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Sample records for biological rhythms human

  1. Biological Rhythms and Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Ditisheim, Agnès J.; Dibner, Charna; Philippe, Jacques; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The impact of impaired circadian rhythm on health has been widely studied in shift workers and trans-meridian travelers. A part from its correlation with sleep and mood disorders, biological rhythm impairment is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and breast cancer. Preeclampsia is a major public health issue, associated with a significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the risks factors for this condition such as obesity, diabetes, pre-existing h...

  2. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  3. Biological Rhythms and Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditisheim, Agnès J.; Dibner, Charna; Philippe, Jacques; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The impact of impaired circadian rhythm on health has been widely studied in shift workers and trans-meridian travelers. A part from its correlation with sleep and mood disorders, biological rhythm impairment is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and breast cancer. Preeclampsia is a major public health issue, associated with a significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the risks factors for this condition such as obesity, diabetes, pre-existing hypertension have been identified, the underlying mechanism of this multi-factorial disease is yet not fully understood. The disruption of the light/dark cycle in pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes. Slightly increased risk for “small for gestational age” babies, “low birth weight” babies, and preterm deliveries has been reported in shift working women. Whether altered circadian cycle represents a risk factor for preeclampsia or preeclampsia is itself linked with an abnormal circadian cycle is less clear. There are only few reports available, showing conflicting results. In this review, we will discuss recent observations concerning circadian pattern of blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive pregnancies. We explore the hypothesis that circadian misalignments may represent a risk factor for preeclampsia. Unraveling potential link between circadian clock gene and preeclampsia could offer a novel approach to our understanding of this multi-system disease specific to pregnancy. PMID:23579266

  4. Biological rhythms and preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eDitisheim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of impaired circadian rhythm on health has been widely studied in shift workers and trans-meridian travelers. A part from its correlation with sleep and mood disorders, biological rhythm impairment is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and breast cancer.Preeclampsia is a major public health issue, associated with a significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the risks factors for this condition such as obesity, diabetes, pre-existing hypertension have been identified, the underlying mechanism of this multi-factorial disease is yet not fully understood.The disruption of the light/dark cycle in pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes. Slightly increased risk for small for gestational age babies, low birth weight babies and preterm deliveries has been reported in shift working women. Whether altered circadian cycle represents a risk factor for preeclampsia or preeclampsia is itself linked with an abnormal circadian cycle is less clear. There are only few reports available, showing conflicting results. In this review, we will discuss recent observations concerning circadian pattern of blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive pregnancies. We explore the hypothesis that circadian misalignments may represent a risk factor for preeclampsia. Unraveling potential link between circadian clock gene and preeclampsia could offer a novel approach to our understanding of this multi-system disease specific to pregnancy.

  5. Biological rhythm disturbance in remitted bipolar patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Adriane R; Comes, Mercè; Torrent, Carla; Solè, Brisa; Reinares, Maria; Pachiarotti, Isabella; Salamero, Manel; Kapczinski, Flávio; Colom, Francesc; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Biological rhythm disturbance is common in bipolar patients and seems to affect the course and prognosis of the illness negatively. The main aim of the current study was to assess biological rhythms in remitted bipolar patients. We also assessed whether there was an association between clinical variables or functioning and biological rhythms in remitted bipolar participants. Methods The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess biologi...

  6. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  7. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Appenzeller

    Full Text Available Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  8. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...... Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P < .05) was found in the measurement period between on call and pre call values. There was increased sleep time during the day on call and...

  9. Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Hattori

    Full Text Available Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking. Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse, suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

  10. Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum) and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking). Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse), suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement. PMID:26132703

  11. Rhythm and Randomness in Human Contact

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Mervyn P; Yoneki, Eiko; Crowcroft, Jon

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the effect of human mobility patterns on opportunistic communications. Inspired by recent work revisiting some of the early evidence for a L\\'evy flight foraging strategy in animals, we analyse datasets on human contact from real world traces. By analysing the distribution of inter-contact times on different time scales and using different graphical forms, we find not only the highly skewed distributions of waiting times highlighted in previous studies but also clear circadian rhythm. The relative visibility of these two components depends strongly on which graphical form is adopted and the range of time scales. We use a simple model to reconstruct the observed behaviour and discuss the implications of this for forwarding efficiency.

  12. Biological rhythms for rehabilitation of radiation damage of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable disturbances in biological eurhythmycal structure of redoracu were discovered for people living in Borodulikha area of the Semipalatinsk test site. The deep desynchronise may result in a development of the cardiovascular, bronco-pulmonary, endocrine, oncologic, neuro psychic diseases. A method to correct the biological eurhythmycal structure was developed. Homeopathic doses of melatonin ('rhythm driver' managing the most regenerating and immune systems) and uthynol (promoting production of dehydroepiandrosterone of maternal prehormone of 27 hormones) were used to provide the general correction. The endocrine diseases are not practically subjected to the homeopathic correction. The sub correction was sometimes carried out after 5 months. The developed methods of rehabilitation of the radiation damages are unique, since they allow performing the homeopathic correction using the acupuncture monitoring

  13. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system. PMID:26915078

  14. Animal Care Practices in Experiments on Biological Rhythms and Sleep: Report of the Joint Task Force of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms and the Sleep Research Society

    OpenAIRE

    Bittman, Eric L; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Szymusiak, Ronald; Toth, Linda A; Turek, Fred W.

    2013-01-01

    Many physiological and molecular processes are strongly rhythmic and profoundly influenced by sleep. The continuing effort of biological, medical, and veterinary science to understand the temporal organization of cellular, physiological, behavioral and cognitive function holds great promise for the improvement of the welfare of animals and human beings. As a result, attending veterinarians and IACUC are often charged with the responsibility of evaluating experiments on such rhythms or the eff...

  15. Biological rhythms, higher brain function, and behavior: gaps, opportunities and challenges”

    OpenAIRE

    Benca, Ruth; Duncan, Marilyn J.; Frank, Ellen; McClung, Colleen; Nelson, Randy J.; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, and affect; further, disruption of circadian clock genes impairs sleep/wake cycle and social rhythms which may be implicated in mental disorders. Despite this strong evidence, a gap in understanding the neural mechanisms of this interaction obscures whether biological rhythms disturbances are the underlying causes or merely symptoms of these diseases. Here, we review current understanding, emerging ...

  16. Biological Rhythms Modelisation of Vigilance and Sleep in Microgravity State with COSINOR and Volterra's Kernels Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudeua de Gerlicz, C.; Golding, J. G.; Bobola, Ph.; Moutarde, C.; Naji, S.

    2008-06-01

    The spaceflight under microgravity cause basically biological and physiological imbalance in human being. Lot of study has been yet release on this topic especially about sleep disturbances and on the circadian rhythms (alternation vigilance-sleep, body, temperature...). Factors like space motion sickness, noise, or excitement can cause severe sleep disturbances. For a stay of longer than four months in space, gradual increases in the planned duration of sleep were reported. [1] The average sleep in orbit was more than 1.5 hours shorter than the during control periods on earth, where sleep averaged 7.9 hours. [2] Alertness and calmness were unregistered yield clear circadian pattern of 24h but with a phase delay of 4h.The calmness showed a biphasic component (12h) mean sleep duration was 6.4 structured by 3-5 non REM/REM cycles. Modelisations of neurophysiologic mechanisms of stress and interactions between various physiological and psychological variables of rhythms have can be yet release with the COSINOR method. [3

  17. Biological rhythms, metabolic syndrome and current depressive episode in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fernanda Pedrotti; Jansen, Karen; Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Kapczinski, Flavio; Frey, Benicio N; Oses, Jean Pierre; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Wiener, Carolina David

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the disruption in biological rhythms and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in individuals with depressive episode. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study with a representative sample of 905 young adults. Current depressive episode were confirmed by a psychologist using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-Plus. Self-reported biological rhythms were assessed using the Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN). MetS was defined using modified NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Significant main effects of current depressive episode (p<0.001, η(2)=0.163) and MetS (p=0.001, η(2)=0.011) were observed on total BRIAN score. There was a significant interaction between depression and MetS in total biological rhythm scores (p=0.002, η(2)=0.011) as well as sleep (p=0.001, η(2)=0.016) and social domains (p<0.001, η(2)=0.014). In the depressive group, subjects with MetS had a higher disruption in total BRIAN scores (p=0.010), sleep domain (p=0.004), social domain (p=0.005) and in the eating pattern domain approached the level of significance (p=0.098), when compared to subjects with no MetS. The results of the present study showed that self-reported disruptions in biological rhythms are associated with key components of the MetS in community adults with MDD. The understanding of the complex interactions between biological rhythms, MetS and depression are important in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27343724

  18. Biological Races in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two m...

  19. Diurnal rhythms in neurexins transcripts and inhibitory/excitatory synapse scaffold proteins in the biological clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Shapiro-Reznik

    Full Text Available The neurexin genes (NRXN1/2/3 encode two families (α and β of highly polymorphic presynaptic proteins that are involved in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance. Recent studies indicate that neuronal activation and memory formation affect NRXN1/2/3α expression and alternative splicing at splice sites 3 and 4 (SS#3/SS#4. Neurons in the biological clock residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN act as self-sustained oscillators, generating rhythms in gene expression and electrical activity, to entrain circadian bodily rhythms to the 24 hours day/night cycles. Cell autonomous oscillations in NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 exons splicing and their links to rhythms in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the circadian clock were explored. NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 splicing, levels of neurexin-2α and the synaptic scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and gephyrin (representing excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively were studied in mRNA and protein extracts obtained from SCN of C3H/J mice at different times of the 24 hours day/night cycle. Further studies explored the circadian oscillations in these components and causality relationships in immortalized rat SCN2.2 cells. Diurnal rhythms in mNRXN1α and mNRXN2α transcription, SS#3/SS#4 exon-inclusion and PSD-95 gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels were found in the SCN in vivo. No such rhythms were found with mNRXN3α. SCN2.2 cells also exhibited autonomous circadian rhythms in rNRXN1/2 expression SS#3/SS#4 exon inclusion and PSD-95, gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels. rNRXN3α and rNRXN1/2β were not expressed. Causal relationships were demonstrated, by use of specific siRNAs, between rNRXN2α SS#3 exon included transcripts and gephyrin levels in the SCN2.2 cells. These results show for the first time dynamic, cell autonomous, diurnal rhythms in expression and splicing of NRXN1/2 and subsequent effects on the expression of neurexin-2α and postsynaptic

  20. The Characterization of Biological Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Ortiz-Tudela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease, present several circadian impairments related to an accelerated perturbation of their biological clock that is caused by the illness itself and not merely age-related. Thus, the objective of this work was to elucidate whether these circadian system alterations were already present in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, as compared to healthy age-matched subjects. Methods. 40 subjects (21 patients diagnosed with MCI, 74.1 ± 1.5 y.o., and 19 healthy subjects, 71.7 ± 1.4 y.o. were subjected to ambulatory monitoring, recording wrist skin temperature, motor activity, body position, and the integrated variable TAP (including temperature, activity, and position for one week. Nonparametrical analyses were then applied. Results. MCI patients exhibited a significant phase advance with respect to the healthy group for the following phase markers: temperature M5 (mean ± SEM: 04:20 ± 00:21 versus 02:52 ± 00:21 and L10 (14:35 ± 00:27 versus 13:24 ± 00:16 and TAP L5 (04:18 ± 00:14 versus 02:55 ± 00:30 and M10 (14:30 ± 00:18 versus 13:28 ± 00:23. Conclusions. These results suggest that significant advances in the biological clock begin to occur in MCI patients, evidenced by an accelerated aging of the circadian clock, as compared to a healthy population of the same age.

  1. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  2. Short-term influence of cataract surgery on circadian biological rhythm and related health outcomes (CLOCK-IOL trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Nishi, Tomo; Miyata, Kimie; Maruoka, Shinji; Ueda, Tetsuo; OKAMOTO, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Taiji; Matsuura, Toyoaki; Tone, Nobuhiro; Ogata, Nahoko; Kurumatani, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Background Light information is the most important cue of circadian rhythm which synchronizes biological rhythm with external environment. Circadian misalignment of biological rhythm and external environment is associated with increased risk of depression, insomnia, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Increased light transmission by cataract surgery may improve circadian misalignment and related health outcomes. Although some observational studies have shown improvement of ...

  3. The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinberg, Alain; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency. PMID:27019304

  4. Rhythm Pattern of Sole through Electrification of the Human Body When Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Kiyoaki; Wada, Takayuki; Tohyama, Shigeki

    The rhythm of automatic cyclic movements such as walking is known to be generated by a rhythm generator called CPG in the spinal cord. The measurement of rhythm characteristics in walking is considered to be important for analyzing human bipedal walking and adaptive walking on irregular terrain. In particular, the soles that contact the terrain surface perform flexible movements similar to the movement of the fins of a lungfish, which is considered to be the predecessor of land animals. The sole movements are believed to be a basic movement acquired during prehistoric times. The detailed rhythm pattern of sole motion is considered to be important. We developed a method for measuring electrification without installing device on a subject's body and footwear for stabilizing the electrification of the human body. We measured the rhythm pattern of 20 subjects including 4 infants when walking by using this system and the corresponding equipment. Therefore, we confirmed the commonality of the correlative rhythm patterns of 20 subjects. Further, with regard to an individual subject, the reproducibility of a rhythm pattern with strong correlation coefficient > 0.93 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) concerning rhythms of trials that are differently conducted on adult subjects could be confirmed.

  5. The effect of human rhythm on packet delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In communication networks such as the Internet, the relationship between packet generation rate and time is similar to a rectangle wavefunction due to the rhythm of humans. Thus, we investigate the traffic dynamics on a network with a rectangle wavepacket generation rate. It is found that the critical delivering capacity parameter βc (which separates the congested phase and the free phase) decreases significantly with the duty cycle r of the rectangle wave for package generation. And, in the congested phase, more collective generation of packets (smaller r) is helpful for decreasing the packet aggregation rate. Moreover, it is found that the congested phase can be divided into two regions, i.e., region 1 and region 2, where the distributions of queue lengths are nonlinear and linear, respectively. Also, the linear expression for the distribution of queue lengths in region 2 is obtained analytically. Our work reveals an obvious effect of the rectangle wave on the traffic dynamics and the queue length distribution in the system, which is of essential interest and may provide insights into the designing of work–rest schedules and routing strategies

  6. Biological races in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  7. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  8. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew A; Cook, Peter F; Large, Edward W; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms-i.e., beat keeping-is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced "perturbations," altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms. PMID:27375418

  9. Do changes in subjective sleep and biological rhythms predict worsening in postpartum depressive symptoms? A prospective study across the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczak, Elizabeth M; Minuzzi, Luciano; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-08-01

    Abnormalities of sleep and biological rhythms have been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, less is known about the influence of biological rhythm disruptions across the perinatal period on postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the relationship between subjective changes in both sleep and biological rhythms and worsening of depressive symptoms from pregnancy to the postpartum period in women with and without mood disorders. Eighty-three participants (38 euthymic women with a history of a mood disorder and 45 healthy controls) were studied. Participants completed subjective assessments of sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), biological rhythm disturbances (Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry), and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) prospectively at two time points: third trimester of pregnancy and at 6-12 weeks postpartum. Multivariate regression analyses showed that changes in biological rhythms across the perinatal period predicted worsening of depressive symptoms in both groups. Moreover, women with a history of a mood disorder showed higher levels of sleep and biological rhythm disruption during both pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings suggest that disruptions in biological rhythms during the perinatal period increase the risk for postpartum mood worsening in healthy pregnant as well as in pregnant women with a history of mood disorders. PMID:26920913

  10. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, K.; Plomp, R; Lao, O; Middleton, B; Revell, VL; Skene, DJ; Kayser, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean ± SD: 23 ± 5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g...

  11. Metabolic rhythms in adolescents with diabetes during treatment with porcine or human insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, M D; Crase, J; Rayner, P H; Nattrass, M

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic rhythms were studied over 24 hours in eight adolescent diabetic patients during treatment with porcine insulin and after transfer to human insulin. Despite an increase in dose with human insulin no significant changes were found in fasting blood glucose, 24h mean blood glucose, or glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations. Significantly higher 24h mean blood lactate concentrations and lower total ketone bodies and glycerol concentrations were observed during treatment with human insul...

  12. Milk Leptin Surge and Biological Rhythms of Leptin and Other Regulatory Proteins in Breastmilk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozhenko, Yuriy; Asnani-Kishnani, Madhu; Rodríguez, Ana M.; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of chronic diseases are linked to perinatal nutrition, and prevention may be associated to naturally occurring components of breast milk. One key hormone in breast milk is leptin, related with the protection from obesity in the adulthood, thus knowing its changes through the day or lactation is crucial. We aimed to investigate the daily rhythms in the milk levels of leptin, together with other two related hormones, ghrelin and adiponectin, during lactation (days 5, 10 and 15) in rat dams, and the relation with morphometric parameters (dams and pups). Summarizing the main results, the existence of biological rhythms, but not daily and maybe circasemidian, was confirmed for the three hormones at the earliest period of lactation. The correlations performed generally showed a possible dependence of milk hormone levels on plasma levels at the early phase of lactation, while with the progression of lactation this dependence may fade and the hormone levels are suggested to be more dependent on mammary gland production/maturation. There was also a correlation between milk leptin and adiponectin levels, especially in the first half of lactation, suggesting a possible parallel regulation. Interestingly, we describe a milk leptin surge around the mid of lactation (at day 10) which may be related with pup´s growth (males and females) and with the well-known (in the literature) plasma leptin surge in pups. All this knowledge may be crucial for future applications in the development of formula milk and in relation with the role of leptin surge during lactation. PMID:26680765

  13. Controlled breathing protocols probe human autonomic cardiovascular rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, W. H.; Cox, J. F.; Diedrich, A. M.; Taylor, J. A.; Beightol, L. A.; Ames, J. E. 4th; Hoag, J. B.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how breathing protocols requiring varying degrees of control affect cardiovascular dynamics. We measured inspiratory volume, end-tidal CO2, R-R interval, and arterial pressure spectral power in 10 volunteers who followed the following 5 breathing protocols: 1) uncontrolled breathing for 5 min; 2) stepwise frequency breathing (at 0.3, 0.25, 0.2, 0.15, 0.1, and 0.05 Hz for 2 min each); 3) stepwise frequency breathing as above, but with prescribed tidal volumes; 4) random-frequency breathing (approximately 0.5-0.05 Hz) for 6 min; and 5) fixed-frequency breathing (0.25 Hz) for 5 min. During stepwise breathing, R-R interval and arterial pressure spectral power increased as breathing frequency decreased. Control of inspired volume reduced R-R interval spectral power during 0.1 Hz breathing (P respiration and R-R intervals and systolic pressure and R-R intervals. Random- and fixed-frequency breathing reduced end-tidal CO2 modestly (P tidal volume control attenuates low-frequency R-R interval oscillations and that fixed- and random-rate breathing may decrease CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation. We conclude that autonomic rhythms measured during different breathing protocols have much in common but that a stepwise protocol without stringent control of inspired volume may allow for the most efficient assessment of short-term respiratory-mediated autonomic oscillations.

  14. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion as Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Rouse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms—i.e., beat keeping—is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan’s performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced perturbations, altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan’s performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms.

  15. Alteration of daily and circadian rhythms following dopamine depletion in MPTP treated non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Fifel

    Full Text Available Disturbances of the daily sleep/wake cycle are common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the impact of dopamine (DA depletion on circadian rhythms in PD patients or non-human primate (NHP models of the disorder have not been investigated. We evaluated alterations of circadian rhythms in NHP following MPTP lesion of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal system. DA degeneration was assessed by in vivo PET ([(11C]-PE2I and post-mortem TH and DAT quantification. In a light∶dark cycle, control and MPTP-treated NHP both exhibit rest-wake locomotor rhythms, although DA-depleted NHP show reduced amplitude, decreased stability and increased fragmentation. In all animals, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin peaks at night and cortisol in early morning. When the circadian system is challenged by exposure to constant light, controls retain locomotor rest-wake and hormonal rhythms that free-run with stable phase relationships whereas in the DA-depleted NHP, locomotor rhythms are severely disturbed or completely abolished. The amplitude and phase relations of hormonal rhythms nevertheless remain unaltered. Use of a light-dark masking paradigm shows that expression of daily rest-wake activity in MPTP monkeys requires the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of light and darkness. These results suggest that following DA lesion, the central clock in the SCN remains intact but, in the absence of environmental timing cues, is unable to drive downstream rhythmic processes of striatal clock gene and dopaminergic functions that control locomotor output. These findings suggest that the circadian component of the sleep-wake disturbances in PD is more profoundly affected than previously assumed.

  16. Reduction theories elucidate the origins of complex biological rhythms generated by interacting delay-induced oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuhiro Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Time delay is known to induce sustained oscillations in many biological systems such as electroencephalogram (EEG activities and gene regulations. Furthermore, interactions among delay-induced oscillations can generate complex collective rhythms, which play important functional roles. However, due to their intrinsic infinite dimensionality, theoretical analysis of interacting delay-induced oscillations has been limited. Here, we show that the two primary methods for finite-dimensional limit cycles, namely, the center manifold reduction in the vicinity of the Hopf bifurcation and the phase reduction for weak interactions, can successfully be applied to interacting infinite-dimensional delay-induced oscillations. We systematically derive the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and the phase equation without delay for general interaction networks. Based on the reduced low-dimensional equations, we demonstrate that diffusive (linearly attractive coupling between a pair of delay-induced oscillations can exhibit nontrivial amplitude death and multimodal phase locking. Our analysis provides unique insights into experimentally observed EEG activities such as sudden transitions among different phase-locked states and occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  17. What Pinnipeds Have to Say about Human Speech, Music, and the Evolution of Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, Andrea; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Hanke, Frederike D.; Heinrich, Tamara; Hurgitsch, Bettina; Kotz, Sonja A.; Scharff, Constance; Stoeger, Angela S.; de Boer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Research on the evolution of human speech and music benefits from hypotheses and data generated in a number of disciplines. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the high relevance of pinniped research for the study of speech, musical rhythm, and their origins, bridging and complementing current research on primates and birds. We briefly discuss speech, vocal learning, and rhythm from an evolutionary and comparative perspective. We review the current state of the art on pinniped communication and behavior relevant to the evolution of human speech and music, showing interesting parallels to hypotheses on rhythmic behavior in early hominids. We suggest future research directions in terms of species to test and empirical data needed. PMID:27378843

  18. What Pinnipeds Have to Say about Human Speech, Music, and the Evolution of Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, Andrea; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Hanke, Frederike D; Heinrich, Tamara; Hurgitsch, Bettina; Kotz, Sonja A; Scharff, Constance; Stoeger, Angela S; de Boer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Research on the evolution of human speech and music benefits from hypotheses and data generated in a number of disciplines. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the high relevance of pinniped research for the study of speech, musical rhythm, and their origins, bridging and complementing current research on primates and birds. We briefly discuss speech, vocal learning, and rhythm from an evolutionary and comparative perspective. We review the current state of the art on pinniped communication and behavior relevant to the evolution of human speech and music, showing interesting parallels to hypotheses on rhythmic behavior in early hominids. We suggest future research directions in terms of species to test and empirical data needed. PMID:27378843

  19. Phase-shifting human circadian rhythms: influence of sleep timing, social contact and light exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Both the timing of behavioural events (activity, sleep and social interactions) and the environmental light-dark cycle have been reported to contribute to entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the 24 h day. Yet, the relative contribution of those putative behavioural synchronizers to that of light exposure remains unclear. 2. To investigate this, we inverted the schedule of rest, sedentary activity and social contact of thirty-two young men either with or without exposure to bright light. 3. On this inverted schedule, the endogenous component of the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were exposed to bright light showed a significant phase shift, demonstrating that they were adapting to the new schedule. In contrast, the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were not exposed to bright light moved on average 0.2 h later per day and after 10 days had not significantly adapted to the new schedule. 4. The direction of phase shift in the groups exposed to bright light was dependent on the time of bright light exposure, while control subjects drifted to a later hour regardless of the timing of their schedule of sleep timing, social contact and meals. 5. These results support the concept that the light-dark cycle is the most important synchronizer of the human circadian system. They suggest that inversion of the sleep-wake, rest-activity and social contact cycles provides relatively minimal drive for resetting the human circadian pacemaker. 6. These data indicate that interventions designed to phase shift human circadian rhythms for adjustment to time zone changes or altered work schedules should focus on properly timed light exposure.

  20. Short wavelength light filtering by the natural human lens and IOLs -- implications for entrainment of circadian rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Kessel, Line

    2013-01-01

    Photoentrainment of circadian rhythm begins with the stimulation of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells that respond directly to blue light. With age, the human lens becomes a strong colour filter attenuating transmission of short wavelengths. The purpose of the study was to examine the ...... effect the ageing human lens may have for the photoentrainment of circadian rhythm and to compare with intraocular implant lenses (IOLs) designed to block UV radiation, violet or blue light....

  1. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude...

  2. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  3. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  4. Synchronization of biological clock neurons by light and peripheral feedback systems promotes circadian rhythms and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashna eRamkisoensing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-hour rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-hour rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders.

  5. Independent delta/theta rhythms in the human hippocampus and entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mormann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta oscillations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL of mammals are involved in various functions such as spatial navigation, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processing. While the theta rhythm was originally assumed to originate in the medial septum, more recent studies suggest autonomous theta generation in the MTL. Although coherence between entorhinal and hippocampal theta activity has been found to influence memory formation, it remains unclear whether these two structures can generate theta independently. In this study we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG recordings from 22 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis undergoing presurgical evaluation prior to resection of the epileptic focus. Using a wavelet-based, frequency-band-specific measure of phase synchronization, we quantified synchrony between 10 different recording sites along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation in the non-epileptic brain hemisphere. We compared EEG synchrony between adjacent recording sites (i within the entorhinal cortex, (ii within the hippocampus, and (iii between the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. We observed a significant interregional gap in synchrony for the delta and theta band, indicating the existence of independent delta/theta rhythms in different subregions of the human MTL. The interaction of these rhythms could represent the temporal basis for the information processing required for mnemonic encoding and retrieval.

  6. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows. PMID:27099365

  7. Biological behaviour of cucumbers depending on rhythm of seed irradiation with laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to determine the optimal parameters of laser stimulation and obtained as a result resonance activation of phytohormones responsible for growth and formation of generative organs. The influence of the rhythm of irradiation on its effect was investigated. Cucumber seeds from the Bulgarian salad cultivar Gergana were irradiated with helium-neon laser of 632.8 nm wave length and exit power 20 mw. Besides control samples, the following irradiation groups were examined: 7-times on the 28th day before sowing (variant 7); 7-times in rhythm - 4-times on the 28th and 3-times on the 14th day before sowing (4+3); 7-times in rhythm - 3-times on the 28th and 3-times on the 14th and once on the day before sowing (3+3+1); 7-times in rhythm - 2-times on the 28th, the 21st and the 14th day and once on the day before sowing (2+2+2+1); 7-times in rhythm - once on the 28th, 24th, 20th, 16th, 12th, 8th and 4th day before sowing (1+1+1+1+1+1+1). There was the highest radiobiological effect at the rhythm of irradiation (2+2+2+1) and (1+1+1+1+1+1+1). The rhythmical application of radiation dose ensures better accumulation of the polarized light by the plant cells. The change of their electric vectors accelerates their growth and forces the physiological and biochemical processes. As a result the early yield has been increased respectively by 15.6% and 12% and the total standard yield - by 15.4% and 11.7%

  8. Dynamic modulation of local population activity by rhythm phase in human occipital cortex during a visual search task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai J Miller

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain rhythms are more than just passive phenomena in visual cortex. For the first time, we show that the physiology underlying brain rhythms actively suppresses and releases cortical areas on a second-to-second basis during visual processing. Furthermore, their influence is specific at the scale of individual gyri. We quantified the interaction between broadband spectral change and brain rhythms on a second-to-second basis in electrocorticographic (ECoG measurement of brain surface potentials in five human subjects during a visual search task. Comparison of visual search epochs with a blank screen baseline revealed changes in the raw potential, the amplitude of rhythmic activity, and in the decoupled broadband spectral amplitude. We present new methods to characterize the intensity and preferred phase of coupling between broadband power and band-limited rhythms, and to estimate the magnitude of rhythm-to-broadband modulation on a trial-by-trial basis. These tools revealed numerous coupling motifs between the phase of low frequency (δ, θ, α, β, and γ band rhythms and the amplitude of broadband spectral change. In the θ and β ranges, the coupling of phase to broadband change is dynamic during visual processing, decreasing in some occipital areas and increasing in others, in a gyrally specific pattern. Finally, we demonstrate that the rhythms interact with one another across frequency ranges, and across cortical sites.

  9. Gender differences in the mu rhythm of the human mirror-neuron system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawei Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychologically, females are usually thought to be superior in interpersonal sensitivity than males. The human mirror-neuron system is considered to provide the basic mechanism for social cognition. However, whether the human mirror-neuron system exhibits gender differences is not yet clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured the electroencephalographic mu rhythm, as a reliable indicator of the human mirror-neuron system activity, when female (N = 20 and male (N = 20 participants watched either hand actions or a moving dot. The display of the hand actions included androgynous, male, and female characteristics. The results demonstrate that females displayed significantly stronger mu suppression than males when watching hand actions. Instead, mu suppression was similar across genders when participants observed the moving dot and between the perceived sex differences (same-sex vs. opposite-sex. In addition, the mu suppressions during the observation of hand actions positively correlated with the personal distress subscale of the interpersonal reactivity index and negatively correlated with the systemizing quotient. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings indirectly lend support to the extreme male brain theory put forward by Baron-Cohen (2005, and may cast some light on the mirror-neuron dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. The mu rhythm in the human mirror-neuron system can be a potential biomarker of empathic mimicry.

  10. Physical and neural entrainment to rhythm: human sensorimotor coordination across tasks and effector systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Balasubramaniam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The human sensorimotor system can be readily entrained to environmental rhythms, through multiple sensory modalities. In this review, we provide an overview of theories of timekeeping that make this neuroentrainment possible. First, we present recent evidence that contests the assumptions made in classic timekeeper models. The role of state estimation, sensory feedback and movement parameters on the organization of sensorimotor timing are discussed in the context of recent experiments that examined simultaneous timing and force control. This discussion is extended to the study of coordinated multi-effector movements and how they may be entrained.

  11. Simulated Night Shift Disrupts Circadian Rhythms of Immune Functions in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Boudreau, Philippe; Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research unveiled a circadian regulation of the immune system in rodents, yet little is known about rhythms of immune functions in humans and how they are affected by circadian disruption. In this study, we assessed rhythms of cytokine secretion by immune cells and tested their response to simulated night shifts. PBMCs were collected from nine participants kept in constant posture over 24 h under a day-oriented schedule (baseline) and after 3 d under a night-oriented schedule. Monocytes and T lymphocytes were stimulated with LPS and PHA, respectively. At baseline, a bimodal rhythmic secretion was detected for IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α: a night peak was primarily due to a higher responsiveness of monocytes, and a day peak was partly due to a higher proportion of monocytes. A rhythmic release was also observed for IL-2 and IFN-γ, with a nighttime peak due to a higher cell count and responsiveness of T lymphocytes. Following night shifts, with the exception of IL-2, cytokine secretion was still rhythmic but with peak levels phase advanced by 4.5-6 h, whereas the rhythm in monocyte and T lymphocyte numbers was not shifted. This suggests distinct mechanisms of regulation between responsiveness to stimuli and cell numbers of the human immune system. Under a night-oriented schedule, only cytokine release was partly shifted in response to the change in the sleep-wake cycle. This led to a desynchronization of rhythmic immune parameters, which might contribute to the increased risk for infection, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, and cancer reported in shift workers. PMID:26873990

  12. Circadian rhythms of cyanobacteria: monitoring the biological clocks of individual colonies by bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, T.; Ishiura, M

    1994-01-01

    Reproducible circadian rhythms of bioluminescence from individual colonies of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) has been observed. Phenotypic monitoring of colonies on agar plates will enable us to genetically analyze the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria by screening for clock mutants. By the introduction of a bacterial luciferase gene, we previously developed a transformed cyanobacterial strain (AMC149) that expresses luciferase as a bioluminescent ...

  13. Methods for serial analysis of long time series in the study of biological rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Díez-Noguera, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    When one is faced with the analysis of long time series, one often finds that the characteristics of circadian rhythms vary with time throughout the series. To cope with this situation, the whole series can be fragmented into successive sections which are analyzed one after the other, which constitutes a serial analysis. This article discusses serial analysis techniques, beginning with the characteristics that the sections must have and how they can affect the results. After consideration of ...

  14. Social origins of rhythm? Synchrony and temporal regularity in human vocalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Bowling

    Full Text Available Humans have a capacity to perceive and synchronize with rhythms. This is unusual in that only a minority of other species exhibit similar behavior. Study of synchronizing species (particularly anurans and insects suggests that simultaneous signal production by different individuals may play a critical role in the development of regular temporal signaling. Accordingly, we investigated the link between simultaneous signal production and temporal regularity in our own species. Specifically, we asked whether inter-individual synchronization of a behavior that is typically irregular in time, speech, could lead to evenly-paced or "isochronous" temporal patterns. Participants read nonsense phrases aloud with and without partners, and we found that synchronous reading resulted in greater regularity of durational intervals between words. Comparison of same-gender pairings showed that males and females were able to synchronize their temporal speech patterns with equal skill. These results demonstrate that the shared goal of synchronization can lead to the development of temporal regularity in vocalizations, suggesting that the origins of musical rhythm may lie in cooperative social interaction rather than in sexual selection.

  15. Social Origins of Rhythm? Synchrony and Temporal Regularity in Human Vocalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Daniel L.; Herbst, Christian T.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2013-01-01

    Humans have a capacity to perceive and synchronize with rhythms. This is unusual in that only a minority of other species exhibit similar behavior. Study of synchronizing species (particularly anurans and insects) suggests that simultaneous signal production by different individuals may play a critical role in the development of regular temporal signaling. Accordingly, we investigated the link between simultaneous signal production and temporal regularity in our own species. Specifically, we asked whether inter-individual synchronization of a behavior that is typically irregular in time, speech, could lead to evenly-paced or “isochronous” temporal patterns. Participants read nonsense phrases aloud with and without partners, and we found that synchronous reading resulted in greater regularity of durational intervals between words. Comparison of same-gender pairings showed that males and females were able to synchronize their temporal speech patterns with equal skill. These results demonstrate that the shared goal of synchronization can lead to the development of temporal regularity in vocalizations, suggesting that the origins of musical rhythm may lie in cooperative social interaction rather than in sexual selection. PMID:24312214

  16. Assessing human mirror activity with EEG mu rhythm: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nathan A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Yoo, Kathryn H; Bowman, Lindsay C; Cannon, Erin N; Vanderwert, Ross E; Ferrari, Pier F; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience is how the brain encodes others' actions and intentions. In recent years, a potential advance in our knowledge on this issue is the discovery of mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the nonhuman primate. These neurons fire to both execution and observation of specific types of actions. Researchers use this evidence to fuel investigations of a human mirror system, suggesting a common neural code for perceptual and motor processes. Among the methods used for inferring mirror system activity in humans are changes in a particular frequency band in the electroencephalogram (EEG) called the mu rhythm. Mu frequency appears to decrease in amplitude (reflecting cortical activity) during both action execution and action observation. The current meta-analysis reviewed 85 studies (1,707 participants) of mu that infer human mirror system activity. Results demonstrated significant effect sizes for mu during execution (Cohen's d = 0.46, N = 701) as well as observation of action (Cohen's d = 0.31, N = 1,508), confirming a mirroring property in the EEG. A number of moderators were examined to determine the specificity of these effects. We frame these meta-analytic findings within the current discussion about the development and functions of a human mirror system, and conclude that changes in EEG mu activity provide a valid means for the study of human neural mirroring. Suggestions for improving the experimental and methodological approaches in using mu to study the human mirror system are offered. PMID:26689088

  17. Vitamin B12 enhances the phase-response of circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, S; Kohsaka, M; Morita, N; Fukuda, N; Honma, S; Honma, K

    1996-12-13

    Eight young males were subjected to a single blind cross-over test to see the effects of vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin; VB12) on the phase-response of the circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure. VB12 (0.5 mg/day) or vehicle was injected intravenously at 1230 h for 11 days, which was followed by oral administration (2 mg x 3/day) for 7 days. A serial blood sampling was performed under dim light condition (less than 200 lx) and plasma melatonin rhythm was determined before and after a single bright light exposure (2500 lx for 3 h) at 0700 h. The melatonin rhythm before the light exposure showed a smaller amplitude in the VB12 trial than in the placebo. The light exposure phase-advanced the melatonin rhythm significantly in the VB12 trail, but not in the placebo. These findings indicate that VB12 enhances the light-induced phase-shift in the human circadian rhythm. PMID:8981490

  18. DISTURBANCES OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS IN A RAT CHRONIC MILD STRESS MODEL OF DEPRESSION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Wiborg, Ove; Bouzinova, Elena

    Aim: The focus of this project is to identify biomarkers related to circadian disturbances in major depressive disorder. Background: A large body of clinical data from depressed individuals showed that sleep, temperature, hormones, physiological states and moodchanges are consistent with...... validated animal model of depression, the chronic mild stress model (CMS). Depression-like and control rats were killed by decapitation within 24 h. Trunk blood, brain and liver tissue were collected. The quantitative amount of plasma corticosterone and melatonin were measured using an ELISA and RIA kit...... that depression-like animals showed an abnormal circadian rhythm in the liver and in subregions of the rat brains related to depression. However, the SCN was partly protected against stress. We found an increased level of corticosteron and melatonin, in the depression-like animals as well as a shifted...

  19. Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body function and health? Circadian rhythms can influence sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions. They have been linked to various sleep disorders, such as insomnia. Abnormal circadian rhythms have also ...

  20. The influence of psychoeducation on regulating biological rhythm in a sample of patients with bipolar II disorder: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria AD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Augusto Duarte Faria,1 Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza,2 Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso,2 Karen Amaral Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Azevedo da Silva,2 Karen Jansen21Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande – FURG, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil; 2Health and Behavior Postgraduate Program, Universidade Católica de Pelotas – UCPEL, Pelotas, RS, BrazilIntroduction: Changes in biological rhythm are among the various characteristics of bipolar disorder, and have long been associated with the functional impairment of the disease. There are only a few viable options of psychosocial interventions that deal with this specific topic; one of them is psychoeducation, a model that, although it has been used by practitioners for some time, only recently have studies shown its efficacy in clinical practice.Aim: To assess if patients undergoing psychosocial intervention in addition to a pharmacological treatment have better regulation of their biological rhythm than those only using medication.Method: This study is a randomized clinical trial that compares a standard medication intervention to an intervention combined with drugs and psychoeducation. The evaluation of the biological rhythm was made using the Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, an 18-item scale divided in four areas (sleep, activity, social rhythm, and eating pattern. The combined intervention consisted of medication and a short-term psychoeducation model summarized in a protocol of six individual sessions of 1 hour each.Results: The sample consisted of 61 patients with bipolar II disorder, but during the study, there were 14 losses to follow-up. Therefore, the final sample consisted of 45 individuals (26 for standard intervention and 19 for combined. The results showed that, in this sample and time period evaluated, the combined treatment of medication and psychoeducation had no statistically significant impact on the

  1. Annual rhythms that underlie phenology : biological time-keeping meets environmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, Barbara; Ben-Shlomo, Rachel; Sheriff, Michael J; Hut, Roelof A; Foster, Russell; Barnes, Brian M; Dominoni, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal recurrence of biological processes (phenology) and its relationship to environmental change is recognized as being of key scientific and public concern, but its current study largely overlooks the extent to which phenology is based on biological time-keeping mechanisms. We highlight the rel

  2. Effect of solar activity on the physiological rhythms of biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infradian components, including those with a period of about 3.5, 7, 30 days, are ubiquitously found in biology, from unicells to complex biological organisms. It can be hypothesized that heliogeophysical factors other than the solar visible light, likely at the origin of the circadian system (with a period of about 27 hours), may be responsible for the infradian biosystems. 37 refs

  3. Effects of Exposure to Intermittent versus Continuous Red Light on Human Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin Suppression, and Pupillary Constriction

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21–...

  4. Effects of Exposure to Intermittent versus Continuous Red Light on Human Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin Suppression, and Pupillary Constriction

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21–...

  5. Two Different Bifurcation Scenarios in Neural Firing Rhythms Discovered in Biological Experiments by Adjusting Two Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WV Xiao-Bo; MO Juan; YANG Ming-Hao; ZHENG Qiao-Hua; GU Hua-Guang; HEN Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Two different bifurcation scenarios, one is novel and the other is relatively simpler, in the transition procedures of neural firing patterns are studied in biological experiments on a neural pacemaker by adjusting two parameters. The experimental observations are simulated with a relevant theoretical model neuron. The deterministic non-periodic firing pattern lying within the novel bifurcation scenario is suggested to be a new case of chaos, which has not been observed in previous neurodynamical experiments.

  6. Effect of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Feng; WANG Min; ZANG Ling-he

    2008-01-01

    Objective To further authenticate the role of melatonin on endogenous biologic clock system. Methods Pinealectomized mice were used in the experiments, a series of circadian rhythm of physiology index, such as glucocorticoid, amino acid neurotransmitter, immune function, sensitivity of algesia and body temperature were measured. Results Effects of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm roughly appeared four forms: 1) The model of inherent rhythm was invariant, but midvalue was removed. 2) Pacing function: pinealectomy and melatonin administration changed amplitude of the circadian vibration of aspartate, peripheral blood WBC and serum hemolysin. 3) Phase of rhythm changed, such as the effects on percentage of lymphocyte and sensitivity of algesia. 4) No effect, the circadian rhythm of body temperature belong to this form Conclusions Melatonin has effects some circadian rhythm, and it can adjust endogenous inherent rhythm and make the rhythm keep step with environmental cycle. Melatonin may be a kind of Zeitgeber, Pineal gland might being a rhythm bearing organ to some circadian rhythm.

  7. Lunar Rhythms In Forestry Traditions - Lunar-Correlated Phenomena In Tree Biology And Wood Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürcher, Ernst

    For more than 2000 years, certain forestry practices and rules regarding tree felling have been carried out in observance to Moon cycles. A general review of the different types of rules followed (known in Europe and on other continents and stemming from both written sources and current practitioners) shows that special timber uses are mentioned in relation to a specific felling date which supposedly ensures advantageous wood properties. These empirical forestry traditions apply to a range of wood uses as diverse as building timber, shingles, wooden chimneys, fuel wood, resonance wood for harmony tables of violins, cheese-boxes, barrels and ploughs. In each of these cases, felling at the ``right date'' is thought to be an important factor to ensure the required properties of the product. Moreover, the rafting of timber used to be limited to certain days of the Moon cycle, when the water was supposed to carry the wood in the best way. The second part presents scientific studies concerned, on the one hand, with ``Moon phases'' factor. They deal with elements of tree biology such as germination and initial growth of tropical trees (where strong and systematic variations and their complicating aspects have been observed), insect attacks on trees and reversible fluctuations of stem diameters. On the other hand, some works concentrate on wood properties and the relation between wood and water. They deal with the durability of wood, with systematic density variations after kiln-drying and with variations in the compression strength of the corresponding samples. An overview tries to find a common link between empirical practices and the scientific results.

  8. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Poulet

    Full Text Available Slowly inactivating Na+ channels conducting "late" Na+ current (INa,late contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under pathological conditions. INa,late was also reported to play a role in chronic atrial fibrillation (AF. The objective of this study was to investigate INa,late in human right atrial cardiomyocytes as a putative drug target for treatment of AF. To activate Na+ channels, cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice which exhibit INa,late (ΔKPQ, and right atrial cardiomyocytes from patients in sinus rhythm (SR and AF were voltage clamped at room temperature by 250-ms long test pulses to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I. INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM was used to define persistent inward current after 250 ms at -30 mV as INa,late. TTX-sensitive current was 0.27±0.06 pA/pF in ventricular cardiomyocytes from ΔKPQ mice, and amounted to 0.04±0.01 pA/pF and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in SR and AF human atrial cardiomyocytes, respectively. With protocol II (holding potential -120 mV, pre-pulse to -80 mV TTX-sensitive INa,late was always larger than with protocol I. Ranolazine (30 μM reduced INa,late by 0.02±0.02 pA/pF in SR and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in AF cells. At physiological temperature (37°C, however, INa,late became insignificant. Plateau phase and upstroke velocity of action potentials (APs recorded with sharp microelectrodes in intact human trabeculae were more sensitive to ranolazine in AF than in SR preparations. Sodium channel subunits expression measured with qPCR was high for SCN5A with no difference between SR and AF. Expression of SCN8A and SCN10A was low in general, and lower in AF than in SR. In conclusion, We confirm for the first time a TTX-sensitive current (INa,late in right atrial cardiomyocytes from SR and AF patients at room

  9. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Fabritz, Larissa; Matschke, Klaus; Knaut, Michael; Ravens, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Slowly inactivating Na+ channels conducting "late" Na+ current (INa,late) contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under pathological conditions. INa,late was also reported to play a role in chronic atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to investigate INa,late in human right atrial cardiomyocytes as a putative drug target for treatment of AF. To activate Na+ channels, cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice which exhibit INa,late (ΔKPQ), and right atrial cardiomyocytes from patients in sinus rhythm (SR) and AF were voltage clamped at room temperature by 250-ms long test pulses to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I). INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM) was used to define persistent inward current after 250 ms at -30 mV as INa,late. TTX-sensitive current was 0.27±0.06 pA/pF in ventricular cardiomyocytes from ΔKPQ mice, and amounted to 0.04±0.01 pA/pF and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in SR and AF human atrial cardiomyocytes, respectively. With protocol II (holding potential -120 mV, pre-pulse to -80 mV) TTX-sensitive INa,late was always larger than with protocol I. Ranolazine (30 μM) reduced INa,late by 0.02±0.02 pA/pF in SR and 0.09±0.02 pA/pF in AF cells. At physiological temperature (37°C), however, INa,late became insignificant. Plateau phase and upstroke velocity of action potentials (APs) recorded with sharp microelectrodes in intact human trabeculae were more sensitive to ranolazine in AF than in SR preparations. Sodium channel subunits expression measured with qPCR was high for SCN5A with no difference between SR and AF. Expression of SCN8A and SCN10A was low in general, and lower in AF than in SR. In conclusion, We confirm for the first time a TTX-sensitive current (INa,late) in right atrial cardiomyocytes from SR and AF patients at room

  10. Saccades during visual exploration align hippocampal 3-8 Hz rhythms in human and non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari L Hoffman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual exploration in primates depends on saccadic eye movements that cause alternations of neural suppression and enhancement. This modulation extends beyond retinotopic areas, and is thought to facilitate perception; yet saccades may also influence brain regions critical for forming memories of these exploratory episodes. The hippocampus, for example, shows oscillatory activity that is generally associated with encoding of information. Whether or how hippocampal oscillations are influenced by eye movements is unknown. We recorded the neural activity in the human and macaque hippocampus during visual scene search. Across species, saccadic eye movements were associated with a time-limited alignment of a low-frequency (3-8 Hz rhythm. The phase alignment depended on the task and not only on eye movements per se, and the frequency band was not a direct consequence of saccade rate. Hippocampal theta-frequency oscillations are produced by other mammals during repetitive exploratory behaviors, including whisking, sniffing, echolocation and locomotion. The present results may reflect a similar yet distinct primate homologue supporting active perception during exploration.

  11. Melatonin and Sleep-Wake Rhythms before and after Ocular Lens Replacement in Elderly Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Marina; Beersma, Domien; Daan, Serge; Pol, Bert van der; Kanis, Martijn; van Norren, Dick; Gordijn, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Light of short wavelengths has been shown to play a key role in non-image forming responses. Due to aging, the ocular lens becomes more yellow reducing the transmission of short wavelengths in the elderly. In the present study, we make use of cataract surgery to investigate the effects of a relative increase of short wavelength transmission on melatonin- and sleep-wake rhythms (N = 14). We observed, on average, a delay of the sleep-wake and the nocturnal melatonin rhythms after cataract surgery. This delay is tentatively attributed to a relatively large increase of light transmittance in the evening hours more than an increase of the already relatively high light intensities found in the daytime. The later phase that we observed after cataract surgery (clear lens) as compared to the earlier phase observed before cataract (yellowish lens) is in agreement with the general later phase reported in the young (clear lens) population. PMID:26891336

  12. Melatonin and Sleep-Wake Rhythms before and after Ocular Lens Replacement in Elderly Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Giménez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Light of short wavelengths has been shown to play a key role in non-image forming responses. Due to aging, the ocular lens becomes more yellow reducing the transmission of short wavelengths in the elderly. In the present study, we make use of cataract surgery to investigate the effects of a relative increase of short wavelength transmission on melatonin- and sleep-wake rhythms (N = 14. We observed, on average, a delay of the sleep-wake and the nocturnal melatonin rhythms after cataract surgery. This delay is tentatively attributed to a relatively large increase of light transmittance in the evening hours more than an increase of the already relatively high light intensities found in the daytime. The later phase that we observed after cataract surgery (clear lens as compared to the earlier phase observed before cataract (yellowish lens is in agreement with the general later phase reported in the young (clear lens population.

  13. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of n...

  14. Marine Biology and Human Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, F. S.

    1976-01-01

    Marine biology has become an important area for study throughout the world. The author of this article discusses some of the important discoveries and fields of research in marine biology that are useful for mankind. Topics include food from the sea, fish farming, pesticides, pollution, and conservation. (MA)

  15. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21-28 yr) lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2) s(-1)), intermittent red light (1 min on/off), or bright white light (2,500 lux) near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group). Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69), with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light. PMID:24797245

  16. Culture, Urbanism and Changing Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Schell, L M

    2014-01-01

    Anthropologists have long known that human activity driven by culture changes the environment. This is apparent in the archaeological record and through the study of the modern environment. Perhaps the largest change since the paleolithic era is the organization of human populations in cities. New environments can reshape human biology through evolution as shown by the evolution of the hominid lineage. Evolution is not the only process capable of reshaping our biology. Some changes in our hum...

  17. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-06-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of novel microbial genetic circuitry for human therapeutics will greatly benefit from the data generated by 'omics' approaches and multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology. Development of novel antimicrobial drugs and vaccines by engineering microbial systems are a promising area of research in the field of synthetic biology for human theragnostics. Expression of plant based medicinal compounds in the microbial system using synthetic biology tools is another avenue dealt in the present study. Additionally, the study suggest that the traditional medicinal knowledge can do value addition for developing novel drugs in the microbial systems using synthetic biology tools. The presented work envisions the success of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach in a holistic manner. Keeping this in view, various legal and socio-ethical concerns emerging from the use of synthetic biology via microbial approach such as patenting, biosafety and biosecurity issues have been touched upon in the later sections. PMID:23730360

  18. Poverty, Human Development, and Basic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Liza

    2007-01-01

    Taking a slight departure from our normal fare, PLoS Biology features two articles with a special focus on poverty and human development: one explores the biological mechanisms of health inequalities; the second discusses the value of including local communities in biodiversity conservation.

  19. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, FJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their ...

  20. Humans in Space &Space Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legner, Klaus

    Inevitably, members of the human species will again walk on the face of the moon and ultimately establish a permanently occupied lunar base. Also, inevitably, humans will venture to the planets within the solar system, most likely beginning with Mars or the Martian satellite, Phobos. These missions will take place because the species that contemplates them is driven by an insatiable desire for knowledge and understanding and because the technical means to accomplish these objectives are possible. There is no question that humans will establish outposts on Earth's moon and make interplanetary journeys. The only uncertainties concern when and how these expeditions are to be made. Just as a 90- or 120-day tour onboard an international space station is fundamentally different from a brief space shuttle mission; a one-year lunar base tour or a two- or three-year mission to Mars will be unique. Despite superficial similarities to other space missions and analogues, the extended durations and astronomical distances involved in lunar and Martian missions will make these activities far more difficult and dangerous. Crowded conditions, language and cultural differences, logistics problems, radiation concerns, communications lag times, workloads, and a variety of additional issues will conspire to impair the performance and affect the behaviour of long duration crew personnel. Above all stressors, however, the durations of the missions will impose the greatest burdens and extract the most severe tolls on the humans involved. On long-duration space missions, time will be the factor that can compound all issues, however trivial, into serious problems.

  1. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  2. Biological Systems, Energy Sources, and Biology Teaching. Biology and Human Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribe, Michael; Pritchard, Alan J.

    This five-chapter document (part of a series on biology and human welfare) focuses on biological systems as energy sources and on the teaching of this subject area. Chapter 1 discusses various topics related to energy and ecology, including biomass, photosynthesis and world energy balances, energy flow through ecosystems, and others. Chapter 2…

  3. Simulation of biatrial conduction via different pathways during sinus rhythm with a detailed human atrial model*

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Dong-dong; Gong, Ying-lan; Shou, Guo-fa; Jiao, Pei-feng; Zhang, Heng-gui; Ye, Xue-song; Xia, Ling

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand biatrial conduction, investigate various conduction pathways, and compare the differences between isotropic and anisotropic conductions in human atria, we present a simulation study of biatrial conduction with known/assumed conduction pathways using a recently developed human atrial model. In addition to known pathways: (1) Bachmann’s bundle (BB), (2) limbus of fossa ovalis (LFO), and (3) coronary sinus (CS), we also hypothesize that there exist two fast conducti...

  4. Statistical methods for detecting and comparing periodic data and their application to the nycthemeral rhythm of bodily harm: A population based study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stroebel, Armin M

    2010-11-08

    Abstract Background Animals, including humans, exhibit a variety of biological rhythms. This article describes a method for the detection and simultaneous comparison of multiple nycthemeral rhythms. Methods A statistical method for detecting periodic patterns in time-related data via harmonic regression is described. The method is particularly capable of detecting nycthemeral rhythms in medical data. Additionally a method for simultaneously comparing two or more periodic patterns is described, which derives from the analysis of variance (ANOVA). This method statistically confirms or rejects equality of periodic patterns. Mathematical descriptions of the detecting method and the comparing method are displayed. Results Nycthemeral rhythms of incidents of bodily harm in Middle Franconia are analyzed in order to demonstrate both methods. Every day of the week showed a significant nycthemeral rhythm of bodily harm. These seven patterns of the week were compared to each other revealing only two different nycthemeral rhythms, one for Friday and Saturday and one for the other weekdays.

  5. Biological Inspiration in Human Centred Robotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Huo-sheng; LIU Jin-dong; Calderon Carlos A

    2004-01-01

    Human centred robotics (HCR) concerns with the development of various kinds of intelligent systems and robots that will be used in environments coexisting with humans. These systems and robots will be interactive and useful assistants/companions for people in different ages, situations, activities and environments in order to improve the quality of life. This paper presents the autors' current research work toward the development of advanced theory and technologies for HCR applications, based on inspiration from biological systems. More specifically, both bio-mimetic system modelling and robot learning by imitation are discussed respectively, and some preliminary results are demonstrated.

  6. Physical biology of human brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia eBudday; Paul eSteinmann; Ellen eKuhl

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopment is a complex, dynamic process that involves a precisely orchestrated sequence of genetic, environmental, biochemical, and physical events. Developmental biology and genetics have shaped our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms during neurodevelopment. Recent studies suggest that physical forces play a central role in translating these cellular mechanisms into the complex surface morphology of the human brain. However, the precise impact of neuronal different...

  7. Simulation of biatrial conduction via different pathways during sinus rhythm with a detailed human atrial model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-dong DENG; Ying-lan GONG; Guo-fa SHOU; Pei-feng JIAO; Heng-gui ZHANG; Xue-song YE; Ling XIA

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand biatrial conduction,investigate various conduction pathways,and compare the differences between isotropic and anisotropic conductions in human atria,we present a simulation study of biatrial conduction with known/assumed conduction pathways using a recently developed human atrial model.In addition to known pathways:(1) Bachmann's bundle (BB),(2) limbus of fossa ovalis (LFO),and (3) coronary sinus (CS),we also hypothesize that there exist two fast conduction bundles that connect the crista terminalis (CT),LFO,and CS.Our simulation demonstrates that use of these fast conduction bundles results in a conduction pattern consistent with experimental data.The comparison of isotropic and anisotropoic conductions in the BB case showed that the atrial working muscles had small effect on conduction time and conduction speed,although the conductivities assigned in anisotropic conduction were two to four times higher than the isotropic conduction.In conclusion,we suggest that the hypothesized intercaval bundles play a significant role in the biatrial conduction and that myofiber orientation has larger effects on the conduction system than the atrial working muscles.This study presents readers with new insights into human atrial conduction.

  8. Late Sodium Current in Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes from Patients in Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Grunnet, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    (APs) recorded with sharp microelectrodes in intact human trabeculae were more sensitive to ranolazine in AF than in SR preparations. Sodium channel subunits expression measured with qPCR was high for SCN5A with no difference between SR and AF. Expression of SCN8A and SCN10A was low in general, and......Slowly inactivating Na+ channels conducting "late" Na+ current (INa,late) contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under pathological conditions. INa,late was also reported to play a role in chronic atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to investigate INa,late in human right...... to -30 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV with a 100-ms pre-pulse to -110 mV (protocol I). INa,late at -30 mV was not discernible as deviation from the extrapolated straight line IV-curve between -110 mV and -80 mV in human atrial cells. Therefore, tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM) was used to define...

  9. Chorusing, synchrony and the evolutionary functions of rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eRavignani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A central goal of biomusicology is to understand the biological basis of human musicality. One approach to this problem has been to compare core components of human musicality (relative pitch perception, entrainment, etc. with similar capacities in other animal species. Here we extend and clarify this comparative approach with respect to rhythm. First, whereas most comparisons between human music and animal acoustic behavior have focused on spectral properties (melody and harmony, we argue for the central importance of temporal properties, and propose that this domain is ripe for further comparative research. Second, whereas most rhythm research in non-human animals has examined animal timing in isolation, we consider how chorusing dynamics can shape individual timing, as in human music and dance, making group behavior key to understand the adaptive functions of rhythm. To illustrate the interdependence between individual and chorusing dynamics, we present a computational model of chorusing agents relating individual call timing with synchronous group behavior. Third, we distinguish and clarify mechanistic and functional explanations of rhythmic phenomena, often conflated in the literature, arguing that this distinction is key for understanding the evolution of musicality. Fourth, we expand biomusicological discussions beyond the species typically considered, providing an overview of chorusing and rhythmic behavior across a broad range of taxa (orthopterans, fireflies, frogs, birds, and primates. Finally, we propose an Evolving Signal Timing hypothesis, suggesting that similarities between timing abilities in biological species will be based on comparable chorusing behaviors. We conclude that the comparative study of chorusing species can provide important insights into the adaptive function(s of rhythmic behavior in our proto-musical primate ancestors, and thus inform our understanding of the biology and evolution of rhythm in human music and

  10. Visual impairment and circadian rhythm disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Lockley, SW; Arendt, J; Skene, DJ

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior are dominated by 24-hour circadian rhythms that have a major impact on our health and well-being, including the sleep-wake cycle, alertness and performance patterns, and many daily hormone profiles. These rhythms are spontaneously generated by an internal "pacemaker" in the hypothalamus, and daily light exposure to the eyes is required to keep these circadian rhythms synchronized both internally and with the external environment. Sighted individua...

  11. Visual impairment and circadiam rhythm disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lockley, Steven W.; Arendt, Josephine; Skene, Debra J.

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior are dominated by 24-hour circadian rhythms that have a major impact on our health and well-being, including the sleep-wake cycle, alertness and performance patterns, and many daily hormone profiles. These rhythms are spontaneously generated by an internal “pacemaker” in the hypothalamus, and daily light exposure to the eyes is required to keep these circadian rhythms synchronized both internally and with the external environment Sighted individual...

  12. Voiced Reading and Rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹艳萍

    2007-01-01

    Since voiced reading is an important way in learning English,rhythm is the most critical factor that enables to read beautifully.This article illustrates the relationship between rhythm and voiced reading,the importance of rhythm,and the methods to develop the sense of rhythm.

  13. Tapping into rhythm generation circuitry in humans during simulated weightlessness conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Solopova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An ability to produce rhythmic activity is ubiquitous for locomotor pattern generation and modulation. The role that the rhythmogenesis capacity of the spinal cord plays in injured populations has become an area of interest and systematic investigation among researchers in recent years, despite its importance being long recognized by neurophysiologists and clinicians. Given that each individual interneuron, as a rule, receives a broad convergence of various supraspinal and sensory inputs and may contribute to a vast repertoire of motor actions, the importance of assessing the functional state of the spinal locomotor circuits becomes increasingly evident. Air-stepping can be used as a unique and important model for investigating human rhythmogenesis since its manifestation is largely facilitated by a reduction of external resistance. This article aims to provide a review on current issues related to the ‘locomotor’ state and interactions between spinal and supraspinal influences on the central pattern generator circuitry in humans, which may be important for developing gait rehabilitation strategies in individuals with spinal cord and brain injuries.

  14. Serial binary interval ratios improve rhythm reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiangWu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Musical rhythm perception is a natural human ability that involves complex cognitive processes. Rhythm refers to the organization of events in time, and musical rhythms have an underlying hierarchical metrical structure. The metrical structure induces the feeling of a beat and the extent to which a rhythm induces the feeling of a beat is referred to as its metrical strength. Binary ratios are the most frequent interval ratio in musical rhythms. Rhythms with hierarchical binary ratios are better discriminated and reproduced than rhythms with hierarchical non-binary ratios. However, it remains unclear whether a superiority of serial binary over non-binary ratios in rhythm perception and reproduction exists. In addition, how different types of serial ratios influence the metrical strength of rhythms remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated serial binary vs. non-binary ratios in a reproduction task. Rhythms formed with exclusively binary (1:2:4:8, non-binary integer (1:3:5:6, and non-integer (1:2.3:5.3:6.4 ratios were examined within a constant meter. The results showed that the 1:2:4:8 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 and 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm types, and the 1:2.3:5.3:6.4 rhythm type was more accurately reproduced than the 1:3:5:6 rhythm type. Further analyses showed that reproduction performance was better predicted by the distribution pattern of event occurrences within an inter-beat interval, than by the coincidence of events with beats, or the magnitude and complexity of interval ratios. Whereas rhythm theories and empirical data emphasize the role of the coincidence of events with beats in determining metrical strength and predicting rhythm performance, the present results suggest that rhythm processing may be better understood when the distribution pattern of event occurrences is taken into account. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlining musical rhythm perception.

  15. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  16. Physical biology of human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eBudday

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodevelopment is a complex, dynamic process that involves a precisely orchestrated sequence of genetic, environmental, biochemical, and physical events. Developmental biology and genetics have shaped our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms during neurodevelopment. Recent studies suggest that physical forces play a central role in translating these cellular mechanisms into the complex surface morphology of the human brain. However, the precise impact of neuronal differentiation, migration, and connection on the physical forces during cortical folding remains unknown. Here we review the cellular mechanisms of neurodevelopment with a view towards surface morphogenesis, pattern selection, and evolution of shape. We revisit cortical folding as the instability problem of constrained differential growth in a multi-layered system. To identify the contributing factors of differential growth, we map out the timeline of neurodevelopment in humans and highlight the cellular events associated with extreme radial and tangential expansion. We demonstrate how computational modeling of differential growth can bridge the scales-from phenomena on the cellular level towards form and function on the organ level-to make quantitative, personalized predictions. Physics-based models can quantify cortical stresses, identify critical folding conditions, rationalize pattern selection, and predict gyral wavelengths and gyrification indices. We illustrate that physical forces can explain cortical malformations as emergent properties of developmental disorders. Combining biology and physics holds promise to advance our understanding of human brain development and enable early diagnostics of cortical malformations with the ultimate goal to improve treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia.

  17. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e.......g. the quantitation of identified DNA-adducts or substance unspecific as is the measurement of DNA-repair. The sample material used for analysis must be well characterized and subject to uniform processing for comparison of the results. Confounding factors of smoking, age and sex must be well controlled...

  18. Light Rhythms in Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2013-01-01

    On one hand, urban lighting expresses itself in a complex visual environment made by the interplay by between many separate lighting schemes, as street lighting, shop lighting, luminous commercials etc. On the other, a noticeable order of patterns occurs, when lighting is observed as luminous...... formation and rhythm. When integrated into an architectural concept, electrical lighting non-intended for poetic composition has the ability to contribute to place, time, and function-telling aspects of places in urban contexts. Urban environments are information wise challenging to pre-historic human...... instincts, but they can be met by careful selection and adjustment of existing light situations....

  19. Circadian Rhythm Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, Phyllis C.; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs).

  20. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychiatric and other sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and individuals with a strong need for stable ... and circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type. Prevalence • The prevalence of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in ...

  1. The effects on human sleep and circadian rhythms of 17 days of continuous bedrest in the absence of daylight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Billy, B. D.; Kennedy, K. S.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a larger bedrest study involving various life science experiments, a study was conducted on the effects of 17 days of continuous bedrest and elimination of daylight on circadian rectal temperature rhythms, mood, alertness, and sleep (objective and diary) in eight healthy middle-aged men. Sleep was timed from 2300 to 0700 hours throughout. Three 72-hour measurement blocks were compared: ambulatory prebedrest, early bedrest (days 5-7), and late bedrest (days 15-17). Temperature rhythms showed reduced amplitude and later phases resulting from the bedrest conditions. This was associated with longer nocturnal sleep onset latencies and poorer subjectively rated sleep but with no reliable changes in any of the other sleep parameters. Daily changes in posture and/or exposure to daylight appear to be important determinants of a properly entrained circadian system.

  2. The Mathematical Biology of Human Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Nowak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans are constant victims of infectious diseases. Biomedical research during this century has led to important insights into the molecular details of immune defense. Yet, many questions relating to disease require a quantitative understanding of the complex systems that arise from the nonlinear interactions between populations of immune cells and infectious agents. Exploration of such questions has lead to a newly emerging field of mathematical biology describing the spread of infectious agents both within and between infected individuals. This essay will discuss simple and complex models of evolution, and the propagation of virus and prion infections. Such models provide new perspectives for our understanding of infectious disease and provide guidelines for interpreting experimental observation; they also define what needs to be measured to improve understanding.

  3. Off beat: pluralizing rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Hoogstad; B. Stougaard Pedersen

    2013-01-01

    Off Beat: Pluralizing Rhythm draws attention to rhythm as a tool for analyzing various cultural objects. In fields as diverse as music, culture, nature, and economy, rhythm can be seen as a phenomenon that both connects and divides. It suggests a certain measure with which people, practices, and cul

  4. Modeling human liver biology using stem cell-derived hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Pingnan; Zhou, XiaoLing; Farnworth, Sarah; Arvind H Patel; Hay, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived hepatocytes represent promising models to study human liver biology and disease. This concise review discusses the recent progresses in the field, with a focus on human liver disease, drug metabolism and virus infection.

  5. Modeling Human Liver Biology Using Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind H Patel; Hay, David C.; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Pingnan Sun; Xiaoling Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived hepatocytes represent promising models to study human liver biology and disease. This concise review discusses the recent progresses in the field, with a focus on human liver disease, drug metabolism and virus infection.

  6. Human Brain Basis of Musical Rhythm Perception: Common and Distinct Neural Substrates for Meter, Tempo, and Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Thaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus. Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas. These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure.

  7. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  8. Markets, Bodies, Rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian; Bondo Hansen, Kristian; Lange, Ann-Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between bodily rhythms and market rhythms in two distinctly different financial market configurations, namely the open-outcry pit (prevalent especially in the early 20th century) and present-day high-frequency trading. Drawing on Henri Lefebvre's rhythmanaly......This article explores the relationship between bodily rhythms and market rhythms in two distinctly different financial market configurations, namely the open-outcry pit (prevalent especially in the early 20th century) and present-day high-frequency trading. Drawing on Henri Lefebvre...

  9. Other Rhythm Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 10/23/2014. Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia Introduction Atrial Fibrillation Bradycardia Conduction Disorders Premature Contractions Tachycardia Ventricular Fibrillation Other Rhythm Disorders Types of ...

  10. Daily rhythms in mobile telephone communication

    CERN Document Server

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls wer...

  11. Sleep, Rhythms, and the Endocrine Brain: Influence of Sex and Gonadal Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Mong, Jessica A.; Baker, Fiona C.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Paul, Ketema N.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Semba, Kazue; Silver, Rae

    2011-01-01

    While much is known about the mechanisms that underlie sleep and circadian rhythms, the investigation into sex differences and gonadal steroid modulation of sleep and biological rhythms is in its infancy. There is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep and biological rhythms is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. While it is known that ovarian steroids...

  12. Musical rhythm and affect. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Maria A. G.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Vuust, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The Quartet Theory of Human Emotion (QT) proposed by Koelsch et al. [1] adds to existing affective models, e.g. by directing more attention to emotional contagion, attachment-related and non-goal-directed emotions. Such an approach seems particularly appropriate to modelling musical emotions, and music is indeed a recurring example in the text, used to illustrate the distinct characteristics of the affect systems that are at the centre of the theory. Yet, it would seem important for any theory of emotion to account for basic functions such as prediction and anticipation, which are only briefly mentioned. Here we propose that QT, specifically its focus on emotional contagion, attachment-related and non-goal directed emotions, might help generate new ideas about a largely neglected source of emotion - rhythm - a musical property that relies fundamentally on the mechanism of prediction.

  13. The biology of human sexuality: evolution, ecology and physiology

    OpenAIRE

    PW Bateman; NC Bennett

    2006-01-01

    Many evolutionary biologists argue that human sexual behaviour can be studied in exactly the same way as that of other species. Many sociologists argue that social influences effectively obscure, and are more important than, a reductionist biological approach to human sexual behaviour. Here,we authors attempt to provide a broad introduction to human sexual behaviour from a biological standpoint and to indicate where the ambiguous areas are. We outline the evolutionary selective pressures that...

  14. Disrupted seasonal biology impacts health, food security and ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, T. J.; Visser, M.E; Arnold, W; Barrett, P; Biello, S; Dawson, A.; Denlinger, D. L.; Dominoni, D.; Ebling, F.J.; Elton, S.; Evans, N.; Ferguson, H M; Foster, R G; Hau, M.; Haydon, D.T.

    2015-01-01

    The rhythm of life on earth is shaped by seasonal changes in the environment. Plants and animals show profound annual cycles in physiology, health, morphology, behaviour and demography in response to environmental cues. Seasonal biology impacts ecosystems and agriculture, with consequences for humans and biodiversity. Human populations show robust annual rhythms in health and well-being, and the birth month can have lasting effects that persist throughout life. This review emphasizes the need...

  15. Towards Systems Biology of Human Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Studer, Sean M.; Kaminski, Naftali

    2007-01-01

    The integrated effect of multiple pathways, molecules, genetic polymorphisms, environmental stimuli, and possible infection determines the lung phenotype in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a chronic progressive and often lethal lung disease. Systems biology approaches aim to provide a systemwide view of biological process using computational tools and high-throughput technologies. Although much of the analysis of genome-level transcriptional high-resolution profiles of IPF was reductioni...

  16. Circadian temperature and melatonin rhythms, sleep, and neurobehavioral function in humans living on a 20-h day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J. K.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of homeostatic and circadian processes in the regulation of waking neurobehavioral functions and sleep was studied in six healthy young subjects. Subjects were scheduled to 15-24 repetitions of a 20-h rest/activity cycle, resulting in desynchrony between the sleep-wake cycle and the circadian rhythms of body temperature and melatonin. The circadian components of cognitive throughput, short-term memory, alertness, psychomotor vigilance, and sleep disruption were at peak levels near the temperature maximum, shortly before melatonin secretion onset. These measures exhibited their circadian nadir at or shortly after the temperature minimum, which in turn was shortly after the melatonin maximum. Neurobehavioral measures showed impairment toward the end of the 13-h 20-min scheduled wake episodes. This wake-dependent deterioration of neurobehavioral functions can be offset by the circadian drive for wakefulness, which peaks in the latter half of the habitual waking day during entrainment. The data demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of many neurobehavioral functions to circadian phase and the accumulation of homeostatic drive for sleep.

  17. Human · mouse genome analysis and radiation biology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue is the collection of the papers presented at the 25th NIRS symposium on Human, Mouse Genome Analysis and Radiation Biology. The 14 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. Using biological monitoring to assess human exposure to priority toxicants.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirkle, J L; Sampson, E J; Needham, L L; Patterson, D G; Ashley, D L

    1995-01-01

    Scientifically valid exposure assessment is crucial to risk assessment, risk management, and prevention of environmental disease. Scientists have used three tools to assess exposure: exposure history/questionnaire, environmental monitoring (including personal monitoring), and biological monitoring. Combinations of these tools usually provide the exposure information needed to meet objectives of human studies evaluating the exposure-health effect relationship. Biological monitoring is a capabl...

  19. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-01-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development ‘in a dish’. We also...

  20. Nitric Oxide: Role in Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil Omer; Ankur Rohilla; Seema Rohilla; Ashok Kushnoor

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, possesses various modulatory effects on biological systems. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by converting it to L-citrulline via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. Moreover, various precursors of NO have been reported that include arginine, citruline, arginine alphaketoglutarate (A-AKG) and arginineketoisocaproate (A-KIC). NO possess various direct and indirect effects that broadly affect various tissues and organ systems inside the body. The present rev...

  1. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock me...

  2. Melatonin the "light of night" in human biology and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvidou Olga D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melatonin "the light of night" is secreted from the pineal gland principally at night. The hormone is involved in sleep regulation, as well as in a number of other cyclical bodily activities and circadian rhythm in humans. Melatonin is exclusively involved in signalling the 'time of day' and 'time of year' (hence considered to help both clock and calendar functions to all tissues and is thus considered to be the body's chronological pacemaker or 'Zeitgeber'. The last decades melatonin has been used as a therapeutic chemical in a large spectrum of diseases, mainly in sleep disturbances and tumours and may play a role in the biologic regulation of mood, affective disorders, cardiovascular system, reproduction and aging. There are few papers regarding melatonin and its role in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Melatonin may play a role in the pathogenesis of scoliosis (neuroendocrine hypothesis but at present, the data available cannot clearly support this hypothesis. Uncertainties and doubts still surround the role of melatonin in human physiology and pathophysiology and future research is needed.

  3. Radiation biology of human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation response of human tumour xenografts can be measured with sufficient accuracy using cell survival in vitro and tumour growth delay in vivo as endpoints. There is evidence that radiation response of xenografts mirrors clinical radioresponsiveness of corresponding tumours in patients. Thus xenografts may have a significant potential in experimental radiotherapeutic research, e.g. in development of in vitro and in vivo predictive assays of clinical radioresponsiveness. There are at least three main disadvantages with xenografts as models for human cancer. Firstly, volume doubling time is usually shorter for xenografts than for tumours in patients. Secondly, the haematological system and vascular network of xenografts originate from the host. Thirdly, host defence mechanisms may be active against xenografts. These disadvantages may limit the usefulness of xenografts as models for human cancer in some types of radiobiological studies. (author)

  4. Basic rhythm of myoelectric activities of sphcter of Oddi and its biological significance%Oddi括约肌肌电活动的基本方式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李虎城; 董家鸿; 陈飞; 邹一平; 李为民

    2010-01-01

    Objective To observe the basic rhythm of myoelectrie activities of sphcter of Oddi (SO)and explore its biological significance.Methods Healthy adult rabbits(n=32)were randomized into 4 groups with 8 in each.The first group was for recording of myoelectric activities of SO after keeping fast for 18 hours.The second group was manipulated to observe the myoelectric activities of SO after food infusion through the stoma in stomach.The myoelectric activities of SO in the third group were monitored after the classical Nardi test was performed on these rabbits.The fourth group was used to observe the myoelectric activities of SO after the cholinergic receptors had been blocked.Using the double claw metal electrodes which were put into SO and duodenum through the plasma membrance,the myoelectric signal were recorded with RM6240 multi-channel physiologic recording and signal processing system and non-stop recording was conducted for 120-150 mins.Results 1)Spike Potentials of SO with the frequency was observed in rabbits that had been fasting.2)Myoelectronic activity of SO was observed in rabbits infused with 50 ml milk through stoma.3)After the administration of 1 mg morphine and 1 mg neostigmine i.v,the myoelectric activities of SO were noted as long-lasting persistent MASO.4)Administration of anisodamine 1 mg(i.v.)in the empty abdomen group dismissed SPSO and MASO.This state lasted for 120 min before SPSO gradually reconverted to the state of empty abdomen.Conclusion There are four patterns of myoelectric activities of SO,i.e,tensional waves under empty abdomen indicating a state in which the SO kept a basic tension level.Peristaltic waves under intake of food.Spastic waves under the stimulation of drugs and relaxant waves under the post-ganglionic block of cholinergic receptors were observed in the present study.Correspondingly,their mechanic locomotion is inferred as the basic tensional state to faciliate the deposition and condensation of bile,the peristalsis for the

  5. Orchestrating intensities and rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou

    2016-01-01

    environmentality and learning-centered governance standards has dramatic and performative effects for the production of (educational) subjectivities. This implies a shift from governing identities, categories and structures towards orchestrating affective intensities and rhythms. Finally, the article discusses...

  6. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  7. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  8. The biology of human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Bernink

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I performed studies to investigate the contribution of human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in maintaining the mucosal homeostasis, initiating and/or propagating inflammatory responses, but also - when not properly regulated - how these cells contribute to immunopathology. First I descr

  9. The Biological Basis of Human Irrationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Albert

    If we define irrationality as thought, emotion, or behavior that leads to self-defeating consequences or that significantly interferes with the survival and happiness of the organism, we find that literally hundreds of major irrationalities exist in all societies and in virtually all humans in those societies. These irrationalities persist despite…

  10. Synthetic Biology and Human Health: Potential Applications for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Carr, Christopher; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Y.; Grenon, Marlene; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Santos, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems. The spacecraft environment further subjects the traveler to noise and gravitational forces, as well as airborne chemical, microbiological contaminants, and radiation exposure. As humans prepare for longer duration missions effective countermeasures must be developed, verified, and implemented to ensure mission success. Over the past ten years, synthetic biology has opened new avenues for research and development in areas such as biological control, biomaterials, sustainable energy production, bioremediation, and biomedical therapies. The latter in particular is of great interest to the implementation of long-duration human spaceflight capabilities. This article discusses the effects of spaceflight on humans, and reviews current capabilities and potential needs associated with the health of the astronauts where synthetic biology could play an important role in the pursuit of space exploration.

  11. The Effects of Daily Rhythms on Sports Functions and Physiological Variables of Immune Elite Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Sharifi; Alireza Babai Mazreno; Marjan Mirjalili; Mohammad Hassan Ehrampoush

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Daily rhythm as one of the biological rhythms with a period of about 24 hours on various body systems and physiological responses affect on them. Body temperature is a fundamental variable as one of the specifications used daily rhythms The main purpose of this study was evaluating the effect of circadian rhythms on exercise performing and physiological variants of security system in swimmers. Materials and Methods In one study, before and after the 12 men swimmers in the league,...

  12. Principles of Security: Human, Cyber, and Biological

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Blake C

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity attacks are a major and increasing burden to economic and social systems globally. Here we analyze the principles of security in different domains and demonstrate an architectural flaw in current cybersecurity. Cybersecurity is inherently weak because it is missing the ability to defend the overall system instead of individual computers. The current architecture enables all nodes in the computer network to communicate transparently with one another, so security would require protecting every computer in the network from all possible attacks. In contrast, other systems depend on system-wide protections. In providing conventional security, police patrol neighborhoods and the military secures borders, rather than defending each individual household. Likewise, in biology, the immune system provides security against viruses and bacteria using primarily action at the skin, membranes, and blood, rather than requiring each cell to defend itself. We propose applying these same principles to address the c...

  13. The timing of the human circadian clock is accurately represented by the core body temperature rhythm following phase shifts to a three-cycle light stimulus near the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, M. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    A double-stimulus experiment was conducted to evaluate the phase of the underlying circadian clock following light-induced phase shifts of the human circadian system. Circadian phase was assayed by constant routine from the rhythm in core body temperature before and after a three-cycle bright-light stimulus applied near the estimated minimum of the core body temperature rhythm. An identical, consecutive three-cycle light stimulus was then applied, and phase was reassessed. Phase shifts to these consecutive stimuli were no different from those obtained in a previous study following light stimuli applied under steady-state conditions over a range of circadian phases similar to those at which the consecutive stimuli were applied. These data suggest that circadian phase shifts of the core body temperature rhythm in response to a three-cycle stimulus occur within 24 h following the end of the 3-day light stimulus and that this poststimulus temperature rhythm accurately reflects the timing of the underlying circadian clock.

  14. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    to the advances in next generation sequencing, which has allowed for large-scale metagenomics studies of different niches of the human microbiota. Especially the gut microbiota has been studied intensively. However, most studies have been purely descriptive, thus there is still a lot to learn regarding...... the interplay between species in the microbiota and also between the host and the inhabiting microorganisms. Additionally, the non-bacterial part of the microbiota, which includes bacteriophages, plasmids and micro-eukaryotes, is not very well described. In this thesis, metagenomics data from the human gut......, nose and oral cavity has been analyzed. The central method has been a co-abundance clustering method, which separates genes from metagenomics data under the assumption that genes originating from the same DNA (e.g. a bacterial genome, a phage or a plasmid) will co-vary across samples. Thus, co...

  15. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  16. Molecular Genetics of Williams Syndrome: Windows into Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Korenberg

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is my favorite way of thinking: Williams syndrome seen through the eyes of a geneticist. Williams syndrome (WS) is the most compelling model in which to link the basis of human emotion and behavior to their biological origins. The explanatory power of human genetics in WS rests on the recent revolution in understanding the human genome but more specifically on the ability to link genetic with behavioral variation at high resolution. WS is due to the deletion of about 25 g...

  17. Melatonin in sleepless children : everything has a rhythm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    Every living organism has an biological clock regulating endogenous melatonin production, synchronized by exogenous impulses like daylight, temperature and feeding. Inappropriately applied bright light disturbs this melatonin rhythm. Some large swine producers apply artificial light three times a da

  18. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  19. The biology of human sexuality: evolution, ecology and physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PW Bateman

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Many evolutionary biologists argue that human sexual behaviour can be studied in exactly the same way as that of other species. Many sociologists argue that social influences effectively obscure, and are more important than, a reductionist biological approach to human sexual behaviour. Here,we authors attempt to provide a broad introduction to human sexual behaviour from a biological standpoint and to indicate where the ambiguous areas are. We outline the evolutionary selective pressures that are likely to have influenced human behaviour and mate choice in the past and in the present; ecological features that influence such things as degree of parental care and polygamy; and the associated physiology of human sexuality. Then they end with a discussion of �abnormal� sexuality.

  20. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for...

  1. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  2. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  3. Disrupted seasonal biology impacts health, food security and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. J.; Visser, M. E.; Arnold, W.; Barrett, P.; Biello, S.; Dawson, A.; Denlinger, D. L.; Dominoni, D.; Ebling, F. J.; Elton, S.; Evans, N.; Ferguson, H. M.; Foster, R. G.; Hau, M.; Haydon, D. T.; Hazlerigg, D. G.; Heideman, P.; Hopcraft, J. G. C.; Jonsson, N. N.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.; Kumar, V.; Lincoln, G. A.; MacLeod, R.; Martin, S. A. M.; Martinez-Bakker, M.; Nelson, R. J.; Reed, T.; Robinson, J. E.; Rock, D.; Schwartz, W. J.; Steffan-Dewenter, I.; Tauber, E.; Thackeray, S. J.; Umstatter, C.; Yoshimura, T.; Helm, B.

    2015-01-01

    The rhythm of life on earth is shaped by seasonal changes in the environment. Plants and animals show profound annual cycles in physiology, health, morphology, behaviour and demography in response to environmental cues. Seasonal biology impacts ecosystems and agriculture, with consequences for humans and biodiversity. Human populations show robust annual rhythms in health and well-being, and the birth month can have lasting effects that persist throughout life. This review emphasizes the need for a better understanding of seasonal biology against the backdrop of its rapidly progressing disruption through climate change, human lifestyles and other anthropogenic impact. Climate change is modifying annual rhythms to which numerous organisms have adapted, with potential consequences for industries relating to health, ecosystems and food security. Disconcertingly, human lifestyles under artificial conditions of eternal summer provide the most extreme example for disconnect from natural seasons, making humans vulnerable to increased morbidity and mortality. In this review, we introduce scenarios of seasonal disruption, highlight key aspects of seasonal biology and summarize from biomedical, anthropological, veterinary, agricultural and environmental perspectives the recent evidence for seasonal desynchronization between environmental factors and internal rhythms. Because annual rhythms are pervasive across biological systems, they provide a common framework for trans-disciplinary research. PMID:26468242

  4. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  5. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwolińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  6. Disrupted seasonal biology impacts health, food security, and ecosystems: a call for integrated research

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, T. J.; Visser, M.E; Arnold, W; Barrett, P; Biello, S; Dawson, A.; Denlinger, D. L.; Dominoni, D.; Ebling, F.J.; Elton, S.; Evans, N.; Ferguson, H M; Foster, R G; Hau, M.; Haydon, D.T.

    2015-01-01

    The rhythm of life on earth is shaped by seasonal changes in the environment. Plants and animals show profound annual cycles in physiology, health, morphology, behaviour and demography in response to environmental cues. Seasonal biology impacts ecosystems and agriculture, with consequences for humans and biodiversity. Human populations show robust annual rhythms in health and well-being, and the birth month can have lasting effects that persist throughout life. This review emphasizes the need...

  7. Biology of Human Papillomavirus–Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Jason D.; Chung, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent data show that human papillomavirus–positive oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) has a distinct biological and clinical behavior compared with human papillomavirus–negative OPC. As this subset of head and neck cancer represents an increasing public health concern, a thorough understanding of the causative and mechanistic differences between these diseases and how these distinctions impact clinical treatment is required. In this review, we will summarize recent data in epidemiology, the mechanis...

  8. Update on Human Herpesvirus 6 Biology, Clinical Features, and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    de Bolle, Leen; Naesens, Lieve; De Clercq, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a betaherpesvirus that is closely related to human cytomegalovirus. It was discovered in 1986, and HHV-6 literature has expanded considerably in the past 10 years. We here present an up-to-date and complete overview of the recent developments concerning HHV-6 biological features, clinical associations, and therapeutic approaches. HHV-6 gene expression regulation and gene products have been systematically characterized, and the multiple interactions between HHV-6...

  9. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rund, Samuel S C; O'Donnell, Aidan J; Gentile, James E; Reece, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control. PMID:27089370

  10. The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Gottesman, Kay S.; Goulding, Philip G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Micikas, Lynda B.; Mural, Richard J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zola, John

    This module, for high school teachers, is the second of two modules about the Human Genome Project (HGP) produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The first section of this module provides background information for teachers about the structure and objectives of the HGP, aspects of the science and technology that underlie the…

  11. Enhancing Biology Instruction with the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxeda, Rosa J.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a recent scientific milestone that has received notable attention. This article shows how a biology course is using the HGP to enhance students' experiences by providing awareness of cutting edge research, with information on new emerging career options, and with opportunities to consider ethical questions raised…

  12. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jackson, S.P.; Bartek, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 461, č. 7267 (2009), s. 1071-1078. ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * human disease * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 34.480, year: 2009

  13. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  14. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  15. A Causal Rhythm Grouping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a method to identify segment boundaries in music. The method is based on a multi-step model; first a features is measured from the audio, then a measure of rhythm is calculated from the feature, the diagonal of a self-similarity matrix is calculated, and finally the segment...

  16. Rhythm Sticks without Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 specific rhythm stick activities for preschoolers and kindergartners to increase children's awareness of basic music theory. Lessons incorporated in these activities include tempo, dynamics, intensity, laterality, and directionality. Lessons also address children's awareness of personal space and improved listening skills. Instructions…

  17. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  18. Rhythm information represented in the fronto-parieto-cerebellar motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoike, Naho; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyachi, Shigehiro; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Yomogida, Yukihito; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Kuraoka, Koji; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2012-10-15

    Rhythm is an essential element of human culture, particularly in language and music. To acquire language or music, we have to perceive the sensory inputs, organize them into structured sequences as rhythms, actively hold the rhythm information in mind, and use the information when we reproduce or mimic the same rhythm. Previous brain imaging studies have elucidated brain regions related to the perception and production of rhythms. However, the neural substrates involved in the working memory of rhythm remain unclear. In addition, little is known about the processing of rhythm information from non-auditory inputs (visual or tactile). Therefore, we measured brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy subjects memorized and reproduced auditory and visual rhythmic information. The inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum exhibited significant activations during both encoding and retrieving rhythm information. In addition, most of these areas exhibited significant activation also during the maintenance of rhythm information. All of these regions functioned in the processing of auditory and visual rhythms. The bilateral inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum are thought to be essential for motor control. When we listen to a certain rhythm, we are often stimulated to move our body, which suggests the existence of a strong interaction between rhythm processing and the motor system. Here, we propose that rhythm information may be represented and retained as information about bodily movements in the supra-modal motor brain system. PMID:22796994

  19. Social Rhythm Therapies for Mood Disorders: an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Patricia L; Gengler, Devan; Kelly, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Social rhythms are patterns of habitual daily behaviors that may impact the timing of the circadian system directly or indirectly through light exposure. According to the social rhythm hypothesis of depression, depressed individuals possess a vulnerability in the circadian timing system that inhibits natural recovery after disrupting life events. Social rhythm therapies (SRTs) support the implementation of regular, daily patterns of activity in order to facilitate recovery of circadian biological processes and also to improve mood. The majority of SRT research has examined interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) for bipolar disorder. Recent studies have examined IPSRT in inpatient settings, using alternative modes of delivery (group, combined individual and group, internet-based applications) and with brief timeframes. New forms of SRTs are developing that target mood in individuals who have experienced specific types of stressful life events. This manuscript reviews the theoretical and biological bases of SRTs and current literature on SRT outcomes. PMID:27338753

  20. Decellularized Human Skeletal Muscle as Biologic Scaffold for Reconstructive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Porzionato

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineered skeletal muscle tissues have been proposed as potential solutions for volumetric muscle losses, and biologic scaffolds have been obtained by decellularization of animal skeletal muscles. The aim of the present work was to analyse the characteristics of a biologic scaffold obtained by decellularization of human skeletal muscles (also through comparison with rats and rabbits and to evaluate its integration capability in a rabbit model with an abdominal wall defect. Rat, rabbit and human muscle samples were alternatively decellularized with two protocols: n.1, involving sodium deoxycholate and DNase I; n.2, trypsin-EDTA and Triton X-NH4OH. Protocol 2 proved more effective, removing all cellular material and maintaining the three-dimensional networks of collagen and elastic fibers. Ultrastructural analyses with transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the preservation of collagen, elastic fibres, glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans. Implantation of human scaffolds in rabbits gave good results in terms of integration, although recellularization by muscle cells was not completely achieved. In conclusion, human skeletal muscles may be effectively decellularized to obtain scaffolds preserving the architecture of the extracellular matrix and showing mechanical properties suitable for implantation/integration. Further analyses will be necessary to verify the suitability of these scaffolds for in vitro recolonization by autologous cells before in vivo implantation.

  1. Production of biologically active recombinant human lactoferrin in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P P; Lo, J Y; Duke, M; May, G S; Headon, D R; Conneely, O M

    1992-07-01

    We report the production of recombinant human lactoferrin in Aspergillus oryzae. Expression of human lactoferrin (hLF), a 78 kD glycoprotein, was achieved by placing the cDNA under the control of the A. oryzae alpha-amylase promoter and the 3' flanking region of the A. niger glucoamylase gene. Using this system, hLF is expressed and secreted into the growth medium at levels up to 25 mg/l. The recombinant lactoferrin is indistinguishable from human milk lactoferrin with respect to its size, immunoreactivity, and iron-binding capacity. The recombinant protein appears to be appropriately N-linked glycosylated and correctly processed at the N-terminus by the A. oryzae secretory apparatus. Lactoferrin is the largest heterologous protein and the first mammalian glycoprotein expressed in the Aspergillus system to date. Hence, this expression system appears suitable for the large-scale production and secretion of biologically active mammalian glycoproteins. PMID:1368268

  2. Relation between functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who do and do not stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Chow, Ho Ming; Wieland, Elizabeth A; McAuley, J Devin

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to perceive and produce rhythmic patterns in the environment supports fundamental human capacities ranging from music and language processing to the coordination of action. This article considers whether spontaneous correlated brain activity within a basal ganglia-thalamocortical (rhythm) network is associated with individual differences in auditory rhythm discrimination. Moreover, do children who stutter with demonstrated deficits in rhythm perception have weaker links between rhythm network functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination? All children in the study underwent a resting-state fMRI session, from which functional connectivity measures within the rhythm network were extracted from spontaneous brain activity. In a separate session, the same children completed an auditory rhythm-discrimination task, where behavioral performance was assessed using signal detection analysis. We hypothesized that in typically developing children, rhythm network functional connectivity would be associated with behavioral performance on the rhythm discrimination task, but that this relationship would be attenuated in children who stutter. Results supported our hypotheses, lending strong support for the view that (1) children who stutter have weaker rhythm network connectivity and (2) the lack of a relation between rhythm network connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who stutter may be an important contributing factor to the etiology of stuttering. PMID:27622141

  3. Electron microscopic analysis of the specific granule content of human atria. An investigation of the role of atrial pressure and atrial rhythm in the release of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubell, A F; Greeff, M P; Rossouw, D J; Weich, H F

    1990-08-18

    Knowledge about the stimulus for the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) from human atria is incomplete. Atrial stretch is known to be a stimulus and atrial tachyarrhythmias are thought to be another. The effects of atrial size (by two-dimensional echocardiography) and atrial fibrillation on the atrial specific granule content of human atria were studied to gain insight into the secretory mechanisms of ANP. An electron microscopic analysis of the atrial granule content was used to study 12 patients--5 with mitral stenosis and sinus rhythm, 3 with mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation and 4 controls. Granules were counted using a free count and montage method. This is the first report of such a morphometric analysis in humans. Granule counts were significantly raised in the patients with mitral stenosis compared with controls (P less than 0.014). This observation probably reflects a high turnover state induced by elevated atrial pressures. Further support for this conclusion is provided by the demonstration of a positive correlation between granule counts and left atrial size (r = 0.86; P less than 0.01). The tendency for higher counts in patients with atrial fibrillation may be related to the rhythm disturbance itself, but clinical and echocardiographic data suggest more severe atrial pressure overload in this group. PMID:2143315

  4. Modelling Complexity in Musical Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Wu, Tai-Hei; Lee, Chia-Ying

    2007-01-01

    This paper constructs a tree structure for the music rhythm using the L-system. It models the structure as an automata and derives its complexity. It also solves the complexity for the L-system. This complexity can resolve the similarity between trees. This complexity serves as a measure of psychological complexity for rhythms. It resolves the music complexity of various compositions including the Mozart effect K488. Keyword: music perception, psychological complexity, rhythm, L-system, autom...

  5. "Bird Song Metronomics": Isochronous Organization of Zebra Finch Song Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Philipp; Scharff, Constance

    2016-01-01

    The human capacity for speech and vocal music depends on vocal imitation. Songbirds, in contrast to non-human primates, share this vocal production learning with humans. The process through which birds and humans learn many of their vocalizations as well as the underlying neural system exhibit a number of striking parallels and have been widely researched. In contrast, rhythm, a key feature of language, and music, has received surprisingly little attention in songbirds. Investigating temporal periodicity in bird song has the potential to inform the relationship between neural mechanisms and behavioral output and can also provide insight into the biology and evolution of musicality. Here we present a method to analyze birdsong for an underlying rhythmic regularity. Using the intervals from one note onset to the next as input, we found for each bird an isochronous sequence of time stamps, a "signal-derived pulse," or pulse(S), of which a subset aligned with all note onsets of the bird's song. Fourier analysis corroborated these results. To determine whether this finding was just a byproduct of the duration of notes and intervals typical for zebra finches but not dependent on the individual duration of elements and the sequence in which they are sung, we compared natural songs to models of artificial songs. Note onsets of natural song deviated from the pulse(S) significantly less than those of artificial songs with randomized note and gap durations. Thus, male zebra finch song has the regularity required for a listener to extract a perceived pulse (pulse(P)), as yet untested. Strikingly, in our study, pulses(S) that best fit note onsets often also coincided with the transitions between sub-note elements within complex notes, corresponding to neuromuscular gestures. Gesture durations often equaled one or more pulse(S) periods. This suggests that gesture duration constitutes the basic element of the temporal hierarchy of zebra finch song rhythm, an interesting parallel

  6. Modelling of biological transport of radionuclides in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents several camera models describing biological transfer processes of manmade radionuclides in the human body. Two dosimetric camera models of the respiratory system are shown. The models are valid for aerosols with Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) from 0.1 μ to 10 μ (ICRP Publication 30) and from 0.001 mm to 100 mm (ICRP Publication 66) respectively. The gastrointestinal tract model (ICRP Publication 30) is briefly described. From the systemic models for radionuclides transfer from body fluids to different organs and tissues, the Cesium model (ICRP Publication 30) is presented in details

  7. A Systems Biology Approach to the Human Hair Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Nuaimi, Yusur Mamoon

    2011-01-01

    “A Systems Biology Approach to the Human Hair Cycle”. A thesis submitted to The University of Manchester for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Yusur Mamoon Al-Nuaimi, 2011.The hair cycle represents a dynamic process during which a complex mini- organ, the hair follicle, rhythmically regresses and regenerates. The control mechanism that governs the hair cycle (“hair cycle clock”) is thought to be an autonomous oscillator system, however, its exact nature is not known. This thesis aims to u...

  8. Figure out the Rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    Thinking in numbers, figures and systems plays a central part in our - at least scientific – understanding of musical matters. The kind of pre-order that the numbers - and also the systemic thinking - bring along seem to facilitate the access to and dealings with what we understand as fundamental......, we arithmetically acknowledge as rhythms. However, the complex - but mostly unquestioned – figure bound systematism that hereby emerges - in which different or alternating regularities and irregularities are organised in apparently homogeneous regularities - appears to define the objects it claims to...

  9. New methodologies of biological dosimetry applied to human protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry is a diagnostic methodology for the measurement of the individual dose absorbed in the case of accidental overexposition to ionizing radiation. It is demonstrated how in vitro radiobiological and chemobiological studies using cytogenetic methods (count of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) on human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and individuals undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy, as well as on lymphocytes of mammals other than man (comparative cytogenetics), can help to increase the basic radiobiological and chemobiological scientific information. Such information gives a valid contribution to understanding of the action of ionizing radiation or of pharmaceuticals on cells and, in return, can be of value to human radioprotection and chemoprotection. Cytogenetic studies can be summerized as follows: a) biodosimetry (estimate of dose received after accidental events); b) individual radiosensitivity (level of individual response); c) clinical radiobiology and chemobiology (individual response to radiopharmaceuticals, to radiotherapy and to chemopharmaceuticals); d) comparative radiobiology (cytogenetic studies on species other than man); e) animal model in the environmental surveillance

  10. Chronotypes and rhythm stability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; Ackermann, Hanns; Ekhart, Daniel; Fischer, Claudia; Pfeffer, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes: The phase of their sleep-wake cycle with respect to the phase of the external, sidereal cycle of night and day differs. Colloquially, the early chronotypes are addressed as "larks," the late ones as "owls." The human chronotype can be quantified in hours and minutes of local time by determining the median of the sleep phase. Demographically, early and late human chronotypes differ with respect to the stability of their rhythms and the prevalence of several widespread diseases and risk factors, such as depression, nicotine abuse, and others. Inbred mice are widely used in chronobiological research as model organisms, but up to now there was no way to chronotype them. We have developed a method to chronotype mice in hours and fractions of hours by measuring the median of activity (MoA) and have shown that different mouse strains have significantly different MoAs and, thus, chronotypes. We have further developed methods to estimate the stability of the behavioral rhythms and found that "late" mice have relatively instable rhythms. Our methods permit the use of inbred mice for investigations into the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. PMID:24079808

  11. Casual Games and Casual Learning About Human Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C. Aaron; Gean, Katherine; Christensen, Claire G.; Beheshti, Elham; Pernot, Bryn; Segovia, Gloria; Person, Halcyon; Beasley, Steven; Ward, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Casual games are everywhere. People play them throughout life to pass the time, to engage in social interactions, and to learn. However, their simplicity and use in distraction-heavy environments can attenuate their potential for learning. This experimental study explored the effects playing an online, casual game has on awareness of human biological systems. Two hundred and forty-two children were given pretests at a Museum and posttests at home after playing either a treatment or control game. Also, 41 children were interviewed to explore deeper meanings behind the test results. Results show modest improvement in scientific attitudes, ability to identify human biological systems and in the children's ability to describe how those systems work together in real-world scenarios. Interviews reveal that children drew upon their prior school learning as they played the game. Also, on the surface they perceived the game as mainly entertainment but were easily able to discern learning outcomes when prompted. Implications for the design of casual games and how they can be used to enhance transfer of knowledge from the classroom to everyday life are discussed.

  12. Properties of VIP+ synapses in the suprachiasmatic nucleus highlight their role in circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilly, Nathan P

    2016-06-01

    Circadian rhythms coordinate cyclical behavioral and physiological changes in most organisms. In humans, this biological clock is located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and consists of a heterogeneous neuron population characterized by their enriched expression of various neuropeptides. As highlighted here, Fan et al. (J Neurosci 35: 1905-1029, 2015) developed an elegant experimental system to investigate the synaptic properties of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons between day and night, and further delineate their broader architecture and function within the SCN. PMID:26581865

  13. Cyclic Variations in Sustained Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, William R.; Arruda, James E.; Kass, Steven J.; Stanny, Claudia J.

    2009-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a prominent role in the modulation of human physiology and behavior. [Smith, K., Valentino, D., & Arruda, J. (2003). "Rhythmic oscillations in the performance of a sustained attention task." "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology," 25, 561-570] suggested that sustained human performance may systematically…

  14. [Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottai, T; Biloa-Tang, M; Christophe, S; Dupuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rahioui, H; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is common, recurrent, often severe and debiliting disorder. All types of bipolar disorder have a common determinant: depressive episode. It is justify to propose a psychotherapy which shown efficacy in depression. Howewer, perturbations in circadian rhythms have been implicated in the genesis of each episode of the illness. Biological circadian dysregulation can be encouraged by alteration of time-givers (Zeitgebers) or occurrence of time-disturbers (Zeitstörers). Addition of social rhythm therapy to interpersonal psychotherapy leads to create a new psychotherapy adaptated to bipolar disorders: InterPersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT). IPSRT, in combinaison with medication, has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for bipolar disorders. IPSRT combines psychoeducation, behavioral strategy to regularize daily routines and interpersonal psychotherapy which help patients cope better with the multiple psychosocial and relationship problems associated with this chronic disorder. The main issues of this psychotherapy are: to take the history of the patient's illness and review of medication, to help patient for "grief for the lost healthy self" translated in the french version in "acceptance of a long-term medical condition", to give the sick role, to examinate the current relationships and changes proximal to the emergence of mood symptoms in the four problem areas (unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transitions, role déficits), to examinate and increase daily routines and social rhythms. French version of IPSRT called TIPARS (with few differences), a time-limited psychotherapy, in 24 sessions during approximatively 6 months, is conducted in three phases. In the initial phase, the therapist takes a thorough history of previous episodes and their interpersonal context and a review of previous medication, provides psychoeducation, evaluates social rhythms, introduces the Social Rhythm Metric, identifies the patient's main interpersonal

  15. 近日节律对麻醉药物作用的影响%Effect of circadian rhythms on the action of anaesthetic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾海波; 尚游; 袁世荧

    2010-01-01

    多数麻醉医生认为,人体是一个非常稳定的有机体.事实上,机体的许多方面因为受到生物节律的影响而会表现出周期性的变化.近日节律是一种重要的生物节律,对动植物乃至人都有诸多重要的影响,这其中也包括对麻醉药物作用的影响.因此,在从事科学研究和临床工作时,近日节律对麻醉药物作用的这种影响不容忽视.%Many anaesthetists assume that humans are homeostatic organisms but in reality we show periodic variations in nearly all facets of our physiology and behaviour, influenced by biologic rhythms. Circadian rhythms is an important biologic rhythm which can affect animals, plants and human beings. Also it make effects on anesthetics, The effects of circadian rhythms should be considered in scientific research of anaesthetic drugs and works of clinical practice of anaesthesia.

  16. Human genome project: revolutionizing biology through leveraging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Carol A.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    1996-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international project to develop genetic, physical, and sequence-based maps of the human genome. Since the inception of the HGP it has been clear that substantially improved technology would be required to meet the scientific goals, particularly in order to acquire the complete sequence of the human genome, and that these technologies coupled with the information forthcoming from the project would have a dramatic effect on the way biomedical research is performed in the future. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art for genomic DNA sequencing, technological challenges that remain, and the potential technological paths that could yield substantially improved genomic sequencing technology. The impact of the technology developed from the HGP is broad-reaching and a discussion of other research and medical applications that are leveraging HGP-derived DNA analysis technologies is included. The multidisciplinary approach to the development of new technologies that has been successful for the HGP provides a paradigm for facilitating new genomic approaches toward understanding the biological role of functional elements and systems within the cell, including those encoded within genomic DNA and their molecular products.

  17. Circadian rhythms in cognitive performance: implications for neuropsychological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdez P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Valdez, Candelaria Ramírez, Aída GarcíaLaboratory of Psychophysiology, School of Psychology, University of Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, MéxicoAbstract: Circadian variations have been found in human performance, including the efficiency to execute many tasks, such as sensory, motor, reaction time, time estimation, memory, verbal, arithmetic calculations, and simulated driving tasks. Performance increases during the day and decreases during the night. Circadian rhythms have been found in three basic neuropsychological processes (attention, working memory, and executive functions, which may explain oscillations in the performance of many tasks. The time course of circadian rhythms in cognitive performance may be modified significantly in patients with brain disorders, due to chronotype, age, alterations of the circadian rhythm, sleep deprivation, type of disorder, and medication. This review analyzes the recent results on circadian rhythms in cognitive performance, as well as the implications of these rhythms for the neuropsychological assessment of patients with brain disorders such as traumatic head injury, stroke, dementia, developmental disorders, and psychiatric disorders.Keywords: human circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, neuropsychological assessment, attention, working memory, executive functions

  18. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Human Services that applicant did not act with due diligence; (iii) One-half the number of days... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human...

  19. Modeling human risk: Cell ampersand molecular biology in context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response

  20. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  1. Tubulin acetylation: responsible enzymes, biological functions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules have important functions ranging from maintenance of cell morphology to subcellular transport, cellular signaling, cell migration, and formation of cell polarity. At the organismal level, microtubules are crucial for various biological processes, such as viral entry, inflammation, immunity, learning and memory in mammals. Microtubules are subject to various covalent modifications. One such modification is tubulin acetylation, which is associated with stable microtubules and conserved from protists to humans. In the past three decades, this reversible modification has been studied extensively. In mammals, its level is mainly governed by opposing actions of α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (ATAT1) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Knockout studies of the mouse enzymes have yielded new insights into biological functions of tubulin acetylation. Abnormal levels of this modification are linked to neurological disorders, cancer, heart diseases and other pathological conditions, thereby yielding important therapeutic implications. This review summarizes related studies and concludes that tubulin acetylation is important for regulating microtubule architecture and maintaining microtubule integrity. Together with detyrosination, glutamylation and other modifications, tubulin acetylation may form a unique 'language' to regulate microtubule structure and function. PMID:26227334

  2. Biological effect of carbon beams on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to determine the biological effect of carbon beams on 13 human tumor cells, in comparison with 200 KVp X-rays. Carbon beams were generated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron. The RBE (relative biological effectiveness) values were distributed from 1.46 to 2.20 for LET of 20 keV/μm, and 2.29-3.54 for 80 keV/μm. The RBEs were increased in all cell lines as the LET of carbon beams was increased from 20 to 80 keV/μm. There was no significant difference in radiosensitivity between cells from adenocarcinoma and those from squamous cell carcinoma. The relationship between the radiosensitivity of cells to X-rays and RBE was analyzed, but no significant correlation was suggested. Several survival curves of 20-40 keV/μm carbon beam irradiation showed the initial shoulders and the recovery ratios between two split doses were determined. Recovery was observed for LET of 2O keV/μm but not for that of 40 keV/μm. Furthermore, recovery ratios were 1.0-1.8, smaller than those for X-rays (1.5-2.4). (author)

  3. Can chimpanzee biology highlight human origin and evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-07-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily "Homininae". This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human-chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine's subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  4. An ESR study on biological dosimeters: Human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, characteristic features of the radicals found in untreated, gamma and UV-irradiated and mechanical damaged human hair samples were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Heights of the resonance peaks measured with respect to the spectrum base line were used to monitor microwave power, dose-response, storage time and temperature dependent kinetic features of the radical species contributing to the formation of recorded experimental ESR spectra. Peak heights and g-values (2.0037-2.0052) determined from recorded spectra of hair were color dependent with ΔHpp-0.47 mT. The act of cutting hair samples gene rates sulfur centered radicals which are found in the a-keratin structure of hair. The variations of the peak heights with temperature were related with the water content found in the hair samples. In the 6-1100 Gy dose range, a linear + quadratic dose-response curve was recorded for hair and the mean radiation yield (Gmean) was calculated to be 0.4. The gamma radiation induced radicals were stable for a several hours at room temperature storage conditions. Based on these findings it was concluded that human hair samples could be used as biological/personnel dosimeters and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring its dosimetric behaviours.

  5. An ESR study on biological dosimeters: Human hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colak, Seyda, E-mail: seyda@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Physics Engineering Department, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozbey, Turan [Hacettepe University, Physics Engineering Department, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    In the present work, characteristic features of the radicals found in untreated, gamma and UV-irradiated and mechanical damaged human hair samples were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Heights of the resonance peaks measured with respect to the spectrum base line were used to monitor microwave power, dose-response, storage time and temperature dependent kinetic features of the radical species contributing to the formation of recorded experimental ESR spectra. Peak heights and g-values (2.0037-2.0052) determined from recorded spectra of hair were color dependent with {Delta}Hpp-0.47 mT. The act of cutting hair samples gene rates sulfur centered radicals which are found in the a-keratin structure of hair. The variations of the peak heights with temperature were related with the water content found in the hair samples. In the 6-1100 Gy dose range, a linear + quadratic dose-response curve was recorded for hair and the mean radiation yield (G{sub mean}) was calculated to be 0.4. The gamma radiation induced radicals were stable for a several hours at room temperature storage conditions. Based on these findings it was concluded that human hair samples could be used as biological/personnel dosimeters and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring its dosimetric behaviours.

  6. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Malaysia Mexico Monaco Morocco Netherlands New Zealand Norway Oman ... info@HRSonline.org © Heart Rhythm Society 2016 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You are about ...

  7. Circadian Rhythm Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  8. Rhythm Disturbances in the Aerospace Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A number of rhythm disorders such as sinus arrhythmia, premature ventricular contractions, premature atrial contractions and sinus bradycardia and heart rate alterations may be seen under +Gz. The shift in autonomic balance may lead to alterations in cardiac rhythm and heart rate. The significance of these rhythm disturbances is not yet fully understood. In this manuscript the rhythm disturbances in the aerospace medicine were reviewed.Key Words: Aerospace medicine; rhythm disturbances; gravity

  9. Methemoglobin-Based Biological Dose Assessment for Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Zhao, Su-Ying; Xie, Li-Hua; Miao, Yu-Ji; Li, Qun; Min, Rui; Liu, Pei-Dang; Zhang, Hai-Qian

    2016-07-01

    Methemoglobin is an oxidative form of hemoglobin in erythrocytes. The authors' aim was to develop a new biological dosimeter based on a methemoglobin assay. Methemoglobin in peripheral blood (of females or males) that was exposed to a Co source (0.20 Gy min) was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The dose range was 0.5-8.0 Gy. In a time-course experiment, the time points 0, 0.02, 1, 2, 3, 7, 15, 21, and 30 d after 4-Gy irradiation of heparinized peripheral blood were used. Methemoglobin levels in a lysed erythrocyte pellet from the irradiated blood of females and males increased with the increasing dose. Methemoglobin levels in female blood irradiated with γ-doses more than 4 Gy were significantly higher than those in male samples at the same doses. Two dose-response relations were fitted to the straight line: one is with the correlation coefficient of 0.98 for females, and the other is with the correlation coefficient of 0.99 for males. The lower limit of dose assessment based on methemoglobin is about 1 Gy. Methemoglobin levels in blood as a result of auto-oxidation increase after 7-d storage at -20 °C. The upregulation of methemoglobin induced by γ-radiation persists for ∼3 d. The absorbed doses that were estimated using the two dose-response relations were close to the actual doses. The results suggest that methemoglobin can be used as a rapid and accurate biological dosimeter for early assessment of absorbed γ-dose in human blood. PMID:27218292

  10. 'The clocks that time us'-circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videnovic, A.; Lazar, A.S.; Barker, R.A.; Overeem, S.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep-wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodeg

  11. Biological evaluation of recombinant human erythropoietin in pharmaceutical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The potencies of mammalian cell-derived recombinant human erythropoietin pharmaceutical preparations, from a total of five manufacturers, were assessed by in vivo bioassay using standardized protocols. Eight-week-old normocythemic mice received a single subcutaneous injection followed by blood sampling 96 h later or multiple daily injections with blood sampling 24 h after the last injection. Reticulocyte counting by microscopic examination was employed as the end-point using the brilliant cresyl blue or selective hemolysis methods, together with automated flow cytometry. Different injection schedules were investigated and dose-response curves for the European Pharmacopoeia Biological Reference Preparation of erythropoietin were compared. Manual and automated methods of reticulocyte counting were correlated with respect to assay validity and precision. Using 8 mice per treatment group, intra-assay precision determined for all of the assays in the study showed coefficients of variation of 12.1-28.4% for the brilliant cresyl blue method, 14.1-30.8% for the selective hemolysis method and 8.5-19.7% for the flow cytometry method. Applying the single injection protocol, a combination of at least two independent assays was required to achieve the precision potency and confidence limits indicated by the manufacturers, while the multiple daily injection protocol yielded the same acceptable results within a single assay. Although the latter protocol using flow cytometry for reticulocyte counting gave more precise and reproducible results (intra-assay coefficients of variation: 5.9-14.2%, the well-characterized manual methods provide equally valid alternatives for the quality control of recombinant human erythropoietin therapeutic products.

  12. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  13. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Roffman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  14. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-01-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  15. Seasonal variations in daily rhythms of activity in athletic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, C; Giannetto, C; Fazio, F; Piccione, G

    2008-07-01

    Circadian rhythms reflect extensive programming of biological activity that meets and exploits the challenges and opportunities offered by the periodic nature of the environment. In the present investigation, we recorded the total activity of athletic horses kept at four different times of the year (vernal equinox, summer solstice, autumn equinox and winter solstice), to evaluate the presence of seasonal variations of daily activity rhythms. Athletic Thoroughbred horses were kept in individual boxes with paddock. Digitally integrated measure of total activity of each mare was continuously recorded by actigraphy-based data loggers. Horse total activities were not evenly distributed over the day, but they were mainly diurnal during the year. Daily activity rhythms showed clear seasonal variations, with the highest daily amount of activity during the vernal equinox and the lowest during the winter solstice. Interestingly, the amount of activity during either photophase or scotophase changed significantly throughout the year. Circadian analysis of horse activities showed that the acrophase, the estimated time at which the peak of the rhythm occurs, did not change during the year, it always occurred in the middle of the photoperiod. Analysing the time structure of long-term and continuously measured activity and feeding could be a useful method to critically evaluate athletic horse management systems in which spontaneous locomotor activity and feeding are severely limited. Circadian rhythms are present in several elements of sensory motor and psychomotor functions and these would be taken into consideration to plan the training schedules and competitions in athletic horses. PMID:22443706

  16. Human development I: Twenty Fundamental Problems of Biology, Medicine, and Neuro-Psychology Related to Biological Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyge Dahl Hermansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a new series of papers, we address a number of unsolved problems in biology today. First of all, the unsolved enigma concerning how the differentiation from a single zygote to an adult individual happens has been object for severe research for decades. By uncovering a new holistic biological paradigm that introduces an energetic-informational interpretation of reality as a new way to experience biology, these papers will try to solve the problems connected with the events of biological ontogenesis involving a fractal hierarchy, from a single cell to the function of the human brain. The problems discussed are interpreted within the frames of a universe of roomy fractal structures containing energetic patterns that are able to deliver biological information. We think biological organization is guided by energetic changes on the level of quantum mechanics, interacting with the intention that again guides the energetic conformation of the fractal structures to gain disorders or healthiness. Furthermore, we introduce two new concepts: “metamorphous top down” evolution and “adult human metamorphosis”. The first is a new evolutionary theory involving metamorphosis as a main concept of evolution. The last is tightly linked to the evolutionary principle and explains how human self-recovery is governed. Other subjects of special interest that we shall look deeper into are the immunological self-nonself discrimination, the structure and function of the human brain, the etiology and salutogenesis of mental and somatic diseases, and the structure of the consciousness of a human being. We shall criticize Szentagothai’s model for the modulated structure of the human cerebral cortex and Jerne’s theory of the immunological regulatory anti-idiotypic network.

  17. Moving Towards Interpretable Mechanisms in Human Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    A detailed understanding of biomolecular mechanisms enables predictive modeling in biological systems. In the late 1990's, whole-genome sequencing and the development of various high-throughput technologies led to the emergence of systems biology, primarily in simple model organisms such as bacteria and yeast. Mechanisms between biological components and processes were cataloged and placed in mathematical frameworks to explain the role of genotype and environmental factors on phenotypes. Some...

  18. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26820249

  19. Computed Tomography of the Human Pineal Gland for Study of the Sleep-Wake Rhythm: Reproducibility of a Semi-Quantitative Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose a semi-quantitative computed tomography (CT) protocol for determining uncalcified pineal tissue (UCPT), and to evaluate its reproducibility in modification of studies showing that the degree of calcification is a potential marker of deficient melatonin production and may prove an instability marker of circadian rhythm. Material and Methods: Twenty-two pineal gland autopsy specimens were scanned in a skull phantom with different slice thickness twice and the uncalcified tissue visually assessed using a four-point scale. The maximum gland density was measured and its inverse graded on a non-linear four-point scale. The sum of both scores was multiplied by the gland volume to yield the UCPT. The within-subject variance of UCPT was determined and compared between scans of different slice thickness. Results: The UCPT of the first measurement, in arbitrary units, was 39±52.5 for 1 mm slice thickness, 44±51.1 for 2 mm, 45±34.8 for 4 mm, and 84±58.0 for 8 mm. Significant differences of within-subject variance of UCPT were found between 1 and 4 mm, 1 and 8 mm, and 2 and 8 mm slice thicknesses ( P <0.05). Conclusion: A superior reproducibility of the semi-quantitative CT determination of UCPT was found using 1 and 2 mm slice thicknesses. These data support the use of thin slices of 1 and 2 mm. The benefit in reproducibility from thin slices has to be carefully weighted against their considerably higher radiation exposure

  20. Computed Tomography of the Human Pineal Gland for Study of the Sleep-Wake Rhythm: Reproducibility of a Semi-Quantitative Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, S.A.; Platzek, I.; Kunz, D.; Mahlberg, R.; Wolf, K.J.; Heidenreich, J.O. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a semi-quantitative computed tomography (CT) protocol for determining uncalcified pineal tissue (UCPT), and to evaluate its reproducibility in modification of studies showing that the degree of calcification is a potential marker of deficient melatonin production and may prove an instability marker of circadian rhythm. Material and Methods: Twenty-two pineal gland autopsy specimens were scanned in a skull phantom with different slice thickness twice and the uncalcified tissue visually assessed using a four-point scale. The maximum gland density was measured and its inverse graded on a non-linear four-point scale. The sum of both scores was multiplied by the gland volume to yield the UCPT. The within-subject variance of UCPT was determined and compared between scans of different slice thickness. Results: The UCPT of the first measurement, in arbitrary units, was 39{+-}52.5 for 1 mm slice thickness, 44{+-}51.1 for 2 mm, 45{+-}34.8 for 4 mm, and 84{+-}58.0 for 8 mm. Significant differences of within-subject variance of UCPT were found between 1 and 4 mm, 1 and 8 mm, and 2 and 8 mm slice thicknesses ( P <0.05). Conclusion: A superior reproducibility of the semi-quantitative CT determination of UCPT was found using 1 and 2 mm slice thicknesses. These data support the use of thin slices of 1 and 2 mm. The benefit in reproducibility from thin slices has to be carefully weighted against their considerably higher radiation exposure.

  1. Disrupted seasonal biology impacts health, food security, and ecosystems: a call for integrated research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, T.J.; Visser, M.E.; Arnold, W.; Barrett, P.; Biello, S.; Dawson, A.; Denlinger, D.L.; Dominoni, D.; Ebling, F.J.; Elton, S.; Evans, N.; Ferguson, H.M.; Foster, R.G.; Hau, M.; Haydon, D.T.; Hazlerigg, D.G.; Heideman, P.; Hopcraft, J.G.C.; Jonsson, N.N.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.; Kumar, V.; Lincoln, G.A.; MacLeod, R.; Martin, S.A.M.; Martinez-Bakker, M.; Nelson, R.J.; Reed, T.; Robinso, J.E.; Rock, D.; Schwartz, W.J.; Steffan-Dewenter, I.; Tauber, E.; Thackeray, S.J.; Umstatter, C.; Yoshimura, T.; Helm, B.

    2015-01-01

    The rhythm of life on earth is shaped by seasonal changes in the environment. Plants and animals show profound annual cycles in physiology, health, morphology, behaviour and demography in response to environmental cues. Seasonal biology impacts ecosystems and agriculture, with consequences for human

  2. Comparison of English Language Rhythm and Kalhori Kurdish Language Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Taghva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating on quantitative features of languages rhythm is a recent issue that attracts the attention of linguists. Interval-based method is a method of studying the rhythmic quantitative features of languages. This method use Pairwise Variability Index (PVI to consider the variability of vocalic duration and inter-vocalic duration of sentences which leads to classification of languages rhythm into stress-timed languages and syllable-timed ones. This study aims to consider the rhythm of British English and Kalhori Kurdish, which is spoken in some part of west of Iran, based on interval-based method. In order to reach this aim the duration variability of vocalic interval and inter-vocalic interval of English and Kalhori Kurdish are measured by PVI. Afterward the outcomes of this study were compared to the existed results of other languages. The results of this research demonstrated that the rhythmic quantitative features of these two languages are placed among stress-timed languages.  Keywords: Rhythm, interval-based method, syllable-timed, stress-timed

  3. Rhythm as Knowledge-Translation, Knowledge as Rhythm-Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Robinson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores Henri Meschonnic’s conception of rhythm as a vehicle of subjectivization—but specifically of intersubjectization, and thus as a key channel of knowledge transfer or knowledge translation. Because we experience rhythm in time, knowledge-translation that comes to us as rhythm-as-intersubjectivization is experienced serially; because it is a phenomenology of body-becoming-mind, it is experienced kinesthetically-becoming-affectively-becoming-conatively, which is to say, in the model this paper develops, “icotically”—through the collective move toward the normativization of opinion as “truth” or “fact”. Key to knowledge-translation-as-rhythm is the ear, which is the icotic agent of the group in each individual, that which helps us hear style as truth. The first question for knowledge-translation, how many subjects it creates—one for each text (source and target? one for each reader? one for each reading?—is superseded by the icotic take on subjectivization, which collectivizes it, meaning that the exact number is less important than the social entelechies in which subjects participate.

  4. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles. (paper)

  5. Pathophysiology and pathogenesis of circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hida Akiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic, physiological and behavioral processes exhibit 24-hour rhythms in most organisms, including humans. These rhythms are driven by a system of self-sustained clocks and are entrained by environmental cues such as light-dark cycles as well as food intake. In mammals, the circadian clock system is hierarchically organized such that the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus integrates environmental information and synchronizes the phase of oscillators in peripheral tissues. The transcription and translation feedback loops of multiple clock genes are involved in the molecular mechanism of the circadian system. Disturbed circadian rhythms are known to be closely related to many diseases, including sleep disorders. Advanced sleep phase type, delayed sleep phase type and nonentrained type of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs are thought to result from disorganization of the circadian system. Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is indispensable to understanding the pathophysiology of CRSD. It is laborious and costly to assess an individual's circadian properties precisely, however, because the subject is usually required to stay in a laboratory environment free from external cues and masking effects for a minimum of several weeks. More convenient measurements of circadian rhythms are therefore needed to reduce patients' burden. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of CRSD as well as surrogate measurements for assessing an individual's circadian phenotype.

  6. Circadian rhythms and addiction: mechanistic insights and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ryan W; Williams, Wilbur P; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug-induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  7. Pattern entropy a tool for nonlinear dynamics analysis of a biological nonstationary system: the human heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tools for a nonlinear analysis of the dynamics of the rhythm of the human heart are discussed. Three-dimensional images in the phase space are formed by means of the Takens trajectory reconstruction method of 24-h sequences of time intervals between heart beats (RR intervals). Best projections of these images are sought and a surprising high symmetry is found for some types of pathology. The effects of filtering of arrhythmias on the symmetry is demonstrated. Images of RR intervals are also made in time window of 100 -400 beats and examples of such images preceding cardiac death are given. A new quantitative tool for the analysis of the local time degree of ordering of RR sequences - pattern entropy - is briefly discussed. (author)

  8. Pattern entropy a tool for nonlinear dynamics analysis of a biological nonstationary system: the human heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebrowski, J.J. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Poplawska, W.; Baranowski, R. [National Inst. of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-06-01

    Tools for a nonlinear analysis of the dynamics of the rhythm of the human heart are discussed. Three-dimensional images in the phase space are formed by means of the Takens trajectory reconstruction method of 24-h sequences of time intervals between heart beats (RR intervals). Best projections of these images are sought and a surprising high symmetry is found for some types of pathology. The effects of filtering of arrhythmias on the symmetry is demonstrated. Images of RR intervals are also made in time window of 100 -400 beats and examples of such images preceding cardiac death are given. A new quantitative tool for the analysis of the local time degree of ordering of RR sequences - pattern entropy - is briefly discussed. (author). 7 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab.

  9. The Biological Unity of Mankind: Human Ethology, Concepts and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl-Eibesfeldt, Irenaus

    1977-01-01

    Compares inborn behavior patterns of animals and humans, and argues that all human behavior is not shaped by environment and culture. A cross-cultural comparison of human motor patterns is described in order to substantiate the author's argument that man's behavior is not entirely learned. (AV)

  10. Light and Gravity Effects on Circadian Rhythms of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Temporal integration of a biological organism's physiological, behavioral and biochemical systems depends upon its circadian timing system. The endogenous period of this timing system is typically synchronized to the 24- hour day by environmental cues. The daily alternation of light and dark has long been known as one of the most potent environmental synchronizers influencing the circadian timing system. Alterations in the lighting environment (length or intensity of light exposure) can also affect the homeostatic state of the organism. A series of experiments was performed using rhesus monkeys with the objective of defining the fundamental properties of the circadian rhythm of body temperature. Three major experiments were performed in addition to several preliminary studies. These experiments explored 1.) the response of the rhesus body temperature rhythm to varying day length and light intensity; 2.) the response of the body temperature rhythm to light exposure as a function of time of day; and 3.) the characteristics of the metabolic heat production rhythm which is responsible for the daily cycle in body temperature. Results of these three completed experiments will be reported here. In addition, preliminary experiments were also performed in social entrainment of rhesus circadian rhythms and the properties of rhesus body temperature rhythms in constant conditions, where no external time cues were provided. Four adult male rhesus monkeys served as subjects in all experiments. All experiments were performed at the California Regional Primate Research Center. Each animal was implanted with a biotelemetry unit that measured deep body temperature. All surgeries were performed by a board certified veterinary surgeon under sterile conditions. The biotelemetry implants also provided an index of activity level in each animal. For metabolic heat production measurements, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured and the caloric equivalent of these

  11. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wine and eating too much can bring about symptoms in others. These rhythm problems are rarely serious. Substance Abuse: Drugs and Inhalants Abusing legal or illegal drugs can lead to dangerous arrhythmias . Alcohol Small amounts (no more than one drink a ...

  12. Learning by joining the rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Ravn, Susanne; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2012-01-01

    . The two rowers’ aim is to be among the exclusive group of teams that qualify for the Olympic Games three years later. However Anne is not a rower, and has to be apprenticed by Juliane, who is an experienced elite rower. One important learning goal in the apprenticeship is to find a good joint rhythm...

  13. The International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Liz

    1987-01-01

    The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, a popular, long-lived, all-female jazz band of the 1940s, were the first racially integrated women's band in America. Their achievement has been largely neglected by music historians. A brief history of the band is presented, and their significance is discussed. (BJV)

  14. Rhythm Deficits in "Tone Deafness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Jessica M.; Nandy, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    It is commonly observed that "tone deaf" individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ("tone deafness") and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were…

  15. Effectiveness of melatonin treatment on circadian rhythm disturbances in dementia. Are there implications for delirium? : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonghe, A; Korevaar, J C; van Munster, B C; de Rooij, S E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Circadian rhythm disturbances, like sundowning, are seen in dementia. Because the circadian rhythm is regulated by the biological clock, melatonin might be effective in the treatment of these disturbances. We systematically studied the effect of melatonin treatment in patients with dement

  16. Interests of 5th through 10th Grade Students toward Human Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Sinan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the middle and high school students' interests towards the subjects of human biology, specifically, "Human Health and Nutrition" and "Human Body and Organs." The study also investigated sources of their interests and factors that impact their interests, namely people that they interact and courses that they take about…

  17. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices. PMID:27277872

  18. Biology of sexuality inborn determinants of human sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, R E

    1983-09-01

    Opinions vary on the relative importance of biological and learning processes in the aetiology of sexual expression and deviance. The structure of personality, consistency of fantasy patterns, and the familial nature of homosexuality hint at a biological anlage. Research with the HY-antigen complex and X chromosome, and the elucidation of the interactions of intrauterine testosterone and its products with the foetal brain and neurotransmitters, have given us new models to understand the programming of sexuality. However, gonadotrophin feedback is not relevant as an indicator of brain feminization in primates and man. Finally, the interaction of masculinization and defeminization provides us with a model for understanding homosexual behaviour. PMID:6138111

  19. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Lindsay; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is defined in this review as ‘an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems’. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is extr...

  20. Richards, ed.: Human Skeletal Biology: Contributions to the Understanding of California's Prehistoric Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Suchey, Judy Myers

    1989-01-01

    Human Skeletal Biology: Contributions to the Understanding of California's Prehistoric Populations. Gary D. Richards, ed. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 24, 1988, iv -i- 178 pp., 10 figs., 79 tables, 3 maps, $9.95 (paper).

  1. Alterations in circadian rhythms are associated with increased lipid peroxidation in females with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney, Lauren E; Sassi, Roberto B; Behr, Guilherme A; Streiner, David L; Minuzzi, Luciano; Moreira, Jose C F; Frey, Benicio N

    2014-05-01

    Disturbances in both circadian rhythms and oxidative stress systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD), yet no studies have investigated the relationship between these systems in BD. We studied the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on lipid damage in 52 depressed or euthymic BD females, while controlling for age, severity of depressive symptoms and number of psychotropic medications, compared to 30 healthy controls. Circadian rhythm disruption was determined by a self-report measure (Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry; BRIAN), which measures behaviours such as sleep, eating patterns, social rhythms and general activity. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as a proxy of lipid peroxidation. We also measured the activity of total and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Multiple linear regressions showed that circadian rhythm disturbance was independently associated with increased lipid peroxidation in females with BD (p GST activity between bipolar females and controls. Circadian rhythms were not associated with lipid peroxidation in healthy controls, where aging was the only significant predictor. These results suggest an interaction between the circadian system and redox metabolism, in that greater disruption in daily rhythms was associated with increased lipid peroxidation in BD only. Antioxidant enzymes have been shown to follow a circadian pattern of expression, and it is possible that disturbance of sleep and daily rhythms experienced in BD may result in decreased antioxidant defence and therefore increased lipid peroxidation. This study provides a basis for further investigation of the links between oxidative stress and circadian rhythms in the neurobiology of BD. PMID:24438530

  2. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Regulation: Insights from Pre-Clinical Models

    OpenAIRE

    McClung, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder are associated with major disruptions in circadian rhythms. Indeed, altered sleep/wake cycles are a critical feature for diagnosis in the DSM IV and several of the therapies used to treat these disorders have profound effects on rhythm length and stabilization in human populations. Furthermore, multiple human genetic studies have identified polymorphisms in specific circadian genes that associate w...

  3. Biology of human hair : know your hair to control it

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Rita; Fernandes, Margarida M.; Paulo, Artur Cavaco; Gomes, Andreia

    2011-01-01

    Hair can be engineered at different levels—its structure and surface—through modification of its constituent molecules, in particular proteins, but also the hair follicle (HF) can be genetically altered, in particular with the advent of siRNA-based applications. General aspects of hair biology are reviewed, as well as the most recent contributions to understanding hair pigmentation and the regulation of hair development. Focus will also be placed on the techniques developed specifically for d...

  4. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  5. Feto-maternal biology and ethics of human society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petraglia Felice

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing interest in human reproduction and the identity of the embryo have prompted us to bring some considerations to the attention of scientists. In particular, we focus on the interactive relationship between the embryo and the mother starting from the earliest stages of development. Principles governing the acceptance and growth of the embryo in the uterus may represent a model for mutual tolerance and peaceful co-existence in human society.

  6. Biology of Zika virus infection in human skin cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells ar...

  7. Multiple biological activities of human recombinant interleukin 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Dinarello, C A; Cannon, J. G.; Mier, J W; Bernheim, H. A.; LoPreste, G; Lynn, D L; Love, R N; Webb, A C; Auron, P. E.; Reuben, R C

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA coding for human monocyte interleukin 1 (IL-1), pI 7 form, was expressed in Escherichia coli. During purification, IL-1 activity on murine T cells was associated with the recombinant protein. Homogeneous human recombinant IL-1 (hrIL-1) was tested in several assays to demonstrate the immunological and inflammatory properties attributed to this molecule. hrIL-1 induced proliferative responses in a cloned murine T cell in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of mitogen, wh...

  8. Temporal interactions between cortical rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple local neuronal circuits support different, discrete frequencies of network rhythm in neocortex. Relationships between different frequencies correspond to mechanisms designed to minimise interference, couple activity via stable phase interactions, and control the amplitude of one frequency relative to the phase of another. These mechanisms are proposed to form a framework for spectral information processing. Individual local circuits can also transform their frequency through changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and interactions with other oscillating microcircuits. Here we discuss a frequency transformation in which activity in two coactive local circuits may combine sequentially to generate a third frequency whose period is the concatenation sum of the original two. With such an interaction, the intrinsic periodicity in each component local circuit is preserved – alternate, single periods of each original rhythm form one period of a new frequency - suggesting a robust mechanism for combining information processed on multiple concurrent spatiotemporal scales.

  9. Circadian Rhythms: Hijacking the Cyanobacterial Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O’Neill, John S

    2016-01-01

    The production of limitless carbon-free energy is a long-sought dream of scientists and politicians alike. One strategy for achieving this aim is the production of hydrogen by photosynthetic microorganisms – harnessing the effectively limitless power of the sun to power our cars, toasters and PCR machines. It may be tempting to think of host expression systems as miniature factories given over entirely to the production our molecule of interest. However, the biological nature of the host must be taken into account if we are to maximize productivity. The circadian rhythm, an organism’s entrainable oscillation of biological processes with a period of around 24 hours, is one such aspect that has received scant attention but is likely to be of particular importance to photosynthetic host systems. In this issue of current biology Xu et al. describe how our knowledge of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock can be leveraged to improve the production of exogeneous proteins, including those involved in the production of hydrogen [1]. PMID:24309283

  10. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Manjunatha; Shantala Hari Dass; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Extensive research has been carried out to understand how circadian clocks regulate various physiological processes in organisms. The discovery of clock genes and the molecular clockwork has helped researchers to understand the possible role of these genes in regulating various metabolic processes. In Drosophila melanogaster, many studies have shown that the basic architecture of circadian clocks is multi-oscillatory. In nature, different neuronal subgroups in the brain of D. melanogaster have been demonstrated to control different circadian behavioural rhythms or different aspects of the same circadian rhythm. Among the circadian phenomena that have been studied so far in Drosophila, the egg-laying rhythm is unique, and relatively less explored. Unlike most other circadian rhythms, the egg-laying rhythm is rhythmic under constant light conditions, and the endogenous or free-running period of the rhythm is greater than those of most other rhythms. Although the clock genes and neurons required for the persistence of adult emergence and activity/rest rhythms have been studied extensively, those underlying the circadian egg-laying rhythm still remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the circadian egg-laying rhythm in D. melanogaster, and the possible molecular and physiological mechanisms that control the rhythmic output of the egg-laying process.

  11. Preference for Point-Light Human Biological Motion in Newborns: Contribution of Translational Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet-Ildei, Christel; Kitromilides, Elenitsa; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre; Pavlova, Marina; Gentaz, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    In human newborns, spontaneous visual preference for biological motion is reported to occur at birth, but the factors underpinning this preference are still in debate. Using a standard visual preferential looking paradigm, 4 experiments were carried out in 3-day-old human newborns to assess the influence of translational displacement on perception…

  12. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption. PMID:27104378

  13. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF RHYTHM IN THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SYSTEM FOR ATHLETES AND TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftimichuk Olga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Rhythm is important for the implementation of all processes as in nature and in living organisms. It organizes motor human activity making it more productive and rational. On teaching working and sports motions the process of the impellent work correct rhythm assimilation plays an important role because it determines the movement performance optimum that is shown in its automation process reduction. As a result, man’s physical strength and nervous energy are saved. Rhythm category acquires a special status for the physical training specialist. All his activity including the motor component depends on the rhythm. The aim of the research is to study the physiology of rhythm and justify the more efficient training process for future teachers and coaches. Methods . The following theoretical research methods were used: the abstract and axiomatic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, idealization, comparison and generalization. Results. As a result of study of materials from the natural sciences, numerology, psychology, music, cybernetics, synergetic, physiology, was found that the change of different states, as in nature and in living organisms, is an undulating rhythmic character. Physiological basis of the same rhythm is dynamic change excitation and inhibition processes occurring in the central nervous system. In this paper features of rhythm were identified. To accelerate the assimilation of motor action rational rhythm it is necessary to develop a sense of rhythm which is successfully formed in during the musical-motor activities. Conclusions. For today the study of the rhythm phenomenon in professional preparation on physical education and sport, in our opinion, requires the further study. Adding exercises involving certain motor skills elements similar in rhythmic structure with professional and technical actions to the coaches and teachers education and the competitive technology formation should be

  14. Evolutionary Interrogation of Human Biology in Well-Annotated Genomic Framework of Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E.; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive N...

  15. THERMOREGULATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Vol 53 (Medicine & Sport Science) This collection on the latest interpretation of research data about the relationship between thermoregulation, exercise performance and fatigue is published as the 53rd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE The book aims to explain how the advances in technology and methodology allowed studying the affects of the changing body temperature on metabolism and the role played by the nervous system in shaping human performance under challenging the...

  16. Using Genomics to Study Human Biology and Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Ricard M. (Stanford University School of Medicine)

    2005-04-06

    The Human Genome Project culminated in April 2003 with the finished DNA sequence of all of the human chromosomes. This book of information, particularly in conjunction with the genome sequences of many other organisms, has already begun to revolutionize the way that biomedical scientists study our species. The identification of essentially all of our genes has provided a template upon which researchers can discover basic processes that govern cells, organs, and the whole organism, and to understand the fundamental causes of the diseases that occur when something goes wrong with a gene or a set of genes. The Genome Project has already made it possible to identify the genes that are defective in more than 1,000 rare inherited diseases, and these discoveries have helped to understand the mechanisms of the more common forms of these disorders. This understanding of primary defects in diseases - which is translated as mutations in genes that encode proteins that serve specific functions - is transforming the way that biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies identify drug targets, and a few notable cases have already had a striking impact on specific diseases. In addition, it has become clear that the differential response to drugs in human populations is heavily influenced by genes, and a whole field called pharmacogenetics has begun to identify these genetic factors. Such knowledge will allow physicians to prescribe drugs targeted to each individual, with the potential to increase efficacy and decrease side-effects. Determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and identifying the genes has been an exciting endeavor, but we are only just beginning to understand the treasures present in all of our DNA. My presentation will briefly describe the road we took to get the sequence, as well as the tools that we are developing to unlock its secrets.

  17. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    OpenAIRE

    Itai Roffman; Eviatar Nevo

    2010-01-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving cap...

  18. THERMOREGULATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E Marino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vol 53 (Medicine & Sport Science This collection on the latest interpretation of research data about the relationship between thermoregulation, exercise performance and fatigue is published as the 53rd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE The book aims to explain how the advances in technology and methodology allowed studying the affects of the changing body temperature on metabolism and the role played by the nervous system in shaping human performance under challenging thermal situations. FEATURES This publication provides different interpretations of recent research for a better understanding of the limitations of thermoregulation in nine titles. The presented titles are: The Evolutionary Basis of Thermoregulation and Exercise Performance; Comparative Thermoregulation and the Quest for Athletic Supremacy; Thermoregulation, Fatigue and Exercise Modality; Neuromuscular Response to Exercise Heat Stress; Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Symptoms: The 'Canary in the Coal Mine' during Exercise-Heat Stress?; Effects of Peripheral Cooling on Characteristics of Local Muscle; Cooling Interventions for the Protection and Recovery of Exercise Performance from Exercise-Induced Heat Stress; Ethnicity and Temperature Regulation; Exercise Heat Stress and Metabolism. The evidence for the human's ability to adjust their performance according to the thermal limits in order to preserve cellular homeostasis is particularly noteworthy. AUDIENCE This is a fundamental book for any students and/or researchers involved in the fields of medicine, exercise physiology and human performance with special reference to thermal regulation. ASSESSMENT This publication is a must-read text for all those working in thermal medicine, exercise physiology and human performance fields

  19. “Bird Song Metronomics”: Isochronous Organization of Zebra Finch Song Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Philipp; Scharff, Constance

    2016-01-01

    The human capacity for speech and vocal music depends on vocal imitation. Songbirds, in contrast to non-human primates, share this vocal production learning with humans. The process through which birds and humans learn many of their vocalizations as well as the underlying neural system exhibit a number of striking parallels and have been widely researched. In contrast, rhythm, a key feature of language, and music, has received surprisingly little attention in songbirds. Investigating temporal periodicity in bird song has the potential to inform the relationship between neural mechanisms and behavioral output and can also provide insight into the biology and evolution of musicality. Here we present a method to analyze birdsong for an underlying rhythmic regularity. Using the intervals from one note onset to the next as input, we found for each bird an isochronous sequence of time stamps, a “signal-derived pulse,” or pulseS, of which a subset aligned with all note onsets of the bird's song. Fourier analysis corroborated these results. To determine whether this finding was just a byproduct of the duration of notes and intervals typical for zebra finches but not dependent on the individual duration of elements and the sequence in which they are sung, we compared natural songs to models of artificial songs. Note onsets of natural song deviated from the pulseS significantly less than those of artificial songs with randomized note and gap durations. Thus, male zebra finch song has the regularity required for a listener to extract a perceived pulse (pulseP), as yet untested. Strikingly, in our study, pulsesS that best fit note onsets often also coincided with the transitions between sub-note elements within complex notes, corresponding to neuromuscular gestures. Gesture durations often equaled one or more pulseS periods. This suggests that gesture duration constitutes the basic element of the temporal hierarchy of zebra finch song rhythm, an interesting parallel to the

  20. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM, potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1 platelet function and (2 platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01. These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM. The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the

  1. An analysis of heart rhythm dynamics using a three-coupled oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhythmic phenomena represent one of the most striking manifestations of the dynamic behavior in biological systems. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for biological rhythms is crucial for the comprehension of the dynamics of life. Natural rhythms could be either regular or irregular over time and space. Each kind of dynamical behavior may be related to both normal and pathological physiological functioning. The cardiac conducting system can be treated as a network of self-excitatory elements and, since these elements exhibit oscillatory behavior, they can be modeled as nonlinear oscillators. This paper proposes a mathematical model to describe heart rhythms considering three modified Van der Pol oscillators connected with time delay couplings. Therefore, the heart dynamics is represented by a system of differential difference equations. Numerical simulations are carried out presenting qualitative agreement with the general heart rhythm behavior. Normal and pathological rhythms represented by the ECG signals are reproduced. Pathological rhythms are generated by either the coupling alterations that represents communications aspects in the heart electric system or forcing excitation representing external pacemaker excitation.

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells: from basic biology to clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, B M; Kassem, M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  3. Update of the human parvovirus B19 biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant-Delmas, A; Morinet, F

    2016-02-01

    Since its discovery, the human parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been associated with many clinical situations in addition to the prototype clinical manifestations, i.e. erythema infectiosum and erythroblastopenia crisis. The clinical significance of the viral B19V DNA persistence in sera after acute infection remains largely unknown. Such data may constitute a new clinical entity and is discussed in this manuscript. In 2002, despite the genetic diversity among B19V viruses has been reported to be very low, the description of markedly distinct sequences showed a new organization into three genotypes. The most recent common ancestor for B19V genotypes was estimated at early 1800s. B19V replication is enhanced by hypoxia and this might to explain the high viral load detected by quantitative PCR in the sera of infected patients. The minimum infectious dose necessary to transmit B19V infection by the transfusion of labile blood products remains unclear. At the opposite, the US Food and Drug Administration proposed a limit of 10(4)IU/mL of viral DNA in plasma pools used for the production of plasma derivatives. Recently, a new human parvovirus (PARV4) has been discovered. The consequences on blood transfusion of this blood-borne agent and its pathogenicity are still unknown. PMID:26778837

  4. Speech-like rhythm in a voiced and voiceless orangutan call.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano R Lameira

    Full Text Available The evolutionary origins of speech remain obscure. Recently, it was proposed that speech derived from monkey facial signals which exhibit a speech-like rhythm of ∼5 open-close lip cycles per second. In monkeys, these signals may also be vocalized, offering a plausible evolutionary stepping stone towards speech. Three essential predictions remain, however, to be tested to assess this hypothesis' validity; (i Great apes, our closest relatives, should likewise produce 5Hz-rhythm signals, (ii speech-like rhythm should involve calls articulatorily similar to consonants and vowels given that speech rhythm is the direct product of stringing together these two basic elements, and (iii speech-like rhythm should be experience-based. Via cinematic analyses we demonstrate that an ex-entertainment orangutan produces two calls at a speech-like rhythm, coined "clicks" and "faux-speech." Like voiceless consonants, clicks required no vocal fold action, but did involve independent manoeuvring over lips and tongue. In parallel to vowels, faux-speech showed harmonic and formant modulations, implying vocal fold and supralaryngeal action. This rhythm was several times faster than orangutan chewing rates, as observed in monkeys and humans. Critically, this rhythm was seven-fold faster, and contextually distinct, than any other known rhythmic calls described to date in the largest database of the orangutan repertoire ever assembled. The first two predictions advanced by this study are validated and, based on parsimony and exclusion of potential alternative explanations, initial support is given to the third prediction. Irrespectively of the putative origins of these calls and underlying mechanisms, our findings demonstrate irrevocably that great apes are not respiratorily, articulatorilly, or neurologically constrained for the production of consonant- and vowel-like calls at speech rhythm. Orangutan clicks and faux-speech confirm the importance of rhythmic speech

  5. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dziechciaż

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging. The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists’ assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it.

  6. Calibrated variability of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during graded head-up tilt in humans and its link with noradrenaline data and cardiovascular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias; Porta, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) variability is traditionally computed through a low-pass filtering procedure that requires normalization. We proposed a new beat-to-beat MSNA variability computation that preserves dimensionality typical of an integrated neural discharge (i.e., bursts per unit of time). The calibrated MSNA (cMSNA) variability technique is contrasted with the traditional uncalibrated MSNA (ucMSNA) version. The powers of cMSNA and ucMSNA variabilities in the low-frequency (LF, from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz) band were computed with those of the heart period (HP) of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure (SAP and DAP, respectively) in seven healthy subjects (age, 20-28 years; median, 22 years; 5 women) during a graded head-up tilt. Subjects were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 60° table inclinations. The LF powers of ucMSNA and HP variabilities were expressed in normalized units (LFnu), whereas all remaining spectral markers were expressed in absolute units. We found that 1) the LF power of cMSNA variability was positively correlated with tilt angle, whereas the LFnu power of the ucMSNA series was uncorrelated; 2) the LF power of cMSNA variability was correlated with LF powers of SAP and DAP, LFnu power of HP and noradrenaline concentration, whereas the relationship of the LFnu power of ucMSNA variability to LF powers of SAP and DAP was weaker and that to LFnu power of HP was absent; and 3) the stronger relationship of cMSNA variability to SAP and DAP spectral markers compared with the ucMSNA series was confirmed individually. The cMSNA variability appears to be more suitable in describing sympathetic control in humans than traditional ucMSNA variability. PMID:27009053

  7. Human umbilical cord blood biology, transplantation and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Gal; Toren, Amos; Nagler, Arnon

    2006-01-01

    As the significance of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is constantly rising, the scarcity of matched donors is proving to be a troubling issue. Cord blood (CB) is an important source of stem cells (SC) for transplantation. It has been used in the last two decades for approximately 4500 transplantations. Its collection, cryopreservation, banking and thawing techniques pose unique challenges to clinicians and researchers CB has abundant stem cell with impressive proliferative capacity. On the other hand, CB's immunological system has a naïve and more tolerant nature. Except for the biological aspects, few ethical issues have become a concern for transplantation teams who use CB. There are few advantages of CB over bone marrow, especially the lower rates of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after transplantation. On the other hand, there are relatively high rates of early treatment related mortality in cord blood transplantation (CBT). This is related to the small nucleated cell (NC) dose infused from each CB unit. The clinical experience in CBT, especially in children, is encouraging. When using adequate number of NC/kg, results in CBT for malignant and non-malignant diseases are comparable to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In this article, a comprehensive review of the largest scale studies is presented. There is a continuous search for an optimal way to deal with delayed engraftment of CB and its implication. The current investigational, and also first clinical trials using diverse methods to overcome high rates of TRM are reviewed. Almost twenty years after the first CBT was preformed, many advocate for a routine parallel search, BM and CB, for unrelated donor. Future uses of CB might also be in the field of gene transfer and non hematopoietic injured tissues repair. PMID:16712468

  8. Use of melatonin in circadian rhythm disorders and following phase shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, DJ; Deacon, S; Arendt, J

    1996-01-01

    Following abrupt phase shifts (real or simulated time zone changes, night shift work) there is desynchronisation between the internal circadian rhythms (including melatonin) and the external environment with consequent disturbances in sleep, mood and performance. In humans the pineal hormone melatonin has phase-shifting and resynchronising properties with regard to a number of circadian rhythms. Suitably timed melatonin adrninstration hastened adaptation to phase shift and significantly impro...

  9. Absence of a serum melatonin rhythm under acutely extended darkness in the horse

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Barbara A; Martin, Ann-Marie; Furney, Penney; Elliott, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In contrast to studies showing gradual adaptation of melatonin (MT) rhythms to an advanced photoperiod in humans and rodents, we previously demonstrated that equine MT rhythms complete a 6-h light/dark (LD) phase advance on the first post-shift day. This suggested the possibility that melatonin secretion in the horse may be more strongly light-driven as opposed to endogenously rhythmic and light entrained. The present study investigates whether equine melatonin i...

  10. Paul Valéry and the search for poetic rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, David Elwyn

    2010-01-01

    Throughout his theoretical writings, Valéry insists on two fundamental principles: poetic rhythm is undefinable and yet it is central to poetry. Although his verse practice evolves from irregularity to regularity, Valéry insists that predictable metrical forms are no guarantee of poeticity, and rejects the Romantic model of rhythmic mimesis based on the cosmos, nature or the human body. It is not by confirming the meaningfulness of regular patterns, therefore, that poetic rhythm signifies; ra...

  11. QUANTIFYING ELONGATION RHYTHM DURING FULL-LENGTH PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measure...

  12. Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    GaBI Journal Editor

    2012-01-01

    Clinical biosimilar data should be accessible to all. FDA Form 483: punishment or learning opportunity? Biosimilars: challenges getting into the US. Biosimilar regulatory issues. New Amgen ‘182’ Enbrel patent. Interchangeability or substitution of biosimilars. Is anyone developing biosimilars of darbepoetin alfa in Europe? Biosimilar patents expiring before 2020.

  13. Enzymology and molecular biology of glucocorticoid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Andreas; Maser, Edmund

    2003-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are a vital class of steroid hormones that are secreted by the adrenal cortex and that are regulated by ACTH largely under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. GCs mediate profound and diverse physiological effects in vertebrates, ranging from development, metabolism, neurobiology, anti-inflammation and programmed cell death to many other fuctions. Multiple factors "downstream" of GC secretion, such as glucocorticoid receptor (GR) number and the abundance of plasma binding proteins have originally been considered as modulators of GC action. However, in the last decade the role of tissue-specific GC activating and inactivating enzymes have been identified as additional determinants in GC signalling pathways. On the cellular level, they function as important pre-receptor regulators by acting as "molecular switches" for receptor-active and receptor-inactive GC hormones. According to their biologic activity to catalyze the interconversion of C11-hydroxyl and C11-oxo GCs these enzymes have been named 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD; EC 1.1.1.146). Two isoforms of 11beta-HSD have been cloned and characterized so far. 11beta-HSD type 1 is found in a wide range of tissues, acts predominantly as a reductase in intact cells and tissues by regenerating active cortisol from cortisone, and has been described to regulate GC access to the GR. 11beta-HSD type 2 is found mainly in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as kidney and colon, acts only as a dehydrogenase by producing inactive cortisone, and has been found to protect the mineralocorticoid receptor from high levels of receptor-active cortisol. Recently, 11beta-HSD 1 has become highly topical due to the finding that 11beta-HSD 1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of central obesity and the appearance of the metabolic syndrome. This review provides an overview on the components involved in GC signalling of 11beta-HSD type 1 as an important pre-receptor control

  14. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  15. Biology and pathological associations of the human papillomaviruses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    1998-06-01

    Historical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus studies raised early indications of a mammalian DNA oncogenic virus. Today, molecular cloning recognises numerous animal and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and the development of in vitro transformation assays has escalated oncological research in HPVs. Currently, their detection and typing in tissues is usually by Southern blotting, in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction methods. The complete papillomavirus virion constitutes a protein coat (capsid) surrounding a circular, double-stranded DNA organised into coding and non-coding regions. 8 early (E1-E8) open reading frames (ORFs) and 2 late (L1, L2) ORFs have been identified in the coding region of all papillomaviruses. The early ORFs encode proteins which interact with the host genome to produce new viral DNA while late ORFs are activated only after viral DNA replication and encode for viral capsid proteins. All papillomaviruses are obligatory intranuclear organisms with specific tropism for keratinocytes. Three possible courses of events can follow papillomaviruses entry into cells: (1) viral DNA are maintained as intranuclear, extrachromosomal, circular DNA episomes, which replicates synchronously with the host cell, establishing a latent infection; (2) conversion from latent into productive infection with assembly of complete infective virions; (3) integration of viral DNA into host cellular genome, a phenomenon seen in HPV infections associated with malignant transformation. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) essentially induce skin and mucosal epithelial lesions. Various skin warts are well known to be HPV-associated (HPVs 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10). Besides HPVs 3 and 10, HPVs 5, 8, 17 and 20 have been recovered from Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions. Anogenital condyloma acuminatum, strongly linked with HPVs 6 and 11 are probably sexually transmitted. The same HPVs, demonstrable in recurrent juvenile laryngeal papillomas, are probably transmitted by passage

  16. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Bhangar, Seema; Adams, Rachel I.; Pasut, Wilmer; Huffman, Alex; Arens, Edward A.; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Tom D; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m3 chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5–10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million partic...

  17. Structural biology of human H3K9 methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  18. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  19. Unraveling human complexity and disease with systems biology and personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Naylor, Stephen; Jake Y Chen

    2010-01-01

    We are all perplexed that current medical practice often appears maladroit in curing our individual illnesses or disease. However, as is often the case, a lack of understanding, tools and technologies are the root cause of such situations. Human individuality is an often-quoted term but, in the context of human biology, it is poorly understood. This is compounded when there is a need to consider the variability of human populations. In the case of the former, it is possible to quantify human ...

  20. "Ritual Rhythms" - a collaborative WebDocumentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Perle

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative web-based filmproject in 11 vignettes about the rituals and rhythms of daily life in various locations & settings in the city of Copenhagen. Created by Perle Møhl and the students on the 2014 courses in Visual Anthropology in Practice. We use the concepts of Ritual and Rhythm to...

  1. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods: Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were…

  2. Monitoring circadian rhythms of individual honey bees in a social environment reveals social influences on postembryonic ontogeny of activity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, A; Bloch, G

    2007-08-01

    Social factors constitute an important component of the environment of many animals and have a profound influence on their physiology and behavior. Studies of social influences on circadian rhythms have been hampered by a methodological trade-off: automatic data acquisition systems obtain high-quality data but are effective only for individually isolated animals and therefore compromise by requiring a context that may not be sociobiologically relevant. Human observers can monitor animal activity in complex social environments but are limited in the resolution and quality of data that can be gathered. The authors developed and validated a method for prolonged, automatic, high-quality monitoring of focal honey bees in a relatively complex social environment and with minimal illumination. The method can be adapted for studies on other animals. The authors show that the system provides a reliable estimation of the actual path of a focal bee, only rarely misses its location for > 1 min, and removes most nonspecific signals from the background. Using this system, the authors provide the first evidence of social influence on the ontogeny of activity rhythms. Young bees that were housed with old foragers show ~24-h rhythms in locomotor activity at a younger age and with stronger rhythms than bees housed with a similar number of young bees. By contrast, the maturation of the hypopharyngeal glands was slower in bees housed with foragers, similar to findings in previous studies. The morphology and function of the hypopharyngeal glands vary along with age-based division of labor. Therefore, these findings indicate that social inhibition of task-related maturation was effective in the experimental setup. This study suggests that although the ontogeny of circadian rhythms is typically correlated with the age-based division of labor, their social regulation is different. PMID:17660451

  3. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2016-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3+ p...

  4. Human Biological Monitoring of Diisononyl Phthalate and Diisodecyl Phthalate: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gurusankar Saravanabhavan; Janine Murray

    2012-01-01

    High molecular-weight phthalates, such as diisononyl phthalate (DINP), and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), are widely used as plasticizers in the manufacturing of polymers and consumer products. Human biological monitoring studies have employed the metabolites of DINP and DIDP as biomarkers to assess human exposure. In this review, we summarize and analyze publicly available scientific data on chemistry, metabolism, and excretion kinetics, of DINP and DIDP, to identify specific and sensitive met...

  5. The phaseness of human biological development assesse with the use of selected physicochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Czapla, Zbigniew

    2000-01-01

    The principal idea of the work was to show a new, original method of description of the phenomena of human biological development with the use of nonstandard research methods so far unused in the ontogenetic studies in regard to the stable and involutional phases of ontogenesis. The main purpose of the work was to assess with selected methods individual reactions of a human organism in ontogenesis against the development of the population. Two research methods were selec...

  6. The study on human health and environment by neutron activation analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    - Choice of samples for the research goal and survey of individual food habit and sampling for the meaningful statistical output - Development of the optimum analytical method for the analysis of trace elements in biological samples such as hair, blood, and foods. - Quantitative analysis of several samples to identify the source of trace elements into human body. - Evaluation in view of health and environment to the trace elements in various sources which can be introduced inside human body

  7. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering, and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0–72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as ...

  8. Human evolution, life history theory, and the end of biological reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Cadell

    2014-01-01

    Throughout primate history there have been three major life history transitions towards increasingly delayed sexual maturation and biological reproduction, as well as towards extended life expectancy. Monkeys reproduce later and live longer than do prosimians, apes reproduce later and live longer than do monkeys, and humans reproduce later and live longer than do apes. These life history transitions are connected to increased encephalization. During the last life history transition from apes to humans, increased encephalization co-evolved with increased dependence on cultural knowledge for energy acquisition. This led to a dramatic pressure for more energy investment in growth over current biological reproduction. Since the industrial revolution socioeconomic development has led to even more energy being devoted to growth over current biological reproduction. I propose that this is the beginning of an ongoing fourth major primate life history transition towards completely delayed biological reproduction and an extension of the evolved human life expectancy. I argue that the only fundamental difference between this primate life history transition and previous life history transitions is that this transition is being driven solely by cultural evolution, which may suggest some deeper evolutionary transition away from biological evolution is already in the process of occurring. PMID:24852016

  9. Biohorizons: An eConference to Assess Human Biology in Large, First-Year Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors detail the design, implementation and evaluation of an eConference entitled "Biohorizons," using a presage-process-product model to describe the development of an eLearning community. Biohorizons was a summative learning and assessment task aiming to introduce large classes of first-year Human Biology students to the practices of…

  10. Nutrition and the biology of human ageing: Proceedings of the ninth nestle international nutrition symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 9th Nestle Nutrition Symposium on “Nutrition and the Biology of Human Ageing” is presented at a time of unprecedented demographic change worldwide. The UN population division forecasts that the number of people living over age 65 will rise to almost 1 billion (12% percent of the world’s populat...

  11. HExpoChem: a systems biology resource to explore human exposure to chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Kalhauge, Christian Gram;

    2013-01-01

    of computational biology approaches are needed to assess the health risks of chemical exposure. Here we present HExpoChem, a tool based on environmental chemicals and their bioactivities on human proteins with the objective of aiding the qualitative exploration of human exposure to chemicals. The......Summary: Humans are exposed to diverse hazardous chemicals daily. Although an exposure to these chemicals is suspected to have adverse effects on human health, mechanistic insights into how they interact with the human body are still limited. Therefore, acquisition of curated data and development...... chemical–protein interactions have been enriched with a quality-scored human protein–protein interaction network, a protein–protein association network and a chemical–chemical interaction network, thus allowing the study of environmental chemicals through formation of protein complexes and phenotypic...

  12. Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Circadian Rhythms, and AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews concepts regarding oxidative stress and the mechanisms by which endogenous and exogenous factors produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also surveys the relationships between oxidative stress, circadian rhythms, and retinal damage in humans, particularly those related to light and photodamage. In the first section, the production of ROS by different cell organelles and biomolecules and the antioxidant mechanisms that antagonize this damage are reviewed. The second section includes a brief review of circadian clocks and their relationship with the cellular redox state. In the third part of this work, the relationship between retinal damage and ROS is described. The last part of this work focuses on retinal degenerative pathology, age-related macular degeneration, and the relationships between this pathology, ROS, and light. Finally, the possible interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), circadian rhythms, and this pathology are discussed. PMID:26885250

  13. Quantifying elongation rhythm during full-length protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2013-07-31

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measured elongation rates and codon and isoacceptor tRNA usage, and provide a quantitative estimate of the effect on elongation rate of replacing a codon recognizing an abundant tRNA with a synonymous codon cognate to a rarer tRNA. Our results suggest that tRNA selection plays an important general role in modulating the rates and rhythms of protein synthesis, potentially influencing simultaneous co-translational processes such as folding and chemical modification. PMID:23822614

  14. The SCID-hu mouse and its application to human radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiological study of humans has been hampered by a lack of suitable in vivo experimental models. Of course, acute and chronic radiation effects in humans have been documented in the studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and patients irradiated either by therapeutic intent or by accident. However, the information gained from these studies has been limited by the difficulties in estimating precise radiation doses and in obtaining biological samples for directly analyzing the processes of radiation-induced pathogenesis. With these issues in mind, we propose that the severe combined immunodeficient mouse-human chimera can be used as an in vivo experimental model for human radiation biology. We have developed techniques by which normal human bone marrow can be implanted into immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice (S. Kyoizumi et al, Blood 79, 1704, 1992). We have report that this in vivo model can be used for the analysis of radiation damage to human bone marrow. After whole-body irradiation of the engrafted animals, human progenitor cells within the human marrow were destroyed in a dose-dependent manner (D0 = 0.7-1.0Gy, n = 1.0). Acute hematotoxicity was reduced when the radioprotective agent (WR-2721) was administered prior to irradiation. After low dose irradiation, the recovery of human progenitor activity was accelerated by treatment with human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). This small animal model may prove amenable for the risk analysis of human radiation exposure as well as for the development of new modalities for the prevention and treatment of radiotoxic damage to the human hematopoietic system. (author)

  15. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziechciaż, Małgorzata; Filip, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists' assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it. PMID:25528930

  16. Research and Application of Human Capital Strategic Classification Tool: Human Capital Classification Matrix Based on Biological Natural Attribute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the causes of weak human capital structure strategic classification management in China, we analyze that enterprises around the world face increasingly difficult for human capital management. In order to provide strategically sound answers, the HR managers need the critical information provided by the right technology processing and analytical tools. In this study, there are different types and levels of human capital in formal organization management, which is not the same contribution to a formal organization. An important guarantee for sustained and healthy development of the formal or informal organization is lower human capital risk. To resist this risk is primarily dependent on human capital hedge force and appreciation force in value, which is largely dependent on the strategic value of the performance of senior managers. Based on the analysis of high-level managers perspective, we also discuss the value and configuration of principles and methods to be followed in human capital strategic classification based on Boston Consulting Group (BCG matrix and build Human Capital Classification (HCC matrix based on biological natural attribute to effectively realize human capital structure strategic classification.

  17. On the Effect of Lengthening Circadian Rhythm by Heavy Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmedov T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of time sensor of biological clock (BC attracts interest of many scientists, and a great number of experiments are being conducted to stud y the influence of vari- ous physical and chemical factors on functioning of BC. Special attention is drawn to studying the influence of heavy water (D 2 O on functioning of BC that always leads to lengthening of circadian rhythms (CR. This work presents theoretical consideration of lengthening of CR, when hydrogen (H 2 in water is replaced by deuterium (D 2 , that is based on spacial difference of energy levels with similar principle quantum numbers.

  18. Effects of chronic expression of the HIV-induced protein, transactivator of transcription, on circadian activity rhythms in mice, with or without morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Conner, Clayton; Knapp, Pamela E.; Xu, Ruquiang; Nath, Avindra; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection exhibit changes in sleep patterns, motor disorders, and cognitive dysfunction; these symptoms may be secondary to circadian rhythm abnormalities. Studies in mice have shown that intracerebral injection of an HIV protein, transactivator of transcription (Tat), alters the timing of circadian rhythms in a manner similar to light. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic Tat expression alters circadian rhythms, especially their en...

  19. Maize global transcriptomics reveals pervasive leaf diurnal rhythms but rhythms in developing ears are largely limited to the core oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Hayes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant diurnal rhythms are vital environmental adaptations to coordinate internal physiological responses to alternating day-night cycles. A comprehensive view of diurnal biology has been lacking for maize (Zea mays, a major world crop. METHODOLOGY: A photosynthetic tissue, the leaf, and a non-photosynthetic tissue, the developing ear, were sampled under natural field conditions. Genome-wide transcript profiling was conducted on a high-density 105 K Agilent microarray to investigate diurnal rhythms. CONCLUSIONS: In both leaves and ears, the core oscillators were intact and diurnally cycling. Maize core oscillator genes are found to be largely conserved with their Arabidopsis counterparts. Diurnal gene regulation occurs in leaves, with some 23% of expressed transcripts exhibiting a diurnal cycling pattern. These transcripts can be assigned to over 1700 gene ontology functional terms, underscoring the pervasive impact of diurnal rhythms on plant biology. Considering the peak expression time for each diurnally regulated gene, and its corresponding functional assignment, most gene functions display temporal enrichment in the day, often with distinct patterns, such as dawn or midday preferred, indicating that there is a staged procession of biological events undulating with the diurnal cycle. Notably, many gene functions display a bimodal enrichment flanking the midday photosynthetic maximum, with an initial peak in mid-morning followed by another peak during the afternoon/evening. In contrast to leaves, in developing ears as few as 47 gene transcripts are diurnally regulated, and this set of transcripts includes primarily the core oscillators. In developing ears, which are largely shielded from light, the core oscillator therefore is intact with little outward effect on transcription.

  20. The motivation for biological aggression is an inherent and common aspect of the human behavioural repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rózsa, Lajos

    2009-02-01

    According to a widespread opinion shared by the vast majority of historians, instances of aggression using pathogen weapons constitute extremely rare events in human history. Similarly, students of human behaviour tend to believe that their science plays no role in explaining this phenomenon, which is held to be exceptional and abnormal. Contrary to this dominant view, I argue that Hamiltonian spite - like Hamiltonian altruism - is an inherent part of the human behavioural repertoire and it includes the use of pathogens for spiteful purposes. This paradigm is supported by the following observations. The use of pathogens as weapons emerged far before the scientific understanding of the nature of infections and epidemics, though it has been underrepresented in written history ever since. It is also present in our expectations concerning the likely behaviour of an enemy and it is also a frequent component of threats. Several languages appear to bear linguistic references to our motivation for biological aggression in profanity. Finally, given that wartime epidemics kill people at a rate comparable to (or exceeding) that of mechanical weapons, all wars fought in recorded history incorporated an element of aggression through biological means. On the basis of these arguments, I claim that the motivation for biological aggression is an inherent and common aspect of past and present human behaviour. PMID:19006651

  1. Human Biological Monitoring of Diisononyl Phthalate and Diisodecyl Phthalate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusankar Saravanabhavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High molecular-weight phthalates, such as diisononyl phthalate (DINP, and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP, are widely used as plasticizers in the manufacturing of polymers and consumer products. Human biological monitoring studies have employed the metabolites of DINP and DIDP as biomarkers to assess human exposure. In this review, we summarize and analyze publicly available scientific data on chemistry, metabolism, and excretion kinetics, of DINP and DIDP, to identify specific and sensitive metabolites. Human biological monitoring data on DINP and DIDP are scrutinised to assess the suitability of these metabolites as biomarkers of exposure. Results from studies carried out in animals and humans indicate that phthalates are metabolised rapidly and do not bioaccmulate. During Phase-I metabolism, ester hydrolysis of DINP and DIDP leads to the formation of hydrolytic monoesters. These primary metabolites undergo further oxidation reactions to produce secondary metabolites. Hence, the levels of secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine are found to be always higher than the primary metabolites. Results from human biological monitoring studies have shown that the secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine were detected in almost all tested samples, while the primary metabolites were detected in only about 10% of the samples. This indicates that the secondary metabolites are very sensitive biomarkers of DINP/DIDP exposure while primary metabolites are not. The NHANES data indicate that the median concentrations of MCIOP and MCINP (secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP, resp. at a population level are about 5.1 μg/L and 2.7 μg/L, respectively. Moreover, the available biological monitoring data suggest that infants/children are exposed to higher levels of phthalates than adults.

  2. Human Biological Monitoring of Diisononyl Phthalate and Diisodecyl Phthalate: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High molecular-weight phthalates, such as diisononyl phthalate (Din), and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), are widely used as plasticizers in the manufacturing of polymers and consumer products. Human biological monitoring studies have employed the metabolites of DINP and DIDP as bio markers to assess human exposure. In this review, we summarize and analyze publicly available scientific data on chemistry, metabolism, and excretion kinetics, of DINP and DIDP, to identify specific and sensitive metabolites. Human biological monitoring data on DINP and DIDP are scrutinised to assess the suitability of these metabolites as bio markers of exposure. Results from studies carried out in animals and humans indicate that phthalates are metabolised rapidly and do not bio accumulate. During Phase-I metabolism, ester hydrolysis of DINP and DIDP leads to the formation of hydrolytic monoesters. These primary metabolites undergo further oxidation reactions to produce secondary metabolites. Hence, the levels of secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine are found to be always higher than the primary metabolites. Results from human biological monitoring studies have shown that the secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine were detected in almost all tested samples, while the primary metabolites were detected in only about 10% of the samples. This indicates that the secondary metabolites are very sensitive bio markers of DINP/DIDP exposure while primary metabolites are not. The NHANES data indicate that the median concentrations of MCIOP and MCINP (secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP, resp.) at a population level are about 5.1 μg/L and 2.7 μg/L, respectively. Moreover, the available biological monitoring data suggest that infants/children are exposed to higher levels of phthalates than adults.

  3. Circadian-Rhythm Sleep Disorders in Persons Who Are Totally Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, R. L.; Blood, M. L.; Hughes, R. J.; Lewy, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the diagnosis and management of "non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome," a form of cyclic insomnia to which people who are totally blind are prone. Covered are incidence and clinical features, formal diagnostic criteria, the biological basis of circadian sleep disorders, circadian rhythms in blind people, pharmacological entrainment, and the…

  4. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  5. Keeping time in your sleep: overnight consolidation of temporal rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Penelope A; Couch, Tom J; Walker, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    Temporal processing forms the basis of a vast number of human behaviours, from simple perception and action to tasks like locomotion, playing a musical instrument, and understanding language. Growing evidence suggests that these procedural skills are consolidated during sleep, however investigation of such learning has focused upon the order in which movements are made rather than their temporal dynamics. Here, we use psychophysics and neuroimaging to explore the possibility that temporal aspects of such skills are also enhanced over a period of sleep. Behaviourally, our examinations of motor (tapping a finger in time with a temporal rhythm) and perceptual (monitoring a temporal rhythm for deviants) tasks reveal post-sleep improvements in both domains. Functionally, we show that brain-state during retention (sleep or wake) modulates subsequent responses in the striatum, supplementary motor area, and lateral cerebellum during motor timing, and in the posterior hippocampus during perceptual timing. Our data support the proposal that these two forms of timing draw on different brain mechanisms, with motor timing using a more automatic system while perceptual timing of the same rhythm is more closely associated with cognitive processing. PMID:20974158

  6. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars;

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships......, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This...

  7. Influence of photoperiod and running wheel access on the entrainment of split circadian rhythms in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Jeffrey A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the laboratory, behavioral and physiological states of nocturnal rodents alternate, with a period near 24 h, between those appropriate for the night (e.g., elevated wheel-running activity and high melatonin secretion and for the day (e.g., rest and low melatonin secretion. Under appropriate 24 h light:dark:light:dark conditions, however, rodents may be readily induced to express bimodal rest/activity cycles that reflect a global temporal reorganization of the central neural pacemaker in the hypothalamus. We examine here how the relative length of the light and dark phases of the environmental cycle influences this rhythm splitting and the necessity of a running wheel for expression of this entrainment condition. Results Rhythm splitting was observed in wheel-running and general locomotion of Siberian and Syrian hamsters. The latter also manifest split rhythms in body temperature. Access to a running wheel was necessary neither for the induction nor maintenance of this entrainment pattern. While rhythms were only transiently split in many animals with two 5 h nights, the incidence of splitting was greater with twice daily nights of shorter duration. Removal of running wheels altered the body temperature rhythm but did not eliminate its clear bimodality. Conclusion The expression of entrained, split circadian rhythms exhibits no strict dependence on access to a running wheel, but can be facilitated by manipulation of ambient lighting conditions. These circadian entrainment patterns may be of therapeutic value to human shift-workers and others facing chronobiological challenges.

  8. Molecular biology in a distributed world. A Kantian perspective on scientific practices and the human mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Portera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the number of scholarly publications devoted to Kant's theory of biology has rapidly growing, with particular attention being given to Kant's thoughts about the concepts of teleology, function, organism, and their respective roles in scientific practice. Moving from these recent studies, and distancing itself from their mostly evolutionary background, the main aim of the present paper is to suggest an original "cognitive turn" in the interpretation of Kant's theory of biology. More specifically, the Authors will trace a connection between some Kantian theses about the “peculiar” or special nature of the human mind (intellectus ectypus, advanced in the Critique of the Power of Judgement (§ 76, 77, and some specific epistemological issues pertaining to the research practice of contemporary molecular biology.

  9. Neuroanatomy of the Extended Circadian Rhythm System

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Lawrence P

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), site of the primary clock in the circadian rhythm system, has three major afferent connections. The most important consists of a retinohypothalamic projection through which photic information, received by classical rod/cone photoreceptors and intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, gains access to the clock. This information influences phase and period of circadian rhythms. The two other robust afferent projections are the median raphe serotoner...

  10. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis. PMID:26187853

  11. Current Status and Development of Vaccines and Other Biologics for Human Rabies Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Nagarajan, Thirumeni; Ertl, Hildegund

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a neglected viral zoonosis with the highest case fatality of any infectious disease. Pasteur's historical accomplishments during the late 19(th) century began the process of human vaccine development, continuing to evolve into the 21(st) century. Over the past 35 years, great improvements occurred in the production of potent tissue culture vaccines and the gradual removal from the market of unsafe nerve tissue products. Timely and appropriate administration of modern biologics virtually assures survivorship, even after severe exposures. Nevertheless, in the developing world, if not provided for free nationally, the cost of a single course of human prophylaxis exceeds the average monthly wage of the common worker. Beyond traditional approaches, recombinant, sub-unit and other novel methods are underway to improve the availability of safe, effective and more affordable rabies biologics. PMID:26796599

  12. Comparative systems biology between human and animal models based on next-generation sequencing methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Qi ZHAO; Gong-Hua LI; Jing-Fei HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Animal models provide myriad benefits to both experimental and clinical research.Unfortunately,in many situations,they fall short of expected results or provide contradictory results.In part,this can be the result of traditional molecular biological approaches that are relatively inefficient in elucidating underlying molecular mechanism.To improve the efficacy of animal models,a technological breakthrough is required.The growing availability and application of the high-throughput methods make systematic comparisons between human and animal models easier to perform.In the present study,we introduce the concept of the comparative systems biology,which we define as "comparisons of biological systems in different states or species used to achieve an integrated understanding of life forms with all their characteristic complexity of interactions at multiple levels".Furthermore,we discuss the applications of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq technologies to comparative systems biology between human and animal models and assess the potential applications for this approach in the future studies.

  13. Biological Width around One- and Two-Piece Implants Retrieved from Human Jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Judgar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several histologic studies regarding peri-implant soft tissues and biological width around dental implants have been done in animals. However, these findings in human peri-implant soft tissues are very scarce. Therefore, the aim of this case series was to compare the biological width around unloaded one- and two-piece implants retrieved from human jaws. Eight partially edentulous patients received 2 test implants in the posterior mandible: one-piece (solid implants that comprise implant and abutment in one piece and two-piece (external hexagon with a healing abutment implants. After 4 months of healing, the implants and surrounding tissue were removed for histologic analysis. The retrieved implants showed healthy peri-implant bone and exhibited early stages of maturation. Marginal bone loss, gaps, and fibrous tissue were not present around retrieved specimens. The biologic width dimension ranged between 2.55 ± 0.16 and 3.26 ± 0.15 to one- and two-piece implants, respectively (P0.05. Within the limits of this study, it could be shown that two-piece implants resulted in the thickening of the connective tissue attachment, resulting in the increase of the biological width, when compared to one-piece implants.

  14. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  15. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation

  16. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-3.

    OpenAIRE

    Weeda, G; van Ham, R C; Masurel, R; Westerveld, A; Odijk, H; Wit, J.; Bootsma, D; van der Eb, A J; Hoeijmakers, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    In this report we present the cloning, partial characterization, and preliminary studies of the biological activity of a human gene, designated ERCC-3, involved in early steps of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The gene was cloned after genomic DNA transfection of human (HeLa) chromosomal DNA together with dominant marker pSV3gptH to the UV-sensitive, incision-defective Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant 27-1. This mutant belongs to complementation group 3 of repair-deficient rodent m...

  17. Stability and biological activity evaluations of PEGylated human basic fibroblast growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Hadadian, Shahin; Shamassebi, Dariush Norouzian; Mirzahoseini, Hasan; Shokrgozar, Mohamad Ali; Bouzari, Saeid; Sepahi, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human basic fibroblast growth factor (hBFGF) is a heparin-binding growth factor and stimulates the proliferation of a wide variety of cells and tissues causing survival properties and its stability and biological activity improvements have received much attention. Materials and Methods: In the present work, hBFGF produced by engineered Escherichia coli and purified by cation exchange and heparin affinity chromatography, was PEGylated under appropriate condition employing 10 kD pol...

  18. Biological Monitoring of human exposure to neonicotinoids using urine samples, and neonicotinoid excretion kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Harada, Kouji H; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-Toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults...

  19. Human embryonic stem cell research, justice, and the problem of unequal biological access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moller Mark S

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2003, Ruth Faden and eighteen other colleagues argued that a "problem of unequal biological access" is likely to arise in access to therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. They showed that unless deliberate steps are taken in the United States to ensure that the human embryonic stem cell lines available to researchers mirrors the genetic diversity of the general population, white Americans will likely receive the benefits of these therapies to the relative exclusion of minority ethnic groups. Over the past five years the problem of unequal biological access has not received much attention from politicians, bioethicists and even many researchers in the United States, in spite of the widely held belief in the country that there is an obligation to prevent and correct ethnic disparities in access to medical care. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the problem of unequal biological access and of the need to do more than is currently being done to ensure that ethnic disparities in access to human embryonic stem cell-based therapies do not arise. Specifically, this paper explains why the problem of unequal biological access will likely arise in the United States in such a way that white Americans will disproportionately receive most of the benefits of the therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. It also argues for why there is an obligation to prevent these ethnic disparities in access from happening and outlines four steps that need to be taken towards meeting this obligation.

  20. Urgent Biophilia: Human-Nature Interactions and Biological Attractions in Disaster Resilience

    OpenAIRE

    Keith G. Tidball

    2012-01-01

    This contribution builds upon contemporary work on principles of biological attraction as well as earlier work on biophilia while synthesizing literatures on restorative environments, community-based ecological restoration, and both community and social-ecological disaster resilience. It suggests that when humans, faced with a disaster, as individuals and as communities and populations, seek engagement with nature to further their efforts to summon and demonstrate resilience in the face of a ...

  1. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  2. Systems biology approach predicts immunogenicity of the yellow fever vaccine in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Querec, Troy D; Akondy, Rama S.; Lee, Eva K.; Cao, Weiping; Nakaya, Helder I.; Teuwen, Dirk; Pirani, Ali; Gernert, Kim; Deng, Jiusheng; Marzolf, Bruz; Kennedy, Kathleen; Wu, Haiyan; Bennouna, Soumaya; Oluoch, Herold; Miller, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge in vaccinology is to prospectively determine vaccine efficacy. Here we have used a systems biology approach to identify early gene ‘signatures’ that predicted immune responses in humans vaccinated with yellow fever vaccine YF-17D. Vaccination induced genes that regulate virus innate sensing and type I interferon production. Computational analyses identified a gene signature, including complement protein C1qB and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4—an or...

  3. The Biological Study of the Cultured Human Lens Epithelial Cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The human lens epithelial cells (HLE) cultured in vitro was established in normal and cataractous lenses. The biological feature, histological characteristics and the ultrastructure of the cultured HLE cells were investigated. The results reveal that the proliferative capacity of the culutured HLE cells is reversely proportional to the donour age; the cultured HLE cells has the limited proliferative capacity in vitro. The relieve of the contact inhibition is the effective trigger of the HLE cell prolife...

  4. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats' performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects' performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans. PMID:26795072

  5. Human development I: Twenty Fundamental Problems of Biology, Medicine, and Neuro-Psychology Related to Biological Information

    OpenAIRE

    Tyge Dahl Hermansen; Søren Ventegodt; Erik Rald; Birgitte Clausen; Maj Lyck Nielsen; Joav Merrick

    2006-01-01

    In a new series of papers, we address a number of unsolved problems in biology today. First of all, the unsolved enigma concerning how the differentiation from a single zygote to an adult individual happens has been object for severe research for decades. By uncovering a new holistic biological paradigm that introduces an energetic-informational interpretation of reality as a new way to experience biology, these papers will try to solve the problems connected with the events of biological ont...

  6. Biological stimulation of the Human skin applying health promoting light and plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awakowicz, P.; Bibinov, N. [Center for Plasma Science and Technology, Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany); Born, M.; Niemann, U. [Philips Research, Aachen (Germany); Busse, B. [Zell-Kontakt GmbH, Noerten-Hardenberg (Germany); Gesche, R.; Kuehn, S.; Porteanu, H.E. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Helmke, A. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Goettingen (Germany); Kaemling, A.; Wandke, D. [CINOGY GmbH, Duderstadt (Germany); Kolb-Bachofen, V.; Liebmann, J. [Institute for Immunobiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kovacs, R.; Mertens, N.; Scherer, J. [Aurion Anlagentechnik GmbH, Seligenstadt (Germany); Oplaender, C.; Suschek, C. [Clinic for Plastic Surgery, University Clinic, Aachen (Germany); Vioel, W. [Laser-Laboratorium, Goettingen (Germany); University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    In the frame of BMBF project ''BioLiP'', new physical treatment techniques aiming at medical treatment of the human skin have been developed. The acronym BioLiP stands for ''Desinfektion, Entkeimung und biologische Stimulation der Haut durch gesundheitsfoerdernde Licht- und Plasmaquellen'' (Disinfection, germ reduction and biological stimulation of the human skin by health promoting light and plasma sources). A source applying a low-temperature dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) has been investigated on its effectiveness for skin disinfection and stimulation of biological material. Alternatively an atmospheric plasma source consisting of a microwave resonator combined with a solid state power oscillator has been examined. This concept which allows for a compact and efficient design avoiding external microwave power supply and matching units has been optimized with respect to nitrogen monoxide (NO) production in high yields. In both cases various application possibilities in the medical and biological domain are opened up. Light sources in the visible spectral range have been investigated with respect to the proliferation of human cell types. Intensive highly selective blue light sources based on LED technology can slow down proliferation rates without inducing toxic effects which offers new opportunities for treatments of so-called hyperproliferative skin conditions (e.g. with psoriasis or in wound healing) using UV-free light. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Radiation cytogenetic in vitro studies on human donors in the development of a suitable biological dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report is on the work carried out under the Agency research contract 3173/RB entitled ''Radiation cytogenetic in vitro studies on human donors in the development of a suitable biological dosimeter'', at the Clinical Hospital Centre ''Zvezdara'' in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. In co-operation and co-ordination dissemination with an international team of cytogeneticists under the IAEA CRP, the development of a suitable biological dosimetry system has been accomplished at the national institute to assist reliably in the absorbed radiation-dose assessment of accidentally-over-exposed personnel. The quantitative yield of asymmetrical chromosomal aberrations, such as dicentrics, rings and fragments consequent to exposure(s) to radiation overdose, help in such estimation of vital prognostic and radiation protection significance. This biological dosimeter system is particularly essential where the exposed person was not wearing any physical dosemeter during the accident. Prerequisite for implementation of an effective biological dosimetry is the availability of a reliable standard dose-response curve and an adherence to a protocol for lymphocytic chromosome analysis in first division phase of lymphocytes. The validation of the reported biological dosimeter is established through its successful analysis of a simulated over-exposure incident, with the associated error of less than 10%. Analytical cytogenetic methods for whole- and part-body acute exposures have been discussed. Part of the results have been reported in the publications under the CRP concerned

  8. The preparation of albumin as a biological drug from human plasma by fiber filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi Hosseini K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: In recent years, consumption of whole-blood for the treatment of patients has decreased but use of biological plasma-derived medicines such as albumin, immunoglobulin and coagulation factors have increased instead. Paying attention to albumin molecular structure is important for its isolation from human plasma. Albumin is a single-chain protein consisting of about 585 amino acids and a molecular weight of 66500 Daltons. Albumin is a stable molecule and it is spherical in shape. There are different methods for human albumin preparation. Considering the large consumption of this biological drug in clinical settings, methods with fewer steps in production line are of big advantage in saving time and manufacturing more products."n "nMethods: In this project, we prepared human albumin using hollow fiber cartridges in order to omit the rework on fraction V+VI. Human albumin is usually produced by the application of cold ethanol method, where albumin is obtained from fraction V by doing a rework on fraction V+VI to separate fraction V."n "nResults: In the current work, human albumin was prepared from fraction V+VI by the help of hollow fiber cartridges. With a concentration of 20%, the obtained albumin had 96.5% of monomer and 3.5% of polymer and polymer aggregate."n "nConclusion: Comparing the obtained human albumin with a number of commercial human albumin samples by the use of SDS-page, the results were satisfactory regarding the 3.5 percent polymer and aggregate rate for the prepared albumin.

  9. Circadian Control of the Daily Plasma Glucose Rhythm: An Interplay of GABA and Glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Andries Kalsbeek; Ewout Foppen; Ingrid Schalij; Caroline Van Heijningen; Jan van der Vliet; Eric Fliers; Ruud M. Buijs

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian biological clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), imposes its temporal structure on the organism via neural and endocrine outputs. To further investigate SCN control of the autonomic nervous system we focused in the present study on the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is an important target area of biological clock output and harbors the pre-autonomic neurons that control peripheral sympathet...

  10. Purification and characterization of biologically active recombinant human Eppin expressed in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qing-yi; GU Xiao-jian; YANG Jin; WANG Jun-hong; TANG Bo; WU Hong-fei

    2008-01-01

    Background Eppin(epididymis protease inhibitor)appears to play an important role in primate fertility.However,the function of Eppin and its antibody in men and its relationship with men's infertility are poorly studied.To reveal the significance and possibility of detection of anti-Eppin antibody in clinical infertilty cases,we developed an Escherichia coli expression system for the expression of biologically actire human Eppin.Methods The human Eppin gene was cloned into PET-28a(+)vector after induction with 0.5 mmol/L isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside(IPTG)at 26℃ for 4 hours,and the expressed fusion protein His6-Eppin was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography.Afterwards,six female 8-week-old Balb/c mice were immunized with purified His6-Eppin for three weeks.Their sera were collected and polyclonal antibodies against His6-Eppin were purified,all of which were further verified by Western-blot and immunofluorescence analysis.Results About 18.33 mg His6-Eppin was obtained from 1-L flask culture.The produced polyclonal antibodies against His6-Eppin recognized the Eppin protein both in human epididymis and in HEK293T cells by over-expression of the recombinant human Eppin.Conclusion The purified His6-Eppin protein has biological activity,which might be a candidate for clinical diagnosis of infertility and development of male immuno-contraceptive agents.

  11. Prokaryotic Expression and Biological Activity Analysis of Human Ar-resten Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zifang; ZHENG Qichang; LI Wei; XIONG Jun; SHANG Dan; SHU Xiaogang

    2005-01-01

    To express recombinant arresten in Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and investigate its biological activity, prokaryotic expression vector of human arresten gene was constructed by gene engineering. Human arresten gene was amplified from recombinant plasmid pGEMArr by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and inserted into prokaryotic expression vector pRSET containing T7 promoter. Restriction analysis and DNA sequencing verified that the arresten gene was correctly cloned into the expression vector. The recombinant plasmid pRSETAt was subsequently transformed into E. Coli BL21 (DE3), and the target gene was expressed under induction of IPTG. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the recombinant protein with a molecular weight of 29 kD (1 kD=0. 992 1 ku) amounted to 29 % of the total bacterial proteins. After purification and renaturation, the recombinant protein could significantly suppress the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These results suggested that the expression of a biologically active form of human arresten in the pRSET expression system laid a foundation for further study on the mechanistic insight into arresten action on angiogenesis and the development of powerful anti-cancer drugs.

  12. The Occurrence, Fate and Biological Activities of C-glycosyl Flavonoids in the Human Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courts, Fraser L; Williamson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The human diet contains a wide variety of plant-derived flavonoids, many of which are glycosylated via an O- or less commonly a C-glycosidic linkage. The distribution, quantity, and biological effects of C-glycosyl flavonoids in the human diet have received little attention in the literature in comparison to their O-linked counterparts, however, despite being present in many common foodstuffs. The structural nature, nomenclature, and distribution of C-glycosyl flavonoids in the human diet are, therefore, reviewed. Forty-three dietary flavonoids are revealed to be C-glycosylated, arising from the dihydrochalcone, flavone, and flavan-3-ol backbones, and distributed among edible fruits, cereals, leaves, and stems. C-linked sugar groups are shown to include arabinose, galactose, glucose, rutinose, and xylose, often being present more than once on a single flavonoid backbone and occasionally in tandem with O-linked glucose or rutinose groups. The pharmacokinetic fate of these compounds is discussed with particular reference to their apparent lack of interaction with hydrolytic mechanisms known to influence the fate of O-glycosylated dietary flavonoids, explaining the unusual but potentially important appearance of intact C-glycosylated flavonoid metabolites in human urine following oral administration. Finally, the potential biological significance of these compounds is reviewed, describing mechanisms of antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, anxiolytic, antispasmodic, and hepatoprotective effects. PMID:24915338

  13. Alpha-amylase circadian rhythm of young rat parotid gland: an endogenous rhythm with maternal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1992-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in the parotid glands of 25-day-old rats were studied under different experimental designs (fasting, reversed photoperiod, constant lighting conditions and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of fasted rats did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm was present, with changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and postnatal life in constant light or dark. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, and with maternal coordination. PMID:1610312

  14. The effects of an interdisciplinary undergraduate human biology program on socioscientific reasoning, content learning, and understanding of inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Jennifer L.

    Preparing students to take informed positions on complex problems through critical evaluation is a primary goal of university education. Socioscientific issues (SSI) have been established as effective contexts for students to develop this competency, as well as reasoning skills and content knowledge. This mixed-methods study investigates the effects of an interdisciplinary undergraduate human biology program focused on the development of evidence-based reasoning to form personal commitments on SSI. Specifically, the study investigates how human biology majors differ from traditional biology majors in their reasoning with SSI, their perceptions of experiences with SSI, their understanding of scientific inquiry, their levels and perceptions of science content knowledge, and their general program perceptions. These outcomes were assessed through open-ended questionnaires on SSI and scientific inquiry and a basic biology concept test administered to 95 participants representing both programs and 16 semi-structured student interviews. Although the two groups did not differ significantly in their decisions or factors influencing their decisions in SSI, human biology majors showed higher levels of socioscientific reasoning, suggesting that learning contextualized in SSI helped them understand and reason with similar issues. While biology majors reported few experiences with socioscientific reasoning, human biology majors felt well equipped to reason with SSI and more likely to consider alternative perspectives in their decision making. Human biology majors also were more likely to view social science research as a form of inquiry and less likely to view scientific inquiry as purely experimental. No difference was found between groups in basic biology content knowledge, although human biology majors felt they were exposed to less detailed biology content. This exploratory study illustrates a novel approach to interdisciplinary, SSI-based science education at the college

  15. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  16. The sensory-motor theory of rhythm and beat induction 20 years on: A new synthesis and future perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Philip Todd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Some 20 years ago Todd and colleagues proposed that rhythm perception is mediated by the conjunction of a sensory representation of the auditory input and a motor representation of the body (Todd 1994, 1995, and that a sense of motion from sound is mediated by the vestibular system (Todd 1992, 1993. These ideas were developed into a sensory-motor theory of rhythm and beat induction (Todd et al. 1999. A neurological substrate was proposed which might form the biological basis of the theory (Todd et al. 2002. The theory was implemented as a computational model and a number of experiments conducted to test it. In the following time there have been several key developments. One is the demonstration that the vestibular system is primal to rhythm perception, and in related work several experiments have provided further evidence that rhythm perception is body dependent. Another is independent advances in imaging, which have revealed the brain areas associated with both vestibular processing and rhythm perception. A third is the finding that vestibular receptors contribute to auditory evoked potentials (Todd et al. 2014ab. These behavioural and neurobiological developments demand a theoretical overview which could provide a new synthesis over the domain of rhythm perception. In this paper we suggest four propositions as the basis for such a synthesis. (1 Rhythm perception is a form of vestibular perception; (2 Rhythm perception evokes both external and internal guidance of somatotopic representations; (3 A link from the limbic system to the internal guidance pathway mediates the dance habit; (4 The vestibular reward mechanism is innate. The new synthesis provides an explanation for a number of phenomena not often considered by rhythm researchers. We discuss these along with possible computational implementations and alternative models and propose a number of new directions for future research.

  17. The sensory-motor theory of rhythm and beat induction 20 years on: a new synthesis and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P. M.; Lee, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Some 20 years ago Todd and colleagues proposed that rhythm perception is mediated by the conjunction of a sensory representation of the auditory input and a motor representation of the body (Todd, 1994a, 1995), and that a sense of motion from sound is mediated by the vestibular system (Todd, 1992a, 1993b). These ideas were developed into a sensory-motor theory of rhythm and beat induction (Todd et al., 1999). A neurological substrate was proposed which might form the biological basis of the theory (Todd et al., 2002). The theory was implemented as a computational model and a number of experiments conducted to test it. In the following time there have been several key developments. One is the demonstration that the vestibular system is primal to rhythm perception, and in related work several experiments have provided further evidence that rhythm perception is body dependent. Another is independent advances in imaging, which have revealed the brain areas associated with both vestibular processing and rhythm perception. A third is the finding that vestibular receptors contribute to auditory evoked potentials (Todd et al., 2014a,b). These behavioral and neurobiological developments demand a theoretical overview which could provide a new synthesis over the domain of rhythm perception. In this paper we suggest four propositions as the basis for such a synthesis. (1) Rhythm perception is a form of vestibular perception; (2) Rhythm perception evokes both external and internal guidance of somatotopic representations; (3) A link from the limbic system to the internal guidance pathway mediates the “dance habit”; (4) The vestibular reward mechanism is innate. The new synthesis provides an explanation for a number of phenomena not often considered by rhythm researchers. We discuss these along with possible computational implementations and alternative models and propose a number of new directions for future research. PMID:26379522

  18. Urgent Biophilia: Human-Nature Interactions and Biological Attractions in Disaster Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith G. Tidball

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution builds upon contemporary work on principles of biological attraction as well as earlier work on biophilia while synthesizing literatures on restorative environments, community-based ecological restoration, and both community and social-ecological disaster resilience. It suggests that when humans, faced with a disaster, as individuals and as communities and populations, seek engagement with nature to further their efforts to summon and demonstrate resilience in the face of a crisis, they exemplify an urgent biophilia. This urgent biophilia represents an important set of human-nature interactions in SES characterized by hazard, disaster, or vulnerability, often appearing in the 'backloop' of the adaptive cycle. The relationships that human-nature interactions have to other components within interdependent systems at many different scales may be one critical source of resilience in disaster and related contexts. In other words, the affinity we humans have for the rest of nature, the process of remembering that attraction, and the urge to express it through creation of restorative environments, which may also restore or increase ecological function, may confer resilience across multiple scales. In making this argument, the paper also represents a novel contribution to further theorizing alternatives to anthropocentric understandings of human-nature relations, and strongly makes the case for humans as part of, not separate from, ecosystems.

  19. Microglia modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Morales, Teresa; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Alcantara-Gonzalez, David; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has been linked to the induction of apneas and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, whereas proinflammatory mediators inhibit breathing when applied peripherally or directly into the CNS. Considering that peripheral inflammation can activate microglia in the CNS and that this cell type can directly release all proinflammatory mediators that modulate breathing, it is likely that microglia can modulate breathing generation. It might do so also in hypoxia, since microglia are sensitive to hypoxia, and peripheral proinflammatory conditions affect gasping generation and autoresuscitation. Here, we tested whether microglial activation or inhibition affected respiratory rhythm generation. By measuring breathing as well as the activity of the respiratory rhythm generator (the preBötzinger complex), we found that several microglial activators or inhibitors, applied intracisternally in vivo or in the recording bath in vitro, affect the generation of the respiratory rhythms both in normoxia and hypoxia. Furthermore, microglial activation with lipopolysaccharide affected the ability of the animals to autoresuscitate after hypoxic conditions, an effect that is blocked when lipopolysaccharide is co-applied with the microglial inhibitor minocycline. Moreover, we found that the modulation of respiratory rhythm generation induced in vitro by microglial inhibitors was reproduced by microglial depletion. In conclusion, our data show that microglia can modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation. PMID:26678570

  20. The mood stabilizer valproic acid opposes the effects of dopamine on circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Joiner, William J; McCarthy, Michael J; Kiessling, Silke; Barandas, Rita; Young, Jared W; Cermakian, Nicolas; Welsh, David K

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous circadian (∼24 h) clocks regulate key physiological and cognitive processes via rhythmic expression of clock genes. The main circadian pacemaker is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mood disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD), are commonly associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. Dopamine (DA) contributes to mania in BD and has direct impact on clock gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that high levels of DA during episodes of mania contribute to disturbed circadian rhythms in BD. The mood stabilizer valproic acid (VPA) also affects circadian rhythms. Thus, we further hypothesized that VPA normalizes circadian disturbances caused by elevated levels of DA. To test these hypotheses, we examined locomotor rhythms and circadian gene cycling in mice with reduced expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT-KD mice), which results in elevated DA levels and mania-like behavior. We found that elevated DA signaling lengthened the circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants. In contrast, we found that VPA shortened circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants, hippocampal cell lines, and human fibroblasts from BD patients. Thus, DA and VPA have opposing effects on circadian period. To test whether the impact of VPA on circadian rhythms contributes to its behavioral effects, we fed VPA to DAT-deficient Drosophila with and without functioning circadian clocks. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that VPA had potent activity-suppressing effects in hyperactive DAT-deficient flies with intact circadian clocks. However, these effects were attenuated in DAT-deficient flies in which circadian clocks were disrupted, suggesting that VPA functions partly through the circadian clock to suppress activity. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence across species that elevated DA signaling lengthens the circadian

  1. Confronting actual influence of radiation on human bodies and biological defense mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, social, economical, psychological pressures on local residents and fears of radiation among the general public have not been resolved. Based on the assumption that the negligence of specialists to clearly explain the influence of radiation on human bodies to the general public is the factor for above mentioned pressures and fears, the influence of radiation from a realistic view was discussed. The topics covered are: (1) understanding the meaning of radiation regulation, (2) radiation and threshold values, (3) actual influence of low-dose radiation, (4) chemical and biological defense in defense mechanism against radiation, (5) problems raised by Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. Furthermore, the article explains the principles and the applications of biological defense function activation, and suggested that self-help efforts to fight against stress are from now on. (S.K.)

  2. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  3. Systems biology approach predicts immunogenicity of the yellow fever vaccine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eva K; Cao, Weiping; Nakaya, Helder I; Teuwen, Dirk; Pirani, Ali; Gernert, Kim; Deng, Jiusheng; Marzolf, Bruz; Kennedy, Kathleen; Wu, Haiyan; Bennouna, Soumaya; Oluoch, Herold; Miller, Joseph; Vencio, Ricardo Z; Mulligan, Mark; Aderem, Alan; Ahmed, Rafi; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in vaccinology is to prospectively determine vaccine efficacy. Here we have used a systems biology approach to identify early gene ‘signatures’ that predicted immune responses in humans vaccinated with yellow fever vaccine YF-17D. Vaccination induced genes that regulate virus innate sensing and type I interferon production. Computational analyses identified a gene signature, including complement protein C1qB and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4—an orchestrator of the integrated stress response—that correlated with and predicted YF-17D CD8+ T cell responses with up to 90% accuracy in an independent, blinded trial. A distinct signature, including B cell growth factor TNFRS17, predicted the neutralizing antibody response with up to 100% accuracy. These data highlight the utility of systems biology approaches in predicting vaccine efficacy. PMID:19029902

  4. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangar, S; Adams, R I; Pasut, W; Huffman, J A; Arens, E A; Taylor, J W; Bruns, T D; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-04-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m(3) chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5-10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million particles per person-h. Walking was associated with a 5-6× increase in the emission rate. During both walking and sitting, 60-70% or more of emissions originated from the floor. The increase in emissions during walking (vs. while sitting) was mainly attributable to release of particles from the floor; the associated increased vigor of upper body movements also contributed. Clothing, or its frictional interaction with human skin, was demonstrated to be a source of coarse particles, and especially of the highly fluorescent fraction. Emission rates of FBAPs previously reported for lecture classes were well bounded by the experimental results obtained in this chamber study. In both settings, the size distribution of occupant FBAP emissions had a dominant mode in the 3-5 μm diameter range. PMID:25704637

  5. Synthetic biology meets bioprinting: enabling technologies for humans on Mars (and Earth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J

    2016-08-15

    Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and by re-supply. Thus materials brought from Earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches, a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because life can replicate and repair itself, and perform a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology enhances and expands life's evolved repertoire. Using organisms as feedstock, additive manufacturing through bioprinting will make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. This new approach and the resulting novel products will enable human exploration and settlement on Mars, while providing new manufacturing approaches for life on Earth. PMID:27528764

  6. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-04-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid-phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0-72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as N-glucuronides. The absorption was estimated at 0.6% of the 70±15 mg of TCC in the soap used. The TCC-N-glucuronide urine concentration varied widely among the subjects, and continuous daily use of the soap led to steady state levels of excretion. In order to assess potential biological effects arising from this exposure, we screened TCC for the inhibition of human enzymes in vitro. We demonstrate that TCC is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), whereas TCC's major metabolites lack strong inhibitory activity. Topical administration of TCC at similar levels to rats in a preliminary in vivo study, however, failed to alter plasma biomarkers of sEH activity. Overall the analytical strategy described here revealed that use of TCC soap causes exposure levels that warrant further evaluation. PMID:21381656

  7. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: Biological activities in vitro and in vivo, pathological correlation to human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yi-Hui; Yan, Jie; Mao, Ya-Fei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the biological activity of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) lipopolysaccharide (H-LPS) and understand pathological correlation between H-LPS and human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer.

  8. Time-Specific Fear Acts as a Non-Photic Entraining Stimulus of Circadian Rhythms in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pellman, Blake A.; Earnest Kim; Melissa Reilly; James Kashima; Oleksiy Motch; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Kim, Jeansok J.

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all animals have endogenous clock mechanisms that “entrain” to the light-dark (LD) cycle and synchronize psychophysiological functions to optimal times for exploring resources and avoiding dangers in the environment. Such circadian rhythms are vital to human mental health, but it is unknown whether circadian rhythms “entrained” to the LD cycle can be overridden by entrainment to daily recurring threats. We show that unsignaled nocturnal footshock caused rats living in an “ethologica...

  9. Scientific Goals and Objectives for the Human Exploration of Mars: 1. Biology and Atmosphere/Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Garvin, J. B.; Anbar, A. D.; Beaty, D. W.; Bell, M. S.; Clancy, R. T.; Cockell, C. S.; Connerney, J. E.; Doran, P. T.; Delory, G.; Dickson, J. T.; Elphic, R. C.; Eppler, D. B.; Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Head, J. W.; Helper, M.; Gruener, J. E.; Heldmann, J.; Hipkin, V.; Lane, M. D.; Levy, J.; Moersch, J.; Ori, G. G.; Peach, L.; Poulet, F.

    2008-01-01

    To prepare for the exploration of Mars by humans, as outlined in the new national vision for Space Exploration (VSE), the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG), chartered by NASA's Mars Exploration Program (MEP), formed a Human Exploration of Mars Science Analysis Group (HEM-SAG), in March 2007. HEM-SAG was chartered to develop the scientific goals and objectives for the human exploration of Mars based on the Mars Scientific Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities.1 The HEM-SAG is one of several humans to Mars scientific, engineering and mission architecture studies chartered in 2007 to support NASA s plans for the human exploration of Mars. The HEM-SAG is composed of about 30 Mars scientists representing the disciplines of Mars biology, climate/atmosphere, geology and geophysics from the U.S., Canada, England, France, Italy and Spain. MEPAG selected Drs. James B. Garvin (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) and Joel S. Levine (NASA Langley Research Center) to serve as HEMSAG co-chairs. The HEM-SAG team conducted 20 telecons and convened three face-to-face meetings from March through October 2007. The management of MEP and MEPAG were briefed on the HEM-SAG interim findings in May. The HEM-SAG final report was presented on-line to the full MEPAG membership and was presented at the MEPAG meeting on February 20-21, 2008. This presentation will outline the HEM-SAG biology and climate/atmosphere goals and objectives. A companion paper will outline the HEM-SAG geology and geophysics goals and objectives.

  10. [Rhythm disorders and cardiac crypto-malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J M; Raczka, F; Cung, T T; Combes, N; Bortone, A; Gaty, D

    2005-12-01

    Faced with a cardiac arrhythmia occuring in an apparently healthy heart, it is necessary to perform an anatomical investigation to detect any unsuspected anomalies. Congenital cardiopathy must certainly be excluded, as this is often responsible for rhythm disorders and/or cardiac conduction defects. Similarly, any acquired conditions, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac tumour must be sought. However, the possibility should always be considered of a minimal congenital malformation, which could be repsonsible for: any type of cardiac arrhythmia: rhythm disorder or conduction defect at the atrial, junctional or ventricular level, with a benign or serious prognosis. Unexpected therapeutic difficulties during radiofrequency ablation procedures or at implantation of pacemakers or defibrillators. Together with rhythm studies, the investigation of choice is high quality imaging, either the classic left or right angiography or the more modern cardiac CT or intracardiac mapping. PMID:16433240

  11. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human

  12. The role of biological clock in glucose homeostasis 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Chrościcki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the biological clock is based on a rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes. As a result of their transcripto-translational associations, endogenous rhythms in the synthesis of key proteins of various physiological and metabolic processes are created. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms exists in the central nervous system. The master circadian clock, localized in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, regulates multiple metabolic pathways, while feeding behavior and metabolite availability can in turn regulate the circadian clock. It is also suggested that in the brain there is a food entrainable oscillator (FEO or oscillators, resulting in activation of both food anticipatory activity and hormone secretion that control digestion processes. Moreover, most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks. Maintenance of the glucose homeostasis is particularly important for the proper function of the body, as this sugar is the main source of energy for the brain, retina, erythrocytes and skeletal muscles. Thus, glucose production and utilization are synchronized in time. The hypothalamic excited orexin neurons control energy balance of organism and modulate the glucose production and utilization. Deficiency of orexin action results in narcolepsy and weight gain, whereas glucose and amino acids can affect activity of the orexin cells. Large-scale genetic studies in rodents and humans provide evidence for the involvement of disrupted clock gene expression rhythms in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In general, the current lifestyle of the developed modern societies disturbs the action of biological clock. 

  13. Human Development VII: A Spiral Fractal Model of Fine Structure of Physical Energy Could Explain Central Aspects of Biological Information, Biological Organization and Biological Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have made a draft of a physical fractal essence of the universe, a sketch of a new cosmology, which we believe to lay at the root of our new holistic biological paradigm. We present the fractal roomy spiraled structures and the energy-rich dancing “infinite strings” or lines of the universe that our hypothesis is based upon. The geometric language of this cosmology is symbolic and both pre-mathematical and pre-philosophical. The symbols are both text and figures, and using these we step by step explain the new model that at least to some extent is able to explain the complex informational system behind morphogenesis, ontogenesis, regeneration and healing. We suggest that it is from this highly dynamic spiraled structure that organization of cells, organs, and the wholeness of the human being including consciousness emerge. The model of ““dancing fractal spirals” carries many similarities to premodern cultures descriptions of the energy of the life and universe. Examples are the Native American shamanistic descriptions of their perception of energy and the old Indian Yogis descriptions of the life-energy within the body and outside. Similar ideas of energy and matter are found in the modern superstring theories. The model of the informational system of the organism gives new meaning to Bateson’s definition of information: “A difference that makes a difference”, and indicates how information-directed self-organization can exist on high structural levels in living organisms, giving birth to their subjectivity and consciousness.

  14. Production and Analysis of Biological Properties of Recombinant Human Apolipoprotein A-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchenko, A V; Kotova, M V; Tverdohleb, N V; Knyazev, R A; Polyakov, L M

    2015-11-01

    Production of recombinant human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) in E. coli cells is described and its biological properties are compared with those of natural protein. Recombinant apoA-I was isolated as a chimeric polypeptide and then processed to a mature form apoA-I (rapo-I). We studied the ability of the resulting protein to penetrate into hepatocyte nuclei and regulate the rate of DNA biosynthesis in complex with estriol. Penetration of rapoA-I conjugated with FITC into hepatocyte nuclei was demonstrated. rapoA-I-estriol and apoA-I-estriol complexes induced similar increase in DNA biosynthesis rate in isolated hepatocytes, which confi rms functional similarity of the obtained recombinant mature protein (rapoA-I) and native human apoA-I. PMID:26612626

  15. Review of the biological effects of weightlessness on the human endocrine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1993-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that there are basic physiological changes in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalad fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known but the general approach has been to investigate systemic and hormonal changes. However, data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs, Spacelab 3 (SL-3), Spacelab D-I (SL-DI), and now the new SLS-1 missions support a more basic biological response to microgravity that may occur at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level. This report summarizes ground-based and SLS-1 experiments that examined the mechanism of loss of red blood cell mass in humans, the loss of bone mass and lowered osteoblast growth under space flight conditions, and loss of immune function in microgravity.

  16. Biological Characteristics of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA Xian'en; WANG Lixia; HOU Jianfeng; ZHANG Ruicheng; WANG Haiyong; YANG Chenyuan

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Some biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in vitro were observed. hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow and purified by density gradient centrifugation method, and then cultured in vitro. The proliferation and growth characteristics of hMSCs were observed in primary and passage culture. MSCs of passage 3 were examined for the purify by positive rate of CD29 and CD44 through flow cytometry. Human bone marrow MSCs showed active proliferation capacity in vitro. The purify of MSCs separated by our method was higher than 90 %. It was concluded that hMSCs have been successfully cultured and expanded effectively. It provided a foundation for further investigation and application of MSCs.

  17. The Biology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di QIN; Chun LU

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV),also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8),is discovered in 1994 from Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesion of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)patient.In addition to its association with KS,KSHV has also been implicated as the causative agent of two other AIDS-associated malignancies:primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD).KSHV is a complex DNA virus that not only has the ability to promote cellular growth and survival for tumor development,but also can provoke deregulated angiogenesis,inflammation,and modulate the patient's immune system in favor of tumor growth.As KSHV is a necessary but not sufficient etiological factor for KS,human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a very important cofactor.Here we review the basic information about the biology of KSHV,development of pathogenesis and interaction between KSHV and HIV.

  18. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability. PMID:25352979

  19. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Bonmati-Carrion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night, whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD, including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.

  20. Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lango Allen, Hana; Estrada, Karol; Lettre, Guillaume; Berndt, Sonja I.; Weedon, Michael N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Willer, Cristen J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ferreira, Teresa; Wood, Andrew R.; Weyant, Robert J.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Soranzo, Nicole; Park, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Jian; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Randall, Joshua C.; Qi, Lu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Mägi, Reedik; Pastinen, Tomi; Liang, Liming; Heid, Iris M.; Luan, Jian'an; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Winkler, Thomas W.; Goddard, Michael E.; Lo, Ken Sin; Palmer, Cameron; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Johansson, Åsa; Zillikens, M.Carola; Feitosa, Mary F.; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Kraft, Peter; Mangino, Massimo; Prokopenko, Inga; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Ernst, Florian; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Monda, Keri L.; Polasek, Ozren; Preuss, Michael; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Perry, John R.B.; Surakka, Ida; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Altmaier, Elizabeth L.; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bhangale, Tushar; Boucher, Gabrielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Constance; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew N.; Dixon, Anna L.; Gibson, Quince; Grundberg, Elin; Hao, Ke; Junttila, M. Juhani; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kettunen, Johannes; König, Inke R.; Kwan, Tony; Lawrence, Robert W.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lorentzon, Mattias; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Martina; Ngwa, Julius Suh; Purcell, Shaun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Salem, Rany M.; Salvi, Erika; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Jianxin; Sovio, Ulla; Thompson, John R.; Turchin, Michael C.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Verlaan, Dominique J.; Vitart, Veronique; White, Charles C.; Ziegler, Andreas; Almgren, Peter; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Campbell, Harry; Citterio, Lorena; De Grandi, Alessandro; Dominiczak, Anna; Duan, Jubao; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Glorioso, Nicola; Haiqing, Shen; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Illig, Thomas; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Koiranen, Markku; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Laitinen, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Marusic, Ana; Maschio, Andrea; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Petersmann, Astrid; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Walters, G.Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zagato, Laura; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Alavere, Helene; Farrall, Martin; McArdle, Wendy L.; Nelis, Mari; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ripatti, Samuli; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Aben, Katja K.; Ardlie, Kristin G; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Collins, Francis S.; Cusi, Daniele; den Heijer, Martin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gejman, Pablo V.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Iribarren, Carlos; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Melander, Olle; Mosley, Tom H.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Oostra, Ben; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rissanen, Aila; Rivolta, Carlo; Schunkert, Heribert; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Viikari, Jorma; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Province, Michael A.; Kayser, Manfred; Arnold, Alice M.; Atwood, Larry D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chanock, Stephen J.; Deloukas, Panos; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Hall, Per; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Lathrop, G.Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Uda, Manuela; Waterworth, Dawn; Wright, Alan F.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Hofman, Albert; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Cupples, L.Adrienne; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fox, Caroline S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Völzke, Henry; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hu, Frank B.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Metspalu, Andres; North, Kari E.; Schlessinger, David; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hunter, David J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Strachan, David P.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Borecki, Ingrid B.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schadt, Eric E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Peltonen, Leena; Uitterlinden, André; Visscher, Peter M.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Stefansson, Kari; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2010-01-01

    Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that

  1. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Dalibor; Prevorovská, Svetlana; Marsík, Frantisek

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters-the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not directly measurable, however, their values can be determined using the numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The 24-segment hemodynamical model (pulsating type) of the human cardiovascular system was used for the numerical simulation of the changes of myocardial workload for cardiac rhythm pacing. The model was fitted by well-measurable parameters for each patient. The calculated parameters were compared using the two-tailed Student's test. The differences of SWI and MVO2 between the modes AAI and VVI and the modes DDD and VVI are statistically significant (P0.05). PMID:18080208

  2. PHASE INTERACTION BETWEEN EEG RHYTHMS IN THE STUDY OF PROCESSES OF TIME PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Bushov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study pursued to investigate the role of phase interactions between EEG rhythms in the process of the perception of time. The purpose of the study was to analyse the dependence of these interactions on the type and stage of the activity being performed, as well as on the individual characteristics of a human. For this purpose, 27 boys and 29 girls, all university students, were asked to reproduce and measure short intervals of time (200 and 800 ms, during which their EEG was recorded in frontal, central, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes, according to the system 10–20%. While studying phase interactions between EEG rhythms, we used wavelet bispectral analysis and calculated the bicoherence function. As it follows from the conducted research, most often close phase interactions are observed between the gamma-rhythm and other rhythms of EEG or between different frequencies of the gamma-rhythm. It was established that the phase interactions under study were influenced by the factors of “sex”, “activity type”, and “activity stage”. The study showed correlations of phase interactions with the levels of intellect, extraversion, neuroticism, with the particularities of the lateral organisation of brain, and the accuracy of time perception.

  3. Circadian rhythm and sleep influences on digestive physiology and disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Bradley V Vaughn, Sean Rotolo, Heidi L Roth Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythms and sleep influence a variety of physiological functions, including the digestive system. The digestive system also has intrinsic rhythms that interact dynamically with circadian rhythms. New advances in understanding the interaction of these rhythms and sleep provide the prospect of evaluating their...

  4. Protocatechuic acid and human disease prevention: biological activities and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, R; Santangelo, C; D'Archivio, M; Li Volti, G; Giovannini, C; Galvano, F

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that a high dietary intake of vegetables and fruit rich in polyphenols is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality from coronary heart disease. The healthy effects associated with polyphenol consumption have made the study of the mechanisms of action a matter of great importance. In particular, the hydroxybenzoic acid protocatechuic acid (PCA) has been eliciting a growing interest for several reasons. Firstly, PCA is one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols such as anthocyanins and procyanidins that are normally found at high concentrations in vegetables and fruit, and are absorbed by animals and humans. Since the daily intake of anthocyanins has been estimated to be much higher than that of other polyphenols, the nutritional value of PCA is increasingly recognized. Secondly, a growing body of evidence supports the concept that PCA can exert a variety of biological effects by acting on different molecular targets. It has been shown that PCA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, PCA seems to have chemopreventive potential because it inhibits the in vitro chemical carcinogenesis and exerts pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in different tissues. This review is aimed at providing an up-dated and comprehensive report on PCA giving a special emphasis on its biological activities and the molecular mechanisms of action most likely responsible for a beneficial role in human disease prevention. PMID:22519395

  5. Radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes: Potential as a biological dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested the possibility of using apoptosis (programmed cell death) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes as a short-term biological dosimeter. Lymphocytes isolated from whole blood were irradiated in culture with 250 kVp x-rays or 60Co gamma rays. Two assays were used to measure apoptosis in lymphocytes after irradiation: in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay and fluorescence analysis of DNA unwinding assay. Similar qualitative and quantitative results were produced by the assays, supporting the notion that the fluorescence analysis of DNA unwinding assay measured DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis in lymphocytes irradiated in vitro was proportional to dose and could be detected following exposures as low as 0.05 Gy. Lymphocytes irradiated in vitro was proportional to dose and could be detected following exposures as low as 0.05 Gy. Lymphocytes from individual donors had reproducible dose responses. There was, however, variation between donors. X-ray and gamma-ray exposures induced similar levels of apoptosis at similar doses. The induction kinetics of apoptosis in vitro indicate a maximum is reached about 72 h after irradiation. In conclusion, the in vitro experimental evidence indicates that radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes has the kinetics, sensitivity, and reproductibility to be a potential biological dosimeter. 29 refs., 5 figs

  6. Does Melody Assist in the Reproduction of Novel Rhythm Patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Daryl W.; Forsythe, Jere L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined music education majors' ability to reproduce rhythmic stimuli presented in melody and rhythm only conditions. Participants reproduced rhythms of two-measure music examples by immediately echo-performing through a method of their choosing (e.g., clapping, tapping, vocalizing). Forty examples were presented in melody and rhythm only…

  7. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the cloning, partial characterization, and preliminary studies of the biological activity of a human gene, designated ERCC-3, involved in early steps of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The gene was cloned after genomic DNA transfection of human (HeLa) chromosomal DNA together with dominant marker pSV3gptH to the UV-sensitive, incision-defective Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant 27-1. This mutant belongs to complementation group 3 of repair-deficient rodent mutants. After selection of UV-resistant primary and secondary 27-1 transformants, human sequences associated with the induced UV resistance were rescued in cosmids from the DNA of a secondary transformant by using a linked dominant marker copy and human repetitive DNA as probes. From coinheritance analysis of the ERCC-3 region in independent transformants, we deduce that the gene has a size of 35 to 45 kilobases, of which one essential segment has so far been refractory to cloning. Conserved unique human sequences hybridizing to a 3.0-kilobase mRNA were used to isolate apparently full-length cDNA clones. Upon transfection to 27-1 cells, the ERCC-3 cDNA, inserted in a mammalian expression vector, induced specific and (virtually) complete correction of the UV sensitivity and unscheduled DNA synthesis of mutants of complementation group 3 with very high efficiency. Mutant 27-1 is, unlike other mutants of complementation group 3, also very sensitive toward small alkylating agents. This unique property of the mutant is not corrected by introduction of the ERCC-3 cDNA, indicating that it may be caused by an independent second mutation in another repair function. By hybridization to DNA of a human x rodent hybrid cell panel, the ERCC-3 gene was assigned to chromosome 2, in agreement with data based on cell fusion

  8. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy: an intervention addressing rhythm dysregulation in bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    FRANK, ELLEN; Swartz, Holly A.; Boland, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by frequent recurrences, often related to noncompliance with drug treatment, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) was designed to directly address these problem areas. This article discusses the circadian basis of IPSRT and the importance of stable daily routines in the maintenance of the euthymic state, as well as the two large controlled trials which empirically support this intervention. ...

  9. Mistimed sleep disrupts circadian regulation of the human transcriptome.

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, SN; Laing, EE; Möller-Levet, CS; Van der Veen, DR; Bucca, G; Lazar, AS; Santhi, N.; Slak, A; Kabiljo, R.; von Schantz, M.; Smith, CP; DIJK, DJ

    2014-01-01

    Circadian organization of the mammalian transcriptome is achieved by rhythmic recruitment of key modifiers of chromatin structure and transcriptional and translational processes. These rhythmic processes, together with posttranslational modification, constitute circadian oscillators in the brain and peripheral tissues, which drive rhythms in physiology and behavior, including the sleep-wake cycle. In humans, sleep is normally timed to occur during the biological night, when body temperature i...

  10. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  11. Sensible biological models to be exposed to VDT (Video Display Terminal) radiations in human male reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature and environmental effects, particularly endocrine disrupters and EMF radiations, are actively investigated in human and non-human reproduction experimental models. Sensitivity and specificity of the different cell types of the testes seminiferous tubules in animals and in human are evaluated, showing a specific responsiveness of spermatogonia (SPG) and resting pachytene spermatocytes (SPC). At 32 oC the 24 h short-term cultures of biopsies of normal human testis show an expected low occurrence of apoptotic SPG (1 %) that increases to 3,4 % in peer samples exposed to VDT for the same period, with the appearance of apoptotic SPC (4,6 %). In samples from a thermically-impaired testis of the same subject the apoptotic occurrence of SPG is 2,6 % with 15,4 % for SPC after 24 h cultures. After 24 h exposure to VDT the apoptotic score is 7,6 % for SPG and 18,5 % for SPC in thermically impaired peer samples. With EMF-bioshields the apoptotic score for SPG is 0,8 % in normal 2,2 % for SPG and 13,8 % for SPC in T-impaired peer-samples. NMRS of the cultures fluids show a proportional production of lactate, corresponding to the different degrees of histopathological impairment of the samples. IVOS (Integrated Visual Optic System) analysis of sperm samples from thermically-impaired, not-repaired and repaired testes exposed to VDT shows sensible variations on straightness (STR), linearity (LIN) and lateral head displacement (LHD) parameters. To evaluate the thermic and non-thermic potential bioeffects of VDT on human spermatogenesis the specificity, the sensitivity and the reproducibility of the biological models on one side and the specificity of the methodologies on the other side must be provided. (author)

  12. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  13. A conundrum in molecular toxicology: molecular and biological changes during neoplastic transformation of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, G E; Shuler, C F; Lee, H; Casto, B C

    1995-12-01

    The process of multistage carcinogenesis lends itself to the concept that the effects of carcinogens are mediated through dose-related, multi-hit, linear changes. Multiple in vitro model systems have been developed that are designed to examine the cellular changes associated with the progression of cells through the different stages in the process; however, these systems may have inherent limitations due to the cell lines used for these studies, the manner of assessing the effects of the carcinogens, and the subsequent growth and differentiation of the exposed cells. Each of these variables results in increasing levels of uncertainty relative to the correlation of the events with the actual process of human tumor development. Therefore, the prediction of the ultimate effect of any carcinogen is difficult. Moreover, relationships between individual biological endpoints resulting from carcinogen treatment appear at best to be approximations. The presence of an activated carcinogen inside the cell can give rise to multiple outcomes, only some of which may be critical events. For example, site-specific modification of the 12th and 13th codons of H-ras is different than that in the adjacent 14th and 15th codons. It is interesting to speculate what effect these differences might have on a biological outcome, e.g., transformation to anchorage-independent growth. The use of different model systems to examine the effects of activated carcinogens also creates additional problems. Comparisons of in vitro transformed cells with similar cells isolated from human tumors indicate that the culture environment appears to influence the expression of a particular phenotype, in that human tumor cells in culture express many of the same parameters as those found in cells transformed with carcinogens in vitro. If the process of transformation is linear, then less aggressive phenotypes should progress to a more aggressive transformed stage. However, in carcinogen-transformed human cells

  14. Thalamic and cortical contributions to physiological brain rhythms in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Schmiedt, Joscha

    2016-01-01

    Rhythms, i.e. periodic sequences of events or states, are a ubiquitous feature of physiological systems such as the heart, the lungs or the brain. For the brain in particular, the diversity of rhythms is remarkable, ranging from low frequency rhythms in the slow/delta band (0.5-4 Hz) during sleep to gamma band oscillations (30-120 Hz) rhythms during alert behavior, all expressed in various brain areas and at various spatial scales. To understand whether these rhythms subserve a function for t...

  15. Vertebrate records in polar sediments: Biological responses to past climate change and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. G.; Emslie, S. D.; Huang, T.; Blais, J. M.; Xie, Z. Q.; Liu, X. D.; Yin, X. B.; Wang, Y. H.; Huang, W.; Hodgson, D. A.; Smol, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Biological responses to climate and environmental changes in remote polar regions are of increasing interest in global change research. Terrestrial and marine polar ecosystems have suffered from impacts of both rapid climate change and intense human activities, and large fluctuations in the population sizes of seabirds, seals, and Antarctic krill have been observed in the past decades. To understand the mechanisms driving these regime shifts in polar ecosystems, it is important to first distinguish the influences of natural forcing from anthropogenic activities. Therefore, investigations of past changes of polar ecosystems prior to human contact are relevant for placing recent human-induced changes within a long-term historical context. Here we focus our review on the fossil, sub-fossil, archaeological, and biogeochemical remains of marine vertebrates in polar sediments. These remains include well-preserved tissues such as bones, hairs and feathers, and biogeochemical markers and other proxy indicators, including deposits of guano and excrement, which can accumulate in lake and terrestrial sediments over thousands of years. Analyses of these remains have provided insight into both natural and anthropogenic impacts on marine vertebrates over millennia and have helped identify the causal agents for these impacts. Furthermore, land-based seabirds and marine mammals have been shown to play an important role as bio-vectors in polar environments as they transport significant amounts of nutrients and anthropogenic contaminants between ocean and terrestrial ecosystems.

  16. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis

  17. Development and characterization of a radioimmunoassay to measure human tissue kallikrein in biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct radioimmunoassay has been developed to measure tissue kallikrein in human biological fluids, including serum, plasma, urine, pancreatic juice and saliva. Purified kallikreins from human urine and human saliva were used to raise rabbit antibody and each labelled with Na125I for use in the radioimmunoassay. Comparison of the different antigen-antibody systems was then made. Bound and free enzyme were separated by a double-antibody technique. The usable range of the standard curve was from 2.5 to 100 μg kallikrein/1. The intra-assay coefficient of variation was 4.7%, the interassay coefficient of variation 8.9% and the recoveries of purified kallikrein added to the samples were 99.3, 96.0, 110.8 and 81.2% for urine, saliva, serum and plasma respectively. Parallel dilution curves were obtained for serum and plasma, as well as urine, saliva and pancreatic juice. Plasma anticoagulated with EDTA or heparin gave consistently lower values than serum, when measured in the radioimmunoassay. From eight different subjects plasma (EDTA) values were on average 50% lower than those of serum, and subsequent experiments revealed that treatment of blood with some anticoagulants, in particular heparin and EDTA, resulted in a marked reduction in measurable tissue kallikrein. (author)

  18. [Ants as biological indicators of human impact in mangroves of the southeastern coast of Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabie, Jacques H C; Paim, Valéria R L de M; Do Nascimento, Ivan C; Campiolo, Sofia; Mariano, Cléa dos S F

    2006-01-01

    Mangroves are common in estuaries along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. Although plant diversity is low, this ecosystem supports a range of animals, offering some resources for non-aquatic organisms. Many insects live in mangroves and, between them, many ant species that are exclusively arboreous. Mangroves throughout the world suffer from high levels of human impact, and this is particularly true for southeastern Bahia, where land-uses include traditional crab and fish exploitation, urban development, refuse pollution, recreation, and timber extraction. The ants of 13 mangrove sites, representing a range of levels of human use, have been studied along 250 km of the southern Bahia littoral, between Itacaré and Porto Seguro. Ants were sampled both inside and on the periphery of the tidal zone, using entomological rainbow, baiting, collect of hollow branches and pit-fall. A total of 108 species have been collected, with the richest genera being Camponotus and Pseudomyrmex, and the most frequent belonging to the genera Azteca and Crematogaster. The ant community living on the periphery of mangrove areas is rather homogeneous regardless of the degree of environmental perturbation, but varies markedly with the disturbance inside the mangroves themselves. The evolution of richness of the both communities, mangrove and periphery, is negatively related to the human effects, even limited to the periphery. Ant communities therefore have the potential to be useful as biological indicators of ecological impacts of land-use in these mangrove systems. PMID:17144131

  19. In vivo biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Waugh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session of ESWT was administered to the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon in thirteen healthy individuals (aged 25.7 ± 7.0 years and patellar or Achilles tendon of six patients with tendinopathies (aged 39.0 ± 14.9 years. Dialysate samples from the surrounding peri-tendon were collected before and immediately after ESWT. Interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, vascular endothelial growth factor and interferon-γ were quantified using a cytometric bead array while gelatinase activity (MMP-2 and -9 was examined using zymography. There were no statistical differences between the biological tissue response to ESWT in healthy and pathological tendons. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 were the cytokines predominantly detected in the tendon dialysate. IL-1β and IL-2 did not change significantly with ESWT. IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were elevated immediately after ESWT and remained significantly elevated for four hours post-ESWT (p < 0.001. Pro-forms of MMP-2 and -9 also increased after ESWT (p < 0.003, whereas there were no significant changes in active MMP forms. In addition, the biological response to ESWT treatment could be differentiated between possible responders and non-responders based on a minimum 5-fold increase in any inflammatory marker or MMP from pre- to post-ESWT. Our findings provide novel evidence of the biological mechanisms underpinning ESWT in humans in vivo. They suggest that the mechanical stimulus provided by ESWT might aid tendon remodelling in tendinopathy by promoting the inflammatory and catabolic processes that are associated with removing damaged matrix constituents. The non-response of some individuals may

  20. Pituitary hormone circadian rhythm alterations in cirrhosis patients with subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze pituitary hormone and melatonin cir- cadian rhythms, and to correlate hormonal alterations with clinical performance, hepatic disease severity and diagnostic tests used for the detection of hepatic en- cephalopathy in cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with cirrhosis were enrolled in the study. Thirteen patients hospitalized for systemic diseases not affecting the liver were included as controls. Liver disease severity was assessed by the Child-Pugh score. All patients underwent detailed neurological assessment, electroencephalogram (EEG), brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), assays of pi- tuitary hormone, cortisol and melatonin, and complete blood chemistry evaluation. RESULTS: Pituitary hormone and melatonin circadian patterns were altered in cirrhosis patients without clinical encephalopathy. Circadian hormone alterations were different in cirrhosis patients compared with con- trois. Although cortisol secretion was not altered in any patient with cirrhosis, the basal cortisol levels were low and correlated with EEG and brain MRI abnormalities. Melatonin was the only hormone associated with the severity of liver insufficiency. CONCLUSION: Abnormal pituitary hormone and mel- atonin circadian patterns are present in cirrhosis before the development of hepatic encephalopathy. These abnormalities may be early indicators of impending hepatic encephalopathy. Factors affecting the human biologic clock at the early stages of liver insufficiency require further study.

  1. Systemic PPARγ deletion impairs circadian rhythms of behavior and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangrui; Jia, Zhanjun; Aoyagi, Toshinori; McClain, Donald; Mortensen, Richard M; Yang, Tianxin

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence from both human and animal studies suggests a physiological link between the circadian rhythm and metabolism but the underlying mechanism is still incompletely understood. We examined the role of PPARγ, a key regulator of energy metabolism, in the control of physiological and behavioral rhythms by analyzing two strains of whole-body PPARγ null mouse models. Systemic inactivation of PPARγ was generated constitutively by using Mox2-Cre mice (MoxCre/flox) or inducibly by using the tamoxifen system (EsrCre/flox/TM). Circadian variations in oxygen consumption, CO(2) production, food and water intake, locomotor activity, and cardiovascular parameters were all remarkably suppressed in MoxCre/flox mice. A similar phenotype was observed in EsrCre/flox/TM mice, accompanied by impaired rhythmicity of the canonical clock genes in adipose tissues and liver but not skeletal muscles or the kidney. PPARγ inactivation in isolated preadipocytes following exposure to tamoxifen led to a similar blockade of the rhythmicity of the clock gene expression. Together, these results support an essential role of PPARγ in the coordinated control of circadian clocks and metabolic pathways. PMID:22899986

  2. Biomarkers for Circadian Rhythm Disruption Independent of Time of Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dycke, Kirsten C. G.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; van Oostrom, Conny T. M.; van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; van Steeg, Harry; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Rodenburg, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Frequent shift work causes disruption of the circadian rhythm and might on the long-term result in increased health risk. Current biomarkers evaluating the presence of circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD), including melatonin, cortisol and body temperature, require 24-hr (“around the clock”) measurements, which is tedious. Therefore, these markers are not eligible to be used in large-scale (human) studies. The aim of the present study was to identify universal biomarkers for CRD independent of time of day using a transcriptomics approach. Female FVB mice were exposed to six shifts in a clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) CRD protocol and sacrificed at baseline and after 1 shift, 6 shifts, 5 days recovery and 14 days recovery, respectively. At six time-points during the day, livers were collected for mRNA microarray analysis. Using a classification approach, we identified a set of biomarkers able to classify samples into either CRD or non-disrupted based on the hepatic gene expression. Furthermore, we identified differentially expressed genes 14 days after the last shift compared to baseline for both CRD protocols. Non-circadian genes differentially expressed upon both CW and CCW protocol were considered useful, universal markers for CRD. One candidate marker i.e. CD36 was evaluated in serum samples of the CRD animals versus controls. These biomarkers might be useful to measure CRD and can be used later on for monitoring the effectiveness of intervention strategies aiming to prevent or minimize chronic adverse health effects. PMID:25984797

  3. Biological dosimetry of X-rays using in-Vitro micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micronuclei (Mn) are products of fragmented chromosomes which are recently being used as an alternative approach to the chromosome aberrations analysis for the estimation of biological absorbed dose in the case of occupationally exposed radiation workers including those working in industrial radiography, diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine departments, as well as in nuclear installations. In the present work human blood samples were taken and after in- vitro irradiation with various doses of X-rays, in the dose range of 5-50 and 50-300 cgs were studied. Micronucleus test was performed using cytokinesis blocked cells. The best fit was obtained by linear quadratic model, Y=C +αD +βD2. Moreover we have observed X-ray induced micronucleus in lymphocytes from 7 exposed hospital X-ray workers. The micronucleus counts in these persons were 3-7 fold higher than those in control

  4. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry in radiological protection: chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocyties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been know for several decades and dose effect relationships are also fairly well established for several doses and dose rates. Apart from its biological significance, the interpretation of chromosome aberration frequency associated with human exposure to radiation plays an important role in dose assessment, particularly in cases where exposure is though to have occurred but no physical dose monitoring system was present. Based on the cytogenetic data obtained from seven cases of exposure to radiation the aberration frequency have been fitted to the quadratic function Y= αD + βD2 as the dose response curves from literature. The dose equivalent estimate by frequency of chromosomic aberration found here was compared with 60Co and 192Ir already published curves obtained at almost similar dose rate together with some hematological data. (author)

  5. Insights into biological information processing: structural and dynamical analysis of a human protein signalling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an investigation on the structural and dynamical properties of a 'human protein signalling network' (HPSN). This biological network is composed of nodes that correspond to proteins and directed edges that represent signal flows. In order to gain insight into the organization of cell information processing this network is analysed taking into account explicitly the edge directions. We explore the topological properties of the HPSN at the global and the local scale, further applying the generating function formalism to provide a suitable comparative model. The relationship between the node degrees and the distribution of signals through the network is characterized using degree correlation profiles. Finally, we analyse the dynamical properties of small sub-graphs showing high correlation between their occurrence and dynamic stability

  6. Serotonin and corticosterone rhythms in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and in patients with COPD:implication for COPD-associated neuropathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac K Sundar; Yao, Hongwei; Huang, Yadi; Lyda, Elizabeth; Sime, Patricia J.; Sellix, Michael T.; Rahman, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    The circadian timing system controls daily rhythms of physiology and behavior, and disruption of clock function can trigger stressful life events. Daily exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) can lead to alteration in diverse biological and physiological processes. Smoking is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have abnormal circadian rhythms, reflected by daily changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function...

  7. Serotonin and Corticosterone Rhythms in Mice Exposed to Cigarette Smoke and in Patients with COPD: Implication for COPD-Associated Neuropathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac K Sundar; Yao, Hongwei; Huang, Yadi; Lyda, Elizabeth; Sime, Patricia J.; Sellix, Michael T.; Rahman, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    The circadian timing system controls daily rhythms of physiology and behavior, and disruption of clock function can trigger stressful life events. Daily exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) can lead to alteration in diverse biological and physiological processes. Smoking is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have abnormal circadian rhythms, reflected by daily changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function...

  8. Expression of Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF165) in Pichia pastoris and Its Biological Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To express human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF165) cDNA in Pichia pastroris, purify the expressed product and detect the biological activity of it. Methods  By inserting hVEGF165 cDNA coding 165 amino acid residues into Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC9K containing AOX1 promoter and the sequences of α secreting signal peptides, a recombinant expression plasmid pPIC9K/hVEGF165 was constructed and transformed to yeast host strain KM71, then multiple-copy insert transformants were screened out and cultured in flasks, and hVEGF165 was expressed under the induction of 1% methanol. Results  SDS-PAGE showed that after being induced with 1% methanol for 4d, the expressed product existed in supernatant in the form of soluble molecule and contained 60% of total protein expressed. Western blot showed good antigenicity and specificity of expressed product. After being purified by Heparin-Sepharose CL6B affinity chromatography, the purity of expressed product reached above 90%. Biological assays proved that the expressed product could stimulate the proliferation of HUVEC. Conclusion  hVEGF165 was successfully expressed. The study opened up a wide prospect for the application of VEGF165 in the prevention and treatment of ischemic heart disease and other tissue ischemic diseases such as secondary arterial occlusion in limbs.

  9. Biological and intelligent manufacturing: human life-skills applied to technological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nelcy Jiménez Hernández

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly competitive settings, characterised by development being promoting by the predominance of knowledge, means that mul- tidisciplinary approaches must be adopted for dealing with specific problems. Indeed, techniques and tools have been created by imitating human beings’ behaviour and applying them to productive and technological contexts to increase efficiency and enable a quick response. This paper deals with this topic and presents the results of scientometric- and technological surveillance-based research for revealing life sciences’ impact on technological development and its management. It was found that such impact has been mainly reflected in producing concepts and applications for topics such as intelligent manufacturing, biological manu- facturing systems and holonic and bionic manufacturing, thereby providing manufacturing and information management with hu- man attributes such as adaptation, self-learning, flexibility and the ability to evolve. It may thus be concluded that technological factor management has been strengthened, based on fields such as biology, thereby leading to direct outcomes regarding pro- duction.

  10. Systems-Biology Approaches to Discover Anti-Viral Effectors of the Human Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F.R. Sommer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections elicit an immediate innate response involving antiviral factors. The activities of some of these factors are, in turn, blocked by viral countermeasures. The ensuing battle between the host and the viruses is crucial for determining whether the virus establishes a foothold and/or induces adaptive immune responses. A comprehensive systems-level understanding of the repertoire of anti-viral effectors in the context of these immediate virus-host responses would provide significant advantages in devising novel strategies to interfere with the initial establishment of infections. Recent efforts to identify cellular factors in a comprehensive and unbiased manner, using genome-wide siRNA screens and other systems biology “omics” methodologies, have revealed several potential anti-viral effectors for viruses like Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, West Nile virus (WNV, and influenza virus. This review describes the discovery of novel viral restriction factors and discusses how the integration of different methods in systems biology can be used to more comprehensively identify the intimate interactions of viruses and the cellular innate resistance.

  11. Synthesis of novel flavone derivatives possessing substituted benzamides and their biological evaluation against human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo Hee; Lee, Young Hun; Park, Kyung Tae; Jung, Su Jin; Lee, Yong Sup

    2016-09-01

    Baicalein is a well-known flavone derivative that possesses diverse biological properties, such as anticancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Numerous baicalein derivatives, including 5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone, have been synthesized with the aim of enhancing its inherent biological activities. In the present work, new flavones, possessing an N-aroylamine-substituent on the B-ring, were synthesized to improve the cytotoxicity of baicalein and 5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone against human cancer cell lines. The majority of the flavones synthesized exhibited greater cytotoxicity than baicalein and 5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone against HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Among them, compounds 5n, possessing a 3-methoxybenzoylamino group, exhibited great cytotoxic effects on HepG2 (GI50=7.06μM) and MCF-7 (GI50=7.67μM) cells. In contrast, N-aroylamine-substituted 5-hydroxy-6,7-dimethoxyflavone derivatives showed greater cytotoxicity against MCF-7 than HepG2 cells, indicating that the replacement of a 5-methoxy group on the A-ring with a 5-hydroxy group has a marked influence on the cytotoxicity profile. PMID:27503682

  12. Biological dosimetry: the potential use of radiation-induced apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for biological dosimetry based on the induction of apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes is described. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric identification of cells displaying apoptosis-associated DNA condensation. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were analysed. They were recognized on the basis of their cell-surface antigens. Four parameters were measured for both cell types: cell size, granularity, antigen immunofluorescence and DNA content. Apoptosis was quantified as the fraction of CD4-, or CD8-positive cells with a characteristic reduction of cell size and DNA content. At doses below 1 Gy, levels of radiation-induced apoptosis increased for up to 5 days after irradiation. Optimal dose discrimination was observed 4 days after irradiation, at which time the dose-response curves were linear, with a slope of 8% ± 0.5% per 0.1 Gy. In controlled, dose-response experiments the lowest dose level at which the radiation-induced apoptosis frequency was still significantly above control was 0.05 Gy. After 5 days post-irradiation incubation, intra- and interdonor variations were measured and found to be similar; thus, apoptotic levels depend more on the dose than on the donor. The results demonstrate the potential of this assay as a biological dosimeter. (orig.)

  13. Milligram production and biological activity characterization of the human chemokine receptor CCR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqing Wang

    Full Text Available Human chemokine receptor CCR3 (hCCR3 belongs to the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs superfamily of membrane proteins and plays major roles in allergic diseases and angiogenesis. In order to study the structural and functional mechanism of hCCR3, it is essential to produce pure protein with biological functions on a milligram scale. Here we report the expression of hCCR3 gene in a tetracycline-inducible stable mammalian cell line. A cell clone with high hCCR3 expression was selected from 46 stably transfected cell clones and from this cell line pure hCCR3 on a milligram scale was obtained after two-step purification. Circular dichroism spectrum with a characteristic shape and magnitude for α-helix indicated proper folding of hCCR3 after purification. The biological activity of purified hCCR3 was verified by its high binding affinity with its endogenous ligands CCL11 and CCL24, with K D in the range of 10(-8 M to 10(-6 M.

  14. Human epithelial cells in vitro – Are they an advantageous tool to help understand the nanomaterial-biological barrier interaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.; Jud, Corinne; Fink, Alke; Wick, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The human body can be exposed to nanomaterials through a variety of different routes. As nanomaterials get in contact with the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, and the respiratory tract, these biological compartments are acting as barriers to the passage of nano-sized materials into the organism. These structural and functional barriers are provided by the epithelia serving as an interface between biological compartments. In order to initiate the reduction, refinement and replacement of time...

  15. Synthetic biology ethically evaluated: The creating God and co-creating human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaan Rheeder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available God did not create once and then put an end to it. Testimony from Scripture shows that God continuously establishes or creates new things. Humans can therefore expect to always see and experience new things in creation. With this pattern of reasoning, one can anticipate that the human being as image of God will continuously establish new things in history. Although nature has value, it does not have absolute value and therefore it can be synthesised responsibly. The thought that humans are stewards of God is no longer adequate to, theologically put into words, the relationship human beings have with nature. New biotechnological developments ask for different answers from Scripture. Several ethicists are of the opinion that the theological construction of humans and created co-creators can help found the relationship of the human being to nature. Humans developed as God’s image evolutionary. On the one hand, this means humans themselves are a product of nature. On the other hand, the fact that humans are the image of God is also an ethical call that humans, like God, have to develop and create new things throughout history. Synthetic biology can be evaluated as technology that is possible, because humans are the image of God. However, it should, without a doubt, be executed responsibly.Sintetiese biologie eties geëvalueer: Die skeppende God en medeskeppende mens. God het nie net eenmaal geskep en daar gestop nie. Uit Skrifgetuienisse kan afgelei word dat God voortdurend nuwe dinge tot stand bring of skep. Daarom kan die mens verwag om gedurig nuwe dinge in die skepping te sien en te beleef. Hiermee saam kan verwag word dat die mens as beeld van God voortdurend nuwe dinge in die geskiedenis tot stand sal bring. Alhoewel die natuur waarde het, het dit nie absolute waarde nie en kan dus verantwoordelik gesintetiseer word. Die gedagte dat die mens rentmeester van God is, is nie meer voldoende om die mens se verhouding tot die natuur teologies te

  16. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  17. Biospheric Life Support - integrating biological regeneration into protection of humans in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mauricio; Iha, Koshun

    2016-07-01

    A biosphere stands for a set of biomes (regional biological communities) interacting in a materially closed (though energetically open) ecological system (CES). Earth's biosphere, the thin layer of life on the planet's surface, can be seen as a natural CES- where life "consumables" are regenerated/restored via biological, geological and chemical processes. In Life Sciences, artificial CESs- local ecosystems extracts with varying scales and degrees of closure, are considered convenient/representatives objects of study. For outer space, these concepts have been applied to the issue of life support- a significant consideration as long as distance from Earth increases. In the nineties, growing on the Russian expertise on biological life support, backed by a multidisciplinary science team, the famous Biosphere 2 appeared. That private project innovated, by assembling a set of Earth biomes samples- plus an organic ag one, inside a closed Mars base-like structure, next to 1.5 ha under glass, in Arizona, US. The crew of 8 inside completed their two years contract, though facing setbacks- the system failed, e.g., to produce enough food/air supplies. But their "failures"- if this word can be fairly applied to science endeavors, were as meaningful as their achievements for the future of life support systems (LSS) research. By this period, the Russians had accumulated experience in extended orbital stays, achieving biological outcomes inside their stations- e.g. complete wheat cycles. After reaching the Moon, the US administration decided to change national priorities, putting the space program as part of a "détente" policy, to relieve international tensions. Alongside the US space shuttle program, the Russians were invited to join the new International Space Station (ISS), bringing to that pragmatic project, also their physical/chemical LSS- top air/water regenerative technology at the time. Present US policy keeps the ISS operational, extending its service past its planned

  18. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  19. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijie Bian; Hongmin Sun; Chengbiao Lu; Li Yao; Shengyong Chen; Xiaoli Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI). It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results support...

  20. Endocannabinoid signalling: has it got rhythm?

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Linda K.; Denning, Gerene; Stuhr, Kara L.; de Wit, Harriet; Hill, Matthew N.; Hillard, Cecilia J.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous cannabinoid signalling is widespread throughout the body, and considerable evidence supports its modulatory role in many fundamental physiological processes. The daily and seasonal cycles of the relationship of the earth and sun profoundly affect the terrestrial environment. Terrestrial species have adapted to these cycles in many ways, most well studied are circadian rhythms and hibernation. The purpose of this review was to examine literature support for three hypotheses: (i) end...

  1. Expression of Recombinant Human Amelogenin in Iranian Lizard Leishmania and Its Biological Function Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra YADEGARI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amelogenins are the major components of enamel matrix proteins. Enamel matrix derivatives (EMD can be used in periodontal diseases to regenerate periodontal tissues. The main aim of this study was to evaluate ex-pression of full-length functional recombinant human amelogenin (rhAm in Iranian lizard Leishmania (I.L.L. as an alternative eukaryotic expression system.Methods: Human cDNA encoding a 175-amino acid amelogenin expression cassette was sub cloned into a pLEXSY vector. The construct was transferred into Leishmania cells by electroporation. The protein production was surveyed in the transcription and the translation levels. The expressed protein was purified and some of its biological properties were investigated in comparison to EMD and negative control.Results: Expression of rhAm was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blot test in Leishmania cells. Purified rhAm sig-nificantly inhibited the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive (TRAP+ multinuclear cells in calcitriol stimulated mouse marrow cultures. Moreover, it significantly promoted proliferation and DNA synthesis in L929 mouse fibroblast cells.Conclusion: Functional rhAm was successfully expressed in I.L.L. Easy handling and post translation modification were the main advantages of this expression system. It is suggested to investigate molecular properties of this rhAm in the future.

  2. Simulated studies on the biological effects of space radiation on quiescent human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; He, Jinpeng; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Liu, Cuihua; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Li, He; Hu, Wentao; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Jufang; Wang, Tieshan; Zhou, Guangming

    2013-10-01

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are severe risk to manned long-term outer space exploration. Studies on the biological effects of space HZE particles and the underlying mechanisms are essential to the accurate risk assessment and the development of efficient countermeasure. Since majority of the cells in human body stay quiescent (G0 phase), in this study, we established G0 cell and G1 cell models by releasing human normal embryonic lung fibroblast cells from contact inhibition and studied the radiation toxicity of various kinds of HZE particles. Results showed that all of the particles were dose-dependently lethal and G0 cells were more radioresistant than G1 cells. We also found that 53BP1 foci were induced in a LET- and fluence-dependent manner and fewer foci were induced in G0 cells than G1 cells, however, the decrease of foci in 24 h after irradiation was highly relevant to the type of particles. These results imply that even though health risk of space radiation is probably overestimated by the data obtained with exponentially growing cells, whose radiosensitivity is similar to G1 cells, the risk of space HZE particles is un-ignorable and accurate assessment and mechanistic studies should be deepened. The diverse abilities of G0 cells and G1 cells in repairing DNA damages induced by HZE particles emphasize the importance in studying the impact of HZE particles on DNA damage repair pathways.

  3. Biologically active monoiodinated alpha-MSH derivatives for receptor binding studies using human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different monoiodinated radioligands of alpha-MSH (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) were compared in a binding assay with human D10 melanoma cells: [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH, and [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH. They were prepared either by the classical chloramine T method or by the Enzymobead method. A simple and rapid purification scheme was developed consisting of a primary separation on reversed-phase C18 silica cartridges immediately after the iodination, followed by HPLC purification before each binding experiment. Biological testing of the three radioligands showed that they all retained high melanotropic activity in the B16 melanin assay and the Anolis melanophore assay. However, in human D10 melanoma cells, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH led to a high degree of non-specific binding to the cells which could not be displaced by excess alpha-MSH and only partially by [NIe4]-alpha-MSH. The [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH tracer gave similar results but with a much lower proportion of non-specific binding. On the other hand, [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH proved to be an excellent radioligand whose non-specific binding to the D10 cells was not higher than 20% of the total binding

  4. Non-random distribution of homo-repeats: links with biological functions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Michail Yu; Klus, Petr; Sokolovsky, Igor V; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-01-01

    The biological function of multiple repetitions of single amino acids, or homo-repeats, is largely unknown, but their occurrence in proteins has been associated with more than 20 hereditary diseases. Analysing 122 bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, we observed that the number of proteins containing homo-repeats is significantly larger than expected from theoretical estimates. Analysis of statistical significance indicates that the minimal size of homo-repeats varies with amino acid type and proteome. In an attempt to characterize proteins harbouring long homo-repeats, we found that those containing polar or small amino acids S, P, H, E, D, K, Q and N are enriched in structural disorder as well as protein- and RNA-interactions. We observed that E, S, Q, G, L, P, D, A and H homo-repeats are strongly linked with occurrence in human diseases. Moreover, S, E, P, A, Q, D and T homo-repeats are significantly enriched in neuronal proteins associated with autism and other disorders. We release a webserver for further exploration of homo-repeats occurrence in human pathology at http://bioinfo.protres.ru/hradis/. PMID:27256590

  5. Human chorionic gonadotropin: Different glycoforms and biological activity depending on its source of production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is the first hormonal message from the placenta to the mother. It is detectable in maternal blood two days after implantation and behaves like a super LH agonist stimulating progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum. In addition to maintaining the production of progesterone until the placenta itself produces it, hCG also has a role in myometrial quiescence and local immune tolerance. Specific to humans, hCG is a complex glycoprotein composed of two highly glycosylated subunits. The α-subunit is identical to the pituitary gonadotropin hormones (LH, FSH, TSH), contains two N-glycosylation sites, and is encoded by a single gene (CGA). By contrast, the β-subunits are distinct for each hormones and confer both receptor and biological specificity, although LH and hCG bind to the same receptor (LH/CG-R). The hCG ß-subunit is encoded by a cluster of genes (CGB) and contains two sites of N-glycosylation and four sites of O-glycosylation. The hCG glycosylation state varies with the stage of pregnancy, its source of production and in the pathology. It is well established that hCG is mainly secreted into maternal blood, where it peaks at 8-10weeks of gestation (WG), by the syncytiotrophoblast (ST), which represents the endocrine tissue of the human placenta. The invasive extravillous trophoblast (iEVT) also secretes hCG, and in particular hyperglycosylated forms of hCG (hCG-H) also produced by choriocarcinoma cells. In maternal blood, hCG-H is elevated during early first trimester corresponding to the trophoblastic cell invasion process and then decreases. In addition to its endocrine role, hCG has autocrine and paracrine roles. It promotes formation of the ST and angiogenesis through LH/CG-R but has no effect on trophoblast invasion in vitro. By contrast, hCG-H stimulates trophoblast invasion and angiogenesis by interacting with the TGFß receptor in a LH/CG-R independent signalling pathway. hCG is largely used in antenatal screening

  6. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  7. Circadian rhythm characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma growth in an orthotopic xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao NB

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ningbo Zhao,* Hong Tang,* Kai Yang, Dan Chen Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent studies show that circadian rhythm changes are closely related to the occurrence and development of various tumors, such as breast, liver, and prostate. However, there are significant differences in circadian rhythm between different tumors. At present, the circadian rhythm characteristics of oral cancer remain unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the circadian rhythm characteristics of the in vivo growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.Materials and methods: Thirty-two nude mice were placed under 12-hour light/12-hour dark cycles. The human OSCC cell line BcaCD885 was inoculated in the cheek of nude mice. After 3 weeks, eight mice were sacrificed at four time points, including 4 hours after light onset (HALO, 10 HALO, 16 HALO, and 22 HALO, during a period of 24 hours. The volume of excised tumors was measured and the proliferative index (PI and apoptotic index (AI of tumor cells were determined by flow cytometry. A cosine analysis method was used to determine whether the tumor volume, PI, and AI obeyed a circadian rhythm.Results: There was a significant circadian rhythm in the tumor volume and PI of OSCC cells. For the tumor volume, there were significant differences between the four time points. The peak and trough values of the tumor volume appeared at 3.23 HALO and 15.23 HALO, whereas the peak and trough values of PI appeared at 6.60 HALO and 18.16 HALO, respectively. However, there was no circadian rhythm in the AI of tumor cells, despite significant differences between the four time points.Conclusion: This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the tumor volume and PI of in vivo growing OSCC undergo circadian rhythms. These results support the assertion that time factor should be

  8. Diverse Basis of β-Catenin Activation in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Implications in Biology and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Hirohisa; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Imai, Katsunori; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Higashi, Takaaki; Arima, Kota; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Beppu, Toru; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Aim β-catenin signaling is a major oncogenic pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since β-catenin phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and casein kinase 1ε (CK1ε) results in its degradation, mutations affecting these phosphorylation sites cause β-catenin stabilization. However, the relevance of missense mutations in non-phosphorylation sites in exon 3 remains unclear. The current study explores significance of such mutations in addition to addressing the clinical and biological implications of β-catenin activation in human HCC. Methods Gene alteration in exon3 of CTNNB1, gene expression of β-catenin targets such as glutamate synthetase (GS), axin2, lect2 and regucalcin (RGN), and protein expression of β-catenin were examined in 125 human HCC tissues. Results Sixteen patients (12.8%) showed conventional missense mutations affecting codons 33, 37, 41, and 45. Fifteen additional patients (12.0%) had other missense mutations in codon 32, 34, and 35. Induction of exon3 mutation caused described β-catenin target gene upregulation in HCC cell line. Interestingly, conventional and non-phosphorylation site mutations were equally associated with upregulation of β-catenin target genes. Nuclear localization of β-catenin was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.0461). Of these patients with nuclear β-catenin localization, loss of described β-catenin target gene upregulation showed significant poorer overall survival than others (p = 0.0001). Conclusion This study suggests that both conventional and other missense mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 lead to β-catenin activation in human HCC. Additionally, the mechanism of nuclear β-catenin localization without upregulation of described β-catenin target genes might be of clinical importance depending on distinct mechanism. PMID:27100093

  9. Beyond Extended Phenotype Evolution of extended identity in order to reconcile study of humanity with biological evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mezgebo, Taddese

    2014-01-01

    The question: “How much of biological evolution based theories, as they are understood presently, apply to human behaviour?” is highly controversial and perhaps highly politicized as well. The inference that human beings are evolutionarily programmed to have urges toward aggression, rape, murder, adultery, genocide and so on is a politically rejected idea within the social sciences. To be politically correct those who use evolutionary framework do claim that people can learn or have capacity ...

  10. Effect of carbon black nanomaterial on biological membranes revealed by shape of human erythrocytes, platelets and phospholipid vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Drašler, Barbara; Pajnič, Manca; Šuštar, Vid; Štukelj, Roman; Kononenko, Veno; Šimundić, Metka; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Makovec, Darko; Drobne, Damjana; Krek, Judita Lea

    2016-01-01

    Background We studied the effect of carbon black (CB) agglomerated nanomaterial on biological membranes as revealed by shapes of human erythrocytes, platelets and giant phospholipid vesicles. Diluted human blood was incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by different microscopic techniques. Giant unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (GUVs) created by electroformation were incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by optical microscopy. Populations of erythrocytes and GUVs were analyzed: t...

  11. Integration of multiple biological features yields high confidence human protein interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, Kubra; Sevimoglu, Tuba; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2016-08-21

    The biological function of a protein is usually determined by its physical interaction with other proteins. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are identified through various experimental methods and are stored in curated databases. The noisiness of the existing PPI data is evident, and it is essential that a more reliable data is generated. Furthermore, the selection of a set of PPIs at different confidence levels might be necessary for many studies. Although different methodologies were introduced to evaluate the confidence scores for binary interactions, a highly reliable, almost complete PPI network of Homo sapiens is not proposed yet. The quality and coverage of human protein interactome need to be improved to be used in various disciplines, especially in biomedicine. In the present work, we propose an unsupervised statistical approach to assign confidence scores to PPIs of H. sapiens. To achieve this goal PPI data from six different databases were collected and a total of 295,288 non-redundant interactions between 15,950 proteins were acquired. The present scoring system included the context information that was assigned to PPIs derived from eight biological attributes. A high confidence network, which included 147,923 binary interactions between 13,213 proteins, had scores greater than the cutoff value of 0.80, for which sensitivity, specificity, and coverage were 94.5%, 80.9%, and 82.8%, respectively. We compared the present scoring method with others for evaluation. Reducing the noise inherent in experimental PPIs via our scoring scheme increased the accuracy significantly. As it was demonstrated through the assessment of process and cancer subnetworks, this study allows researchers to construct and analyze context-specific networks via valid PPI sets and one can easily achieve subnetworks around proteins of interest at a specified confidence level. PMID:27196966

  12. Biological consequences from interaction of nanosized titanium(iv) oxides with defined human blood components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Aaron

    The utility of engineered nanomaterials is growing, particularly the titanium(iv) oxide (titanium dioxide, TiO2) nanoparticles. TiO 2 is very useful for brightening paints, and coloring foods. Nano-sized TiO2 is also useful for sunscreens, cosmetics, and can be utilized as a photocatalyst. However, the nanometer size of the TiO2 nanoparticle is a characteristic that may contribute oxidative stress to red blood cells (RBCs) in humans. This study utilized screening methods to evaluate different forms of TiO2 nanoparticles which differ by primary particle size, specific surface area, crystalline phase, and surface polarity. RBCs are rich in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). HPLC analysis revealed that some TiO2 nanoparticles caused oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Vitamin E is a major membrane-bound antioxidant. Vitamin E levels were then determined by HPLC in the RBC membrane after exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. The HPLC results showed that each nanoparticle oxidized RBC glutathione and membrane vitamin E at different rates. When hemoglobin was mixed with each TiO2 nanoparticle, hemoglobin was adsorbed at varying rates to the surface of the nanoparticles. Similarly, the aminothiol homocysteine was also adsorbed at different rates by the TiO2 nanoparticles. Using light microscopy, some TiO2 nanoparticles caused the formation of RBC aggregates which significantly changed the RBC morphology. The aggregation data was quantified using a hemacytometer. The TiO2 nanoparticles also caused hemolysis of RBCs. Hemolysis is considered to be a toxic endpoint for RBCs. Changes in the nucleated lymphocyte gene expression of certain oxidative stress genes were also observed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The data indicates that RBCs can ultimately be hemolyzed by biological oxidative damage resulting from a combination of oxidative mechanisms. Additionally, the TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated the ability to adsorb biomolecules to

  13. Circadian rhythm of glycoprotein secretion in the vas deferens of the moth, Spodoptera littoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvakharia B

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive systems of male moths contain circadian clocks, which time the release of sperm bundles from the testis to the upper vas deferens (UVD and their subsequent transfer from the UVD to the seminal vesicles. Sperm bundles are released from the testis in the evening and are retained in the vas deferens lumen overnight before being transferred to the seminal vesicles. The biological significance of periodic sperm retention in the UVD lumen is not understood. In this study we asked whether there are circadian rhythms in the UVD that are correlated with sperm retention. Results We investigated the carbohydrate-rich material present in the UVD wall and lumen during the daily cycle of sperm release using the periodic acid-Shiff reaction (PAS. Males raised in 16:8 light-dark cycles (LD showed a clear rhythm in the levels of PAS-positive granules in the apical portion of the UVD epithelium. The peak of granule accumulation occurred in the middle of the night and coincided with the maximum presence of sperm bundles in the UVD lumen. These rhythms persisted in constant darkness (DD, indicating that they have circadian nature. They were abolished, however, in constant light (LL resulting in random patterns of PAS-positive material in the UVD wall. Gel-separation of the UVD homogenates from LD moths followed by detection of carbohydrates on blots revealed daily rhythms in the abundance of specific glycoproteins in the wall and lumen of the UVD. Conclusion Secretory activity of the vas deferens epithelium is regulated by the circadian clock. Daily rhythms in accumulation and secretion of several glycoproteins are co-ordinated with periodic retention of sperm in the vas deferens lumen.

  14. Frontiers in the bioarchaeology of stress and disease: cross-disciplinary perspectives from pathophysiology, human biology, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Haagen D

    2014-10-01

    Over the last four decades, bioarchaeology has experienced significant technical growth and theoretical maturation. Early 21st century bioarchaeology may also be enhanced from a renewed engagement with the concept of biological stress. New insights on biological stress and disease can be gained from cross-disciplinary perspectives regarding human skeletal variation and disease. First, pathophysiologic and molecular signaling mechanisms can provide more precise understandings regarding formation of pathological phenotypes in bone. Using periosteal new bone formation as an example, various mechanisms and pathways are explored in which new bone can be formed under conditions of biological stress, particularly in bone microenvironments that involve inflammatory changes. Second, insights from human biology are examined regarding some epigenetic factors and disease etiology. While epigenetic effects on stress and disease outcomes appear profoundly influential, they are mostly invisible in skeletal tissue. However, some indirect and downstream effects, such as the developmental origins of adult health outcomes, may be partially observable in bioarchaeological data. Emerging perspectives from the human microbiome are also considered. Microbiomics involves a remarkable potential to understand ancient biology, disease, and stress. Third, tools from epidemiology are examined that may aid bioarchaeologists to better cope with some of the inherent limitations of skeletal samples to better measure and quantify the expressions of skeletal stress markers. Such cross-disciplinary synergisms hopefully will promote more complete understandings of health and stress in bioarchaeological science. PMID:25082158

  15. HEART RHYTHM DISORDERS IN NEW-BORNS AND INFANTS: CLINICAL COURSE AND PERINATAL RISK FACTORS OF ARRHYTHMIAS APPEARANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kovalyov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical course, prognosis and mechanisms of separate forms of heart rhythm disorders in children differ from those in adults. Especially, it refers to new-borns and infants whose conduction system differs by functional and morphologic immaturity. In connection with it, the assessment of natural history of heart rhythm disorders, occurred in a perinatal period, and determination of risk factors of arrhythmia appearance in infants are of some interest. 88 newborns took part in the study. The patients were involved by continuous sampling technique. Risk factors, occurred in a perinatal period and potentially influenced on development of heart rhythm disorders, were assessed. In our study we took biological, gynecologic and obstetric history, data of gestation and delivery course, early and late neonatal period, early infancy, Echo, neurosonography, Holter monitoring with determination of heart rhythm variability, and determined thyroid hormonal status. Maximum specific gravity had extrasystoles – 32.4% – in the structure of idiopathic arrhythmias in infants. Heart rhythm disorders with natural history were kept at six months of life only in 5,4% of children. Persistence of arrhythmias was marked during one year only for WPW syndrome. Heart rhythm disorders are often marked significantly in children whose mothers had acute respiratory disease during the pregnancy, or if the children were born from the first pregnancy, had the signs of central nervous system damage syndromes in an early perinatal period (arrest, intracranial hypertension, convulsive disorder. Disorders of autonomic imbalance of cardiac function and peculiarities of hemodynamics of pulmonary circulation contribute significantly into appearance and persistence of all types of arrhythmias. On the whole, the prognosis of heart rhythm disorders, occurred in the perinatal period, without organic and structural changes of myocardium is favorable. The exclusion can be made for

  16. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise. PMID:27124542

  17. [Central EEG rhythm associated with movement and EEG rhythm associated with spatial reasoning: are they homologous?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarotin, I V; Ivanitsky, G A

    2014-01-01

    EEG rhythmical picture of subject's movement suppression and spatial-figurative task solving was examined and analyzed. Rhythms appearing during spatial reasoning and suppressed movements with the frequency of about 11 Hz were isolated. It was hypothesized that a functional link exists between these rhythms in the considered behavioral tests. To test the hypothesis and to reveal this connection, experiments were developed and carried out. Then the analysis of recorded EEG signals was conducted by applying Fourier transform, independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent dipole source localization. Unexpected conclusion about the existence of a general mechanism of movement suppression was drawn. PMID:25975138

  18. speciation of selenium in human biological samples using online hyphenation of HPLC and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium is an important trace element that plays specific biological role in organism. Since bioactivity of selenium is a consequence of individual chemical species, there is considerable interest in the speciation of selenium in the mammalian organism. Inasmuch as selenium is primarily present in the form of selenoproteins in mammalian tissues, speciation studies of Se-containing proteins are focused on the various organs and tissues. Serum and urine samples can be used for study of Se metabolites in vivo. Hyphenation of chromatographic separation with element-specific detection has been proved as a powerful technique for Se speciation analysis recently. In present study, using an ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography, Se species such as selenite (Se(IV>), selenate (Se(VI>), trimethyl selenonium (TMSe+), selenocystine (SeCys), selenourea (SeUr), selenomethionine (SeMet), and selenocystamine (SeCM) are separated and followed by the online coupling detection as introduced below. A 5-μm Symmetry Shield RP18 column was applied for the analysis of Se compounds using 0.1% HFBA in 1:99 methanol-water buffer as mobile phase. Elemental signal detected by ICP-MS geminated in case of collision cell technique (CCT) mode, since the most abundant isotope 80Se instead of 82Se or 78Se monitored in ordinary model. More sensitive technique based on ICP-MS and CCT can recognize signals of Se standard compounds, whose concentrations were less than l ppb in hyphenation experiment, and Se concentrations of quantitative analysis could reach several ppb. Human liver cytoplasm and serum samples gave legible chromatograms with a few peaks recognized easily, while urine samples of human gave much more complex chromatograms according to the intricate components. The uncertainty of measurement will be estimated too.Nevertheless, both of serum and urine samples give quantifiable elemental signals, while cytoplasm samples gave weaker signals referring to the lower concentrations of Se

  19. The Personal Response: A Novel Writing Assignment to Engage First Year Students in Large Human Biology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of highly valued scientific writing skills in the first year of university is challenging. This report describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel written assignment, "The Personal Response" and accompanying Peer Review, in the course, Human Biology (BIOL1015) at The University of Queensland. These assignments were…

  20. The Contribution of a Substance-Oriented Forum to the Study of Human Biology in Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilon, Batia; Kliachko, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Today, forums constitute an integral part of almost all online courses in teacher education colleges. In many of these courses the forum serves for sharing opinions, attitudes, and feelings by the learners rather than for scaffolding cognitive processes. The forum in the "Human Biology and Health" course for prospective elementary-school science…

  1. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Broman, Michael T; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Weber, Christopher R; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2016-08-31

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Atrial cardiomyocytes from the Tbx5-mutant mice exhibited action potential abnormalities, including spontaneous depolarizations, which were rescued by chelating free calcium. We identified a multitiered transcriptional network that linked seven previously defined AF risk loci: TBX5 directly activated PITX2, and TBX5 and PITX2 antagonistically regulated membrane effector genes Scn5a, Gja1, Ryr2, Dsp, and Atp2a2 In addition, reduced Tbx5 dose by adult-specific haploinsufficiency caused decreased target gene expression, myocardial automaticity, and AF inducibility, which were all rescued by Pitx2 haploinsufficiency in mice. These results defined a transcriptional architecture for atrial rhythm control organized as an incoherent feed-forward loop, driven by TBX5 and modulated by PITX2. TBX5/PITX2 interplay provides tight control of atrial rhythm effector gene expression, and perturbation of the co-regulated network caused AF susceptibility. This work provides a model for the molecular mechanisms underpinning the genetic implication of multiple AF genome-wide association studies loci and will contribute to future efforts to stratify patients for AF risk by genotype. PMID:27582060

  2. Influence of personality traits on expression in musical rhythm improvisation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Miho; Akimitsu, Keiko; Okamoto, Yuko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality and characteristics in rhythm-improvisation of music. Sixty-eight undergraduates were asked to fill out a Five-Factor Personality Questionnaire (FFPQ) and to improvise musical rhythms on 6 types of percussion instruments. As a result, it was suggested that some personality traits were reflected in specific characteristics of expression in rhythm-improvisation of the music. In addition, these results suggest that...

  3. Systems biology study of mucopolysaccharidosis using a human metabolic reconstruction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Diego A; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Herreño, Angélica; Barbosa, Hector; Herrera, Juliana; Ardila, Andrea; Barreto, George E; González, Janneth; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a group of lysosomal storage diseases (LSD), characterized by the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme responsible for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). This deficiency leads to the lysosomal accumulation of partially degraded GAG. Nevertheless, deficiency of a single lysosomal enzyme has been associated with impairment in other cell mechanism, such as apoptosis and redox balance. Although GAG analysis represents the main biomarker for MPS diagnosis, it has several limitations that can lead to a misdiagnosis, whereby the identification of new biomarkers represents an important issue for MPS. In this study, we used a system biology approach, through the use of a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction to understand the effect of metabolism alterations in cell homeostasis and to identify potential new biomarkers in MPS. In-silico MPS models were generated by silencing of MPS-related enzymes, and were analyzed through a flux balance and variability analysis. We found that MPS models used approximately 2286 reactions to satisfy the objective function. Impaired reactions were mainly involved in cellular respiration, mitochondrial process, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and ion exchange. Metabolic changes were similar for MPS I and II, and MPS III A to C; while the remaining MPS showed unique metabolic profiles. Eight and thirteen potential high-confidence biomarkers were identified for MPS IVB and VII, respectively, which were associated with the secondary pathologic process of LSD. In vivo evaluation of predicted intermediate confidence biomarkers (β-hexosaminidase and β-glucoronidase) for MPS IVA and VI correlated with the in-silico prediction. These results show the potential of a computational human metabolic reconstruction to understand the molecular mechanisms this group of diseases, which can be used to identify new biomarkers for MPS. PMID:26276570

  4. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  5. The Scorpion An ideal animal model to study long-term microgravity effects on circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewe, Pascal C.; Horn, Eberhard R.

    2000-01-01

    The temporal pattern of light and darkness is basic for the coordination of circadian rhythms and establishment of homoeostasis. The 24th frequency of zeitgebers is probably a function of the Earth's rotation. The only way to eliminate its influence on organisms is to study their behavior in space because the reduced day length during orbiting the Earth might disrupt synchronizing mechanisms based on the 24th rhythm. The stability of microgravity induced disturbances of synchronization as well as the extent of adaptation of different physiological processes to this novel environment can only be studied during long-term exposures to microgravity, i.e., on the International Space Station. Biological studies within the long-term domain on ISS demand the use of experimental models which can be exposed to automatic handling of measurements and which need less or no nutritional care. Scorpions offer these features. We describe a fully automatic recording device for the simultaneous collection of data regarding the sensorimotor system and homoeostatic mechanisms. In particular, we record sensitivity changes of the eyes, motor activity and heart beat and/or respiratory activity. The advantage of the scorpion model is supported by the fact that data can be recorded preflight, inflight and postflight from the same animal. With this animal model, basic insights will be obtained about the de-coupling of circadian rhythms of multiple oscillators and their adaptation to the entraining zeitgeber periodicity during exposure to microgravity for at least three biological parameters recorded simultaneously. .

  6. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  7. Circadian rhythm of body temperature during prolonged undersea voyages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, W P; Paine, M W; Fort, A

    1978-05-01

    Circadian rhythms of oral temperature were assessed in 12 watchkeepers during a prolonged submarine voyage and compared with a "standard" rhythm obtained from nonwatchkeepers ashore. Initially, the parameters of the rhythms were similar to those of the standard; however, among eight ratings working 4-h watches in a rapidly rotating cycle, considerable changes in the rhythms occurred as the voyage progressed, and concurrent alterations in sleep patterning were observed. The most characteristic change in the rhythm was a marked decline in its amplitude. In most subjects, the rhythm also tended to depart from its original circadian pattern; in at least one case, it effectively disintegrated. One subject's rhythm appeared to "free-run" with a period greater than 24 h. A strong circadian rhythm was maintained in only one of these eight subjects. In four officers whose watch times were at fixed hours, adaptation of the rhythm to unusual times of sleep occurred in 2 of 3 cases where the schedule demanded it. The results are discussed in relation to the design of optimal watchkeeping systems for submariners. PMID:655989

  8. Chronobiological studies of chicken IgY: monitoring of infradian, circadian and ultradian rhythms of IgY in blood and yolk of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin-Xin; Thirumalai, Diraviyam; Schade, Rüdiger; Zhang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-08-15

    IgY is the functional equivalent of mammalian IgG found in birds, reptiles and amphibians. Many of its biological aspects have been explored with different approaches. In order to evaluate the rhythmicity of serum and yolk IgY, four chickens were examined and reared under the same conditions. To monitor biological oscillations of IgY in yolk and serum, the eggs and blood samples were collected over a 60 day period and the rhythm of yolk and serum IgY was determined by direct-ELISA. Results indicated that, there is a significant circaseptan rhythm in yolk IgY and circaquattran rhythm in serum IgY. The serum IgY concentration reached a peak in the morning, decreased to a minimum during the daytime and increased again at night revealing a significant circadian rhythm was superimposed by an ultradian rhythm. These data are suited to address the controversies concerning the IgY concentration in egg yolk and blood of laying hens. In addition, this study raised new questions, if the different rhythms in yolk and serum are concerned. PMID:24998020

  9. Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a review of its distribution, molecular biology and clinical significance as a human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Joel; Chan, Douglas; Sandaradura, Indy; Malik, Richard; Spielman, Derek; Lee, Rogan; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a metastrongyloid nematode found widely in the Asia-Pacific region, and the aetiological agent of angiostrongyliasis; a disease characterized by eosinophilic meningitis. Rattus rats are definitive hosts of A. cantonensis, while intermediate hosts include terrestrial and aquatic molluscs. Humans are dead-end hosts that usually become infected upon ingestion of infected molluscs. A presumptive diagnosis is often made based on clinical features, a history of mollusc consumption, eosinophilic pleocytosis in cerebral spinal fluid, and advanced imaging such as computed tomography. Serological tests are available for angiostrongyliasis, though many tests are still under development. While there is no treatment consensus, therapy often includes a combination of anthelmintics and corticosteroids. Angiostrongyliasis is relatively rare, but is often associated with morbidity and sometimes mortality. Recent reports suggest the parasites' range is increasing, leading to fatalities in regions previously considered Angiostrongylus-free, and sometimes, delayed diagnosis in newly invaded regions. Increased awareness of angiostrongyliasis would facilitate rapid diagnosis and improved clinical outcomes. This paper summarizes knowledge on the parasites' life cycle, clinical aspects and epidemiology. The molecular biology of Angiostrongylus spp. is also discussed. Attention is paid to the significance of angiostrongyliasis in Australia, given the recent severe cases reported from the Sydney region. PMID:27225800

  10. Characterization and biological activities of recombinant human plasminogen kringle 1-3 produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weon-Kyoo; So, Seung-Ho; Sohn, Young-Doug; Lee, Hyosil; Park, Doo-Hong; Chung, Soo-Il; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2004-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from preexisting blood vessels, is involved in many pathological conditions, for example, tumorigenesis, diabetic retinopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Angiostatin, which contains the kringle 1-4 domains of plasminogen, is known to be a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and a strong suppressor of various solid tumors. In this study, we expressed recombinant protein containing the kringle 1-3 domains of human plasminogen in Escherichia coli and investigated its biological activities. The protein was successfully refolded from inclusion bodies and purified at a 30% overall yield, as a single peak by HPLC. The purified recombinant protein had biochemical properties that were similar to those of the native form, which included molecular size, lysine-binding capacity, and immunoreactivity with a specific antibody. The recombinant protein was also found to strongly inhibit the proliferation of bovine capillary endothelial cells in vitro, and the formation of new capillaries on chick embryos. In addition, it suppressed the growth of primary Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma in an in vivo mouse model. Our findings suggest that the recombinant kringle 1-3 domains in a prokaryote expression system have anti-angiogenic activities, which may be useful in clinical and basic research in the field of angiogenesis. PMID:15177278

  11. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation. PMID:26520385

  12. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji H Harada

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults.Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  13. Relative biological effectiveness of high energy protons for a human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the survival of human melanoma cells induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) protons was investigated. Exponentially growing HTB140 cells were irradiated close to the Bragg peak maximum of the 62 MeV protons, as well as with 60Co γ-rays, over single doses, ranging from 8-24 Gy. Clonogenic survival and cell viability were assessed up to 48 h post-irradiation, therefore considered as early inactivation effects. Dose dependent cell inactivation induced by high LET protons was observed. Surviving fractions have shown great overlapping with estimated cell viability, both with the increase of dose and with prolonged cell incubation. Evaluated RBEs were higher with the rise of dose, being in the range from 2 to 3. All analyzes performed have demonstrated a very radio-resistant nature of HTB140 melanoma cells. However, high LET protons are able to inactivate these cells in a larger extent compared to the effects of γ-rays. (author)

  14. Comparative Study on Human Risk by Ionizing Radiation and Pesticide as Biological Information about Environmental Disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental risk factors such as ionizing radiations, heavy metals, and pesticides can cause environmental disasters when they exist in excess. The increases in use of ionizing radiation and agricultural pesticide are somewhat related to the possibility of the disaster. The risk of radiation and pesticide was evaluated by means of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) assay on the human blood lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were irradiated with 0∼2.0 Gy of 60Co gamma ray. Another groups of lymphocytes were exposed to various concentrations of parathion. Significantly increased tail moment, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in SCGE assay, showed a clear dose- or concentration-response relationship. Parathion of a recommended concentration for agricultural use ( 1 mg l-1) has a strong cytotoxic effect on lymphocytes, which is equivalent to damage induced by 0.1 Gy of γ-ray. Furthermore, 2 mg l-1 of parathion can give rise to DNA damage equivalent to that induced by 0.25 Gy at which the radiation-induced damage can start to develop into clinical symptoms. The comparative results of this study can provide an experimental basis and biological information for the prevention of environmental disaster

  15. The induction of dendritic cell from human peripheral blood and its biological characteristics observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish the method of inducing and proliferating dendritic cells (DC) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro and analyze its biological characteristics. Method: After the post-mobilization treatment PBMCs were collected and cultured for 2 hours and then the floating cells were removed. Cytokines including IL-4, GM-CSF and TNF-α were added into the fresh medium. After 8 days culture, phenotypes were analyzed by FACS. The level of IL-12 in the supernatant was detected by ELISA. The induced DCs were also co-cultured with naive T cells derived from cord blood. Its stimulating index was detected by 3H-TdR assay. Results: The mobilized adherent PBMCs cultured in the above medium highly expressed differential antigens (CD1a:89.1%, CD40:99.8%, CD80:95.1%, CD83:45.7%, HLA-DR:97.6%). Nevertheless, the induced DC can secrete IL-12 and effectively stimulate naive T cells to proliferate (SI = 6.92). Conclusion: It is an applicable method by using mobilized blood as a source after adherent treatment and being cultured in the above medium containing cytokines to generate DCs with high purity and special functions. Moreover, CD34+ purification is not necessary in the process

  16. Systems Biology Strategy Reveals PKC-delta is Key for Sensitizing TRAIL-Resistant Human Fibrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro eHayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are highly variable and resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recently, the use of the tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced treatment is gaining momentum, due to TRAIL’s ability to specifically target cancers with limited effect on normal cells. However, several malignant cancer types still remain non-sensitive to TRAIL. Previously, we developed a dynamic computational model, based on perturbation-response approach, and predicted protein kinase C (PKC as the most effective target, with over 95% capacity to kill human fibrosarcoma (HT1080 in TRAIL stimulation (Piras, V. et al. 2011, Scientific Reports. Here, to validate the model prediction, which has significant implications for cancer treatment, we conducted experiments on two TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines (HT1080 and HT29. Using PKC inhibitor Bisindolylmaleimide I, we first demonstrate, as predicted by our previous model, cell viability is significantly impaired with over 95% death of both cancer types. Next, to identify crucial PKC isoform from 10 known members, we analyzed their mRNA expressions in HT1080 cells and shortlisted 4 isoforms for siRNA knock-down (KD experiments. From these KDs, PKC-delta produced the most cancer cell death in conjunction with TRAIL. Overall, systems biology approach, combining model prediction with experimental validation, holds promise for TRAIL-based cancer therapy.

  17. Rare earth analysis in human biological samples by atomic absorption using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of Sc and seven rare earth elements, Nd, Sm, Dy, Ho, Eu, Tm, and Yb, in biological samplesby atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) using electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytic graphite tube is shown to be rapid, precise and accurate. The technique utilizes the method of standard additions and linear regression analysis to determine results from peak area data. Inter-elemental interferences are negligible. The elements found sensitive enough for this type of analysis are, in order of decreasing sensitivity, Yb, Eu, Tm, Dy, Sc, Ho, Sm and Nd. The determination in these types of materials of Gd and elements less sensitive to AAS detection than Gd does not appear to be feasible. Results are presented on the concentrations of these elements in 41 samples from human subjects, cows and vegetables with normal environmental exposure to the rare earth elements. The composite percent mean deviation in peak-area readings for all samples and all elements examined was 4%. The mean standard error in the results among samples was about 6.5%

  18. Biological Niches within Human Calcified Aortic Valves: Towards Understanding of the Pathological Biomineralization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cottignoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, mineralization site, its microarchitecture, and composition in calcific heart valve remain poorly understood. A multiscale investigation, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS, from micrometre up to nanometre, was conducted on human severely calcified aortic and mitral valves, to provide new insights into calcification process. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial relationship existing between bioapatite crystals, their local growing microenvironment, and the presence of a hierarchical architecture. Here we detected the presence of bioapatite crystals in two different mineralization sites that suggest the action of two different growth processes: a pathological crystallization process that occurs in biological niches and is ascribed to a purely physicochemical process and a matrix-mediated mineralized process in which the extracellular matrix acts as the template for a site-directed nanocrystals nucleation. Different shapes of bioapatite crystallization were observed at micrometer scale in each microenvironment but at the nanoscale level crystals appear to be made up by the same subunits.

  19. The Biological Efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor Beam on Human Lymphocytes (Methodological Approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present preliminary results of examination of the biological efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor mixed beam with respect to 250 kV X-rays for the induction of DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated by the beam from Research Reactor in ECN Petten, Netherlands and dose response relationships for the level of damage induced were investigated. In order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture, chemical pretreatment with boric acid or mercaptoborane (containing boron-10 ions) was done. The estimation of the DNA damage was done with the use of a single cell gel-electrophoresis method (SCGE), to asses the frequency of chromosomal aberrations culturing of lymphocytes for the evaluation of cytogenetic damage was performed. Abnormal behavior of blood samples during a culture procedure and abnormally low metaphases frequency was noticed. During the analysis of DNA damage by SCGE assay we have also found the abnormalities in shapes and brightness of investigated comets. Part of the studied lymphocytes was bigger than others and had much bigger fraction of the DNA in tail. Very poor dose response relationship was observed in those results. From this reason, our paper presents the methodological approach and discussion of the results obtained and also studies on the parameters reflecting the level of the DNA in human lymphocytes. In order to eliminate outstanding comets (fluffy) we measured for all our results the relation of the fraction of DNA in tail to the length of the comet tail. The value of this ratio usually fluctuated in range of 0.1 to 0.70. For the fluffy comets mentioned before the tDNA/TL ratio was generally about 0.9, or even more than 1.0 that means that the percentage of fraction of DNA in tail was higher than in usually seen comets with such a tail length. After analysis of distribution of frequency cells with various t

  20. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research. PMID:10564129

  1. Electromagnetic Interference in Implantable Rhythm Devices: Comment

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, PV

    2002-01-01

    This is a short comment on the editorial on Electromagnetic Interference in Implantable Rhythm Devices - The Indian Scenario in the July-September issue of the journal.1 Regarding the statement: "Systems working at 0.5 Tesla are available in the country so that it may be considered in such situations..." , though the author conveys his point, it gives reader a feeling that 0.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) units are advantageous. In fact for every other diagnostic purpose we would li...

  2. Telomere Lengths and Telomerase Activity in Dog Tissues: A Potential Model System to Study Human Telomere and Telomerase Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Nasir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on telomere and telomerase biology are fundamental to the understanding of aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. However, human studies have been hindered by differences in telomere biology between humans and the classical murine animal model system. In this paper, we describe basic studies of telomere length and telomerase activity in canine normal and neoplastic tissues and propose the dog as an alternative model system. Briefly, telomere lengths were measured in normal canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, a range of normal canine tissues, and in a panel of naturally occurring soft tissue tumours by terminal restriction fragment (TRF analysis. Further, telomerase activity was measured in canine cell lines and multiple canine tissues using a combined polymerase chain reaction/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. TRF analysis in canine PBMCs and tissues demonstrated mean TRF lengths to range between 12 and 23 kbp with heterogeneity in telomere lengths being observed in a range of normal somatic tissues. In soft tissue sarcomas, two subgroups were identified with mean TRFs of 22.2 and 18.2 kbp. Telomerase activity in canine tissue was present in tumour tissue and testis with little or no activity in normal somatic tissues. These results suggest that the dog telomere biology is similar to that in humans and may represent an alternative model system for studying telomere biology and telomerase-targeted anticancer therapies.

  3. Long-Range Correlations in the Sequence of Human Heartbeats and Other Biological Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Malvin C.

    1998-03-01

    The sequence of heartbeat occurrence times provides information about the state of health of the heart. We used a variety of measures, including multiresolution wavelet analysis, to identify the form of the point process that describes the human heartbeat. These measures, which are based on both interbeat (R-R) intervals and counts (heart rate), have been applied to records for both normal and heart-failure patients drawn from a standard database, and various surrogate versions thereof. Several of these measures reveal scaling behavior (1/f-type fluctuations; long-range power-law correlations).(R. G. Turcott and M. C. Teich, Proc. SPIE) 2036 (Chaos in Biology and Medicine), 22--39 (1993). Essentially all of the R-R and count-based measures we investigated, including those that exhibit scaling, differ in statistically significant ways for the normal and heart-failure patients. The wavelet measures, however, reveal a heretofore unknown scale window, between 16 and 32 heartbeats, over which the magnitudes of the wavelet-coefficient variances fall into disjoint sets for the normal and heart-failure patients.(R. G. Turcott and M. C. Teich, Ann. Biomed. Eng.) 24, 269--293 (1996).^,(S. Thurner, M. C. Feurstein, and M. C. Teich, Phys. Rev. Lett.) (in press). This enables us to correctly classify every patient in the standard data set as either belonging to the heart-failure or normal group with 100% accuracy, thereby providing a clinically significant measure of the presence of heart-failure. Previous approaches have provided only statistically significant measures. The tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity for various salient measures, as a function of data length, is determined by the use of ROC analysis. A phase-space reconstruction based on generalized heart rate is used to obtain a putative attractor's capacity dimension. Though the dependence of this dimension on the embedding dimension is consistent with that of a low-dimensional dynamical system, surrogate

  4. ZNF217 expression correlates with the biological behavior of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lilin Hang; Min Zhang; Fanliang Meng; Mei Zhong; Jing Li 

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation of zinc-finger protein 217 (ZNF217) gene ex-pression with the biological behavior of human ovarian cancer HO-8910 cel s. Methods:The expression of ZNF217 in ovarian carcinoma cel lines was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The biological behaviors of the transfectants were investigated by MTT, in vitro Boyden chamber and in vivo invasion assay, respectively. Results:RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that transfection of ZNF217 into the HO-8910 cel s significantly increased their proliferation along with mark-edly enhanced in vitro and in vivo invasion and metastatic abilities. MTT assay showed that the proliferation ability of pEGFP-N1-ZNF217/HO-8910 cel s was significantly higher than that of pEGFP-N1/HO-8910 cel s and HO-8910 cel s (P<0.001). The Boyden chamber assay showed that the numbers of migrating pEGFP-N1-ZNF217/HO-8910, pEGFP-N1/HO-8910 and HO-8910 cel s were (141.25 ± 13.91) cel s/200 × field, (82.50 ± 11.73) cel s/200 × field and (81.75 ± 12.12) cel s/200 × field, respectively, with a significant dif erence between them (F=29.274, P<0.001). The nude mouse experiment showed that the in vivo tumor formation ability of pEGFP-N1-ZNF217/HO-8910 cel s was significantly higher than that of pEGFP-N1/HO-8910 cel s (P<0.001). Conclusion:Based on these clinical and laboratory observations, we conclude that ZNF217 may contribute to ovarian cancer invasion and metastasis, and associated with worse clinical outcomes. We evaluated ZNF217’s role as a biomarker of ovarian carcinogenesis and tumor progression in patient samples and explored possible molecular mechanisms in promoting tumor growth and invasion.

  5. Designing mental health interventions informed by child development and human biology theory: a social ecology intervention for child soldiers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Jordans, Mark J D; Koirala, Suraj; Worthman, Carol M

    2015-01-01

    The anthropological study of human biology, health, and child development provides a model with potential to address the gap in population-wide mental health interventions. Four key concepts from human biology can inform public mental health interventions: life history theory and tradeoffs, redundancy and plurality of pathways, cascades and multiplier effects in biological systems, and proximate feedback systems. A public mental health intervention for former child soldiers in Nepal is used to illustrate the role of these concepts in intervention design and evaluation. Future directions and recommendations for applying human biology theory in pursuit of public mental health interventions are discussed. PMID:25380194

  6. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Yingshou Xing; Yang Xia; Keith Kendrick; Xiuxiu Liu; Maosen Wang; Dan Wu; Hua Yang; Wei Jing; Daqing Guo; Dezhong Yao

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive ef...

  7. Challenges for the European governance of synthetic biology for human health

    OpenAIRE

    Stemerding, D.; Douglas, C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a series of scientific and technological practices involved in the application of engineering principles to the design and production of predictable and robust biological systems. While policy discussions abound in this area, emerging technologies like synthetic biology present considerable challenges in the articulation of concrete policy options given that their introduction into society may still be in the distant future. This paper reports on a series of governance wo...

  8. Chaos control applied to heart rhythm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A natural cardiac pacemaker is modeled by a modified Van der Pol oscillator. → Responses related to normal and chaotic, pathological functioning of the heart are investigated. → Chaos control methods are applied to avoid pathological behaviors of heart dynamics. → Different approaches are treated: stabilization of unstable periodic orbits and chaos suppression. - Abstract: The dynamics of cardiovascular rhythms have been widely studied due to the key aspects of the heart in the physiology of living beings. Cardiac rhythms can be either periodic or chaotic, being respectively related to normal and pathological physiological functioning. In this regard, chaos control methods may be useful to promote the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits using small perturbations. In this article, the extended time-delayed feedback control method is applied to a natural cardiac pacemaker described by a mathematical model. The model consists of a modified Van der Pol equation that reproduces the behavior of this pacemaker. Results show the ability of the chaos control strategy to control the system response performing either the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or the suppression of chaotic response, avoiding behaviors associated with critical cardiac pathologies.

  9. Melatonin rhythms in Pony mares and foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, D M; Sharp, D C; Berglund, L A; Grubaugh, W; McDowell, K J; Peck, L S

    1982-01-01

    Melatonin concentrations in intact (N = 3) and sham-operated (N = 3) mares during March were greater (P less than 0 . 05) during the night than during the day, but this pattern was not seen in 3 mares from which the superior cervical ganglia had been removed bilaterally. When 4 Pony mares were exposed to a photoperiod of 10L:14D for 3 weeks and then to continuous darkness (0L:24D) for another 3 weeks, melatonin levels were greater (P less than 0 . 05) at the end of the 0L:24D period than during the earlier period and still displayed rhythmic fluctuations but were no longer co-ordinated with equivalent day/night rhythms or among mares. When melatonin rhythms were monitored in 3 mares and their foals housed in open pens exposed to natural lighting, significant time trends in melatonin concentrations were observed in mares when the foals were aged 1-3, 4-6 and 7-11 weeks, but foals did not display significant times trends in melatonin until they were 7-11 weeks old. PMID:6962864

  10. Chaos control applied to heart rhythm dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca, E-mail: biaborem@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza de Paula, Aline, E-mail: alinedepaula@unb.br [Universidade de Brasi' lia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 70.910.900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Amorim Savi, Marcelo, E-mail: savi@mecanica.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A natural cardiac pacemaker is modeled by a modified Van der Pol oscillator. > Responses related to normal and chaotic, pathological functioning of the heart are investigated. > Chaos control methods are applied to avoid pathological behaviors of heart dynamics. > Different approaches are treated: stabilization of unstable periodic orbits and chaos suppression. - Abstract: The dynamics of cardiovascular rhythms have been widely studied due to the key aspects of the heart in the physiology of living beings. Cardiac rhythms can be either periodic or chaotic, being respectively related to normal and pathological physiological functioning. In this regard, chaos control methods may be useful to promote the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits using small perturbations. In this article, the extended time-delayed feedback control method is applied to a natural cardiac pacemaker described by a mathematical model. The model consists of a modified Van der Pol equation that reproduces the behavior of this pacemaker. Results show the ability of the chaos control strategy to control the system response performing either the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or the suppression of chaotic response, avoiding behaviors associated with critical cardiac pathologies.

  11. Biological variability dominates and influences analytical variance in HPLC-ECD studies of the human plasma metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willett Walter C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarker-based assessments of biological samples are widespread in clinical, pre-clinical, and epidemiological investigations. We previously developed serum metabolomic profiles assessed by HPLC-separations coupled with coulometric array detection that can accurately identify ad libitum fed and caloric-restricted rats. These profiles are being adapted for human epidemiology studies, given the importance of energy balance in human disease. Methods Human plasma samples were biochemically analyzed using HPLC separations coupled with coulometric electrode array detection. Results We identified these markers/metabolites in human plasma, and then used them to determine which human samples represent blinded duplicates with 100% accuracy (N = 30 of 30. At least 47 of 61 metabolites tested were sufficiently stable for use even after 48 hours of exposure to shipping conditions. Stability of some metabolites differed between individuals (N = 10 at 0, 24, and 48 hours, suggesting the influence of some biological factors on parameters normally considered as analytical. Conclusion Overall analytical precision (mean median CV, ~9% and total between-person variation (median CV, ~50–70% appear well suited to enable use of metabolomics markers in human clinical trials and epidemiological studies, including studies of the effect of caloric intake and balance on long-term cancer risk.

  12. Preliminary Study on Biological Properties of Adult Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao; BAI Hai; WANG Jingchang; SHI Jingyun; WANG Cunbang; LU Jihong; OU Jianfeng; WANG Qian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method of culture and expansion of adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs in vitro and to explore their biological properties. Methods: Mononuclear cells were obtained from 5 mL adult human bone marrow by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll solution. Adult human MSCs were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with low glucose (LG-DMEM) containing 10% fetal calf serum at a density of 2× 105 cell/cm2. The morphocytology was observed under phase-contrast microscope. The cell growth was measured by MTT method. The flow cytometer was performed to examine the expression of cell surface molecules and cell cycle. The ultrastructure of MSCs was observed under transmission electron microscope. The immunomodulatory functions of MSCs were measured by MTT method. The effects of MSCs on the growth of K562 cells and the dynamic change of HA, Ⅳ-C, LN concentration in the culture supernatant of MSCs was also observed. Results: The MSCs harvested in this study were homogenous population and exhibited a spindle-shaped fibroblastic morphology. The cell growth curve showed that MSCs had a strong ability of proliferation. The cells were positive for CD44,while negative for hematopoietic cell surface marker such as CD3, CD4, CD7, CD13, CD14, CD15, CD19,CD22, CD33, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR, which was closely related to graft versus host disease. Above 90% cells of MSCs were found at G0/G1 phase. The ultrastructure of MSCs indicated that there were plenty of cytoplasmic organelles. Allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes proliferation was suppressed by MSCs and the inhibition ratio was 60.68% (P<0.01). The suppressive effect was also existed in the culture supernatant of MSCs and the inhibition ratio was 9.00% (P<0.05). When lymphocytes were stimulated by PHA, the suppression effects of the culture supernatant were even stronger and the inhibition ratio was 20.91%(P<0.01). Compared with the cell growth curve of the K562 cells alone, the K562

  13. Novel biologically-inspired rosette nanotube PLLA scaffolds for improving human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartilage defects are a persistent issue in orthopedic tissue engineering where acute and chronic tissue damage stemming from osteoarthritis, trauma, and sport injuries, present a common and serious clinical problem. Unlike bone, cartilage repair continues to be largely intractable due to the tissue's inherently poor regenerative capacity. Thus, the objective of this study is to design a novel tissue engineered nanostructured cartilage scaffold via biologically-inspired self-assembling rosette nanotubes (RNTs) and biocompatible non-woven poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) for enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) chondrogenic differentiation. Specifically, RNTs are a new class of biomimetic supramolecular nanomaterial obtained through the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight modified guanine/cytosine DNA base hybrids (the G∧C motif) in an aqueous environment. In this study, we synthesized a novel twin G∧C-based RNT (TB-RGDSK) functionalized with cell-favorable arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine–lysine (RGDSK) integrin binding peptide and a twin G∧C based RNT with an aminobutane linker molecule (TBL). hMSC adhesion, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated in vitro in scaffold groups consisting of biocompatible PLLA with TBL, 1:9 TB-RGDSK:TBL, and TB-RGDSK, respectively. Our results show that RNTs can remarkably increase total glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and protein production when compared to PLLA controls without nanotubes. Furthermore, the TB-RGDSK with 100% well-organized RGDSK peptides achieved the highest chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The current in vitro study illustrated that RNT nanotopography and surface chemistry played an important role in enhancing hMSC chondrogenic differentiation thus making them promising for cartilage regeneration. (paper)

  14. Synthesis of biological active thiosemicarbazone and characterization of the interaction with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wangshu; Shi, Lei; Hui, Guangquan [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Cui, Fengling, E-mail: fenglingcui@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2013-02-15

    The synthesis of a new biological active reagent, 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone) aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS), was designed. The interaction between DHAQTS and HSA was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling under simulation of physiological conditions. According to the results of fluorescence measurements, the quenching mechanism was suggested to be static. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the complex. The number of binding sites (n) was calculated. Through the site marker competitive experiment, DHAQTS was confirmed to be located in site I of HSA. The binding distance r=2.83 nm between the donor HSA and acceptor DHAQTS was obtained according to Foerster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results showed the conformation and microenvironment of HSA changed in the presence of DHAQTS. The effects of common ions on the binding of DHAQTS to HSA were also evaluated. The experimental results were in agreement with the results obtained via a molecular docking study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone)aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS) was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DHAQTS can quench the fluorescence of human serum albumin (HSA) by static quenching mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The competitive experiment was carried out to identify the DHAQTS binding site on HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-dimensional spectra confirmed DHAQTS caused the conformational change of HSA.

  15. Synthesis of biological active thiosemicarbazone and characterization of the interaction with human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of a new biological active reagent, 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone) aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS), was designed. The interaction between DHAQTS and HSA was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling under simulation of physiological conditions. According to the results of fluorescence measurements, the quenching mechanism was suggested to be static. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the complex. The number of binding sites (n) was calculated. Through the site marker competitive experiment, DHAQTS was confirmed to be located in site I of HSA. The binding distance r=2.83 nm between the donor HSA and acceptor DHAQTS was obtained according to Förster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results showed the conformation and microenvironment of HSA changed in the presence of DHAQTS. The effects of common ions on the binding of DHAQTS to HSA were also evaluated. The experimental results were in agreement with the results obtained via a molecular docking study. - Highlights: ► 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone)aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS) was synthesized. ► DHAQTS can quench the fluorescence of human serum albumin (HSA) by static quenching mechanism. ► Hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces. ► The competitive experiment was carried out to identify the DHAQTS binding site on HSA. ► Three-dimensional spectra confirmed DHAQTS caused the conformational change of HSA.

  16. Aqueous Extracts of Selected Potentilla Species Modulate Biological Activity of Human Normal Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Locatelli, Marcello; Pleszczyńska, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional and in folk medicine for many years. This study characterized the activity of extracts from aerial parts of selected Potentilla species: P. argentea, P. anserina, P. grandiflora and P. erecta as well as one species of closely related to the genus Potentilla, Drymocallis rupestris (syn. P. rupestris). The biological activities were analyzed using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on CCD 841 CoTr and CCD-18Co cells. Moreover, cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin F-filaments organization and IL-6 and IL-10 levels by ELISA were analyzed after 24 h of incubation. Potentilla extracts at dose levels between 25 and 250 µg/mL were analyzed. For ELISA, 15 µg/mL and 30 μg/mL were chosen. When mitochondrial succinyl dehydrogenase activity was tested (MTT assay) only extract obtained from P. erecta at lower concentrations (up to 125 µg/mL) suppressed metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells mitochondrial enzyme activity increased after incubation with all extracts. In Neutral Red (NR) method cellular membrane disturbance of both cell cultures was found after D. rupestris and P. grandiflora addition. Moreover, strong influence on epithelial cells was also found for P. anserina. All extracts showed similar, concentration-dependent free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect. Potentilla extracts, especially at lower concentration, decreased IL-6 production in myofibroblasts but the level of the cytokine was found to be stable in epithelial cells. IL-10 analysis revealed that P. argentea, D. rupestris, P. erecta extracts decrease cytokine level in myofibroblasts, while only when higher concentration were applied, decreased cytokine level produced by epithelial cells was found. F-actin filaments staining revealed that Potentilla extracts significantly influence on cellular cytoskeleton organization. Potentilla extracts influence on cells of human colon wall lining modulating the main features of them (viability

  17. Novel biologically-inspired rosette nanotube PLLA scaffolds for improving human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Allie; Hemraz, Usha D; Castro, Nathan J; Fenniri, Hicham; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage defects are a persistent issue in orthopedic tissue engineering where acute and chronic tissue damage stemming from osteoarthritis, trauma, and sport injuries, present a common and serious clinical problem. Unlike bone, cartilage repair continues to be largely intractable due to the tissue's inherently poor regenerative capacity. Thus, the objective of this study is to design a novel tissue engineered nanostructured cartilage scaffold via biologically-inspired self-assembling rosette nanotubes (RNTs) and biocompatible non-woven poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) for enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) chondrogenic differentiation. Specifically, RNTs are a new class of biomimetic supramolecular nanomaterial obtained through the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight modified guanine/cytosine DNA base hybrids (the G∧C motif) in an aqueous environment. In this study, we synthesized a novel twin G∧C-based RNT (TB-RGDSK) functionalized with cell-favorable arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine-lysine (RGDSK) integrin binding peptide and a twin G∧C based RNT with an aminobutane linker molecule (TBL). hMSC adhesion, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated in vitro in scaffold groups consisting of biocompatible PLLA with TBL, 1:9 TB-RGDSK:TBL, and TB-RGDSK, respectively. Our results show that RNTs can remarkably increase total glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and protein production when compared to PLLA controls without nanotubes. Furthermore, the TB-RGDSK with 100% well-organized RGDSK peptides achieved the highest chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The current in vitro study illustrated that RNT nanotopography and surface chemistry played an important role in enhancing hMSC chondrogenic differentiation thus making them promising for cartilage regeneration. PMID:24225196

  18. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  19. Effects of tempo and timing of simple musical rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repp, B.H.; Windsor, W.L.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether and how the timing of musical rhythms changes with tempo. Twelve skilled pianists played a monophonic 8-bar melody in 21 different rhythmic versions at 4 different tempi. Within bars, the rhythms represented all possible ordered pairs and triplets of note values

  20. A Rhythm Recognition Computer Program to Advocate Interactivist Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Jean-Christophe

    2004-01-01

    This paper advocates the main ideas of the interactive model of representation of Mark Bickhard and the assimilation/accommodation framework of Jean Piaget, through a rhythm recognition demonstration program. Although completely unsupervised, the program progressively learns to recognize more and more complex rhythms struck on the user's keyboard.…

  1. Dissociable systems of working memory for rhythm and melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerde, Trenton A; Childs, Stephanie K; Handy, Sarah T; Nagode, Jennifer C; Pardo, José V

    2011-08-15

    Specialized neural systems are engaged by the rhythmic and melodic components of music. Here, we used PET to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a working memory task for sequences of rhythms and melodies, which were presented in separate blocks. Healthy subjects, without musical training, judged whether a target rhythm or melody was identical to a series of subsequently presented rhythms or melodies. When contrasted with passive listening to rhythms, working memory for rhythm activated the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, right anterior insular cortex, and left anterior cingulate gyrus. These areas were not activated in a contrast between passive listening to rhythms and a non-auditory control, indicating their role in the temporal processing that was specific to working memory for rhythm. The contrast between working memory for melody and passive listening to melodies activated mainly a right-hemisphere network of frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices: areas involved in pitch processing and auditory working memory. Overall, these results demonstrate that rhythm and melody have unique neural signatures not only in the early stages of auditory processing, but also at the higher cognitive level of working memory. PMID:21645625

  2. The biological response of plucked human hair to low-dose radiation: a measure of individual radiosensitivity and a technique for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often assumed that the effects of radiation are linear with dose and that high dose effects can be extrapolated to low dose levels. However, there are a variety of mechanisms which can alter the response at low doses. The most important of these relate to induced sensitivity or induced repair mechanisms. It is therefore important that this area is studied in more depth by looking at the molecular effects and damage to cells at low doses. It is well known that there are certain rare genetic syndromes which predispose individuals to cancer, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. It is also probable that there is a large range of sensitivity in the natural variation of individuals to the risk of radiation-induced cancer. It is proposed that radiosensitivity is studied using stimulated lymphocytes from whole blood and the technique extended to look at the effects in cell cultures established from human hair. Radiation treatment of cell cultures established from plucked human hair has been previously advocated as a non-invasive technique for non-uniform biological dosimetry and it is proposed that these techniques are adapted to the use of hair to estimate individual radiosensitivity. The aim is to establish and optimize these techniques for culturing keratinocytes from plucked human hair follicles with a view to study biological markers for the subsequent assessment of radiosensitivity. Preliminary results are promising and suggest that the technique for culturing keratinocytes from hair presents a feasible approach. Results from this primary cell culture technique and results from the comparison of the micronuclei data obtained from the cell cultures and stimulated lymphocytes will be presented. (author)

  3. Violating instructed human agency: An fMRI study on ocular tracking of biological and nonbiological motion stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Hanna; Hilger, Maximilian; Hegele, Mathias; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that beliefs about the human origin of a stimulus are capable of modulating the coupling of perception and action. Such beliefs can be based on top-down recognition of the identity of an actor or bottom-up observation of the behavior of the stimulus. Instructed human agency has been shown to lead to superior tracking performance of a moving dot as compared to instructed computer agency, especially when the dot followed a biological velocity profile and thus matched the predicted movement, whereas a violation of instructed human agency by a nonbiological dot motion impaired oculomotor tracking (Zwickel et al., 2012). This suggests that the instructed agency biases the selection of predictive models on the movement trajectory of the dot motion. The aim of the present fMRI study was to examine the neural correlates of top-down and bottom-up modulations of perception-action couplings by manipulating the instructed agency (human action vs. computer-generated action) and the observable behavior of the stimulus (biological vs. nonbiological velocity profile). To this end, participants performed an oculomotor tracking task in an MRI environment. Oculomotor tracking activated areas of the eye movement network. A right-hemisphere occipito-temporal cluster comprising the motion-sensitive area V5 showed a preference for the biological as compared to the nonbiological velocity profile. Importantly, a mismatch between instructed human agency and a nonbiological velocity profile primarily activated medial-frontal areas comprising the frontal pole, the paracingulate gyrus, and the anterior cingulate gyrus, as well as the cerebellum and the supplementary eye field as part of the eye movement network. This mismatch effect was specific to the instructed human agency and did not occur in conditions with a mismatch between instructed computer agency and a biological velocity profile. Our results support the hypothesis that humans activate a specific

  4. Cadências escolares, ritmos docentes School cadences, teaching rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Assunção de Castro Teixeira

    1999-07-01

    of the interactions between educators and students, the academic calendar rhythms, and the tempo of school hours. The work concludes that teaching rhythms, although inscribed in the pace of modern life, have peculiarities related to the school cadences, to the pedagogical processes, and to the processes of human education. It is then the case to analyze the polyrhythmic nature of school times in their complexities and peculiarities so that we can understand the modulations and meanings of the experience of time as lived by the teacher, which is a constitutive experience of teaching identities.

  5. Biological Motion Preference in Humans at Birth: Role of Dynamic and Configural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the hypothesis that detection of biological motion is an intrinsic capacity of the visual system guided by a non-species-specific predisposition for the pattern of vertebrate movement and investigates the role of global vs. local information in biological motion detection. Two-day-old babies exposed to a biological…

  6. Remote long-term registrations of sleep-wake rhythms, core body temperature and activity in marmoset monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Kerstin; Coolen, Alex; Schlumbohm, Christina; Meerlo, Peter; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    Initial studies in the day active marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) indicate that the sleep-wake cycle of these non-human primates resembles that of humans and therefore conceivably represent an appropriate model for human sleep. The methods currently employed for sleep studies in marmosets are limited. The objective of this study was to employ and validate the use of specific remote monitoring system technologies that enable accurate long-term recordings of sleep-wake rhythms and the clos...

  7. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer. PMID:23997531

  8. ‘Ragged Time’ in Intra-panel Comics Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry Shores

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A phenomenological method of comics analysis can be useful when we need to uncover the structural features of the comics experience itself. One fruitful application would be in the study of irregular intra-panel rhythms, where the temporalized divisions are not visibly indicated but rather are only experienced. By means of Gilles Deleuze’s notion of rhythmic repetition and his elaboration of it through Olivier Messiaen’s theory of ‘kinetic’ rhythm, we will formulate a conception of visual rhythm as being based on metrical irregularity. We further explicate this concept of irregular rhythm by drawing upon the notion of ‘ragged time’ in the early jazz musical form, ragtime. We finally test its usefulness by examining how the ‘jazzy’ rhythms of Cubist-styled panels by Art Spiegelman and Mary Fleener generate an experience of ragged time.

  9. U.S. biological experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1981-01-01

    The history of biologic experimentation in space is traced. Early balloon and rocket borne animals showed no abnormalities on the macroscale, and biosatellite launches with bacteria and amoebae revealed no microscopic dysfunctions. Adult Drosophila flies on board Cosmos spacecraft died with a shortened lifespan, while their offspring lived full lifespans. Green pepper plants grown in weightlessness showed a different orientation, but no physiological disturbances. Normal bone growth in rats has been found to almost cease after 11 days in space, and the mean life span of red blood cells decreases by four days. A series of experiments designed by U.S. scientists will be performed on primates provided and flown by the U.S.S.R. Finally, experiments on board Spacelab will involve determination of the persistence of circadian rhythms in bacteria and humans.

  10. Assessment of uranium and selenium speciation in human and bacterial biological models to probe changes in their structural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avoscan, L.; Milgram, S.; Untereiner, G.; Collins, R.; Khodja, H.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [Lab. Pierre Sue, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Coves, J. [Inst. de Biologie Structurale - J.-P. Ebel, Lab. des Proteines Membranaires, Grenoble (France); Hazemann, J.L. [Lab. de Geophysique Interne et Tectonopbysique, UMR CNRS/Univ. Joseph Fourier, Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France)

    2009-07-01

    This study illustrates the potential of physicochemical techniques to speciate uranium (U) and selenium (Se) in biological samples. Speciation, defined he0re as the study of structural environment, of both toxic elements, was characterized at several levels in biological media and directly in human cells or bacteria once the metal(loid)s were internalized. External speciation that is extracellular speciation in culture media was predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium computer modelling using the JChess software and validated by spectroscopic measurements (XANES and EXAFS). Internal speciation that is intracellular speciation in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells was studied in vitro with a soil bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and ROS 17/2.8 osteoblasts, human cells responsible for bone formation. XANES, EXAFS, HPLC-ICP-MS and SDS-PAGE coupled to particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) permitted the identification and quantification of complexes formed with organic or inorganic molecules and/or larger proteins. (orig.)

  11. Time-Specific Fear Acts as a Non-Photic Entraining Stimulus of Circadian Rhythms in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, Blake A; Kim, Earnest; Reilly, Melissa; Kashima, James; Motch, Oleksiy; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all animals have endogenous clock mechanisms that "entrain" to the light-dark (LD) cycle and synchronize psychophysiological functions to optimal times for exploring resources and avoiding dangers in the environment. Such circadian rhythms are vital to human mental health, but it is unknown whether circadian rhythms "entrained" to the LD cycle can be overridden by entrainment to daily recurring threats. We show that unsignaled nocturnal footshock caused rats living in an "ethological" apparatus to switch their natural foraging behavior from the dark to the light phase and that this switch was maintained as a free-running circadian rhythm upon removal of light cues and footshocks. Furthermore, this fear-entrained circadian behavior was dependent on an intact amygdala and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Thus, time-specific fear can act as a non-photic entraining stimulus for the circadian system, and limbic centers encoding aversive information are likely part of the circadian oscillator network that temporally organizes behavior. PMID:26468624

  12. Continuity of visual and auditory rhythms influences sensorimotor coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Varlet

    Full Text Available People often coordinate their movement with visual and auditory environmental rhythms. Previous research showed better performances when coordinating with auditory compared to visual stimuli, and with bimodal compared to unimodal stimuli. However, these results have been demonstrated with discrete rhythms and it is possible that such effects depend on the continuity of the stimulus rhythms (i.e., whether they are discrete or continuous. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of the continuity of visual and auditory rhythms on sensorimotor coordination. We examined the dynamics of synchronized oscillations of a wrist pendulum with auditory and visual rhythms at different frequencies, which were either unimodal or bimodal and discrete or continuous. Specifically, the stimuli used were a light flash, a fading light, a short tone and a frequency-modulated tone. The results demonstrate that the continuity of the stimulus rhythms strongly influences visual and auditory motor coordination. Participants' movement led continuous stimuli and followed discrete stimuli. Asymmetries between the half-cycles of the movement in term of duration and nonlinearity of the trajectory occurred with slower discrete rhythms. Furthermore, the results show that the differences of performance between visual and auditory modalities depend on the continuity of the stimulus rhythms as indicated by movements closer to the instructed coordination for the auditory modality when coordinating with discrete stimuli. The results also indicate that visual and auditory rhythms are integrated together in order to better coordinate irrespective of their continuity, as indicated by less variable coordination closer to the instructed pattern. Generally, the findings have important implications for understanding how we coordinate our movements with visual and auditory environmental rhythms in everyday life.

  13. Influence of some biologically active substances on amount of MGMT and MARP proteins in human cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kotsarenko K. V.; Lylo V. V.; Macewicz L. L.; Ruban T. P.; Luchakivska Yu. S.; Kuchuk M. V.; Lukash L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate an effect of biologically active compounds IFN-α2b, EMAPII, Card medium, fibronectin on the amount of MGMT (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) and MARP (anti-Methyltransferase Antibody Recognizable Protein) proteins in human cells in vitro. Methods. The human cells of 4BL, Hep-2 and A102 lines were treated with growth factors and cytokines. Changes in the amount of MGMT and MARP proteins were studied by Western blot analysis with anti-MGMT mAbs. Results. The treatment...

  14. Rationally designed mutations convert complexes of human recombinant T cell receptor ligands into monomers that retain biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Huan, Jianya Y; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Yuan K. Chou; Edwards, David M.; Rich, Cathleen; Link, Jason M.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Bourdette, Dennis N.; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2004-01-01

    Single-chain human recombinant T cell receptor ligands derived from the peptide binding/TCR recognition domain of human HLA-DR2b (DRA*0101/DRB1*1501) produced in Escherichia coli with and without amino-terminal extensions containing antigenic peptides have been described previously. While molecules with the native sequence retained biological activity, they formed higher order aggregates in solution. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to modify the β-sheet platform of the DR2-de...

  15. Human biological monitoring as demonstrated by means of a heavy-metal polluted abandoned site; Human-Biomonitoring am Beispiel einer Schwermetallaltlast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elison, M.; Schulte-Hostede, S. [GSF-Forschungzentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    Models for estimating exposure permit to make a rough assessment of the risk emanating from a contaminated area. But it must not be overlooked that such models are fraught with considerable weaknesses.- In studies such as the one described, concerned citizens should additionally be examined in order to obtain supplementary information and to aid interpretation. Such human biological monitoring makes sense only if the persons in question actually live in the contaminated areas, so that a higher exposure may reasonably be expected. Human biological monitoring is to help assess the inner exposure of human beings to pollutants emanating from the contaminated area. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe von Modellen zur Expositionsabschaetzung ist man nach den oben dargestellten Vorgehensweisen in der Lage, eine orientierende Bewertung des von einer kontaminierten Flaeche ausgehenden Risikos vorzunehmen. Dabei ist jedoch zu beruecksichtigen, dass solche Modelle mit erheblichen Schwachstellen belastet sind. Zur Ergaenzung und Interpretationshilfe sind bei Untersuchungen wie der hier vorgestellten auch Untersuchungen an den betroffenen Buergen vorzunehmen. Dieses Human-Biomonitoring hat nur dort einen Sinn, wo sichergestellt ist, dass die Menschen dort tatsaechlich auf belasteten Flaechen leben und damit eine erhoehte Belastung der Menschen anzunehmen ist. Das Human-Biomonitoring soll eine Abschaetzung der inneren Belastung des Menschen mit Schadstoffen, die von der kontaminierten Flaeche herruehren, ermoeglichen. (orig./SR)

  16. Insights into structural features that affect the biological activities and mode of action of the human antimicrobial cathelicidin LL-37

    OpenAIRE

    Xhindoli, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The human peptide LL-37 is an important innate immune effector that contributes to defending the organism against infection in different scenarios, ranging from direct bacterial killing to the modulation of immune responses and acting as a signal molecule for different cell types involved in defence or healing. All these functions are possible despite its relatively simple structure, due to its capacity to interact with different types of biological membranes. This cationic peptide is able to...

  17. Preparation of biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin. Displaceable binding to rat uterus, cervix, and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and is known to exert its biological effects on various parts of the mammalian reproductive system. Biologically active human relaxin has been chemically synthesized based on the nucleotide sequence obtained from an ovarian cDNA clone. In the present study synthetic human relaxin was radiolabled by phosphorylation with cAMP-dependent protein kinase and [gamma-32P]ATP to a specific activity of 5000 Ci/mmol. The phosphorylated relaxin was purified on cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography and was shown to co-migrate with relaxin on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry revealed a single phosphorylated site on the B chain of relaxin. The 32P-relaxin was able to bind to a goat anti-relaxin antibody, and this binding could be displaced by unlabeled relaxin in a concentration-dependent manner. A comparison of the concentration responses of cellular cAMP production stimulated by relaxin and phosphorylated relaxin in a primary human uterine cell line showed that phosphorylation did not affect the in vitro biological efficacy of relaxin. This made it suitable for in situ autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat uterine, cervical, and brain tissue sections. Displacement of the binding of 100 pM 32P-relaxin by 100, 10, and 3 nM unlabeled relaxin, but not by 100 nM insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and an insulin-like growth factor-I analog, demonstrated the high affinity and specificity of such binding. We conclude that 32P-labeled human relaxin is biologically and immunologically active and that this novel probe binds reversibly and with high affinity to classical (e.g. uterus) and unpredicted (e.g. brain) tissues

  18. Human exposure to radiation following the release of radioactivity from a reactor accident: a quantitative assessment of the biological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this review is to provide a biological basis upon which to assess the consequences of the exposure of a population to radioactivity released after a reactor accident. Depending upon the radiation dose, both early and late somatic damage could occur in the exposed population and hereditary effects may occur in their descendants. The development of dose-effect relationships has been based upon the limited amount of information available on humans, supplemented by data obtained from experiments on animals. (author)

  19. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy L Etcoff; Shannon Stock; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than g...

  20. Research and Application of Human Capital Strategic Classification Tool: Human Capital Classification Matrix Based on Biological Natural Attribute

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Liu; Dazheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the causes of weak human capital structure strategic classification management in China, we analyze that enterprises around the world face increasingly difficult for human capital management. In order to provide strategically sound answers, the HR managers need the critical information provided by the right technology processing and analytical tools. In this study, there are different types and levels of human capital in formal organization management, which is not the same ...

  1. Genetic adaptation of the human circadian clock to day-length latitudinal variations and relevance for affective disorders

    OpenAIRE

    De Forni, D; Pozzoli, U; R. Cagliani; C. Tresoldi; G. Menozzi; Riva, S; F. Guerini; Comi, G; Bolognesi, E; Bresolin, N.; Clerici, M.; Sironi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The temporal coordination of biological processes into daily cycles is a common feature of most living organisms. In humans, disruption of circadian rhythms is commonly observed in psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and autism. Light therapy is the most effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and circadian-related treatments sustain antidepressant response in bipolar disorder patients. Day/night cycles represent a major circadian...

  2. Changes in the diurnal rhythms during a 45-day head-down bed rest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Liang

    Full Text Available In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of -6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR. In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms.

  3. "Fascinating Rhythm's" Fascinating Rhythm: : Celebrating the Gershwins' Self-referential Song

    OpenAIRE

    Arleo, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Introduced in the 1924 musical comedy Lady Be Good, "Fascinating Rhythm" is a classic example of George Gershwin composing a "jagged musical space", into which precise "verbal shards" had to be fit, much like in the art of creating mosaics, a favorite Ira Gershwin metaphor to describe the craft of the lyricist (Furia 1996: 5). This paper pursues an earlier investigation of the Gershwin songbook, which has had such a powerful influence on the development of popular song and music (Arleo 2002)....

  4. Temporal rhythm of petal programmed cell death in Ipomoea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, M-Y; Ni, X-L; Wang, H-B; Liu, W-Z

    2016-09-01

    Flowers are the main sexual reproductive organs in plants. The shapes, colours and scents of corolla of plant flowers are involved in attracting insect pollinators and increasing reproductive success. The process of corolla senescence was investigated in Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae) in this study. In the research methods of plant anatomy, cytology, cell chemistry and molecular biology were used. The results showed that at the flowering stage cells already began to show distortion, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane degradation and tonoplast dissolution and rupture. At this stage genomic DNA underwent massive but gradual random degradation. However, judging from the shape and structure, aging characteristics did not appear until the early flower senescence stage. The senescence process was slow, and it was completed at the late stage of flower senescence with a withering corolla. We may safely arrive at the conclusion that corolla senescence of I. purpurea was mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) that occurred at the flowering stage. The corolla senescence exhibited an obvious temporal rhythm, which demonstrated a high degree of coordination with pollination and fertilization. PMID:27259176

  5. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, Ti-48-ions with energies ranging from 240 to 1000 MeV/u, or to Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Si beams in this study ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m, the LET of the Ti ions ranged from 107 to 240 keV/micron, and the LET of the Fe-ions ranged from 145 to 440 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBEmax values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, 21.4+/-1.7 to 28.3+/-2.4 for Ti ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBEmax value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 MeV/u beam, the highest RBEmax value for Ti ions was obtained 1000 MeV/u beam, and the highest RBEmax value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For Si and Fe ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses Si-28-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  6. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming Yang; Huang, Chung Ju; Chang, Yu Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance. PMID:26866770

  7. Copula-based analysis of rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.; Viola, M. L. Lanfredi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we establish stochastic profiles of the rhythm for three languages: English, Japanese and Spanish. We model the increase or decrease of the acoustical energy, collected into three bands coming from the acoustic signal. The number of parameters needed to specify a discrete multivariate Markov chain grows exponentially with the order and dimension of the chain. In this case the size of the database is not large enough for a consistent estimation of the model. We apply a strategy to estimate a multivariate process with an order greater than the order achieved using standard procedures. The new strategy consist on obtaining a partition of the state space which is constructed from a combination of the partitions corresponding to the three marginal processes, one for each band of energy, and the partition coming from to the multivariate Markov chain. Then, all the partitions are linked using a copula, in order to estimate the transition probabilities.

  8. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI. It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results supported that the Pilates training is very beneficial for improving brain function or intelligence. These findings maybe give us some line evidence to suggest that the Pilates training is very helpful for the intervention of brain degenerative diseases and cogitative dysfunction rehabilitation.

  9. Biologic TNFα-inhibitors that cross the human blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Pardridge, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α inhibitors (TNFI) are a major class of biologic therapeutics, and include decoy receptor and monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapeutics that block TNFα action. TNFα is a pro-inflammatory cytokine in brain disease, such as stroke, brain or spinal cord injury, or Alzheimer disease. However, the biologic TNFIs cannot be developed for the brain, because these large molecules do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Brain penetrating forms of TNFα decoy receptors or ant...

  10. A Selective Critique of Animal Experiments in Human-Orientated Biological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. P.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages and justifications for using small animals in human-oriented research are reviewed. Some of the pitfalls of extrapolating animal-derived data to humans are discussed. Several specific problems with animal experimentation are highlighted. (CW)

  11. Cross-Cultural Influences on Rhythm Processing: Reproduction, Discrimination, and Beat Tapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to synchronize one’s movements to musical rhythms appears to be universal. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on the perception, production, and beat tapping of rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced both by the culture of the participant and by the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than unfamiliar rhythms. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion.

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  13. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Edward W; Herrera, Jorge A; Velasco, Marc J

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  14. Neural networks for beat perception in musical rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Large

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly forty years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. We test the model's prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm.

  15. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H T

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  16. Neural responses to complex auditory rhythms: the role of attending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HeatherLChapin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the role of attention in pulse and meter perception using complex rhythms. We used a selective attention paradigm in which participants attended to either a complex auditory rhythm or a visually presented word list. Performance on a reproduction task was used to gauge whether participants were attending to the appropriate stimulus. We hypothesized that attention to complex rhythms – which contain no energy at the pulse frequency – would lead to activations in motor areas involved in pulse perception. Moreover, because multiple repetitions of a complex rhythm are needed to perceive a pulse, activations in pulse related areas would be seen only after sufficient time had elapsed for pulse perception to develop. Selective attention was also expected to modulate activity in sensory areas specific to the modality. We found that selective attention to rhythms led to increased BOLD responses in basal ganglia, and basal ganglia activity was observed only after the rhythms had cycled enough times for a stable pulse percept to develop. These observations suggest that attention is needed to recruit motor activations associated with the perception of pulse in complex rhythms. Moreover, attention to the auditory stimulus enhanced activity in an attentional sensory network including primary auditory, insula, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex, and suppressed activity in sensory areas associated with attending to the visual stimulus.

  17. Downregulation of RSK2 influences the biological activities of human osteosarcoma cells through inactivating AKT/mTOR signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Quanhe; Jiang, Jing; Lin, Liangbo; Cheng, Si; Xin, Daqi; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Jieliang; Hu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    RSK2 (90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase) is a downstream effector of the Ras/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway that has major functions in cell biological activities, including regulating nuclear signaling, cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell growth, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell survival, and is expressed in most types of human malignant tumors, including lung cancer, prostate and breast tumors, skin cancer and osteosarcomas (OS). RSK2 was found to be essential for osteosarcoma formation. To investigate whether RSK2 is expressed at high levels in human osteosarcome tissues and whether its expression is correlated with the aggressive biological behavior of osteosarcoma cell line (OCLs), we assessed the association between RSK2 expression and OS cell progression, as well as the effects of RSK2 inhibition on the biological activities of osteosarcoma cells. We performed immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of RSK2 in specimens from 30 humans with osteosarcoma, and 15 normal tissues. RSK2 gene expression levels in 30 specimens with osteosarcoma were significantly higher than those of normal tissues. We performed RNA interference on three OCLs to evaluate cell apoptosis, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell motility, chemosensitivity and oncogenicity. After transfection with RSK2 shRNA, increased cell apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, cell cycle progression, weaker cell proliferation, cell migration and weaker tumor formation were observed in all OCLs. These results suggested that RSK2 expression may mediate the biological activities of OS cells and RSK2 may be an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of osteosarcomas. The AKT/mTOR, MAPK/ERK/c-Fos and Bcl2/Bax pathways were analysed to clarify the mechanisms involved. PMID:27082640

  18. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Developmental Toxicity Assays for Chemical Safety Screening and Systems Biology Data Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Klima, Stefanie; Sureshkumar, Perumal Srinivasan; Meganathan, Kesavan; Jagtap, Smita; Rempel, Eugen; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Waldmann, Tanja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Leist, Marcel; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2015-01-01

    Efficient protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells to various tissues in combination with -omics technologies opened up new horizons for in vitro toxicity testing of potential drugs. To provide a solid scientific basis for such assays, it will be important to gain quantitative information on the time course of development and on the underlying regulatory mechanisms by systems biology approaches. Two assays have therefore been tuned here for these requirements. In the UKK test system, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) (or other pluripotent cells) are left to spontaneously differentiate for 14 days in embryoid bodies, to allow generation of cells of all three germ layers. This system recapitulates key steps of early human embryonic development, and it can predict human-specific early embryonic toxicity/teratogenicity, if cells are exposed to chemicals during differentiation. The UKN1 test system is based on hESC differentiating to a population of neuroectodermal progenitor (NEP) cells for 6 days. This system recapitulates early neural development and predicts early developmental neurotoxicity and epigenetic changes triggered by chemicals. Both systems, in combination with transcriptome microarray studies, are suitable for identifying toxicity biomarkers. Moreover, they may be used in combination to generate input data for systems biology analysis. These test systems have advantages over the traditional toxicological studies requiring large amounts of animals. The test systems may contribute to a reduction of the costs for drug development and chemical safety evaluation. Their combination sheds light especially on compounds that may influence neurodevelopment specifically. PMID:26132533

  19. The Effects of Rhythm Training on Tennis Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Grou...

  20. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia;

    2013-01-01

    aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we...... indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first......It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease...

  1. Aberrant Free Radical Biology Is a Unifying Theme in the Etiology and Pathogenesis of Major Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick E. Domann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The seemingly disparate areas of oxygen toxicity, radiation exposure, and aging are now recognized to share a common feature—the aberrant production and/or removal of biologically derived free radicals and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. Advances in our understanding of the effects of free radicals in biology and medicine have been, and continue to be, actively translated into clinically tractable diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This issue is dedicated to recent advances, both basic discoveries and clinical applications, in the field of free radicals in biology and medicine. As more is understood about the proximal biological targets of aberrantly produced or removed reactive species, their sensors, and effectors of compensatory response, a great deal more will be learned about the commonalities in mechanisms underlying seemingly disparate disease states. Together with this deeper understanding, opportunities will arise to devise rational therapeutic interventions to decrease the incidence and severity of these diseases and positively impact the human healthspan.

  2. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H. V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G C M; Brown, D L; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; Fitzpatrick, D R; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with sev...

  3. Composition and biological significance of the human Nα-terminal acetyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    Starheim, Kristian K; Gromyko, Darina; Velde, Rolf; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Arnesen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Protein Nα-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications in eukaryotic cells, occurring on approximately 80% of soluble human proteins. An increasing number of studies links Nα-terminal acetylation to cell differentiation, cell cycle, cell survival, and cancer. Thus, Nα-terminal acetylation is an essential modification for normal cell function in humans. Still, little is known about the functional role of Nα-terminal acetylation. Recently, the three major human N-acetyl...

  4. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Evans (David); M.-J. Brion (Maria); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); J.P. Kemp (John); G. Mcmahon (George); M.R. Munafò (Marcus); J. Whitfield (John); S.E. Medland; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); N. Timpson (Nicholas); B. St Pourcain (Beate); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); G. Davey-Smith (George)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIt is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in

  5. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, D.M.; Brion, M.J.; Paternoster, L.; Kemp, J.P.; McMahon, G.; Munafo, M.; Whitfield, J.B.; Medland, S.E.; Montgomery, G.W.; Consortium, G.; Consortium, C.R.P.; Consortium, T.A.G.; Timpson, N.J.; Pourcain, B. St; Lawlor, D.A.; Martin, N.G.; Dehghan, A.; Hirschhorn, J.; Smith, G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aet

  6. Experiencing Our Anatomy: Incorporating Human Biology into Dance Class via Imagery, Imagination, and Somatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a model for introducing biological perspectives into teaching dance as a means to encourage students toward deeper, healthier, and more personal relationships with their art form as well as appreciation for their physical and cognitive abilities, both inside and outside of the dance studio. It recommends that dance teachers…

  7. The protolobar structure of the human kidney: Its biologic and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book depicts the uniqueness of each kidney as a result of the interaction of the process of nephronogenesis with the random variability of vascular channels within the bounds of a limited space. The fields of anatomy, developmental biology, comparative morphology, embryology, nephrology, pathology, physiology, radiology, and urologic surgery are treated

  8. An update of human mesenchymal stem cell biology and their clinical uses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Walid; Harkness, Linda; Kermani, Abbas Jafari;

    2014-01-01

    in vivo. Consequently, stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) are being introduced into many clinical trials due to their ease of isolation and efficacy in treating a number of disease conditions in animal preclinical disease models. The aim of this review is to revise MSC biology, their potential...

  9. Genetic control of chromosome behaviour: Implications in evolution, crop improvement, and human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes and chromosome pairing are pivotal to all biological sciences. The study of chromosomes helps unravel several aspects of an organism. Although the foundation of genetics occurred with the formulation of the laws of heredity in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequ...

  10. Three-Dimensional Printing of Human Skeletal Muscle Cells: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Studying Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, James R.; Galpin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary exploration is vital to education in the 21st century. This manuscript outlines an innovative laboratory-based teaching method that combines elements of biochemistry/molecular biology, kinesiology/health science, computer science, and manufacturing engineering to give students the ability to better conceptualize complex…

  11. Influence of some biologically active substances on amount of MGMT and MARP proteins in human cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotsarenko K. V.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate an effect of biologically active compounds IFN-α2b, EMAPII, Card medium, fibronectin on the amount of MGMT (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and MARP (anti-Methyltransferase Antibody Recognizable Protein proteins in human cells in vitro. Methods. The human cells of 4BL, Hep-2 and A102 lines were treated with growth factors and cytokines. Changes in the amount of MGMT and MARP proteins were studied by Western blot analysis with anti-MGMT mAbs. Results. The treatment of A102 cells with EMAPII, fibronectin, Laferon and Card medium led to a decreased level of the MGMT protein, whereas the amount of MARP was highly increased in these cells. The treatment with the recombinant protein IFN-α2b increased the amount of MGMT and MARP proteins in Hep-2 cells. The treatment with extracts of transgenic plants,containing human IFN-α2b, caused a significant decrease in the content of both proteins in Hep-2 cells and MARP in 4BL cells. Conclusions. Both MGMT and MARP are highly inducible proteins. Their amount in cells can be changed by some growth factors (Card medium, fibronectin, cytokine (IFN-α2b, cytokine-like (EMAPII or cytokine-containing substances (Laferon and IFN-α2b in plant extracts. This regulation depended not only on the type of biologically active substances but on the cell line used in this study as well.

  12. Photoperiodism and circadian rhythms in relation to the hazards of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The duration, intensity and wavelengths of light to which vertebrates and invertebrates are exposed vary widely over a 24-hour period as well as throughout the year. Species, by means of their behavioral patterns, differentially control in part the photoperiodic environment to which they are exposed. It is essential that mammals, probably including humans, adjust their physiology with changes in the makeup of the photoperiod. Numerous body functions undergo variations recurring at about 24-hour intervals in the presence or absence of known environmental changes with similar periods. This applies to continuos but rhythmic phenomena, with a peak and trough repeating itself every 24-hours, as well as to discrete events occurring about once a day. The time intervals separating these consecutive periodic events are similar but often not identical. Such periods are called circadian. Rhythms have been reported in cell growth, hormonal levels, and so on. Rhythms are generally resistant to a variety of chemical substances including stimulants and depressants. photoperiodism and circadian rhythms, in relation to the hazardous effects of environmental pollutants, as pesticides; which may directly or indirectly affect or alter physiologocal processes in living things, are summarized

  13. Ubi-RKE: A Rhythm Key Based Encryption Scheme for Ubiquitous Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Dong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As intelligent ubiquitous devices become more popular, security threats targeting them are increasing; security is seen as one of the major challenges of the ubiquitous computing. Now a days, applying ubiquitous computing in number of fields for human safety and convenience was immensely increased in recent years. The popularity of the technology is rising day by day, and hence the security is becoming the main focused point with the advent and rising popularity of the applications. In particular, the number of wireless networks based on ubiquitous devices has increased rapidly; these devices support transmission for many types of data traffic. The convenient portability of ubiquitous devices makes them vulnerable to security threats, such as loss, theft, data modification, and wiretapping. Developers and users should seriously consider employing data encryption to protect data from such vulnerabilities. In this paper, we propose a Rhythm Key based Encryption scheme for ubiquitous devices (Ubi-RKE. The concept of Rhythm Key based Encryption has been applied to numerous real world applications in different domains. It provides key memorability and secure encryption through user touching rhythm on ubiquitous devices. Our proposed scheme is more efficient for users than existing schemes, by providing a strong cipher.

  14. Speech rhythm sensitivity and musical aptitude: ERPs and individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, Cyrille; Jordan, Deanna K; Gordon, Reyna L

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the electrophysiological markers of rhythmic expectancy during speech perception. In addition, given the large literature showing overlaps between cognitive and neural resources recruited for language and music, we considered a relation between musical aptitude and individual differences in speech rhythm sensitivity. Twenty adults were administered a standardized assessment of musical aptitude, and EEG was recorded as participants listened to sequences of four bisyllabic words for which the stress pattern of the final word either matched or mismatched the stress pattern of the preceding words. Words with unexpected stress patterns elicited an increased fronto-central mid-latency negativity. In addition, rhythm aptitude significantly correlated with the size of the negative effect elicited by unexpected iambic words, the least common type of stress pattern in English. The present results suggest shared neurocognitive resources for speech rhythm and musical rhythm. PMID:26828758

  15. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper. A quantitative characteristic, the width factor, is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron, and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network. An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network. Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. The critical value of r is derived, and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value. (general)

  16. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  17. Death of Loved One May Trigger Heart Rhythm Trouble

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158176.html Death of Loved One May Trigger Heart Rhythm Trouble ... likely to develop an irregular heartbeat following the death of their spouse or life partner, particularly if ...

  18. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuuichi Seki; Teiichi Tanimura

    2014-09-01

    A diverse range of organisms shows physiological and behavioural rhythms with various periods. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms with an approximately 24 h period in both Drosophila and mammals, while less attention has been paid to ultradian rhythms with shorter periods. We used a video-tracking method to monitor the movement of single flies, and clear ultradian rhythms were detected in the locomotor behaviour of wild type and clock mutant flies kept under constant dark conditions. In particular, the Pigment-dispersing factor mutant (Pdf01) demonstrated a precise and robust ultradian rhythmicity, which was not temperature compensated. Our results suggest that Drosophila has an endogenous ultradian oscillator that is masked by circadian rhythmic behaviours.

  19. VARIANT OF PERIODIZATION OF BIOLOGICALLY SIMILAR STAGES OF HUMAN AND RAT’S ONTOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A.Gelashvily

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was carried outgrowing individuals of white laboratory outbred rats. Proportional age ratio of investigated objects and age periods of human was made. Carrying out morphological research on animals with subsequent transferring these data on human purposely to realize the analysis of features of body systems' formation during prenatal and postnatal periods of ontogenesis is obviously possible.

  20. VARIANT OF PERIODIZATION OF BIOLOGICALLY SIMILAR STAGES OF HUMAN AND RAT’S ONTOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    O.A.Gelashvily

    2008-01-01

    The research was carried outgrowing individuals of white laboratory outbred rats. Proportional age ratio of investigated objects and age periods of human was made. Carrying out morphological research on animals with subsequent transferring these data on human purposely to realize the analysis of features of body systems' formation during prenatal and postnatal periods of ontogenesis is obviously possible.