying and utilizing bioinformatics tools. Program Components: This novel information service comprises hands-on training workshops and consultation on the use of bioinformatics tools. The HSLS also provides an electronic portal and networked access to public and commercial molecular biology databases and software packages. Evaluation Mechanisms: Researcher feedback gathered during the first three years of workshops and individual consultation indicate that the information service is meeting user needs. Next Steps/Future Directions: The service's workshop offerings will expand to include emerging bioinformatics topics. A frequently asked questions database is also being developed to reuse advice on complex bioinformatics questions. PMID:16888665

  12. Hatcheries, Harvest and Wild Fish: An Integrated Program at Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery is operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and is located on the Warm Springs River within the Warm Springs Indian...

  13. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Martini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50 and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians.

  14. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V.; Pablos, M. Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  15. Conceptions of the Nature of Science Held by Undergraduate Pre-Service Biology Teachers in South-West Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A. O.; Bello, G.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the conceptions of the nature of science held by pre-service undergraduate biology teachers in South-West, Nigeria. Specifically, the study examined the influence of their gender on their conceptions of the nature of science. The study was a descriptive research of the survey method. The population for the study comprised…

  16. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  17. Columbia River ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in Columbia River. Vector polygons in this...

  18. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector...

  19. American Samoa ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, pelagic, benthic, and estuarine fish species in American Samoa. Vector polygons in this data set...

  20. A Method for Simulating Sedimentation of Fish Eggs to Generate Biological Effects Data for Assessing Dredging Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    used to attach a 150 µm screen (Nylon screen, Pentair Aquatic Eco- Systems ; Sanford, NC) onto the end of the elbow located inside the chamber to...in close proximity to species of concern, and are of known contamination . For the experiments, sediments were analyzed for chemical contamination ...experiment. Sedimentation experiments were performed in the Fish Larvae and Egg Exposure System (FLEES) located at the ERDC (Lutz et al. 2012). The

  1. PathwayExplorer: web service for visualizing high-throughput expression data on biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlecnik, Bernhard; Scheideler, Marcel; Hackl, Hubert; Hartler, Jürgen; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-07-01

    While generation of high-throughput expression data is becoming routine, the fast, easy, and systematic presentation and analysis of these data in a biological context is still an obstacle. To address this need, we have developed PathwayExplorer, which maps expression profiles of genes or proteins simultaneously onto major, currently available regulatory, metabolic and cellular pathways from KEGG, BioCarta and GenMAPP. PathwayExplorer is a platform-independent web server application with an optional standalone Java application using a SOAP (simple object access protocol) interface. Mapped pathways are ranked for the easy selection of the pathway of interest, displaying all available genes of this pathway with their expression profiles in a selectable and intuitive color code. Pathway maps produced can be downloaded as PNG, JPG or as high-resolution vector graphics SVG. The web service is freely available at https://pathwayexplorer.genome.tugraz.at; the standalone client can be downloaded at http://genome.tugraz.at.

  2. Examining the use of color-infrared digital aerial photography to map common non-native invasive plants on two Southern Indiana U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — OBJECTIVES: The overall objective was to determine if CIR digital aerial photography could be used to efficiently map and analyze common invasive plant distribution...

  3. A report to the Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Migratory Bird Management on the convention between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics concerning the conservation of migratory birds and their environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Convention Between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Concerning the Conservation...

  4. An archaeological site survey and inventory for the Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska 1972: A report submitted to the Wilderness Studies Branch, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a 1972 voyage in the Aleutian archipelago to locate prehistoric and historic archeological sites. The report centers on the problems...

  5. Statement of Ronald E. Lambertson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, before the House Subcommittee on Public Lands and National Parks concerning National Wildlife Refuge additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a statement on the Mattamuskeet, Cedar Island, and Pea Island Wildlife Refuges. Given by Ronald E. Lambertson, it says that there are almost no...

  6. [Draft] Effects of alternatives of the Bison and Elk Management Planning Document/EIS on the ability of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to fulfill legal directives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This technical report in support of the Bison and Elk Management Planning Document/EIS for the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park. This draft report...

  7. Memorandum of Understanding between the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Department of Natural Resources , U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife : Chickaloon Flats Management Agreement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chickaloon Flats, as per the attached legal description and map involving forty-eight thousand acres, more or less, are recognized by the agreement participants...

  8. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  9. How chemistry supports cell biology: the chemical toolbox at your service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Neefjes, Jacques; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-12-01

    Chemical biology is a young and rapidly developing scientific field. In this field, chemistry is inspired by biology to create various tools to monitor and modulate biochemical and cell biological processes. Chemical contributions such as small-molecule inhibitors and activity-based probes (ABPs) can provide new and unique insights into previously unexplored cellular processes. This review provides an overview of recent breakthroughs in chemical biology that are likely to have a significant impact on cell biology. We also discuss the application of several chemical tools in cell biology research.

  10. Female versus male biological identities of nanoparticles determine the interaction with immune cells in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Murugadoss, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    can acquire a differential biological identity. Here we examined whether a unique biological identity acquired from sex-specific protein repertoires could alter the degree of nanoparticle uptake by cognate immune cells. We chose zebrafish as a model species of which blood plasma is sexually contrasted......, a “female” biological identity of the nanoparticles was represented by prevailing contribution of vitellogenins to the corona proteome. We then exposed zebrafish blood cells to the three types of pre-formed nanoparticle–protein complexes and compared nanoparticle uptake using flow cytometry. Lymphoid...

  11. Biological Process for Fish-processing Wastewater Treatment%水产品加工废水生物处理工艺研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞津津; 黄冠男; 姬玉欣; 金仁村

    2011-01-01

    High water consumption and high strength effluent in the fish-processing industry were given more attentions. Since the effluent standard is becoming more rigorous, biological treatment of fish-processing wastewater turns into the best option now. Anaerobic treatments such as anaerobic filter(AF), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket(UASB) and anaerobic fluidized bed (AFB) reactor can attain 80%~90% organics removal with biogas output. Aerobic process such as activated sludge process, biological contact oxidation process, rotating biological contactor, trickling filter and aerated lagoons are also used for organics removal. If both anaerobic and aerobic bioreactors were integrated, the superior quality of the effluent would be achieved.%水产品加工行业庞大的耗水量和高浓度废水备受瞩目,同时随着废水排放标准日益严格,其处理势在必行,生物法是处理该类废水的最佳选择.诸如生物滤池(AF)、上流式厌氧污泥床反应器(UASB)和厌氧流化床(AFB)的厌氧工艺能达到80%~90%的有机物去除率并产生沼气;类似活性污泥、接触氧化、生物转盘、滴滤池以及氧化塘的好氧工艺也适合于有机物的去除,若将各种工艺相结合将提升工艺水平.

  12. Chapter 6: Biological Effects of the Reopening of the San Luis Drain to Carry Subsurface Irrigation Drain Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the second year of operation of the Grassland Bypass Project (GBP), the biological effects of contaminants improved in some geographic areas and worsened in...

  13. Assessment of the biological health of streams on the Patuxent Research Refuge within Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses the biological conditions of streams located within the North Track of the Patuxent Research Refuge (Refuge). Over the last 7 years, Anne...

  14. Reproductive biology and recruitment of the deep-sea fish community from the NW Mediterranean continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Arcaya, U.; Rotllant, G.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Recasens, L.; Aguzzi, J.; Flexas, M. M.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; López-Fernández, P.; García, J. A.; Company, J. B.

    2013-11-01

    Temporal patterns in deep-sea fish reproduction are presently unknown for the majority of deep continental margins. A series of seasonal trawling surveys between depths of 300 to 1750 m in the Blanes submarine canyon and its adjacent open slope (NW Mediterranean) were conducted. The bathymetric size distributions and reproductive cycles of the most abundant species along the NW Mediterranean margin were analyzed to assess the occurrence of (i) temporal patterns in reproduction (i.e., spawning season) along a bathymetric gradient and (ii) preferential depth strata for recruitment. The fish assemblages were grouped in relation to their bathymetric distribution: upper slope, middle slope and lower slope species. Middle-slope species (i.e., 800-1350 m) showed short (i.e., highly seasonal) reproductive activity compared to the upper (300-800 m) and lower (1350-1750 m) ones. Our results, together with those previously published for megabenthic crustacean decapods in the area, suggest a cross-phyla depth-related trend of seasonality in reproduction. In the middle and lower slope species, the reproductive activity reached a maximum in the autumn-winter months and decreased in the spring. The observed seasonal spawning patterns appear to be ultimately correlated with changes in the downward transport of organic particles and with seasonal changes in the physicochemical characteristics of the surrounding water masses. The distribution of juveniles was associated with the bathymetric stratum where intermediate nepheloid layers interact with the continental margins, indicating that this stratum acts as a deep-sea fish nursery area.

  15. A study of topics for distance education-A survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.; Marcy, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify training topics and distance education technologies preferred by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees. This study was conducted on behalf of the National Conservation Training Center to support their distance education strategy planning and implementation. When selecting survey recipients, we focused on employees in positions involving conservation and environmental education and outreach programming. We conducted the study in two phases. First, we surveyed 72 employees to identify useful training topics. The response rate was 61 percent; respondents were from all regions and included supervisors and nonsupervisors. Five topics for training were identified: creating and maintaining partnerships (partnerships), technology, program planning and development (program planning), outreach methods to engage the community (outreach methods), and evaluation methods. In the second phase, we surveyed 1,488 employees to assess preferences for training among the five topics identified in the first survey and preferences among six distance education technologies: satellite television, video conferencing, audio conferencing, computer mediated training, written resources, and audio resources. Two types of instructor-led training were included on the survey to compare to the technology options. Respondents were asked what types of information, such as basic facts or problem solving skills, were needed for each of the five topics. The adjusted response rate was 64 percent; respondents were from all regions and included supervisors and nonsupervisors. The results indicated clear preferences among respondents for certain training topics and technologies. All five training topics were valued, but the topics of partnerships and technology were given equal value and were valued more than the other three topics. Respondents indicated a desire for training on the topics of partnerships, technology, program planning, and outreach methods. For

  16. Accuracy of aging ducks in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Waterfowl Parts Collection Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Richkus, Kenneth D.; Rohwer, Frank C.; Cox, Robert R.; Padding, Paul I.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts an annual Waterfowl Parts Collection Survey to estimate composition of harvested waterfowl by species, sex, and age (i.e., juv or ad). The survey relies on interpretation of duck wings by a group of experienced biologists at annual meetings (hereafter, flyway wingbees). Our objectives were to estimate accuracy of age assignment at flyway wingbees and to explore how accuracy rates may influence bias of age composition estimates. We used banded mallards (Anas platyrhynchos; n = 791), wood ducks (Aix sponsa; n = 242), and blue-winged teal (Anas discors; n = 39) harvested and donated by hunters as our source of birds used in accuracy assessments. We sent wings of donated birds to wingbees after the 2002–2003 and 2003–2004 hunting seasons and compared species, sex, and age determinations made at wingbees with our assessments based on internal and external examination of birds and corresponding banding records. Determinations of species and sex of mallards, wood ducks, and blue-winged teal were accurate (>99%). Accuracy of aging adult mallards increased with harvest date, whereas accuracy of aging juvenile male wood ducks and juvenile blue-winged teal decreased with harvest date. Accuracy rates were highest (96% and 95%) for adult and juvenile mallards, moderate for adult and juvenile wood ducks (92% and 92%), and lowest for adult and juvenile blue-winged teal (84% and 82%). We used these estimates to calculate bias for all possible age compositions (0–100% proportion juv) and determined the range of age compositions estimated with acceptable levels of bias. Comparing these ranges with age compositions estimated from Parts Collection Surveys conducted from 1961 to 2008 revealed that mallard and wood duck age compositions were estimated with insignificant levels of bias in all national surveys. However, 69% of age compositions for blue-winged teal were estimated with an unacceptable level of bias. The low

  17. Fish Springs pond snail : Refuge communication scenario

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Communication scenario between the branch of Listing and Recovery, Fish and Wildlife Enhancement, and Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), in regards to the...

  18. Fish Management Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Fish Management Plan for Muscatatuck NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, a description of the area, a description of the fish resource...

  19. Neosho National Fish Hatchery contaminants survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish were collected from Neosho National Fish Hatchery (NNFH) to determine if metal or organic contaminants were elevated in the biota located on the hatchery. Whole...

  20. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Sport Fishing Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Sport Fishing Plans covers the assesment and managment strategies for sport fishing in the Refuge. Focus is on bass, crappie,...

  1. Linking neuroethology to the chemical biology of natural products: interactions between cone snails and their fish prey, a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Baldomero M; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Schmidt, Eric W; Safavi-Hemami, Helena

    2017-05-27

    From a biological perspective, a natural product can be defined as a compound evolved by an organism for chemical interactions with another organism including prey, predator, competitor, pathogen, symbiont or host. Natural products hold tremendous potential as drug leads and have been extensively studied by chemists and biochemists in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the biological purpose for which a natural product evolved is rarely addressed. By focusing on a well-studied group of natural products-venom components from predatory marine cone snails-this review provides a rationale for why a better understanding of the evolution, biology and biochemistry of natural products will facilitate both neuroscience and the potential for drug leads. The larger goal is to establish a new sub-discipline in the broader field of neuroethology that we refer to as "Chemical Neuroethology", linking the substantial work carried out by chemists on natural products with accelerating advances in neuroethology.

  2. Fish Springs weather CY 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Weather data for calendar year 2011 at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. Data is provided for each month and includes maximum temperature, minimum temperature,...

  3. Fish Springs weather CY 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Weather data for calendar year 2010 at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. Data is provided for each month and includes maximum temperature, minimum temperature,...

  4. Anadromous fish inventory: Summary volume

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary volume, with discussion, on anadromous fish inventories, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs/escapements,...

  5. Report on Fish Springs - 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document discusses field survey results from several trips to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge during the summer of 1958. The following information is...

  6. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design: Analysis of Barriers to Upstream Fish Migration, Volume IV of IV, Investigation of the Physical and Biological Conditions Affecting Fish Passage Success at Culverts and Waterfalls, 1982-1984 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    A synopsis of the project components was prepared to provide an overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists or engineers. This short report can be used also by technical persons who are interested in the scope of the project, and as a summary of the three main reports. The contents includes an historical perspective on fishway design which provides the basis for this project. The major project accomplishments and significant additions to the body of knowledge about the analysis and design of fishways are discussed. In the next section the research project organization, objectives and components are presented to familiarize the reader with the scope of this project. The summary report concludes with recommendations for assisting in the enhancement and restoration of fisheries resources from the perspective of fish passage problems and their solution. Promising research topics are included.

  7. Fluctuating Asymmetry in Two Common Freshwater Fishes as a Biological Indicator of Urbanization and Environmental Stress within the Middle Chattahoochee Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Lutterschmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deviations in bilateral symmetry or fluctuating asymmetry of an organism may result under environmental stressors that reduce developmental homeostasis and stability. Anthropogenic stressors such as increased urbanization can negatively impact environmental quality of aquatic ecosystems. Researchers have stressed the value in finding easy, accurate and inexpensive methods for assessing potential stress within ecosystems. Here we use fluctuating asymmetry (FA as a useful quantitative tool in assessing the environmental quality and potential urban-based stressors within eight creeks of the Bull and Upatoi Creeks Watershed within the larger watershed of the Middle Chattahoochee. Using Geographic Information System (GIS, we characterize land-use patterns and a decreasing urbanization gradient as related to each creek’s eastward position from Columbus, Georgia. We collected two common fishes (redbreast sunfish; Lepomis auritus and bluegill; Lepomis macrochirus, measured both metric and meristic traits and investigated if the degree of FA in these two common fishes correlated with the urbanization gradient across creeks. We found significant differences in FA among creeks with one of the highest FA measures for the most urban creek. Principal component analysis (PCA scores of urbanization and water chemistry were regressed against FA scores. We found no significant relationship between urbanization and FA nor environmental water chemistry and FA among creeks. We comment on the use of FA as a potential response variable and biological indicator of environmental stress within this watershed.

  8. 鱼类leptin的生物学特性及功能%BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTIONS OF LEPTIN IN FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢荣华; 孙君君; 梁旭方; 聂国兴; 杨峰

    2015-01-01

    瘦素(Leptin)是肥胖基因(Obesegene)的产物,属于I型细胞因子.在哺乳动物中, leptin主要由脂肪细胞合成与分泌, 是调控摄食、能量代谢、骨骼发育、甲状腺功能以及繁殖等生理过程的重要激素.目前, 多种硬骨鱼类的 leptin 基因已被克隆, 其功能也已得到初步研究.研究认为, 鱼类 leptin的主要合成部位在肝脏,其在氨基酸序列上与哺乳动物存在很大差异,但蛋白质结构高度保守;功能方面, leptin可调节鱼类的摄食、葡萄糖和脂肪代谢以及繁殖等生命活动过程.本文就鱼类leptin及其受体的特征结构、组织分布、表达调控及功能研究进展进行简要综述.%Leptin is the product ofob gene and a kind of Type I cytokine. It is primarily synthesized and secreted by adipocytes and plays an important role in the regulation of ingestion, energy metabolism, skeletal development, thyroid function, and reproduction in mammals. To dateleptin gene has been cloned in various teleostean groups, and there have been studies of the physiological functions of leptin. Previous reports have suggested that fish leptin is mainly synthe-sized in liver, and the amino acid sequence is different from that in mammals; however, the protein structure is highly conservative. Because of its crucial roles in ingestion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and reproduction, Leptin is poten-tially a new drug target for improving the glucose utilization efficiency in fish in the future. Therefore in this review we discussed about fish leptin in terms of its structure, expression, functions, tissue-specific distribution and receptors.

  9. A successful case of biological invasion: the fish Cichla piquiti, an Amazonian species introduced into the Pantanal, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, E K; Marques, D K S; Ferreira, L K S G

    2008-11-01

    The 'tucunaré', Cichla piquiti, an exotic Amazonian fish has become established along the left bank of the Paraguay River in the Pantanal. It was introduced by escaping from culture ponds in the Upper Piquiri River and spread downstream, along the lateral flooded areas of that river, continuing through the clear waters of the left bank of the Paraguay River and reaching south as far as the Paraguai Mirim and Negrinho rivers. Adult spawners have been found in the region, meaning that it is a self-sustained population. Reproduction occurs in the period of low waters. They were found feeding on fishes of lentic environments belonging to the families Characidae, Cichlidae and Loricariidae. Until the end of 2004, its distribution was restricted to the left bank of the Paraguay River, but in March 2005, some specimens were found on the right bank, raising a question for the future: what will be the distribution area of the tucunaré in the Pantanal? Information about its dispersion is increasing: it is known to be in the Tuiuiú Lake, Pantanal National Park and in the Bolivian Pantanal, all of them on the right bank of the Paraguay River. The hypothesis that the 'tucunaré' could not cross turbid waters, such as in the Paraguay River, was refuted by these recent findings. Possibly, the tucunaré's capacity to lay more than one batch of eggs in a reproductive period, as well as its care of eggs and young, lead them to establish themselves successfully in new environments, as has been observed in the Pantanal and other localities.

  10. Ocean cleaning stations under a changing climate: biological responses of tropical and temperate fish-cleaner shrimp to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Lopes, Ana Rita; Pimentel, Marta; Faleiro, Filipa; Baptista, Miguel; Trübenbach, Katja; Narciso, Luis; Dionísio, Gisela; Pegado, Maria Rita; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário

    2014-10-01

    Cleaning symbioses play an important role in the health of certain coastal marine communities. These interspecific associations often occur at specific sites (cleaning stations) where a cleaner organism (commonly a fish or shrimp) removes ectoparasites/damaged tissue from a 'client' (a larger cooperating fish). At present, the potential impact of climate change on the fitness of cleaner organisms remains unknown. This study investigated the physiological and biochemical responses of tropical (Lysmata amboinensis) and temperate (L. seticaudata) cleaner shrimp to global warming. Specifically, thermal limits (CTMax), metabolic rates, thermal sensitivity, heat shock response (HSR), lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration], lactate levels, antioxidant (GST, SOD and catalase) and digestive enzyme activities (trypsin and alkaline phosphatase) at current and warming (+3 °C) temperature conditions. In contrast to the temperate species, CTMax values decreased significantly from current (24-27 °C) to warming temperature conditions (30 °C) for the tropical shrimp, where metabolic thermal sensitivity was affected and the HSR was significantly reduced. MDA levels in tropical shrimp increased dramatically, indicating extreme cellular lipid peroxidation, which was not observed in the temperate shrimp. Lactate levels, GST and SOD activities were significantly enhanced within the muscle tissue of the tropical species. Digestive enzyme activities in the hepatopancreas of both species were significantly decreased by warmer temperatures. Our data suggest that the tropical cleaner shrimp will be more vulnerable to global warming than the temperate Lysmata seticaudata; the latter evolved in a relatively unstable environment with seasonal thermal variations that may have conferred greater adaptive plasticity. Thus, tropical cleaning symbioses may be challenged at a greater degree by warming-related anthropogenic forcing, with potential cascading effects on the health

  11. A successful case of biological invasion: the fish Cichla piquiti, an Amazonian species introduced into the Pantanal, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EK. Resende

    Full Text Available The "tucunaré", Cichla piquiti, an exotic Amazonian fish has become established along the left bank of the Paraguay River in the Pantanal. It was introduced by escaping from culture ponds in the Upper Piquiri River and spread downstream, along the lateral flooded areas of that river, continuing through the clear waters of the left bank of the Paraguay River and reaching south as far as the Paraguai Mirim and Negrinho rivers. Adult spawners have been found in the region, meaning that it is a self-sustained population. Reproduction occurs in the period of low waters. They were found feeding on fishes of lentic environments belonging to the families Characidae, Cichlidae and Loricariidae. Until the end of 2004, its distribution was restricted to the left bank of the Paraguay River, but in March 2005, some specimens were found on the right bank, raising a question for the future: what will be the distribution area of the tucunaré in the Pantanal? Information about its dispersion is increasing: it is known to be in the Tuiuiú Lake, Pantanal National Park and in the Bolivian Pantanal, all of them on the right bank of the Paraguay River. The hypothesis that the "tucunaré" could not cross turbid waters, such as in the Paraguay River, was refuted by these recent findings. Possibly, the tucunaré's capacity to lay more than one batch of eggs in a reproductive period, as well as its care of eggs and young, lead them to establish themselves successfully in new environments, as has been observed in the Pantanal and other localities.

  12. Sport Fishing Plan: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sport Fishing Plan summarizes the objectives of the Fishing Program on Parker River NWR. A description of the program is provided along with fishing regulations.

  13. 75 FR 6058 - Federal Sport Fish Restoration; California Department of Fish and Game Fish Hatchery and Stocking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Federal Sport Fish Restoration; California Department of Fish and Game Fish.... Under the Sport Fish Restoration Act (SFRA), FWS proposes to fund actions associated with the operation...: Under the SFRA (Pub. L. 106-408), FWS has authority to grant Federal funds from the Sport...

  14. A Comparative Study of Compression Methods and the Development of CODEC Program of Biological Signal for Emergency Telemedicine Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, T.S.; Kim, J.S. [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea); Lim, Y.H. [Visionite Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea); Yoo, S.K. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-05-01

    In an emergency telemedicine system such as the High-quality Multimedia based Real-time Emergency Telemedicine(HMRET) service, it is very important to examine the status of the patient continuously using the multimedia data including the biological signals(ECG, BP, Respiration, S{sub p}O{sub 2}) of the patient. In order to transmit these data real time through the communication means which have the limited transmission capacity, it is also necessary to compress the biological data besides other multimedia data. For this purpose, we investigate and compare the ECG compression techniques in the time domain and in the wavelet transform domain, and present an effective lossless compression method of the biological signals using JPEG Huffman table for an emergency telemedicine system. And, for the HMRET service, we developed the lossless compression and reconstruction program of the biological signals in MSVC++ 6.0 using DPCM method and JPEG Huffman table, and tested in an internet environment. (author). 15 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Population structure and reproductive biology of Astyanax gymnodontus (Characiformes: Characidae), a poorly known endemic fish of the Iguaçu River basin, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Matheus Tenório; da Silva, Pedro Rogério Leandro; Baumgartner, Gilmar

    2016-03-01

    Success in fish breeding depends on reproduction intensity, periodicity and the place where it occurs. Information about fish species reproduction is important to assist managers, and to determine conservation and management strategies. The fish assemblage of the Iguaçu River basin is already known for its high endemism, and despite this privilege, the large number of dams built along it, threat this particular biodiversity. Astyanax gymnodontus is an endemic fish species and studies on its population structure and reproductive biology are important, since they represent the first step for further community studies. Our objective was to evaluate some aspects of the population structure and reproductive biology of A. gymnodontus in the influence area of Salto Santiago dam, Iguaçu River, Paraná State, Brazil. Sampling was made monthly from July 2003 to June 2005, and bimonthly from July 2005 to March 2013, at five sites in the influence area of Salto Santiago dam. Fishes were collected using 10 m length gillnets with meshes ranging from 2.5 to 6.0 cm between non-adjacent knots and trammel nets with inner meshes of 6.0 cm between non-adjacent knots. Nets were arranged on surface, bottom and margins of each site, exposed for 24 h. Additional drags on littoral areas were performed from January to March and October to December from 2009 to 2011, with 50.0 m nets, 0.5 cm mesh size, for juveniles capture. We captured and analyzed 21 932 individuals, being 9 249 females and 12 683 males, representing 42.2 % and 57.8 %, respectively. The average body length was 8.8 cm for females and 8.3 cm for males. The average weight was 18.8 g for females and 16.0 g for males. Sex ratio calculated for the entire period was 1.8 males/female. Males were more abundant than females in 73.2 % of samples and significant differences were observed in 35.3 % of samples. The estimated length at first maturity (SL(50)) was 6.4 cm for females and 6.2 cm for males. We suggest that sexual

  16. Analysis of piscicultural-biological results of works with Russian sturgeon brood fish at the sturgeon hatchery “Lebyazhy” (Astrakhan region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Kononenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The state of world stocks of sturgeons is on the edge of catastrophe. These species are either extinct or under threat of extinction under human impacts. At the same time, there are enterprises, fish hatcheries, which deal with restoration and replenishment of natural stocks with of endangered fish species. One of such hatcheries is the sturgeon hatchery “Lebyazhy” (Astrakhan region, Russian Federation. The aim of the study was an analysis of piscicultural-biological features of the Russian sturgeon brood fish. During the study, which was conducted in April–May 2011, 34 Russian sturgeon females were used in two rounds, 17 individuals each. For stimulating gametes maturation, the Derzhavin’s physiological method was used. Caviar was obtained by stripping the eggs under strict hygienic and sanitary norms. Eggs fertilization with the semi-dry method used the male milt that bought at the “Raskat” LLC. Egg stickiness elimination was performed with the aid of talc and apparatuses for the egg stickiness elimination. Eggs incubation was performed in the “Osetr” apparatuses until yolk-sac larvae hatching. The domesticated fish were subjected to bonitation for determining their readiness for spawning. As a result of this bonitation, the brood fish were separated into two groups: first round of rearing works: females with mean weight of 34.8 kg and age of 9 years; second round: females with mean weight of 32.3 kg and the same age. Among injected females of the first round, 100% positive reaction for the stimulating injection was observed, but 95% – among females of the second round. Maturation time of females of both rounds varied from 25 to 30 hours. The maturation state of gametes of sturgeon females or males was determined based on samples obtained. 90.2 kg of eggs were obtained from females of the first round. At the same time, the maximum quantity was observed in the female of 50.5 kg – 9.2 kg of caviar, and the least quantity

  17. Multi-agency analysis of periphyton, fish, and benthic macroinvertebrate communities and the effects of point and non-point sources in the Indian Creek Watershed, Tazewell County, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Chemical, physical, and biological indices were used in this study. Water and sediment samples were analyzed for EPA’s priority pollutants. Other measurements such...

  18. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollbrett, Julien; Larmande, Pierre; de Lamotte, Frédéric; Ruiz, Manuel

    2013-04-15

    In recent years, a large amount of "-omics" data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic.

  19. Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System, 1998-2000 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Sandra L.

    2001-05-01

    Since 1984, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has conducted an ongoing research and development project to expand and improve technology for Passive-Integrated-Transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB). Work conducted as part of this project during 1999-2000 was divided into six individual projects, which are covered separately in this report.

  20. A piecewise regression approach for determining biologically relevant hydraulic thresholds for the protection of fish at river infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boys, Craig A.; Robinson, Wayne; Miller, Brett; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Navarro, Anna; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2016-05-13

    Barotrauma injury can occur when fish are exposed to rapid decompression during downstream passage through river infrastructure. A piecewise regression approach was used to objectively quantify barotrauma injury thresholds in two physoclistous species (Murray cod Maccullochella peelii and silver perch Bidyanus bidyanus) following simulated infrastructure passage in barometric chambers. The probability of injuries such as swim bladder rupture; exophthalmia; and haemorrhage and emphysema in various organs increased as the ratio between the lowest exposure pressure and the acclimation pressure (ratio of pressure change RPCE/A) fell. The relationship was typically non-linear and piecewise regression was able to quantify thresholds in RPCE/A that once exceeded resulted in a substantial increase in barotrauma injury. Thresholds differed among injury types and between species but by applying a multi-species precautionary principle, the maintenance of exposure pressures at river infrastructure above 70% of acclimation pressure (RPCE/A of 0.7) should sufficiently protect downstream migrating juveniles of these two physoclistous species. These findings have important implications for determining the risk posed by current infrastructures and informing the design and operation of new ones.

  1. Experiences of mobility for people living with rheumatoid arthritis who are receiving biologic drug therapy: implications for podiatry services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lucy; Donovan-Hall, Margaret; Borthwick, Alan; Bowen, Catherine J

    2017-01-01

    problematic access to foot health services. Whilst the findings from this study mirror those within the existing literature, which report improvements in physical function related to biological therapy, foot problems clearly remained an unremitting feature of life for patients with rheumatoid disease, even when in receipt of biologics.

  2. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fish Allergy KidsHealth > For Parents > Fish Allergy Print A ... From Home en español Alergia al pescado About Fish Allergy A fish allergy is not exactly the ...

  3. Pre-Service Biology Teachers' and Primary School Students' Attitudes toward and Knowledge about Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazic, Iztok

    2011-01-01

    Snakes are controversial animals emblazoned by legends, but also endangered as a result of human prejudice and fear. The author investigated gender and age-related differences in attitudes to and knowledge of snakes comparing samples of school children and pre-service teachers. It was found that although pre-service teachers had better knowledge…

  4. Endangered river fish: factors hindering conservation and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Paukert, Craig P.; Hogan, Zeb

    2012-01-01

    Globally, riverine fish face many anthropogenic threats including riparian and flood plain habitat degradation, altered hydrology, migration barriers, fisheries exploitation, environmental (climate) change, and introduction of invasive species. Collectively, these threats have made riverine fishes some of the most threatened taxa on the planet. Although much effort has been devoted to identifying the threats faced by river fish, there has been less effort devoted to identifying the factors that may hinder our ability to conserve and restore river fish populations and their watersheds. Therefore, we focus our efforts on identifying and discussing 10 general factors (can also be viewed as research and implementation needs) that constrain or hinder effective conservation action for endangered river fish: (1) limited basic natural history information; (2) limited appreciation for the scale/extent of migrations and the level of connectivity needed to sustain populations; (3) limited understanding of fish/river-flow relationships; (4) limited understanding of the seasonal aspects of river fish biology, particularly during winter and/or wet seasons; (5) challenges in predicting the response of river fish and river ecosystems to both environmental change and various restoration or management actions; (6) limited understanding of the ecosystem services provided by river fish; (7) the inherent difficulty in studying river fish; (8) limited understanding of the human dimension of river fish conservation and management; (9) limitations of single species approaches that often fail to address the broader-scale problems; and (10) limited effectiveness of governance structures that address endangered river fish populations and rivers that cross multiple jurisdictions. We suggest that these issues may need to be addressed to help protect, restore, or conserve river fish globally, particularly those that are endangered.

  5. Monthly Biological report and report of other activities from November 1, 1936 to December 1, 1936 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, upland game birds, mammals, law...

  6. Movement and breeding biology of bald eagles on Adak Island, 01-01 81 to 11-31-81: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes activities completed during the past 11 months on the movement and breeding biology of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on Adak Island,...

  7. Investigation of oil drilling impacts to aquatic habitat resources: In Situ biological assessment of the photoinduced toxicity of environmental releases of crude oil

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study proposed a biological assessment of a recent crude oil spill for potential impacts to aquatic resources due to petroleum hydrocarbon wastes. The...

  8. Monthly Biological report and report of other activities from December 1, 1936 to December 31, 1936 on the Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for Waubay Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the biological conditions of the refuge. Weather, vegetation, waterfowl, raptors, upland game birds,...

  9. Alaskan sport fishing waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As a guide to newcomers and visitors, fishery biologists have compiled a list of some of the well-known fishing waters in Alaska. The list is merely a starting point...

  10. Of Fish and Micrornas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Fish is an important small vertebrate multidisciplinary model for investigating various aspects of reproduction, development, disease (immunology, toxicology, carcinogenesis), and aging. It is also an important model for comparative and evolutionary studies because it represents the lower...... to the mechanisms of control of gene expression, impacting a broad range of biological processes. Thus far, >25, 000 miRNA sequences have been identified in 193 species, including fish. In fish, the interest on miRNAs started with the analysis of their expression and function during embryonic development. In our...... selection markers to identify disease-resistant fish....

  11. Draft genome of the medaka fish: a comprehensive resource for medaka developmental genetics and vertebrate evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-01

    The medaka Oryzias latipes is a small egg-laying freshwater teleost, and has become an excellent model system for developmental genetics and evolutionary biology. The medaka genome is relatively small in size, approximately 800 Mb, and the genome sequencing project was recently completed by Japanese research groups, providing a high-quality draft genome sequence of the inbred Hd-rR strain of medaka. In this review, I present an overview of the medaka genome project including genome resources, followed by specific findings obtained with the medaka draft genome. In particular, I focus on the analysis that was done by taking advantage of the medaka system, such as the sex chromosome differentiation and the regional history of medaka species using single nucleotide polymorphisms as genomic markers.

  12. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1990-1993.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Maynard, D.J.; Downing, S.L. (and others)

    1994-01-01

    In 1983, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) began a multiyear cooperative research program with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to evaluate a new miniaturized identification system that could be used with salmonids. The system is referred to as the passive-integrated-transponder (PIT) tagging and interrogation system. The program has focused on determining the effects of PIT tags on juvenile and adult salmonids, as well as the development and evaluation of tagging and interrogation methods. Earlier results of the program have been reported in annual reports and journal articles cited in this report. This report covers the work per formed from 1990 through 1993. For convenience, the report is divided into three sections: (1) Interrogation and separation systems at Columbia River Basin dams; (2) Systems development and evaluation; and (3) Information and technology transfer.

  13. Monthly Progress Report October 1952. Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1952-10-01

    The present monthly report covers the work in Argonne National Laboratory's Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952.

  14. Biological control of weeds: research by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: selected case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Paul C; DeLoach, C Jack; Wineriter, Susan A; Goolsby, John A; Sobhian, Rouhollah; Boyette, C Douglas; Abbas, Hamed K

    2003-01-01

    Research by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) on biological control of weeds has been practiced for many years because of its inherent ecological and economic advantages. Today, it is further driven by ARS adherence to Presidential Executive Order 13112 (3 February 1999) on invasive species and to USDA-ARS policy toward developing technology in support of sustainable agriculture with reduced dependence on non-renewable petrochemical resources. This paper reports examples or case studies selected to demonstrate the traditional or classical approach for biological control programs using Old World arthropods against Tamarix spp, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav) ST Blake and Galium spurium L/G aparine L, and the augmentative approach with a native plant pathogen against Pueraria lobata Ohwi = P montana. The examples illustrated various conflicts of interest with endangered species and ecological complexities of arthropods with associated microbes such as nematodes.

  15. Reproductive biology of Ilisha elongata (Teleostei: Pristigasteridae) in Ariake Sound, Japan: Implications for estuarine fish conservation in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Takita, Toru; Zhang, Chunguang

    2009-01-01

    Elongate ilisha ( Ilisha enlongata) is a commercially important species that contributes to clupeoid fisheries in Asian countries. In the present study, the reproductive biology of I. elongata in Ariake Sound, Japan is determined for the first time. Six maturity stages were described using ovarian and testicular histology throughout the annual cycle. The spawning season in Ariake Sound lasts from May to July, with peak spawning activity in May and June. Age at first maturity was estimated to be 2 years, with a few exceptions of 1 year in well-developed males. Ovaries that contained both tertiary yolk oocytes and postovulatory follicles occurred from late May to late July, indicating that I. elongata is a multiple spawner. The size-frequency distribution of oocytes provided evidence for its multiple spawning and accuracy of the fecundity estimates. The batch fecundity of this species was estimated at between 22,200 and 270,900 eggs per individual, increasing with age between two and six years. The present findings on the reproductive strategy of I. elongata in Ariake Sound are generally consistent with those in temperate or subtropical populations, but quite different from those of tropical population where first maturation occurs around 200 days and life spans are shorter, with a maximum age less than 3 years. The conservation implications of this reproductive strategy in a harsh, variable environment in Asian countries are also discussed.

  16. The Role of Soil Biological Function in Regulating Agroecosystem Services and Sustainability in the Quesungual Agroforestry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonte, S.; Pauli, N.; Rousseau, L.; SIX, J. W. U. A.; Barrios, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Quesungual agroforestry system from western Honduras has been increasingly promoted as a promising alternative to traditional slash-and-burn agriculture in tropical dry forest regions of the Americas. Improved residue management and the lack of burning in this system can greatly impact soil biological functioning and a number of key soil-based ecosystem services, yet our understanding of these processes has not been thoroughly integrated to understand system functionality as a whole that can guide improved management. To address this gap, we present a synthesis of various field studies conducted in Central America aimed at: 1) quantifying the influence of the Quesungual agroforestry practices on soil macrofauna abundance and diversity, and 2) understanding how these organisms influence key soil-based ecosystem services that ultimately drive the success of this system. A first set of studies examined the impact of agroecosystem management on soil macrofauna populations, soil fertility and key soil processes. Results suggest that residue inputs (derived from tree biomass pruning), a lack of burning, and high tree densities, lead to conditions that support abundant, diverse soil macrofauna communities under agroforestry, with soil organic carbon content comparable to adjacent forest. Additionally, there is great potential in working with farmers to develop refined soil quality indicators for improved land management. A second line of research explored interactions between residue management and earthworms in the regulation of soil-based ecosystem services. Earthworms are the most prominent ecosystem engineers in these soils. We found that earthworms are key drivers of soil structure maintenance and the stabilization of soil organic matter within soil aggregates, and also had notable impacts on soil nutrient dynamics. However, the impact of earthworms appears to depend on residue management practices, thus indicating the need for an integrated approach for

  17. Native Prairie Adaptive Management: a multi region adaptive approach to invasive plant management on Fish and Wildlife Service owned native prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Jill J.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Moore, Clinton T.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the native prairie managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the northern Great Plains is extensively invaded by the introduced cool-season grasses, smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Management to suppress these invasive plants has had poor to inconsistent success. The central challenge to managers is selecting appropriate management actions in the face of biological and environmental uncertainties. In partnership with the FWS, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed an adaptive decision support framework to assist managers in selecting management actions under uncertainty and maximizing learning from management outcomes. This joint partnership is known as the Native Prairie Adaptive Management (NPAM) initiative. The NPAM decision framework is built around practical constraints faced by FWS refuge managers and includes identification of the management objective and strategies, analysis of uncertainty and construction of competing decision models, monitoring, and mechanisms for model feedback and decision selection. Nineteen FWS field stations, spanning four states of the PPR, have participated in the initiative. These FWS cooperators share a common management objective, available management strategies, and biological uncertainties. Though the scope is broad, the initiative interfaces with individual land managers who provide site-specific information and receive updated decision guidance that incorporates understanding gained from the collective experience of all cooperators. We describe the technical components of this approach, how the components integrate and inform each other, how data feedback from individual cooperators serves to reduce uncertainty across the whole region, and how a successful adaptive management project is coordinated and maintained on a large scale. During an initial scoping workshop, FWS cooperators developed a consensus management objective

  18. 76 FR 75898 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... The Council represents the interests of the public and private sectors of the sport fishing,...

  19. 78 FR 4161 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a...

  20. 77 FR 26784 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a...

  1. Population growth, trophic level, and reproductive biology of two congeneric archer fishes (Toxotes chatareus, Hamilton 1822 and Toxotes jaculatrix, Pallas 1767) inhabiting Malaysian coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, K D; Bakar, Y; Samat, A; Zaidi, C C; Aziz, A; Mazlan, A G

    2009-12-01

    Population growth, trophic level, and some aspects of reproductive biology of two congeneric archer fish species, Toxotes chatareus and Toxotes jaculatrix, collected from Johor coastal waters, Malaysia, were studied. Growth pattern by length-weight relationship (W=aL(b)) for the sexes differed, and exhibited positive allometric growth (male, female and combined sexes of T. chatareus; female and combined sexes of T. jaculatrix) and isometric growth (male samples of T. jaculatrix only). Trophic levels of both species were analyzed based on 128 specimens. The results show that, in both species, crustaceans and insects were the most abundant prey items, and among crustaceans the red clawed crab Sesarma bidens and Formicidae family insects were the most represented taxa. The estimated mean trophic levels for T. chatareus and T. jaculatrix were 3.422+/-0.009 and 3.420+/-0.020, respectively, indicating that they are largely carnivores. Fecundity of T. chatareus ranged from 38 354 to 147 185 eggs for females with total length ranging from 14.5 to 22.5 cm and total body weight from 48.7 to 270.2 g, and T. jaculatrix 25 251 to 150 456 eggs for females with total length ranging from 12.2 to 23.0 cm and total body weight from 25.7 to 275.0 g. Differences in values of gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indexes calculated for both species in this study may have resulted from uneven sample size ranges.

  2. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Acceptance of Biological Evolution in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    The present research aims to determine whether or not pre-service science teachers in Turkey are resistant to learning about the theory of evolution (TOE), and to understand the reasons for their acceptance or rejection of this theory. Following an intervention process, essay documents were collected from each participant ("N" = 113) and…

  3. Canadian Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Conceptions of Biological Evolution and Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Anila; Wiles, Jason R.; Alters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    This study explores pre-service elementary school teachers' understandings of evolutionary science and their feelings and concerns about teaching evolution in Canadian elementary schools. Data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Most participants reported acceptance of evolution as a scientifically factual…

  4. Multi-Service Doctrine for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    government, or academia. Examples include pesticides, petrochemicals, fertilizers , corrosives, explosives, and poisons. These chemicals are not primarily...naturally (bacteria, plants, fungi, snakes, insects , and other living organisms), but may also be produced synthetically. Naturally occurring toxins are...event and provide temporary essential operations and services at home and abroad. OVERVIEW 2-1. The deadly , destructive, and disruptive effects of

  5. A survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature-Summary report to respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a summary of responses to the questions included on a survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature. The survey was sponsored by the Division of Education Outreach at the National Conservation Training Center and conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data collection process started on February 25, 2010 and ended on March 9, 2010. The dataset includes the responses from 320 individuals from all regions in the Service. The adjusted response rate for the survey was 55 percent. In this report, we provide the summary results for the survey questions in the order in which the questions were asked. The questions addressed the following topics: relevance of certain outcomes to the aspect of the Service's mission that relates to connecting people with nature, perceived success at connecting children with nature, the extent to which ten constraints present problems in connecting children with nature, and attitudes about the importance of connecting children with nature. The text of comments provided by respondents to open-ended questions is provided. In-depth analyses will be reported in the completion report for this project.

  6. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  7. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  8. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife refuge : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  9. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  10. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  11. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  12. Assessment of Environmental Contaminants in Muddy River Fishes, Clark County, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2002 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) Southern Nevada Field Office initiated a study to identify environmental contaminant impacts to native fish of...

  13. River bank stabilization, Emmonak, Alaska final fish and wildlife coordination act report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (FWCA) Report constitutes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (Service) report on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's (Corps)...

  14. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  15. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  19. A survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding topics for distance education-Summary report to respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Shuster, Rudy M.; Marcy, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a summary of responses to the questions included in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Distance Education survey conducted from January 26, 2010, to February 8, 2010. The survey included questions for two studies sponsored by the Division of Education Outreach (DEO) at the NCTC. The first study identifies the topics of interest to FWS employees on which training could be provided via distance education. The topics were limited to the area of conservation and environmental education, outreach, and partnerships because these topics are within the scope of the DEO. The second study focused on characterizing the relation between onsite course enrollment at NCTC and distance education offerings. Because there were only a few questions on the survey for the second study and because the target populations were the same for both, the two surveys were combined.

  20. Construction of an 8-mm time-lapse camera for biological research

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the construction of an 8mm camera for biological research. A time-lapse camera for use in biological research can be constructed from a super 8-mm...

  1. 78 FR 53156 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council; Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council; Teleconference AGENCY: Fish... Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C...

  2. Fish Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaxter, J. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides related information about hearing in fish, including the sensory stimulus of sound in the underwater environment, mechanoreceptors in fish, pressure perception and the swimbladder, specializations in sound conduction peculiar to certain fish families. Includes numerous figures. (CS)

  3. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a clear and consistent manner, so that consumers with food allergies and their caregivers can be informed as ... the menu, cross-contact with fish is possible. Ethnic ... fish. Avoid foods like fish sticks and anchovies. Some individuals with ...

  4. Biological materials: (Part A): Temperature-responsive polymers and drug delivery, and, (Part B): Polymer modification of fish scale and their nano-mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xu

    This research has three parts. Two parts deal with novel nanoparticle assemblies for drug delivery, and are described in Part A, while the third part looks at properties of fish scales, an abundant and little-used waste resource, that can be modified to have value in medical and other areas. Part A describes fundamental research into the affects of block sequence of amphiphilic block copolymers prepared from on a new and versatile class of monomers, oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (OEGA) and the more hydrophobic di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA). Polymers from these monomers are biologically safe and give polymers with thermoresponsive properties that can be manipulated over a broader temperature range than the more researched N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Using RAFT polymerization and different Chain Transfer Agents (CTAs) amphiphilic block copolymers were prepared to study the effect of block sequence (hydrophilic OEGA and more hydrophobic DEGMA) on their thermo-responsive properties. Pairing hydrophilic chain ends to a hydrophobic DEGMA block and hydrophobic chain ends to hydrophilic blocks ("mis-matched polarity") significantly affected thermoresponsive properties for linear and star diblock copolymers, but little affected symmetric triblock copolymers. Specifically matching polarity in diblock copolymers yielded nanoparticles with higher cloud points (CP), narrow temperature ranges for coil collapse above CP, and smaller hydrodynamic diameter than mis-matched polarity. Using this knowledge two linear OEGA/DEGMA diblock copolymers were prepared with thiol end groups and assembled into hybrid nanoparticles with a gold nanoparticle core (GNP-polymer hybrids). This design was made using the hypothesis that a hybrid polymer drug carrier with a high CP (50-60 °C) and a diblock structure could be designed with low levels of drug release below 37 °C (body temperature) allowing the drug carrier to reach a target (tumor) site with

  5. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  6. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  7. Clinical methods for the assessment of the effects of environmental stress on fish health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Yasutake, William T.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical methods are presented for biological monitoring of hatchery and native fish populations to assess the effects of environmental stress on fish health. The choice of methods is based on the experience of the authors and the judgment of colleagues at fishery laboratories of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Detailed analysis methods, together with guidelines for sample collection and for the interpretation of results, are given for tests on blood (cell counts, chloride, cholesterol, clotting time, cortisol, glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, lactic acid, methemoglobin, osmolality, and total protein); water (ammonia and nitrite content); and liver and muscle (glycogen content).

  8. Attitudinal survey component of the study Quantity, quality, and support for research in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: An organizational assessment: Report of methods and frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Jennifer R.; Lamb, Berton Lee; Swann, Earlene M.; Ratz, Joan; Ponds, Phadrea D.; Liverca, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is responsible for managing the Nation’s fish and wildlife resources so that these trust resources are preserved for the present and future use and enjoyment of the citizens of the United States. The FWS achieves this mission by managing many programs. These include the national system of refuges and fish hatcheries, Fish and Wildlife Management Assistance Offices, migratory birds program, law enforcement, and working with tribal, state, and other Federal agencies to ensure protection of threatened and endangered species. Another role of the FWS is consulting with tribal, state, and other Federal agencies and private sector interests on the best conservation management practices consistent with Federal law. Each of these activities requires a workforce that is recognized for its professionalism, dedication to public service, and command of expert knowledge. Recognition for expert knowledge in fish and wildlife conservation is demonstrated, in part, when FWS personnel direct, conduct, or report research that is well-designed to answer questions of importance for natural resource management. The data reported in this document are one part of a three-part study of the status of organizational support for research in FWS, which was commissioned by the Directorate of the FWS. Funding for this study was provided by the FWS, and the Science Support Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

  9. Implementation of a Service-learning Module in Medical Microbiology and Cell Biology Classes at an Undergraduate Liberal Arts University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Simmons, Alexandra D; Bagnall, Ruth Ann; Rosell, Rosemarie C

    2011-01-01

    Here we discuss the implementation of a service-learning module in two upper-division biology classes, Medical Microbiology and Cell Biology. This exciting hands-on learning experience provided our students with an opportunity to extend their learning of in-class topics to a real-life scenario. Students were required to volunteer their time (a minimum of 10 hours in a semester) at an under-served clinic in Houston, Texas. As they interacted with the personnel at the clinic, they were asked to identify the most prevalent disease (infectious for Medical Microbiology, and cellular-based for Cell) seen at the clinic and, working in groups, come up with educational material in the form of a display or brochure to be distributed to patients. The material was meant to educate patients about the disease in general terms, as well as how to recognize (symptoms), prevent and treat it. Students were required to keep a reflective journal in the form of a blog throughout the semester, and present their final materials to the class orally. Students were surveyed about their opinion of the experience at the end of the semester. The vast majority of student participants felt that the project was a positive experience and that it helped them develop additional skills beyond what they learn in the classroom and understand how lecture topics relate to every day life.

  10. Research on plant-parasitic nematode biology conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitwood, David J

    2003-01-01

    The recent de-registration of several chemical nematicides and the impending loss of methyl bromide from the pest-control market necessitate the development of new methods for controlling nematode-induced crop damage. One approach for developing novel target-specific controls is by exploiting fundamental differences between the biological processes of nematodes and their host plants. Researchers of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the US Department of Agriculture are actively exploring these differences. Research accomplishments include the discovery of heat shock protein genes possibly involved in developmental arrest of the soybean cyst nematode, the identification of neuropeptides and female-specific proteins in the soybean cyst nematode, the disruption of nematode reproduction with inhibitors of nematode sterol metabolism, the development of novel morphological and molecular (heat shock protein genes and the D3 segment of large subunit ribosomal DNA) features useful for nematode identification and classification, and the elucidation of the population genetics of potato cyst nematode pathotypes. In addition, several ARS researchers are investigating biological determinants of nematode response to management strategies utilized in agricultural fields. These collective efforts should lead to new chemical and non-chemical alternatives to conventional nematode control strategies.

  11. Sport fishing decision document package : Marais Des Cygnes NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This packet is for the establishment of a fishing program on Marais Des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge. It contains the Fishing Plan, Section 7 Evaluation,...

  12. Fishing Management Plan Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this fishing plan are 1) To provide recreational fishing, in the Carmans River where it will not interfere with the purposes for which the refuge...

  13. Automobile trip to Fish Springs, March 16, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These memoranda describe trips to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The purpose of these trips was to access the condition of the land in the Fish Springs area.

  14. Revised Fish Management Recommendations for Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish management objectives for Clarence Cannon NWR listed in this report include: (1) manage the fish habitats/populations of the Gardner Division for optimum sport...

  15. Fishing Plan for Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge - 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal calls for the opening of Mathews Brake NWR to sport fishing. General regulations pertaining to licenses, creel limits, and methods of taking fish will...

  16. Fish Population Investigation: Lake Andes, Charles Mix County

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brief background on Lake Andes fishing history, and data on current fish populations. Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an...

  17. Archaeological resources of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document presents results of an archeological survey of two caves located in the Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. It was concluded that the Fish Springs...

  18. 1990 snowy plover status report : Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Status report on snowy plovers at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge for 1990. This report discusses the Fish Springs snowy plover population estimates, available...

  19. Quaternary geology of Fish Springs flat, Juab county, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish Springs Flat is a sediment-filled valley between two tilted mountain blocks, the Thomas Range and the Fish Springs Range, in the Basin and Range physiographic...

  20. 75 FR 79388 - Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ...: The Service Regulations Committee will meet at the Embassy Suites Hotel, Denver--International Airport... Fish and Wildlife Service Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Fish and Wildlife Service (hereinafter Service) will...

  1. Gene expression and biological pathways in tissue of men with prostate cancer in a randomized clinical trial of lycopene and fish oil supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jesus M Magbanua

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that micronutrients may modify the risk or delay progression of prostate cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We examined the effects of lycopene and fish oil on prostate gene expression in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. METHODS: Eighty-four men with low risk prostate cancer were stratified based on self-reported dietary consumption of fish and tomatoes and then randomly assigned to a 3-month intervention of lycopene (n = 29 or fish oil (n = 27 supplementation or placebo (n = 28. Gene expression in morphologically normal prostate tissue was studied at baseline and at 3 months via cDNA microarray analysis. Differential gene expression and pathway analyses were performed to identify genes and pathways modulated by these micronutrients. RESULTS: Global gene expression analysis revealed no significant individual genes that were associated with high intake of fish or tomato at baseline or after 3 months of supplementation with lycopene or fish oil. However, exploratory pathway analyses of rank-ordered genes (based on p-values not corrected for multiple comparisons revealed the modulation of androgen and estrogen metabolism in men who routinely consumed more fish (p = 0.029 and tomato (p = 0.008 compared to men who ate less. In addition, modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism (p = 0.01 was observed after 3 months of fish oil supplementation compared with the placebo group; and modulation of nuclear factor (erythroid derived-2 factor 2 or Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response for either supplement versus placebo (fish oil: p = 0.01, lycopene: p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We did not detect significant individual genes associated with dietary intake and supplementation of lycopene and fish oil. However, exploratory analyses revealed candidate in vivo pathways that may be modulated by these micronutrients. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  2. Ammonia toxicity in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D J; Tsui, T K N

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia is present in the aquatic environment due to agricultural run-off and decomposition of biological waste. Ammonia is toxic to all vertebrates causing convulsions, coma and death, probably because elevated NH4+ displaces K+ and depolarizes neurons, causing activation of NMDA type glutamate receptor, which leads to an influx of excessive Ca2+ and subsequent cell death in the central nervous system. Present ammonia criteria for aquatic systems are based on toxicity tests carried out on, starved, resting, non-stressed fish. This is doubly inappropriate. During exhaustive exercise and stress, fish increase ammonia production and are more sensitive to external ammonia. Present criteria do not protect swimming fish. Fish have strategies to protect them from the ammonia pulse following feeding, and this also protects them from increases in external ammonia, as a result starved fish are more sensitive to external ammonia than fed fish. There are a number of fish species that can tolerate high environmental ammonia. Glutamine formation is an important ammonia detoxification strategy in the brain of fish, especially after feeding. Detoxification of ammonia to urea has also been observed in elasmobranches and some teleosts. Reduction in the rate of proteolysis and the rate of amino acid catabolism, which results in a decrease in ammonia production, may be another strategy to reduce ammonia toxicity. The weather loach volatilizes NH3, and the mudskipper, P. schlosseri, utilizes yet another unique strategy, it actively pumps NH4+ out of the body.

  3. Fish allergy and fish allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuehn, A; Hilger, Christiane; Ollert, Markus

    2016-01-01

    but patients with this phenotype constitute an important sub-group among fish-allergic individuals. 2. Newly identified fish allergens, enolases, aldolases, and fish gelatin, are of high relevance as the majority of the fish-allergic individuals seem to develop specific IgE against these proteins. The present...

  4. Fishing Plan: Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Fishing Plan for Sherburne NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory authorities, a statement...

  5. Erwin National Fish Hatchery [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erwin National Fish Hatchery. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. 2012 Fish Springs NWR predator report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on a 2012 study to determine a relative index of predator populations, primarily coyote, on fish Springs National Wildlife refuge. Scat deposition transects...

  7. Status report on Fish Springs pond snail

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a life history of the pond snail (Lymnaea Hinkleyia pilsbryi) at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The following information is included;...

  8. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge habitat map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Habitat map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This habitat map was created along with the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map of the refuge. Refuge...

  9. Sport Fishing Plan : Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Sport Fishing Plan for Meredosia NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory authorities, a...

  10. Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge: Summer Fishing Regulation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum summarizes the summer fishing regulation for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge as submitted to the Federal Register. This regulation defines areas...

  11. Umatilla - Umatilla Slough Rough Fish Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the proposed action is to enhance environmental conditions in the Whitcomb Island Slough by reducing the population of rough fish, including common...

  12. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife list

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This checklist is a comprehensive list of Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge wildlife species. The checklist contains all wildlife species documented on the...

  13. Intersex fish : Endocrine disruption in smallmouth bass

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Intersex and abnormal vitellogenin in smallmouth bass from portions of the Potomac watershed pose a threat to fish resources. This fact sheet summarizes studies that...

  14. Fishing Plan Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of public fishing at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge are as follows: 1. To provide public access to waters of Lake Champlain and the Missisquoi...

  15. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  16. Fish Creek, South Fork Koyukuk, Koyukuk

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The intent of this study was to gather general information on the wildlife, human use, and terrain in the Fish Creek (east boundary) to Koyukuk (west boundary)...

  17. Fish Springs NWR Water Use Report : 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual Water Management Plan for water use on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge in 1981. This plan discusses expected water levels of management units and the...

  18. Inspection report: Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses results of a reconnaissance trip conducted at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The following is outlined; land condition, presence of...

  19. McNary - Rough Fish Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the action is to enhance environmental conditions in the McNary Slough by reducing the population of rough fish, including common carp (Cyprinus...

  20. Fish Springs NWR Water Use Report : 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for 2010. A general background is presented on historical spring water...

  1. Report of the work of the Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services Divisions for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1953-10-01

    The monthly progress report from the Argonne National Laboratory includes material from one-third of the Laboratory. The three divisions into which the work has been divided are: (l) Reactor Engineering, Physics, Instrument Research and Development, and Electronics, (2) Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services, and (3) Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Metallurgy, and Remote Control Engineering. The present monthly progress report covers the work in Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

  2. Population biology and habitat associations of benthic fish species in the shallow areas of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (SE Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Verdiell Cubedo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the seasonal variation in fish abundance, fish biomass, reproductive status and population structure of four dominant benthic fish species, Salaria pavo, Pomatoschistus marmoratus, Gobius cobitis and Gobius niger, in the shallow and littoral areas of the Mar Menor coastal lagoon. In addition, the seasonal habitat associations of each species were studied by assessing environmental variables related to the habitat structure: submerged vegetation cover, submerged vegetation density, water depth and substrate composition. The temporal variations in fish density, standing stock and size frequency distributions of these species can largely be attributed to the seasonality of their breeding and juvenile recruitment periods. Moreover, habitat associations for these species were similar to those obtained in other Mediterranean and Atlantic coastal lagoons.

  3. The first success of glass eel production in the world: basic biology on fish reproduction advances new applied technology in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohta, Hiromi; Unuma, Tatsuya; Nomura, Kazuharu

    2005-04-01

    The eel has long been esteemed as an important food fish in the world, especially in Japan, and has been used as an experimental fish for many fields of fish physiology. However, the decreases in eel resources have been a serious concern in recent years. The catches of glass eels as seedlings for aquaculture have shown a long-term decrease in both Europe and East Asia. To increase eel resources, the development of techniques for artificial induction of maturation and spawning and rearing their larvae have been eagerly desired. Recent progress of reproductive physiology of fish, especially mechanisms of oocyte maturation and ovulation in female and of spermatozoa maturation in male, facilitate to establish techniques for hormonal induction of maturation and spawning in sexually immature eels. With persistent effort to development of rearing techniques of larvae, we have first succeeded to produce glass eel. These applied techniques are may contribute to understand the basic reproductive physiology of the eel.

  4. Biological Opinion Compliance Report and Permit Activity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    T.W. Custer. 1986. Hatching Success of Caspian Terns Nesting on the Lower Laguna Madre , Texas , USA. Colonial Birds. 9(1). Pp 86-89. Persons working with...U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on November 14,’ 1 990. Initial District implementation of that Biological Opinion began in 1 992, following the...known as the "Red Book." The Red Book was reviewed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and approved for implementation by the Missouri River Division

  5. BIOTECHNOLOGY OF THE FISH AQUACULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    L. P. Buchatsky

    2013-01-01

    The latest progress in biotechnology on fish aquaculture and different modern methods of investigations for increasing of fish productivity in aquaculture are analyzed. Except for the applied aspect, the use of modern biotechnological methods of investigations opens new possibilities for fundamental researches of sex-determining mechanisms, polyploidy, distant hybridization, and developmental biology of bony fishes. Review contains examples of utilizing modern biotechnology methods to obtain ...

  6. Coastal Resources Atlas: Long Island: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for Long Island, New York. Vector polygons...

  7. Bristol Bay, Alaska Subarea ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in the Bristol Bay Subarea. The Subarea...

  8. Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, pelagic, benthic, and estuarine fish species in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. Vector...

  9. 75 FR 22423 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATES: The meeting will be... announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting. Background The...

  10. 76 FR 7579 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATES: The meeting will be... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating...

  11. 75 FR 47624 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATES: The meeting will be.... App., we announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting...

  12. 76 FR 1628 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATE(S... private sectors of the sport fishing, boating, and conservation communities and is organized to...

  13. 77 FR 61626 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), announce a public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). A Federal.... App., we announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a...

  14. BIOTECHNOLOGY OF THE FISH AQUACULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Buchatsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The latest progress in biotechnology on fish aquaculture and different modern methods of investigations for increasing of fish productivity in aquaculture are analyzed. Except for the applied aspect, the use of modern biotechnological methods of investigations opens new possibilities for fundamental researches of sex-determining mechanisms, polyploidy, distant hybridization, and developmental biology of bony fishes. Review contains examples of utilizing modern biotechnology methods to obtain transgenic fishes with accelerated growth and for designing surrogate fishes. Methods for receiving unisexual shoals of salmon and sturgeon female fishes with the view of obtaining a large quantity of caviar, as well as receiving sterile (triploid fishes are analyzed. Great attention is given to androgenesis, particularly to disperm one, in connection with the problem of conserving rare and vanishing fish species using only sperm genetic material. Examples how distant hybrids may be obtained with the use of disperm androgenesis and alkylated DNA are given. Methods of obtaining fish primordium germ cells, recent developments in cultivation of fish stem cells and their use in biotechnology, as well as ones of transplantation of oogonium and spermatogonium to obtain surrogate fishes. The examples of successful experiments on spermatogonial xenotransplantation and characteristic of antifreezing fish proteins and also the prospect of their practical usage are given.

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine fish species in South Florida. Vector polygons in this data set represent fish...

  16. Implementation of a Service-Learning Module in Medical Microbiology and Cell Biology Classes at an Undergraduate Liberal Arts University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Larios-Sanz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the implementation of a service-learning module in two upper-division biology classes, Medical Microbiology and Cell Biology. This exciting hands-on learning experience provided our students with an opportunity to extend their learning of in-class topics to a real-life scenario. Students were required to volunteer their time (a minimum of 10 hours in a semester at an under-served clinic in Houston, Texas. As they interacted with the personnel at the clinic, they were asked to identify the most prevalent disease (infectious for Medical Microbiology, and cellular-based for Cell seen at the clinic and, working in groups, come up with educational material in the form of a display or brochure to be distributed to patients. The material was meant to educate patients about the disease in general terms, as well as how to recognize (symptoms, prevent and treat it. Students were required to keep a reflective journal in the form of a blog throughout the semester, and present their final materials to the class orally. Students were surveyed about their opinion of the experience at the end of the semester. The vast majority of student participants felt that the project was a positive experience and that it helped them develop additional skills beyond what they learn in the classroom and understand how lecture topics relate to every day life. Here we discuss the implementation of a service-learning module in two upper division biology classes, Medical Microbiology and Cell Biology. This exciting hands-on learning experience provided our students with an opportunity to extend their learning of in-class topics into a real life scenario. Students were required to volunteer their time (a minimum of 10 hours in a semester at an under-served clinic in Houston, Texas. As they interacted with the personnel at the clinic, they were asked to identify the most prevalent disease (infectious for Medical Microbiology, and cellular-based for Cell seen at the

  17. Mercury in fish collected from the Indian Lakes System : Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was initiated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess the extent and severity of mercury contamination in fish collected from the five principal...

  18. AFSC: Various fish maturity studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Knowledge of the reproductive biology of fish and crab stocks is critical to stock assessment estimates of the reproductive potential (typically measured as spawning...

  19. Hawaii ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for native stream and anchialine pool fish species in coastal Hawaii. (Anchialine pools are small,...

  20. Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Joseph T.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    1986-01-01

    Explains the adaptations to Antarctic waters that Notothenioidei, a group of advanced bony fishes, have exhibited. Discusses the fishes' mechanisms of production of antifreeze properties and their capacities for neutral buoyancy in water. (ML)

  1. The Road Inventory of Uvalde National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  2. The Road Inventory of Curl Lake National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  3. The Road Inventory of Eagle Fish Health Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  4. The Road Inventory of Pendills Creek National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  5. The Road Inventory of White River National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  6. The Road Inventory of Powell Satellite Facility National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  7. The Road Inventory of Jones Hole National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  8. The Road Inventory of Jordan River National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  9. The Road Inventory of Iron River National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  10. The Road Inventory of Kooskia National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  11. The Road Inventory of Magic Valley National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  12. The Road Inventory of Saratoga National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  13. The Road Inventory of Meridian National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  14. The Road Inventory of Nisqually National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  15. The Road Inventory of Neosho National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  16. The Road Inventory of Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  17. The Road Inventory of Jackson National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  18. The Road Inventory of Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  19. The Road Inventory of Baldhill Dam National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  20. The Road Inventory of Bo Ginn National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  1. The Road Inventory of Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  2. The Road Inventory of San Marcos National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  3. The Road Inventory of Dwight D Eisenhower National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  4. The Road Inventory of Captain John Rapids National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  5. The Road Inventory of Lyons Ferry National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  6. The Road Inventory of Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  7. Fish Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that was inspired by Greek pottery, specifically dishes shaped as fish. Explains that fourth-grade students drew a fish shape that was later used to create their clay version of the fish. Discusses how the students examined the pottery to make decisions about color and design. (CMK)

  8. Assessing Lost Ecosystem Service Benefits Due to Mining-Induced Stream Degradation in the Appalachian Region: Economic Approaches to Valuing Recreational Fishing Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sport fishing is a popular activity for Appalachian residents and visitors. The region’s coldwater streams support a strong regional outdoor tourism industry. We examined the influence of surface coal mining, in the context of other stressors, on freshwater sport fishing in...

  9. A survey of chemical constituents in National Fish Hatchery Fish feed

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Recent studies have demonstrated that of various fish feeds contain significant concentrations of contaminants, many of which can bioaccumulate and bioconcentrate in...

  10. Final Report : Anadromous Fish Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A creel census was conducted during the 1981 Russian River sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), sport fishery to determine harvest and angler participation....

  11. Constraints to connecting children with nature--Survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees sponsored by the National Conservation Training Center, Division of Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) names "connecting people with nature" as one of its top six priorities in the online Service Employee Pocket Guide. The National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) took the initiative to identify issues that impede greater progress in addressing constraints to connecting children with nature. The Division of Education Outreach at NCTC formed a working relation with the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch of the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a study on these issues. To meet the objectives of the study, a survey of a sample of FWS employees was conducted. This report includes the description of how the survey was developed and administered, how the data were analyzed, and a discussion of the survey results. The survey was developed based on published literature and incorporated input from two working groups of professionals focused on the issue of connecting children with nature. Although the objective as stated by the FWS is to connect people with nature, the survey primarily focused on connecting children, rather than all people, with nature. The four primary concepts included on the survey were interpretation of how the FWS defined "connection" as part of its mission, perceived success with outreach, constraints to connecting children with nature, and importance of connecting children with nature. The survey was conducted online using KeySurvey© software. The survey was sent to 604 FWS employees. Responses were received from 320 employees. The respondents represented diversity in regions, tenure, wage/grade level, job series, supervisory status, and involvement with education and outreach activities. The key findings of the survey are as follows: * FWS employees believe they as individuals and the agency are successful now and will be more successful in the future in connecting children with nature. * FWS employees believe that there are many outcomes that are relevant to the FWS objective to connect people

  12. 50 CFR 14.23 - Live farm-raised fish and farm-raised fish eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Live farm-raised fish and farm-raised fish eggs. 14.23 Section 14.23 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Exportation at Designated Ports § 14.23 Live farm-raised fish and farm-raised fish eggs. Live farm-raised...

  13. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Kotler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae. Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus.

  14. A sampling method for tundra swans in the Bristol Bay lowlands of the northern Alaska Peninsula: A summary of a presentation given at the Refuges and Wildlife Project Leaders' meeting, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, December 8-11, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A "census" of tundra swans occurring in the northern Alaska Peninsula was collected over 1984-1985, with supplemental information provided from preliminary surveys...

  15. [Evaluation of the impact on Aedes aegypti infestation in cement tanks of the municipal district of Canindé, Ceará, Brazil after using the Betta splendens fish as an alternative biological control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Luciano de Góes Cavalcanti; Lima, José Wellington de Oliveira; Cunha, Jane Cris de Lima; Santana, Eddie William de Pinho

    2004-01-01

    Canindé has a population of 71,235 inhabitants. In April 2001, the city started using larvivorous fish in cement water tanks, as a means of biological control of Aedes aegypti larvae. During house-to-house visits by health agents, instead of treating the water tank with larvicide, a Betta splendens fish was introduced into each tank. The number of houses and the number of tanks was estimated by monthly surveys. Then, the number of tanks per house was determined. Taking into account this estimated number and the number of houses visited, the infestation level for each kind of deposit was analyzed. In January 2001, 70.4% of the water tanks presented mosquitoes. Following the intervention, in January 2002 only 7.4% were positive and by December 2002 the rate had dropped to 0.2%. The efficacy of Betta splendens as a biological control agent in cement water tanks was clearly demonstrated, by achieving a 320 times reduction in the infestation level.

  16. Biological plausibility as a tool to associate analytical data for micropollutants and effect potentials in wastewater, surface water, and sediments with effects in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Diana; Blaha, Ludek; Giesy, John P; Henneberg, Anja; Köhler, Heinz-R; Kuch, Bertram; Osterauer, Raphaela; Peschke, Katharina; Richter, Doreen; Scheurer, Marco; Triebskorn, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Discharge of substances like pesticides, pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, and chelating agents in surface waters has increased over the last decades due to the rising numbers of chemicals used by humans and because many WWTPs do not eliminate these substances entirely. The study, results of which are presented here, focused on associations of (1) concentrations of micropollutants in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, surface waters, sediments, and tissues of fishes; (2) results of laboratory biotests indicating potentials for effects in these samples and (3) effects either in feral chub (Leuciscus cephalus) from two German rivers (Schussen, Argen) or in brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed in bypass systems to streamwater of these rivers or in cages directly in the rivers. The Schussen and Argen Rivers flow into Lake Constance. The Schussen River is polluted by a great number of chemicals, while the Argen River is less influenced by micropollutants. Pesticides, chelating agents, flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were detected in effluents of a WWTP discharging to the Schussen as well as in surface water, and/or fishes from downstream of the WWTP. Results obtained by biotests conducted in the laboratory (genotoxicity, dioxin-like toxicity, and embryotoxicity) were linked to effects in feral fish collected in the vicinity of the WWTP or in fishes exposed in cages or at the bypass systems downstream of the WWTP. Dioxin-like effect potentials detected by reporter gene assays were associated with activation of CYP1A1 enzymes in fishes which are inducible by dioxin-like chemicals. Abundances of several PCBs in tissues of fishes from cages and bypass systems were not associated with these effects but other factors can influence EROD activity. Genotoxic potentials obtained by in vitro tests were associated with the presence

  17. Fish in Ecotoxicological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Yancheva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination (heavy metals, pesticides, POPs, etc. is a serious environmental issue which has been raising lots of attention in the last decades because it can destroy aquatic ecosystems and hence, reduce biodiversity. In the field of ecotoxicology it is of main interest to investigate what the effects of organic and inorganic toxicants on different biological organization (cell, tissue, organism, population are. Thus, many authors use different test organisms and particularly, fish. In the current study we aimed to present collected data from the last years which describe why fish is an appropriate species in terms of ecotoxicological research.

  18. Risks from the microbiological and chemical contamination of fish materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halaši Tibor J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish is today one of the most important commercial material. In our market as in the world market they are present in fresh and manufactured products. Fish products always have some risk. They could be contaminated with dangerous chemicals and biological contaminants. From biological originated polutions Aflatoxin and other Mycotoxins are very dangerous. The contamination starts in fish ponds, in canals and swamps. Also, the contamination occurs at storage and prepararation of fish materials. It is very important to recognize hygienically correct fish material and control fish food and different products from fish by educated inspectors (Vlahović, 1999.

  19. Final draft: Comprehensive hatchery management plan: Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery: Planning report: Number 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has recognized the need for a comprehensivehatchery planning process to assist in meeting the challenge of changes to...

  20. Environmental Assessment Pondicherry Division Silvio O. National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the September 2, 2003, Environmental Assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) considered the environmental effects of acquiring 4,004 acres (+1-)...

  1. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  2. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  3. Contaminant Baseline Data for Water, Sediments, and Fish of the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge, 1985-1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies were conducted by the Fish and Wildlife Service between 1985 and 1988 to obtain baseline trace element and water quality data on water, sediments, and fish...

  4. Review on Invasive Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle) Conflicting Values: Assessment of Its Ecosystem Services and Potential Biological Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladonja, Barbara; Sušek, Marta; Guillermic, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Globally, invasions by alien plants are rapidly increasing in extent and severity, leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation. One of the most widespread invasive alien plant species in Europe and North America, Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle) was introduced intentionally for use as an ornamental plant in the 18th century. Since then, it has spread and is now frequently found in a number of countries. Today, Tree of Heaven is considered one of the worst invasive plant species in Europe and is also listed as invasive in North America and many other countries. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment is one of many systems trying to list and categorize biological services to humans and to provide a tool for identifying services delivered by natural ecosystems. Invasive species have generally caused degradation of the services, have a major impact on the environment, and are threatening biodiversity and reducing overall species abundance and diversity. On the other hand, some invasive species can provide services useful to human well-being. In the present review A. altissima impacts on ecosystems are identified and positive influences on some ecosystem services are weighed against the negative effects on the environment and human health. The aim of the present review is to resume the general knowledge of A. altissima, group available references on distribution and ecology according to countries, compare ecosystem services provided or enhanced by A. altissima presence and the negative effects it causes, identify gaps in current knowledge, and give recommendations for future lines of research.

  5. Review on Invasive Tree of Heaven ( Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle) Conflicting Values: Assessment of Its Ecosystem Services and Potential Biological Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladonja, Barbara; Sušek, Marta; Guillermic, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Globally, invasions by alien plants are rapidly increasing in extent and severity, leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation. One of the most widespread invasive alien plant species in Europe and North America, Tree of Heaven ( Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle) was introduced intentionally for use as an ornamental plant in the 18th century. Since then, it has spread and is now frequently found in a number of countries. Today, Tree of Heaven is considered one of the worst invasive plant species in Europe and is also listed as invasive in North America and many other countries. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment is one of many systems trying to list and categorize biological services to humans and to provide a tool for identifying services delivered by natural ecosystems. Invasive species have generally caused degradation of the services, have a major impact on the environment, and are threatening biodiversity and reducing overall species abundance and diversity. On the other hand, some invasive species can provide services useful to human well-being. In the present review A. altissima impacts on ecosystems are identified and positive influences on some ecosystem services are weighed against the negative effects on the environment and human health. The aim of the present review is to resume the general knowledge of A. altissima, group available references on distribution and ecology according to countries, compare ecosystem services provided or enhanced by A. altissima presence and the negative effects it causes, identify gaps in current knowledge, and give recommendations for future lines of research.

  6. Archaeological Fish Bones Online: a digital archive of Sydney fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Colley

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the Archaeological Fish Bone Images sustainable digital archive and XTF-based image search and presentation tools developed with University of Sydney Library. The archive contains over 500 images of modern and archaeological fish remains and was developed as part of an archaeological research project into colonial and traditional Aboriginal fishing practices in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from c.3000 years ago to the late 19th century. Links are provided to research information about fish ecology and fishing, the cultural and historical significance of fish taxa and details of taxonomic and anatomical nomenclature. Archaeological fish-bone images at the University of Sydney The article explains how and why the archive was developed, and identifies and discusses the research implications of significant gaps in current fish reference collections. Archive content is useful to researchers who need to identify and interpret fish remains of the same or similar biological taxa from Sydney or elsewhere. The design of the archive and online tools is relevant to other applications that use digital images to aid identification and interpretation of archaeological and other collections.

  7. 76 FR 6401 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Anadromous Fish AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... opportunity for public comment. The Puget Sound Treaty Tribes and the Washington Department of Fish...

  8. Enhanced Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of a variety of biological, reproductive, and energetic data collected from fish on the continental shelf in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Species...

  9. Education in Engineering and Ecohydrology for Fish Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlfeld, D.; Towler, B.

    2011-12-01

    Historical fish migration routes linking feeding and spawning habitats have been significantly impacted by culverts, dikes, dams, and other barriers on waterways throughout the world. For example an estimated 2.5 million barriers to fish migration exist in the United States. In recent years, there has been an increased focus on removing or mitigating these barriers as an efficient mechanism to restore habitat. Effective design and implementation of these measures requires specialists with skills at the intersection of engineering, hydrology and biology. Recognizing the need for a cadre of engineers with the additional skills in hydraulics and ecohydrology needed to analyze and design solutions for enhancing fish passage in streams and rivers, the University of Massachusetts Amherst now offers a Master of Science in Civil Engineering (MSCE) degree with a specialization in Fish Passage Engineering. The curriculum is offered in conjunction with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and is informed by the recommendations of the Curriculum Working Group of the Bioengineering Section of the American Fisheries Society. The curriculum is offered through the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. This presentation will describe the motivation for the degree, the content of coursework and the challenges inherent in developing an interdisciplinary education program spanning biogeosciences and engineering.

  10. 78 FR 33856 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; FF09X60000-FVWF97920900000-XXX] Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council... Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold...

  11. TRANSGENIC FISH MODEL IN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Sharma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of experiments and the use of drugs have been performed in fish. The fish may be used as model organism in various biological experiments, including environmental toxicology. Aquatic animals are being engineered to increase aquaculture production, for medical and industrial research, and for ornamental reasons. Fish have been found to play an important role in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to toxic substances in aquatic environment. Hence, it has been thought that the development of transgenic fish can enhance the use of fish in environmental toxicology. India has developed experimental transgenics of rohu fish, zebra fish, cat fish and singhi fish. Genes, promoters and vectors of indigenous origin are now available for only two species namely rohu and singhi for engineering growth. Development of fish model carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has shown that several aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Fish shows the frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. The feasibility of in vivo mutation analysis using transgenic fish has been demonstrated and the potential value of transgenic fish as a comparative animal model has been illustrated. Therefore, the transgenic fish can give the significant contribution to study the environmental toxicity in animals as a whole.

  12. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the analysis of ... In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) as a culture-independent molecular ... a high percentage and took place in an oily biological system under aerobic ...

  13. Fighting fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, E.; Guerrini, V.; Rinaldi, S.; Schaeffer, G.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce new combinatorial structures, called fighting fish, that generalize directed convex polyominoes by allowing them to branch out of the plane into independent substructures. On the one hand the combinatorial structure of fighting fish appears to be particularly rich: we show that their generating function with respect to the perimeter and number of tails is algebraic, and we conjecture a mysterious multivariate equidistribution property with the left ternary trees introduced by Del Lungo et al On the other hand, fighting fish provide a simple and natural model of random branching surfaces which displays original features: in particular, we show that the average area of a uniform random fighting fish with perimeter 2n is of order n 5/4: to the best of our knowledge this behaviour is non-standard and suggests that we have identified a new universality class of random structures. Dedicated to Tony Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  14. 090728 Estudio del ensilado biológico de pescado como inóculo de bacterias lácticas en la conservación de desechos pesqueros (Biologic fish silage's study as lactic bacterial inoculums in the fresh offal conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llanes Iglesias, José

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar diferentes porcentajes de miel final (0, 10 y 15 y ensilado biológico de pescado (20, 30 y 50 como inóculo de bacterias lácticas en la conservación de desechos pesqueros, así como evaluar la tecnología de producción continua de ensilado biológico de pescado producido con tres inoculaciones sucesivas de este mismo producto (inóculo bacteriano y dos porcentajes de miel final (10 y 15. Los resultados mostraron que con 10 % de miel final y 30% de ensilado biológico se conservan los desechos pesqueros hasta 10 días y con 10% de miel final y 20 % de ensilado biológico de pescado se logra un producto estable durante dos inoculaciones escalonadas de 72 horas cada una, mientras que con 15% de miel se logran tres inoculaciones con un ahorro de 16,60 USD/Tn. AbstractTo determine different percents (0, 10 and 15 of molasses and biological fish silage (20, 30 and 50 as lactic bacterial inoculums in the fresh offal conservation was the objective of this work; as well as biological fish silage continuous production technology evaluation produced with three consecutive inoculations of biological fish silage (bacterial inoculum and two percent of molasses to silage fresh fish wastes. The results showed that with 10% molasses and 30% of biological fish silage a stable production can be obtained, which last 10 days under storage conditions and with 10% molasses and 20% biological fish silage a stable product is obtained during two consecutive inoculations from 72 hours each one, while 15% molasses three consecutive inoculations are obtained in the same period of time, representing a 16,60 USD/Tn saving.

  15. Use of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) in biological control of intermediate host snails of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in nursery ponds in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Nguyen M.; Duc, Nguyen V.; Stauffer, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    the first intermediate host (i.e., freshwater gastropods), would be an attractive approach, if feasible. The black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus, is a well-known predator of freshwater snails and is already used successfully for biological control of snails in various parts of the world including Vietnam....... Here we report the first trials using it for biological control of intermediate host snails in nursery ponds stocked with 1-week old fry (10-12 mm in length) of Indian carp, Labeo rohita. Methods. Semi-field and field experiments were set up to test the effect of black carp on snail populations....... In the semi-field experiment a known quantity of snails was initially introduced into a pond which was subsequently stocked with black carp. In the field trial in nursery ponds, density of snails was estimated prior to a nursing cycle and at the end of the cycle (after 9 weeks). Results: The results showed...

  16. A histological evaluation of livers from the fish resident to select reaches of the Illinois River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following report is based on fifty livers taken from a variety of fish species resident to the Illinois River. Of the fifty fish and necropsied, livers...

  17. Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Opening of Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge to Fishing

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal calls for the opening of Mathews Brake NWR to sport fishing. General regulations pertaining to licenses, creel limits, and methods of taking fish will...

  18. Fish and wildlife resources of Nunivak Island: Part 1, fisheries: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The survey visited all active fish camps to determine numbers of fish caught and methods of capture and preservation. Major streams were surveyed to determine...

  19. 基于改进人工鱼群算法的物流服务定价决策模型研究%Study on Logistics Service Pricing Decision Model Based on Improved Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马战宝; 汪晓华

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed the pricing decision model for the logistics services on the basis of the improved artificial fish swarm algorithm. First we built the mathematic model of the pricing decisions for logistics services, then solved it using the artificial fish swarm algorithm after improving it by correcting its tendency toward local optimization, and next in connection with the feedback strategy, improved the efficiency of the artificial fish swarm algorithm in solving the logistics parameters to reduce cost and realize maximum revenue. At the end, through a simulation, we found that the artificial fish swarm algorithm could satisfactorily provide service pricing solutions for the logistics enterprises.%在物流资金既定的情况下,不同的定价方案,物流企业的获利不同,为了获得更优的物流服务定价决策方案,提高收益率,提出一种改进人工鱼群算法的物流服务定价决策模型。首先建立物流服务定价决策数学模型,模型对物流企业各环节设置参数,定量地衡量这些指标对资金的消耗,然后采用人工鱼群算法对模型进行求解,在求解过程中,利用混沌运动的遍历性,对物流车辆的增加、仓库动态容量的优化、物流人员培训的最佳人数进行了混沌遍历分析,解决了人工鱼群算法对这些物流参数分析时易陷入局部最优的难题,并结合反馈策略,提高了人工鱼群算法对物流参数的求解效率,节约了成本,实现了利益最大化。仿真结果表明,改进人工鱼群算法可以获得使物流企业更加满意的服务定价决策方案,提高了收益率,降低了风险。

  20. Organochlorine pesticide concentrations in fish, wood ducks, and fish eating birds from Mathews Brake and Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuges, Holmes and Leflore Counties, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted this study because of the potential that DDTM (DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE) and other organochlorine pesticides...