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Sample records for biological response modifier

  1. Psoriatic arthritis treatment: biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, P J; Antoni, C E

    2005-03-01

    In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders as a result of the development and application of targeted biological therapies. The elucidation of the overlapping cellular and cytokine immunopathology of such diverse conditions as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and psoriasis points to specific targets for bioengineered proteins or small molecules. Similar to clinical trials in RA, trials in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have shown excellent clinical results with the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab in a variety of domains including the joints, quality of life, function, and slowing of disease progress as evidenced radiologically. In addition, these agents have shown benefit in domains more unique to PsA, such as the skin lesions of psoriasis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, pointing out the similar pathogenesis of the disease in the skin, the tendons, and the synovial membrane. This therapy has been generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of PsA. Other logical candidates for targeted therapy in development include other anti-TNF agents, costimulatory blockade agents that affect T cell function, blockers of other cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, 6, 12, 15, or 18, and B cell modulatory medicines. Also, it will be useful to learn more about the effects of combining traditional disease modifying drugs and the newer biologicals. PMID:15708944

  2. Biologic response modifiers to decrease inflammation: Focus on infection risks

    OpenAIRE

    Le Saux, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers are a novel class of drugs used by sub-specialists to treat immune-mediated conditions such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Also known as ‘cytokine inhibitors’, they are proteins whose purpose is to block the action of cytokines involved in inflammation. The desired therapeutic effect is to reduce or control inflammation. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are the prototypes, but newer agents in this class target other cyto...

  3. Biological response modifiers and their potential use in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Louise S; Skov, Lone; Baadsgaard, Ole

    2003-01-01

    and fewer side-effects than the current systemic therapies now used for severe psoriasis, contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases, the immune system plays a pivotal role, and this is where biological response modifiers such as monoclonal antibodies......In recent years, a more detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of several inflammatory skin diseases, combined with the developments within biotechnology, has made it possible to design more selective response modifiers. Biological response modifiers hold the potential for greater effectiveness......, recombinant cytokines, or fusion proteins may be effective. Several biological response modifiers have already shown positive results in phase II/III clinical trials in skin diseases, and many new biological response modifiers are in progress....

  4. The UV-irradiated mouse as a model for testing biological response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to inducing primary cancers of the skin, ultraviolet (UV) radiation produces specific impairments in the immune system that contribute to the growth and pathogenesis of these skin cancers. The cellular basis for the immunological alterations induced in mice by UV radiation has been studied and characterized over the past ten years. It is now possible to make use of this system to study the activity and mode of action of biological response modifiers. The advantages of this system are that it employs primary hosts, which may respond quite differently from normal animals bearing a transplanted tumor, it closely parallels several specific situations relevant to human cancer, and it may be useful in establishing the mechanism of action of certain agents. Studies in which biological response modifiers have been used in conjunction with the UV carcinogenesis model are reviewed. (Auth.)

  5. Implications of Rheumatic Disease and Biological Response-Modifying Agents in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David M; Borah, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    The preoperative evaluation for any reconstructive or aesthetic procedure requires a detailed history of existing medical conditions and current home medications. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and psoriasis is high, but the impact of these chronic illnesses on surgical outcome and the side effects of the powerful medications used for treatment are often underappreciated. In this review, the authors highlight key perioperative considerations specific to rheumatologic diseases and their associated pharmacologic therapies. In particular, the authors discuss the perioperative management of biological response-modifying agents, which have largely become the new standard of therapy for many rheumatic diseases. The literature reveals three key perioperative concerns with biological therapy for rheumatic disease: infection, wound healing delays, and disease flare. However, data on specific perioperative complications are lacking, and it remains controversial whether withholding biological therapy before surgery is of benefit. The risk of these adverse events is influenced by several factors: age, sex, class of biological agent, duration of exposure, dosage, onset and severity of disease, and type of surgical procedure. Overall, it remains best to develop an individualized plan. In younger patients with recent onset of biological therapy, it is reasonable to withhold therapy based on 3 to 5 half-lives of the specific agent. In older patients with a substantial history of rheumatic disease, the decision to discontinue therapy must be weighed and decided carefully in conjunction with the rheumatologist. PMID:26595025

  6. Effect of three biological response modifiers on chemical carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović, Z; Culo, F; Marusić, M

    1993-01-01

    The modulation of chemical carcinogenesis by three biological response modifiers was assessed in a mouse model. CBA mice given 20-methylcholanthrene s.c. were treated with peptidoglycan monomer, azure B and indomethacin for one month, either from day 0 or 75 after methylcholanthrene injection to assess their effects on tumor incidence (on days 150 and 300), time of tumor appearance, time of death, and duration and dynamics of tumor growth. All three agents significantly influenced some of the parameters of tumor growth, except tumor incidence on day 300. Highly significant sex differences in tumor appearance and growth were observed. Tumors with late appearance grew faster in comparison to tumors with early appearance. The data presented indicate that the effectiveness of anti-cancer body defense mechanisms can be best defined by the time of tumor appearance. PMID:8272149

  7. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  8. Infectious Complications With the Use of Biologic Response Modifiers in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, H Dele

    2016-08-01

    Biologic response modifiers (BRMs) are substances that interact with and modify the host immune system. BRMs that dampen the immune system are used to treat conditions such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease and often in combination with other immunosuppressive agents, such as methotrexate and corticosteroids. Cytokines that are targeted include tumor necrosis factor α; interleukins (ILs) 6, 12, and 23; and the receptors for IL-1α (IL-1A) and IL-1β (IL-1B) as well as other molecules. Although the risk varies with the class of BRM, patients receiving immune-dampening BRMs generally are at increased risk of infection or reactivation with mycobacterial infections (Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria), some viral (herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B) and fungal (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis) infections, as well as other opportunistic infections. The use of BRMs warrants careful determination of infectious risk on the basis of history (including exposure, residence, and travel and immunization history) and selected baseline screening test results. Routine immunizations should be given at least 2 weeks (inactivated or subunit vaccines) or 4 weeks (live vaccines) before initiation of BRMs whenever feasible, and inactivated influenza vaccine should be given annually. Inactivated and subunit vaccines should be given when needed while taking BRMs, but live vaccines should be avoided unless under special circumstances in consultation with an infectious diseases specialist. If the patient develops a febrile or serious respiratory illness during BRM therapy, consideration should be given to stopping the BRM while actively searching for and treating possible infectious causes. PMID:27432853

  9. Cells responsible for tumor surveillance in man: effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the most probable theory of tumor surveillance is neither the existence of any tumor-specific, antigen-dependent, T-cell-mediated cytotoxic effect that could eliminate spontaneous tumors in man and that could be used for some kind of vaccination against tumors, nor the complete absence of any surveillance or defense systems against tumors. What is probable is the cooperation of a number of antigen-independent, relatively weakly cytotoxic or possibly only cytostatic humoral and cellular effects, including nutritional immunity, tumor necrosis factor, certain cytokines, and the cytotoxic effects mediated by macrophages, NK cells, NK-like cells, and certain stimulated T-cells. One question remaining to be solved is why these antigen-independent effects do not attack normal cells. A number of plausible hypotheses are discussed. The hypothetical surveillance system is modulated both by traditional cancer treatment and by attempts at immunomodulation. Radiotherapy reduced the T-helper cell function for almost a decade, but not those of macrophages or NK cells. T-cell changes have no prognostic implication, supporting, perhaps, the suggestion of a major role for macrophages and NK cells. Cyclic adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the peripheral lymphocyte population and several lymphocyte functions but not NK activity. Most of the parameters were normalized some years following treatment, but NK activity remained elevated and Th/Ts cell ratio was still decreased. This might possibly be taken to support the surveillance role of NK cells. Bestatin increases the frequency of lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep red blood cells (but not their mitogenic responses), enhances NK activity, and augments the phagocytic capacity of granulocytes and monocytes (but not their cytotoxic activity). 154 references

  10. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  11. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  12. Update and future perspectives of a thymic biological response modifier (Thymomodulin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, P; Mazzanti, P; Kouttab, N M

    1987-01-01

    Thymomodulin (Ellem Industria Farmaceutica spa, Milan, Italy) is a calf thymus acid lysate with immunomodulating activities. It is composed of several peptides with a molecular weight range of 1-10kD. Extensive studies in animal systems showed that Thymomodulin exhibited no, or very little toxicity even when used at high doses. Studies done in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that Thymomodulin is a biologically active compound which regulates the maturation of human and murine pre T lymphocytes, as well as modulate the functions of apparently mature human and animal B and T lymphocytes. It was observed that Thymomodulin can promote myelopoiesis as demonstrated by an increase of granulocyte-macrophage colonies in agar. Although additional studies to examine its target cell lineage are required, it appears that Thymomodulin exhibits specificity toward T cells. Therefore, enhancement of other cell lineage functions by Thymomodulin may be indirect, and mainly due to its effect on T cells. Of major importance is to note that Thymomodulin is prepared in a manner which allows it to maintain its biological activity when administered orally. PMID:3325544

  13. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  14. Biological response of stainless steel surface modified by N2O/O2 glow discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel wafers were treated with the glow discharge plasma of mixed N2O and O2 at different molar ratios at a certain discharge condition to create desirable biological characteristics to the surfaces. It was found that the molar ratio of N2O to O2 in the mixture at 1:1 used for plasma surface modification caused high apoptotic percentage. Contact angle measurement showed that the surface of stainless steel samples became very hydrophilic after the plasma modification with a value of 15o-30o. The control stainless steel chips without plasma treatment had a contact angle of 40 ± 2o. The data of Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) indicated that there was a certain amount of oxynitrites formed on the plasma treated surfaces, which was considered to play an important role to cell apoptosis and anti-clot formation in cell culture tests. The ESCA depth profile of up to 250 A from the top surface showed the change of elemental compositions within 40-50 A of the surface by the plasma treatment. The decreased platelet attachment, combined with increased apoptosis in fibroblasts is a distinct combination of biological responses arising from the mixed gas plasma treatment. These initial results suggest it may be of particular use relative to stainless steel stents where decreased platelet attachments are advantageous and induction of apoptosis could limit in-stent restenosis.

  15. The modification of radiation therapy by RP-170, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and OK-432, biological response modifier (BRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination therapy with radiation, RP-170 and OK-432, was applied aiming a high therapeutic gain. C3H/HeN mice bearing SCC VII tumors in their legs were irradiated locally 40 min after administration of 200 mg/kg RP-170 orally. OK-432 was administered at 2KE one day before irradiation, at 4KE immediately after irradiation, and 4KE 6 days later. After this multimodal treatment, its TCD50 (the radiation dose to control 50% of irradiated tumor) reduced markedly and as a result, dose modifying factor (DMF) increased to more than 2. Moreover, this combination therapy could reduce the dose of RP-170; radiotherapy with 50 mg/kg RP-170 and OK-432 could produce the same DMF as that from irradiation with 150 mg/kg of RP-170. The higher antitumor effect in this study could also be demonstrated by the significantly increased autologous tumor-cell killing (ATK) activity in tumor infiltrating lymphocyte. (author)

  16. Gene expression of hematoregulatory cytokines is elevated endogenously after sublethal gamma irradiation and is differentially enhanced by therapeutic administration of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt, cytokine-mediated restoration of hematopoiesis is a prerequisite for survival after irradiation. Therapy with biologic response modifiers (BRMs), such as LPS, 3D monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and synthetic trehalose dicrynomycolate (S-TDCM) presumably accelerates hematopoietic recovery after irradiation are poorly defined. One hour after sublethal (7.0 Gy) 60Co gamma irradiation, B6D2F1/J female mice received a single i.p. injection of LPS, MPL, S-TDCM, an extract from Serratia marcescens (Sm-BRM), or Tween 80 in saline (TS). Five hours later, a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay demonstrated marked splenic gene expression for IL-1β, IL-3, IL-6, and granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF). Enhanced gene expression for TNF-α, macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), and stem cell factor (SCF) was not detected. Injection of any BRM further enhanced cytokine gene expression and plasma levels of CSF activity within 24 h after irradiation and hastened bone marrow recovery. Mice injected with S-TDCM or Sm-BRM sustained expression of the IL-6 gene for at least 24 h after irradiation. Sm-BRM-treated mice exhibited greater gene expression for IL-1β, IL-3, TNF-α, and G-CSF at day 1 than any other BRM. When challenged with 2 LD50/30 of Klebsiella pneumoniae 4 days after irradiation, 100% of Sm-BRM-treated mice and 70% of S-TDCM-treated mice survived, whereas ≤30% of mice treated with LPS, MPL, or TS survived. Thus, sublethal irradiation induces transient, splenic cytokine gene expression that can be differentially amplified and prolonged by BRMs. BRMs that sustained and/or enhanced irradiation-induced expression of specific cytokine genes improved survival after experimental infection. 67 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces.

  18. No predictive effect of body mass index on clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after 24 weeks of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Park, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Hwajeong

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether body mass index (BMI) is associated with clinical response to biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We enrolled 68 patients with RA who were treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Biologics included abatacept, tocilizumab, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) blockers (etanercept and adalimumab). Baseline BMI (kg/m(2)) was classified as normal (BMI < 23.0), overweight (23.0 ≤ BMI < 25.0), or obese (BMI ≥ 25.0). Improvement of disease activity score 28 (DAS28) and achievement of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) remission and responses between baseline and 24 weeks were our measures of clinical improvement. Mean baseline BMI before treatment with bDMARDs in patients with RA was 22.2 (SD 3.6). DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP were significantly reduced from baseline after 24 weeks of treatment with bDMARDs (p < 0.001 of both). ∆DAS28-ESR and ∆DAS28-CRP were not found among patients with normal, overweight, or obese BMI (p = 0.133 and p = 0.255, respectively) nor were EULAR responses or EULAR remission (p = 0.540 and p = 0.957, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed no relationship of BMI with EULAR clinical responses (p = 0.093 for good response and p = 0.878 for EULAR remission). This study reveals that BMI is not a predictive factor of clinical response to bDMARDs in patients with RA. PMID:26932795

  19. Immunodominant PstS1 antigen of mycobacterium tuberculosis is a potent biological response modifier for the treatment of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG)-immunotherapy has a well-documented and successful clinical history in the treatment of bladder cancer. However, regularly observed side effects, a certain degree of nonresponders and restriction to superficial cancers remain a major obstacle. Therefore, alternative treatment strategies are intensively being explored. We report a novel approach of using a well defined immunostimulatory component of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for the treatment of bladder cancer. The phosphate transport protein PstS1 which represents the phosphate binding component of a mycobacterial phosphate uptake system is known to be a potent immunostimulatory antigen of M. tuberculosis. This preclinical study was designed to test the potential of recombinant PstS1 to serve as a non-viable and defined immunotherapeutic agent for intravesical bladder cancer therapy. Mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from human peripheral blood and stimulated with PstS1 for seven days. The activation of PBMCs was determined by chromium release assay, IFN-γ ELISA and measurement of lymphocyte proliferation. The potential of PstS1 to activate monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC) was determined by flow cytometric analysis of the marker molecules CD83 and CD86 as well as the release of the cytokines TNF-α and IL-12. Survival of presensitized and intravesically treated, tumor-bearing mice was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve and log rank test. Local and systemic immune response in PstS1-immunotherapy was investigated by anti-PstS1-specific ELISA, splenocyte proliferation assay and immunohistochemistry. Our in vitro experiments showed that PstS1 is able to stimulate cytotoxicity, IFN-γ release and proliferation of PBMCs. Further investigations showed the potential of PstS1 to activate monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC). In vivo studies in an orthotopic murine bladder cancer model demonstrated the therapeutic potential of intravesically applied PstS1

  20. Pharmacovigilance Analysis of Serious Adverse Events Reported for Biologic Response Modifiers Used as Prophylaxis against Transplant Rejection: a Real-World Postmarketing Experience from the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunosuppression by biologic response modifiers (BRM) is a crucial component for successful organ transplantation. In addition to their variable effectiveness in the prevention of organ rejection, these medications have safety concerns that complicate therapeutic outcomes in organ transplant patients. Objective: This study aims at identifying and characterizing safety signals of serious adverse events associated with exposure to BRM among organ transplant patients in a real-world environment. Methods: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System was utilized to apply a pharmacovigilance disproportionality analysis to indentify serious adverse events. Associations between drugs and events were measured by empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (EB05–EB95). Associations with EBGM≥2 were considered significant safety signals. Results: From 1997 to 2012, a total of 12,151 serious adverse event reports for BRM were reported; 15.6% of them (n=1,711) met the safety signal threshold of EB05>1, and 11.6% of these signals (n=199) were significant (EBGM≥2). Sirolimus and mycophenolate accounted for the majority of all signals; antithymocyte immunoglobulin (ATI) and cyclosporine contributed to the majority of significant signals. The following significant signals were identified for ATI (reduced therapeutic response, pulmonary edema, hypotension, serum sickness, infusion-related reaction, and anaphylactic reaction); for azathioprine (alternaria infection, fungal skin infection, and lymphoproliferative disorder); for cyclosporine (neurotoxicity, graft vs. host disease, and thyroid cancer); for cyclophosphamide (disease progression); for daclizumab (cytomegalovirus infection); and for tacrolimus (coma and tremor). 33.6% of these events contributed to patient death (n=67); 6.5% were life-threatening (n=13); 32.1% lead to hospitalization (n=64); and 27.6% resulted in other serious outcomes (n=55). Conclusion: Utilization

  1. Pharmacovigilance Analysis of Serious Adverse Events Reported for Biologic Response Modifiers Used as Prophylaxis against Transplant Rejection: a Real-World Postmarketing Experience from the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Ali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunosuppression by biologic response modifiers (BRM is a crucial component for successfulorgan transplantation. In addition to their variable effectiveness in the prevention of organ rejection,these medications have safety concerns that complicate therapeutic outcomes in organ transplantpatients.Objective: This study aims at identifying and characterizing safety signals of serious adverse events associatedwith exposure to BRM among organ transplant patients in a real-world environment.Methods: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System was utilized to apply a pharmacovigilance disproportionalityanalysis to indentify serious adverse events. Associations between drugs and events weremeasured by empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals(EB05–EB95. Associations with EBGM≥2 were considered significant safety signals.Results: From 1997 to 2012, a total of 12,151 serious adverse event reports for BRM were reported; 15.6%of them (n=1,711 met the safety signal threshold of EB05>1, and 11.6% of these signals (n=199 weresignificant (EBGM≥2. Sirolimus and mycophenolate accounted for the majority of all signals; antithymocyteimmunoglobulin (ATI and cyclosporine contributed to the majority of significant signals. The followingsignificant signals were identified for ATI (reduced therapeutic response, pulmonary edema, hypotension,serum sickness, infusion-related reaction, and anaphylactic reaction; for azathioprine (alternariainfection, fungal skin infection, and lymphoproliferative disorder; for cyclosporine (neurotoxicity,graft vs. host disease, and thyroid cancer; for cyclophosphamide (disease progression; for daclizumab(cytomegalovirus infection; and for tacrolimus (coma and tremor. 33.6% of these events contributedto patient death (n=67; 6.5% were life-threatening (n=13; 32.1% lead to hospitalization (n=64; and27.6% resulted in other serious outcomes (n=55.Conclusion: Utilization of BRM for the

  2. Biology responses to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biology responses to low dose radiation is the most important problem of medical radiation and radiation protection. The especial mechanism of low dose or low dose rate induced cell responses, has been found independent with linear no-threshold model. This article emphasize to introduce low dose or low dose rate induced biology responses of adaptive response, by-effect, super-sensitivity and genomic instability. (authors)

  3. Natural products as radiation response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Protection of cells and organisms against low doses of radiation is a complex issue which must be considered at the level of cells, tissues and organisms. 'Protection' at one level, for example, prevention of cell death, may be adverse at another level, if it allows a damaged cell to survive and form a malignant tumour. Conversely, death of a cell carrying damage can be protective for the organism if it eliminates a damaged cell. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in protection against radiation damage at several hierarchical levels. The use of natural products as radiation response modifiers is very attractive. Many of these compounds are readily available and their function and pharmacology is well understood. Some derive from venoms or natural defenses and are currently used in medicine, others include vitamins, antioxidants or cofactors, which are tried and tested nutritional supplements. Radiation effects may be targeted or untargeted. Radiation may interact directly within a cell causing a direct DNA lesion or it may elicit a bystander response from the irradiated cell. A bystander effect is produced when the irradiated cell apparently exhibits no damage from the radiation, but passes on a biochemical signal which induces neighbouring cells to apoptose or undergo a number of other responses usually associated with irradiation such as mutation induction, transformation, induction of ROS responses etc.. Effects induced in progeny of non-targeted cells in receipt of bystander signals include genetic instability, mini and microsatellite mutations and carcinogenesis. A key characteristic of these non targeted effects is that they occur at very low acute doses (of the order of 5mGy) and saturate so that effective prevention requires an agent which can effectively shut off the mechanism. While the mechanism is not fully known, it is thought to involve signals from irradiated cells communicating via

  4. Consumer Response to Genetically Modified Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Brant, Molly; Tilley, Daniel S.; Mowen, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The consumer trait and characteristic identification, and corresponding relationship to the genetically modified food product's negative reactions was determined from a 354 respondent, 130 item mailed survey. The survey and partially mediated model from Mowen's 3M Model of Personality and Motivation explained how personality traits influence genetically modified food reactions.

  5. Searching for disease-modifying drugs in AD: can we combine neuropsychological tools with biological markers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraci, Filippo; Castellano, Sabrina; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery efforts in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been directed in the last ten years to develop "disease-modifying drugs" able to exert neuroprotective effects in an early phase of AD pathogenesis. Unfortunately several candidate disease-modifying drugs have failed in Phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD for different methodological difficulties, such as the time course of treatment in relation to development of disease as well as the appropriate use of validated biological and neuropsychological markers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been considered a precursor of AD. Much effort is now directed to identify the most appropriate and sensitive markers which can predict the progression from MCI to AD, such as neuroimaging markers (e.g. hippocampal atrophy and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging), cerebrospinal fluid markers (i.e. association of elevated tau with low levels of amyloid β -peptide(1-42) and neuropsychological markers (i.e. episodic memory deficits and executive dysfunction). Recent studies demonstrate that the combination of these different biomarkers significantly increases the chance to predict the conversion into AD within 24 months. These biomarkers will be essential in the future to analyze clinical efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in MCI patients at high risk to develop AD. In the present review we analyze recent evidence on the combination of neuropsychological and biological markers in AD as a new tool to track disease progression in early AD as well as the response to disease-modifying drugs. PMID:24040795

  6. Biological Event Modeling for Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Clement; Cecere, Fred; Darneille, Robert; Laverdure, Nate

    People worldwide continue to fear a naturally occurring or terrorist-initiated biological event. Responsible decision makers have begun to prepare for such a biological event, but critical policy and system questions remain: What are the best courses of action to prepare for and react to such an outbreak? Where resources should be stockpiled? How many hospital resources—doctors, nurses, intensive-care beds—will be required? Will quarantine be necessary? Decision analysis tools, particularly modeling and simulation, offer ways to address and help answer these questions.

  7. Neuroticism modifies psychophysiological responses to fearful films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Reynaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroticism is a personality component frequently found in anxious and depressive psychiatric disorders. The influence of neuroticism on negative emotions could be due to its action on stimuli related to fear and sadness, but this remains debated. Our goal was thus to better understand the impact of neuroticism through verbal and physiological assessment in response to stimuli inducing fear and sadness as compared to another negative emotion (disgust. METHODS: Fifteen low neurotic and 18 high neurotic subjects were assessed on an emotional attending task by using film excerpts inducing fear, disgust, and sadness. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR and corrugator muscle activity (frowning as indices of emotional expression. RESULTS: SCR was larger in high neurotic subjects than in low neurotics for fear relative to sadness and disgust. Moreover, corrugator activity and SCR were larger in high than in low neurotic subjects when fear was induced. CONCLUSION: After decades of evidence that individuals higher in neuroticism experience more intense emotional reactions to even minor stressors, our results indicate that they show greater SCR and expressive reactivity specifically to stimuli evoking fear rather than to those inducing sadness or disgust. Fear processing seems mainly under the influence of neuroticism. This modulation of autonomic activity by neurotics in response to threat/fear may explain their increased vulnerability to anxious psychopathologies such as PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder.

  8. Biological durability of wood modified by citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogoslav Šefc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of measurement of durability of beech wood (Fagus sylvatica modified by Citric Acid (CA against brown rot fungus Poria placenta according to EN 113. Modification was performedby impregnation with 7.0% CA and 6.5% sodium-hypophosphite (SHP water solution and 10-hour curing at 140 °C. The influence of thermal treatment on durability was also researched. Weight percentage gain (WPG caused by modification, moisture content (MC and mass loss of wood (dm after fungal nutrition were measured. WPG of modified beech wood was 6.1% and that of thermally treated wood was -0.3%. The results showed increased durability of modified wood to be 8.3 times greater than nonmodified, while thermal treatment did not give significant durability improvement. These results indicate modification by CA as a promising alternative, but further research on optimisation of modification parameters is needed to achieve improvement of wood properties.

  9. Loss of strength in biologically degraded thermally modified wood

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrika Råberg; Geoffrey Daniel; Nasko Terziev

    2012-01-01

    The durability of thermally modified (TM) and untreated (UT) mini-stakes exposed to in-ground contact was compared by modulus of elasticity (MOE) and mass loss with decay type using microscopy. Results showed a strong correlation between MOE and soft rot decay for UT stakes over a 30 month exposure period. For TM stakes, the correlation between MOE and decay rate (soft rot/bacteria) was not as strong. Loss of MOE of the TM stakes is suggested to be accentuated by the extensive micro-checking ...

  10. Loss of strength in biologically degraded thermally modified wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Råberg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The durability of thermally modified (TM and untreated (UT mini-stakes exposed to in-ground contact was compared by modulus of elasticity (MOE and mass loss with decay type using microscopy. Results showed a strong correlation between MOE and soft rot decay for UT stakes over a 30 month exposure period. For TM stakes, the correlation between MOE and decay rate (soft rot/bacteria was not as strong. Loss of MOE of the TM stakes is suggested to be accentuated by the extensive micro-checking produced in the TM wood tracheids during the original heat treatment. The micro-checks are thought to expand during the winter season due to water expansion during freezing, thereby leading to weakening of the wood in addition to the decay caused by soft rot and bacteria. Using molecular methods, Phialophora hoffmannii was identified as the main fungus causing soft rot decay.

  11. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  12. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death

  13. Biological Behavior of Osteoblast Cell and Apatite Forming Ability of the Surface Modified Ti Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingming; Hwang, K H; Choi, W S; Shin, S J; Lee, J K

    2016-02-01

    Titanium as one kind of biomaterials comes in direct contact with the body, making evaluation of biocompatibility an important aspect to biomaterials development. Surface chemistry of titanium plays an important role in osseointegration. Different surface modification alters the surface chemistry and result in different biological response. In this study, three kinds of mixed acid solutions were used to treat Ti specimens to induce Ca-P formation. Following a strong mixed acid activation process, Ca-P coating successfully formed on the Ti surfaces in simulated body fluid. Strong mixed acid increased the roughness of the metal surface, because the porous and rough surface allows better adhesion between Ca-P coatings and substrates. After modification of titanium surface by mixed acidic solution and subsequently H2O2/HCL treatment evaluation of biocompatibility was conducted from hydroxyapatite formation by biomimetic process and cell viability on modified titanium surface. Nano-scale modification of titanium surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses, which may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy. Results from this study indicated that surface treatment methods affect the surface morphology, type of TiO2 layer formed and subsequent apatite deposition and biological responses. The thermo scientific alamarblue cell viability assay reagent is used to quantitatively measure the viability of mammalian cell lines, bacteria and fungi by incorporating a rapid, sensitive and reliable fluorometric/colorimetric growth indicator, without any toxic and side effect to cell line. In addition, mixed acid treatment uses a lower temperature and shorter time period than widely used alkali treatment. PMID:27433617

  14. Histamine modifies malignant biological behaviour in irradiated breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDA MB 231, a metastatic breast cancer cell line, expresses the four known types of histamine receptors (HAR), which differentially regulate cell proliferation. HA also exerts a radiosensitizing effect when is added to MDA MB 231 cells before irradiation in a way related to the elevation of H2O2 levels. However, ionizing radiation (IR) has also been demonstrated to affect malignant biological behaviour depending upon cell type and irradiation characteristics. The present study was conducted to investigate the action of HA and IR on two events involved in metastatic capacity such as the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cell motility. HA decreased MMP2 and MMP9 expression assessed by RT-PCR and cytochemistry as well enzymatic activity determined by zimography. This effect was mimicked by H2 agonists, while an opposite action was mainly observed when H4 agonists were employed. Cell motility, evaluated by wound healing assay, was also distinctly modulated through HAR. It was significantly augmented via H4R and to a lesser extent via H1R and H3R, though diminished through H2R. 2 Gy irradiated cells showed an enhanced MMP2 and MMP9 activity and cell motility compared to control cells. However, this effect was counteracted by HA. Results suggest that HA treatment could improve radiotherapy efficacy regarding the potential development of metastases. (authors)

  15. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo A. Hendriks

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-like modifiers play critical roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. To increase our understanding of SUMOylation in the mammalian DDR, we employed a quantitative proteomics approach in order to identify dynamically regulated SUMO-2 conjugates and modification sites upon treatment with the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. We have uncovered a dynamic set of 20 upregulated and 33 downregulated SUMO-2 conjugates, and 755 SUMO-2 sites, of which 362 were dynamic in response to MMS. In contrast to yeast, where a response is centered on homologous recombination, we identified dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4.

  16. Development of modified release gliclazide biological macromolecules using natural biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipulkumar D; Mashru, Krupa H; Solanki, Himanshu K; Jani, Girish K

    2013-04-01

    Modified release biological macromolecules (beads) of gliclazide using sodium alginate combined with either gellan gum or pectin in different ratios were prepared by Ionotropic gelation method. Biological macromolecules were evaluated for different physico-chemical parameters. Increase in polymers proportion showed difficulty in production of biological macromolecules due to high viscosity of dispersion. As the polymer concentration increases, the swelling and entrapment efficiency of drug increased. Compared to all other batches and commercial modified release gliclazide tablet, formulated biological macromolecules of sodium alginate with pectin (2:1 ratio) and with gellan gum (6:0.75 ratio) exhibited spherical shape, biphasic in vitro release profile and initial high drug release followed by moderate release up to 12 h as matrix diffusion kinetics and Higuchi model as well as Korsmeyer model. PMID:23305705

  17. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  18. Engineering Titanium for Improved Biological Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C; Bearinger, J; Dimasi, E; Gilbert, J

    2002-01-23

    The human body and its aggressive environment challenge the survival of implanted foreign materials. Formidable biocompatibility issues arise from biological, chemical, electrical, and tribological origins. The body's electrolytic solution provides the first point of contact with any kind of implant, and is responsible for transport, healing, integration, or attack. Therefore, determining how to successfully control the integration of a biomaterial should begin with an analysis of the early interfacial dynamics involved. setting, a complicated feedback system of solution chemistry, pH, ions, and solubility exists. The introduction of a fixation device instantly confounds this system. The body is exposed to a range of voltages, and wear can bring about significant shifts in potentials across an implant. In the environment of a new implant the solution pH becomes acidic, ionic concentrations shift, cathodic currents can lead to corrosion, and oxygen levels can be depleted; all of these impact the ability of the implant to retain its protective oxide layer and to present a stable interface for the formation of a biolayer. Titanium has been used in orthopedic and maxilofacial surgery for many years due to its reputation as being biocompatible and its ability to osseointegrate. Osseointegration is defined as direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone, and the surface of a load carrying implant. Branemark discovered this phenomenon in the 60's while examining titanium juxtaposed to bone. The mechanism by which titanium and its passivating oxide encourage osseosynthetic activity remains unknown. However in general terms the oxide film serves two purposes: first to provide a kinetic barrier that prevents titanium from corroding and second to provide a substrate that allows the constituents of bone (calcium phosphate crystals, cells, proteins, and collagen) to bond to it. We believe that the electrochemical environment dictates the

  19. Biological and behavioral modifiers of urinary arsenic metabolic profiles in a U.S. population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological and behavioral modifiers of urinary arsenic metabolic profiles in a U.S. population David J. Thomas – ISTD, NHEERL Edward F. Hudgens – EHPD, NHEERL John Rogers - Westat Relations between intensity of arsenic exposure from home tap water and levels of inorganic As ...

  20. Optimization of Adsorption Conditions of Cr (VI by PEI Modified BSG Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlong Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface response optimization of Adsorption Conditions of Cr (VI wastewater by PEI modified brewer's grains (BSG with the factors of pH value, adsorbent concentration, adsorption time, amount of adsorbent and the response of adsorption rate were studied. The optimal parameters for adsorption conditions were of adsorbent concentration of 113.30 mg/L, adsorbent particle size of 60~80 mesh, pH 1.79, adsorbent amount of 4.99 g/L, adsorption time and temperature of 1.88 h and 30°C, respectively. The maximal absorption rate got 100.0%, adsorption capacity was 46.58 mg/g. The PEI modified BSG is a promising, cheap, efficient, new biological materials of adsorption for Cr (VI in wastewater.

  1. Temperature-Responsive Polymer Modified Surface for Cell Sheet Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Okano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, as a novel approach for tissue engineering, cell sheet engineering has been proposed by our laboratory. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm, which is a well-known temperature-responsive polymer, has been grafted on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS surfaces through an electron beam irradiated polymerization. At 37 °C, where the PIPAAm modified surface is hydrophobic, cells can adhere, spread on the surface and grow to confluence. By decreasing temperature to 20 °C, since the surface turns to hydrophilic, cells can detach themselves from the surface spontaneously and form an intact cell sheet with extracellular matrix. For obtaining a temperature-induced cell attachment and detachment, it is necessary to immobilize an ultra thin PIPAAm layer on the TCPS surfaces. This review focuses on the characteristics of PIAPAm modified surfaces exhibiting these intelligent properties. In addition, PIPAAm modified surfaces giving a rapid cell-sheet recovery has been further developed on the basis of the characteristic of the PIPAAm surface. The designs of temperature-responsive polymer layer have provided an enormous potential to fabricate clinically applicable regenerative medicine.

  2. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Bernedo Alcazar

    Full Text Available The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses.The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique.The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research.Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups.The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies.

  3. Benefits and Costs of Biologically Contained Genetically Modified Tomatoes and Eggplants in Italy and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf A. Groeneveld

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties.

  4. Moisture sorption, biological durability, and mechanical performance of WPC containing modified wood and polylactates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kristoffer Segerholm

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological durability is an important feature for wood-plastic composites (WPC intended for outdoor applications. One route to achieving WPC products with increased biological durability is to use wood preservative agents in the formulation of the WPC. Another option could be to use a chemically modified wood component that already exhibits increased resistance to biological degradation. There is also a need to use biobased thermoplastics made from renewable resources, which would decrease the dependency on petrochemically-produced thermoplastics in the future. The objective of this study was to examine moisture sorption properties, biological durability, and mechanical performance of injection-molded WPC samples based on acetylated or thermally modified wood components and a polylactate matrix. The biological durability was evaluated in a terrestrial microcosm (TMC test according to ENV 807, followed by mechanical evaluation in a center point bending test. The moisture sorption properties were investigated via both water soaking and exposure in a high-humidity climate. Low or negligible mass losses were observed in the TMC test for all WPC samples. However, the mechanical evaluation after exposure in the TMC test showed 35-40% losses in both strength and stiffness for the WPC containing an unmodified wood component.

  5. Systems biology of neutrophil differentiation and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Porse, Bo T; Borregaard, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Systems biology has emerged as a new scientific field, which aims at investigating biological processes at the genomic and proteomic levels. Recent studies have unravelled aspects of neutrophil differentiation and immune responses at the systems level using high-throughput technologies. These...

  6. The host response to allogeneic and xenogeneic biological scaffold materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-05-01

    The clinical use of biological scaffold materials has become commonplace. Such scaffolds are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), or components of ECM, derived from allogeneic or xenogeneic tissues. Such scaffold materials vary widely in their source tissue, processing methods and sterilization methods. The success or failure of an ECM scaffold for a given application is dependent on the host response following implantation; a response that is largely mediated by the innate immune system and which is influenced by a numerous factors, including the processing methods used in the preparation of biological scaffolds. The present paper reviews various aspects of the host response to biological scaffolds and factors that affect this response. In addition, some of the logistical, regulatory and reconstructive implications associated with the use of biological scaffolds are discussed. PMID:24668694

  7. Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Groeneveld, Rolf A.; Erik Ansink; Clemens C.M. Van de Wiel; Justus Wesseler

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringen...

  8. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  9. Summarizing cellular responses as biological process networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lasher, Christopher D; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy; Murali, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarray experiments can simultaneously identify thousands of genes that show significant perturbation in expression between two experimental conditions. Response networks, computed through the integration of gene interaction networks with expression perturbation data, may themselves contain tens of thousands of interactions. Gene set enrichment has become standard for summarizing the results of these analyses in te...

  10. Engineering Synthetically Modified Insulin for Glucose-Responsive Diabetes Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew J.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Summary Though a suite of different insulin variants have been used clinically to provide greater control over pharmacokinetics, no clinically used insulin can tune its potency and/or bioavailability in a glucose-dependent manner. In order to improve therapy for diabetic patients, a vision has been the development of autonomous closed-loop approaches. Toward this goal, insulin has been synthetically modified with glucose-sensing groups or groups that can compete with free glucose for binding to glucose-binding proteins and evaluated in pre-clinical models. Specifically, it was demonstrated that site-specific modification of insulin with phenylboronic acid can result in glucose-responsive activity, leading to faster recovery in diabetic mice following a glucose challenge but with less observed hypoglycemia in healthy mice. This strategy, along with several others being pursued, holds promise to improve the fidelity in glycemic control with routine insulin therapy.

  11. The Use of an Electronic Response System in Teaching Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, William C.; Nisbet, Jerry J.

    1971-01-01

    An electronic student response system was used in teaching college biology to non-science students. Achievement of this treatment group was compared with that of the control group (not utilizing the response system). The only statistical significant difference found in an analysis of covariance was an interaction between treatment group and time…

  12. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  13. Multilevel systems biology modeling characterized the atheroprotective efficiencies of modified dairy fats in a hamster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Charles; Berton, Amélie; Ginies, Christian; Bott, Romain; Scheercousse, Pierre; Saddi, Alessandra; Gripois, Daniel; Landrier, Jean-François; Dalemans, Daniel; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Delplanque, Bernadette

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the atheroprotective efficiency of modified dairy fats in hyperlipidemic hamsters. A systems biology approach was implemented to reveal and quantify the dietary fat-related components of the disease. Three modified dairy fats (40% energy) were prepared from regular butter by mixing with a plant oil mixture, by removing cholesterol alone, or by removing cholesterol in combination with reducing saturated fatty acids. A plant oil mixture and a regular butter were used as control diets. The atherosclerosis severity (aortic cholesteryl-ester level) was higher in the regular butter-fed hamsters than in the other four groups (P < 0.05). Eighty-seven of the 1,666 variables measured from multiplatform analysis were found to be strongly associated with the disease. When aggregated into 10 biological clusters combined into a multivariate predictive equation, these 87 variables explained 81% of the disease variability. The biological cluster "regulation of lipid transport and metabolism" appeared central to atherogenic development relative to diets. The "vitamin E metabolism" cluster was the main driver of atheroprotection with the best performing transformed dairy fat. Under conditions that promote atherosclerosis, the impact of dairy fats on atherogenesis could be greatly ameliorated by technological modifications. Our modeling approach allowed for identifying and quantifying the contribution of complex factors to atherogenic development in each dietary setup. PMID:26071539

  14. Simulation of triaxial response of granular materials by modified DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XiaoLiang; Li, JiaChun

    2014-12-01

    A modified discrete element method (DEM) with rolling effect taken into consideration is developed to examine macroscopic behavior of granular materials in this study. Dimensional analysis is firstly performed to establish the relationship between macroscopic mechanical behavior, mesoscale contact parameters at particle level and external loading rate. It is found that only four dimensionless parameters may govern the macroscopic mechanical behavior in bulk. The numerical triaxial apparatus was used to study their influence on the mechanical behavior of granular materials. The parametric study indicates that Poisson's ratio only varies with stiffness ratio, while Young's modulus is proportional to contact modulus and grows with stiffness ratio, both of which agree with the micromechanical model. The peak friction angle is dependent on both inter-particle friction angle and rolling resistance. The dilatancy angle relies on inter-particle friction angle if rolling stiffness coefficient is sufficiently large. Finally, we have recommended a calibration procedure for cohesionless soil, which was at once applied to the simulation of Chende sand using a series of triaxial compression tests. The responses of DEM model are shown in quantitative agreement with experiments. In addition, stress-strain response of triaxial extension was also obtained by numerical triaxial extension tests.

  15. Evaluation of the usefulness of modified biological fingerprints in chest radiographs for patient recognition and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoichiro; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Morishita, Junji

    2016-07-01

    We have been developing an image-searching method to identify misfiled images in a PACS server. Developing new biological fingerprints (BFs) that would reduce the influence of differences in positioning and breathing phases to improve the performance of recognition is desirable. In our previous studies, the whole lung field (WLF) that included the shadows of the body and lungs was affected by differences in positioning and/or breathing phases. In this study, we showed the usefulness of a circumscribed lung with a rectangular region of interest and the upper half of a chest radiograph as modified BFs. We used 200 images as hypothetically misfiled images. The cross-correlation identifies the resemblance between the BFs in the misfiled images and the corresponding BFs in the database images. The modified BFs indicated better results than did WLF in a receiver operating characteristic analysis; therefore, they could be used as identifiers for patient recognition and identification. PMID:27132238

  16. Response Priming with More or Less Biological Movements as Primes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, David; Bermeitinger, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Response priming in general is a suitable tool in cognitive psychology to investigate motor preactivations. Typically, compatibility effects reflect faster reactions in cases in which prime and target suggest the same response (i.e., compatible trials) compared with cases in which prime and target suggest opposite responses (i.e., incompatible trials). With moving dots that were horizontally aligned, Bermeitinger (2013) found a stable pattern of results: with short SOAs, faster responses in compatible trials were found; with longer SOAs up to 250 ms, faster responses in incompatible trials were found. It is unclear whether these results are specific to the special motion used therein or whether it generalizes to other motions. We therefore used other motions realized by arrangements of dots. In four experiments, we tested point-light displays (biological coherent walkers vs. less biological scrambled/split displays) as primes. In two experiments, eye gaze motions realized by moving dots representing irises and pupils (i.e., biological) versus the same motion either without surrounding face information or integrated in an abstract line drawing (i.e., less biological) were used. We found overall large positive compatibility effects with biological motion primes and also positive-but smaller-compatibility effects with less biological motion primes. Most important, also with very long SOAs (up to 1320 ms), we did not find evidence for negative compatibility effects. Thus, the pattern of positive-followed-by-negative-compatibility effects found in Bermeitinger (2013) seems to be specific to the materials used therein, whereas response priming in general seems an applicable tool to study motion perception. PMID:27150613

  17. Unconventional biological threats and the molecular biological response to biological threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Ronald A; Lutz, Brock D; Huycke, Mark M; Gilmore, Michael S

    2002-06-01

    This article concludes this symposium on potential agents of warfare and terrorism with discussion of 3 topics. First, influenza A virus is discussed as a potential biological weapon. Although it does not receive much attention in this role, the potential for mass casualties and public panic certainly exist if an epidemic of a virulent influenza A virus were initiated. Second, agroterrorism, terrorism directed at livestock or poultry or crops, is briefly discussed. Finally, the potential role of techniques of modern molecular biology to create new agents for bioterrorism or enhance the terrorist potential of available agents, and the known roles of these techniques in defense against biological warfare or terrorism are discussed. PMID:12074489

  18. Sensitive determination of domperidone in biological fluids using a conductive polymer modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive method for domperidone (DP) determination has been developed by electropolymerizing a polymer film on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) in acidic solution using cyclic voltammetry. The modified sensor was characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical measurements were carried out using square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. The modified sensor exhibited an excellent catalytic response towards the oxidation of DP with a well-defined oxidation peak at 840 mV. The modified sensor exhibited linear calibration curve for DP over a concentration range of 0.1 μM to 100 μM in phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.2 with detection limit of 12.0 nM. The sensor was capable to determine DP effectively without any interference from the common metabolites like ascorbic acid, uric acid, xanthine and hypoxanthine. The analytical utilities of the sensor have been demonstrated by determining the DP in human fluids and pharmaceutical samples. Further, the modified sensor displayed voltammetric responses with high sensitivity, good selectivity and reproducibility which make it suitable for clinical diagnosis

  19. Molecular circuits, biological switches, and nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Melvin E.; Yang, Raymond S.H.; French, C. Tenley; Chubb, Laura S; Dennison, James E

    2002-01-01

    Signaling motifs (nuclear transcriptional receptors, kinase/phosphatase cascades, G-coupled protein receptors, etc.) have composite dose-response behaviors in relation to concentrations of protein receptors and endogenous signaling molecules. "Molecular circuits" include the biological components and their interactions that comprise the workings of these signaling motifs. Many of these molecular circuits have nonlinear dose-response behaviors for endogenous ligands and for exogenous toxicants...

  20. Methotrexate monotherapy and methotrexate combination therapy with traditional and biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis: abridged Cochrane systematic review and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazlewood, Glen S; Barnabe, Cheryl; Tomlinson, George; Marshall, Deborah; Devoe, Dan; Bombardier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare methotrexate based disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatments for rheumatoid arthritis in patients naive to or with an inadequate response to methotrexate. Design Systematic review and Bayesian random effects network meta-analysis of trials assessing methotrexate used alone or in combination with other conventional synthetic DMARDs, biologic drugs, or tofacitinib in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data sources Trials were identified from Medline, Em...

  1. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jackson, S.P.; Bartek, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 461, č. 7267 (2009), s. 1071-1078. ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * human disease * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 34.480, year: 2009

  2. Virtual lesions of the IFG abolish response facilitation for biological and non-biological cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Newman-Norlund

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans are faster to perform a given action following observation of that same action. Converging evidence suggests that the human mirror neuron system (MNS plays an important role in this phenomenon. However, the specificity of the neural mechanisms governing this effect remain controversial. Specialist theories of imitation suggest that biological cues are maximally capable of eliciting imitative facilitation. Generalist models, on the other hand, posit a broader role for the MNS in linking visual stimuli with appropriate responses. In the present study, we investigated the validity of these two theoretical approaches by disrupting the left and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG during the preparation of congruent (imitative and incongruent (complementary actions cued by either biological (hand or non-biological (static dot stimuli. Delivery of TMS over IFG abolished imitative response facilitation. Critically, this effect was identical whether actions were cued by biological or non-biological stimuli. This finding argues against theories of imitation in which biological stimuli are treated preferentially and stresses the notion of the IFG as a vital center of general perception-action coupling in the human brain.

  3. Role of Histone-Modifying Enzymes and Their Complexes in Regulation of Chromatin Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJarlais, Renee; Tummino, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    In 1964, Alfrey and colleagues proposed that acetylation and methylation of histones may regulate RNA synthesis and described "the possibility that relatively minor modifications of histone structure, taking place on the intact protein molecule, offer a means of switching-on or off RNA synthesis at different loci along the chromosome" [Allfrey, V., Faulkner, R., and Mirsky, A. (1964) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 51, 786]. Fifty years later, this prescient description provides a simple but conceptually accurate model for the biological role of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). The basic unit of chromosomes is the nucleosome, with double-stranded DNA wrapped around a histone protein oligomer. The "tails" of histone proteins are post-translationally modified, which alters the physical properties of nucleosomes in a manner that impacts gene accessibility for transcription and replication. Enzymes that catalyze the addition and removal of histone PTMs, histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs), are present in large protein complexes, with DNA-binding proteins, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, and epigenetic reader proteins that bind to post-translationally modified histone residues [Arrowsmith, C. H., Bountra, C., Fish, P. V., Lee, K., and Schapira, M. (2012) Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 11, 384-400]. The activity of HME complexes is coordinated with that of other chromatin-associated complexes that, together, regulate gene transcription, DNA repair, and DNA replication. In this context, the enzymes that catalyze addition and removal of histone PTMs are an essential component of the highly regulated mechanism for accessing compacted DNA. To fully understand the function of HMEs, the structure of nucleosomes, their natural substrate, will be described. Each major class of HMEs subsequently will be discussed with regard to its biochemistry, enzymatic mechanism, and biological function in the context of a prototypical HME complex. PMID:26745824

  4. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Olsen, Jesper V; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-01-01

    identified dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the...

  5. Osteoblast cell response to surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the interaction of cells with modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential biomedical applications, the MWCNTs were chemically modified with carboxylic acid groups (–COOH), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer and biomimetic apatite on their surfaces. Additionally, human osteoblast MG-63 cells were cultured in the presence of the surface-modified MWCNTs. The metabolic activities of osteoblastic cells, cell proliferation properties, as well as cell morphology were studied. The surface modification of MWCNTs with biomimetic apatite exhibited a significant increase in the cell viability of osteoblasts, up to 67.23%. In the proliferation phases, there were many more cells in the biomimetic apatite-modified MWCNT samples than in the MWCNTs–COOH. There were no obvious changes in cell morphology in osteoblastic MG-63 cells cultured in the presence of these chemically-modified MWCNTs. The surface modification of MWCNTs with apatite achieves an effective enhancement of their biocompatibility.

  6. A Modified Oxidation Ditch with Additional Internal Anoxic Zones for Enhanced Biological Nutrient Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Dianhai; XU Li; SHEN Changming

    2013-01-01

    A novel modified pilot scale anaerobic oxidation ditch with additional internal anoxic zones was operated experimentally,aiming to study the improvement of biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the effect of enhanced denitrifying phosphorus removal in the process.Under all experimental conditions,the anaerobic-oxidation ditch with additional internal anoxic zones and an internal recycle ratio of 200% had the highest nutrient removal efficiency.The effluent NH+4-N,total nitrogen(TN),PO34--P and total phosphorus(TP)contents were 1.2 mg·L-1,13 mg·L-1,0.3 mg·L-1 and 0.4 mg·L-1,respectively,all met the discharge standards in China.The TN and TP removal efficiencies were remarkably improved from 37% and 50% to 65% and 88% with the presence of additional internal anoxic zones and internal recycle ratio of 200%.The results indicated that additional internal anoxic zones can optimize the utilization of available carbon source from the anaerobic outflow for denitrification.It was also found that phosphorus removal via the denitrification process was stimulated in the additional internal anoxic zones,which was beneficial for biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal when treating wastewater with a limited carbon source.However,an excess internal recycle would cause nitrite to accumulate in the system.This seems to be harmful to biological phosphorus removal.

  7. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  8. Victimization and Biological Stress Responses in Urban Adolescents: Emotion Regulation as a Moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    Associations between urban adolescents' victimization experiences and biological stress responses were examined, as well as emotion regulation as a moderator of these associations. Data from a 4-wave longitudinal study with a low-income, community-based sample (n = 242; 91 % African American; 57 % female; M = 11.98, SD = 1.56 years at baseline) revealed that victimization, assessed over 3 study waves, was associated with an attenuated cortisol response to a stress interview at the final study wave, indicating that responses of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis were dysregulated. Cortisol responses were moderated by caregiver-reported adolescent emotion regulation, suggesting that this modifiable protective factor that is taught in many school-based prevention programs could help reduce harm associated with HPA axis dysregulation linked to victimization. PMID:26676938

  9. Microscopic visualization of a biological response to charged particle traversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Jakob, B.; Becker, G.; Scholz, M.

    2003-08-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying biological effects of charged particle radiation has become increasingly important in view of the use of ion beams in tumor therapy. Elucidating how the enhanced efficiency of densely ionizing radiation in cell killing is related to the initial causative lesions, namely DNA double-strand breaks, constitutes a major task in radiobiology. The inhomogeneous spatial distribution of energy deposition leading to the induction of more complex and less reparable DNA lesions is the basis for high-LET effects. But the cellular response to radiation damage also involves the interplay between repair and signal transduction proteins with the aim of coordinating the processing of DNA damage and cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Charged particles are used as a probe for the production of localized subcellular damage to study these aspects of the biological response to ionizing radiation. Immunocytochemical techniques applied in combination with confocal laser microscopy allow to monitor the relocalization of DNA damage response proteins within individual nuclei following irradiation. In particular, the rapid accumulation of the signalling protein p21 at sites of heavy ion-induced DNA damage reflects the microscopic distribution of dose deposited within nuclei of irradiated human fibroblasts. The biological response pattern for p21 is presented for high and low energy ion beams, involving different particle species and representing a wide range of radiation qualities.

  10. Biological and ecological responses to carbon-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A.

    This dissertation examines the biological and ecological responses to carbon nanoparticles, a major class of nanomaterials which have been mass produced and extensively studied for their rich physical properties and commercial values. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review on the structures, properties, applications, and implications of carbon nanomaterials, especially related to the perspectives of biological and ecosystems. Given that there are many types of carbon nanomaterials available, this chapter is focused on three major types of carbon-based nanomaterials only, namely, fullerenes, single walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. On the whole organism level, specifically, Chapter II presents a first study on the fate of fullerenes and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in rice plants, which was facilitated by the self assembly of these nanomaterials with NOM. The aspects of fullerene uptake, translocation, biodistribution, and generational transfer in the plants were examined and quantified using bright field and electron microscopy, FT-Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy. The uptake and transport of fullerene in the plant vascular system were attributed to water transpiration, convection, capillary force, and the fullerene concentration gradient from the roots to the leaves of the plants. On the cellular level, Chapter III documents the differential uptake of hydrophilic C60(OH)20 vs. amphiphilic C70-NOM complex in Allium cepa plant cells and HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. This study was conducted using a plant cell viability assay, and complemented by bright field, fluorescence and electron microscopy imaging. In particular, C60(OH)20 and C70-NOM showed contrasting uptake in both the plant and mammalian cells, due to their significant differences in physicochemistry and the presence of an extra hydrophobic plant cell wall in the plant cells. Consequently, C60(OH)20 was found to induce toxicity in Allium cepa cells but not in HT-29 cells, while C70

  11. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines

  12. ANALISIS ARGUMENTASI MAHASISWA PENDIDIKAN BIOLOGI PADA ISU SOSIOSAINFIK KONSUMSI GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM (GMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Herlanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis argumentasi yang dikemukakan oleh mahasiswa pendidikan biologi terkait isu sosiosaintifik yaitu konsumsi pangan Genetically Modified Organism (GMO.  Penelitian menggunakan metode survei secara online.  Partisipan yang berasal dari semester III-VII Universitas Islam Negeri Jakarta yang secara sukarela mengisi kuisioner online yang diunggah pada weblog. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan isu sosiosaintifik GMO lebih banyak ditanggapi secara saintifik oleh partisipan.  Argumentasi sebagian besar berada pada level II, yaitu telah mampu mengungkapkan sebuah klaim disertai dengan alasan. Hanya sedikit yang sudah mampu memberikan argumen secara holistik (level IV, yaitu mampu mengungkapkan argumen dengan alasan yang kuat yang tidak mudah dibantah.  Umumnya argumentasi yang dikemukan partisipan berjenis argumentasi sederhana dan argumentasi tipe rantai.  Berdasarkan temuan ini, perlu dikembangkan sebuah model perkuliahan yang dapat meningkatkan keterampilan berargumentasi. This research aimed to analyze the argument for socioscientifik issue “Genetically Modified Organism (GMO Food Consumtion”.  This reseach used online survey.  Participant filled online questionaire that uploaded in weblog.  Participants are student of biology education in Jakarta Islamic State University. The result showed most participants gave scientific view in their argument.  Most of argumentations were in level II; participants gave a klaim within a warrant.  Only a few argument were in level IV, it’s a holistic argument that contained a klaim, a warrant, a backing, and a rebuttal.  Most of argument had simple type or chain type.  From this result, university must develop strategies of lecturing to improve argumentation skill.

  13. Surface chemical and biological characterization of flax fabrics modified with silver nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladini, F., E-mail: federica.paladini@unisalento.it [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Picca, R.A.; Sportelli, M.C.; Cioffi, N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Sannino, A.; Pollini, M. [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications and wound healing. This work aims to investigate the surface chemical composition and biological properties of silver nanoparticle-modified flax substrates. Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution, by means of a large-scale apparatus. The silver-coated materials were characterized through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), to assess the surface elemental composition of the coatings, and the chemical speciation of both the substrate and the antibacterial nanophases. A detailed investigation of XPS high resolution regions outlined that silver is mainly present on nanophases' surface as Ag{sub 2}O. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also carried out, in order to visualize the distribution of silver particles on the fibers. The materials were also characterized from a biological point of view in terms of antibacterial capability and cytotoxicity. Agar diffusion tests and bacterial enumeration tests were performed on Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed through the extract method on murine fibroblasts in order to verify if the presence of the silver coating affected the cellular viability and proliferation. Durability of the coating was also assessed, thus confirming the successful scaling up of the process, which will be therefore available for large-scale production. - Highlights: • Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications. • Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution. • Flax fabrics were characterized from a biological and surface chemical point of view. • Scaling up of the process was confirmed.

  14. Surface chemical and biological characterization of flax fabrics modified with silver nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications and wound healing. This work aims to investigate the surface chemical composition and biological properties of silver nanoparticle-modified flax substrates. Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution, by means of a large-scale apparatus. The silver-coated materials were characterized through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), to assess the surface elemental composition of the coatings, and the chemical speciation of both the substrate and the antibacterial nanophases. A detailed investigation of XPS high resolution regions outlined that silver is mainly present on nanophases' surface as Ag2O. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also carried out, in order to visualize the distribution of silver particles on the fibers. The materials were also characterized from a biological point of view in terms of antibacterial capability and cytotoxicity. Agar diffusion tests and bacterial enumeration tests were performed on Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed through the extract method on murine fibroblasts in order to verify if the presence of the silver coating affected the cellular viability and proliferation. Durability of the coating was also assessed, thus confirming the successful scaling up of the process, which will be therefore available for large-scale production. - Highlights: • Silver nanophases are increasingly used as effective antibacterial agent for biomedical applications. • Silver coatings were deposited on textiles through the in situ photo-reduction of a silver solution. • Flax fabrics were characterized from a biological and surface chemical point of view. • Scaling up of the process was confirmed

  15. Consumer Response to Genetically Modified Food Products in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    McCluskey, Jill J.; Kristine M. Grimsrud; Ouchi, Hiromi; Wahl, Thomas I.

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, a large U.S. export market, there has been growing public opposition against genetically modified (GM) foods. Using a dichotomous choice contingent valuation method, findings show the discount needed for Japanese Seikyou consumers to purchase GM food products is positively affected (i.e., a greater discount is required) by higher levels of self-reported risk perceptions toward GM food, higher levels of concern about food safety and the environment, higher self-reported knowledge abo...

  16. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells – even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  17. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells. We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants

  18. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  19. Antisocial Traits as Modifiers of Treatment Response in Borderline Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    CLARKIN, JOHN F.; Hull, James; YEOMANS, FRANK; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; CANTOR, JENNIFER

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of antisocial traits to treatment response in 35 female inpatients with borderline personality disorder was studied. Antisocial traits were measured with the Personality Assessment Inventory. Treatment response was measured by weekly ratings on the Symptom Checklist-90—Revised over 25 weeks of hospitalization. Treatment course was found to be significantly associated with the level of antisocial behavior reported at admission.

  20. Physiochemical and Biological Properties of Modified Collagen Sponge from Porcine Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuanyuan; HUANG Shujie; WU Jimin; GUAN Jing; ZHANG Xizheng; LI Zhihong; WANG Pengfei; LI Ruixin; GUO Yong; NING Bo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare one-step method to EDC/NHS crosslinking(EDC/NHS group)and one-step simultaneous method to EDC/NHS crosslinking and heparin immobilization(EDC/NHS-Heparin group)in improving physiochemical and biological properties of native collagen sponge(Control group).Modified collagen sponge overcome the disad-vantages of native collagen sponge.IR spectra suggest the change of the functional groups.DSC data indicate that the stability of caloric transformation in EDC/NHS group is slightly higher than that of EDC/NHS-Heparin group.The crosslinking degree,stability against enzymes,stability in morpho-logically and biomechanical properties of EDC/NHS-Heparin group are higher than those of EDC/NHS group,whereas,the water-binding capacity in EDC/NHS-Heparin group is lower than that of EDC/NHS group.HUVECs in EDC/NHS-Heparin group scaffold proliferate fast,migrate well and distribute uniformly.One-step simultaneous method gains the better effects in above aspects, heparinized collagen matrices increase in angiogenic potential and suit for defect repairing and tissue engineering.

  1. Biological activity of a genetically modified BMP-2 variant with inhibitory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübler Alexander C

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations of the binding epitopes of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 lead to a modified interaction with the ectodomains of BMP receptors. In the present study the biological effect of a BMP-2 double mutant with antagonistic activity was evaluated in vivo. Methods Equine-derived collagenous carriers were loaded with recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2 in a well-known dose to provide an osteoinductive stimulus. The study was performed in a split animal design: carriers only coupled with rhBMP-2 (control were implanted into prepared cavities of lower limb muscle of rats, specimens coupled with rhBMP-2 as well as BMP-2 double mutant were placed into the opposite limb in the same way. After 28 days the carriers were explanted, measured radiographically and characterized histologically. Results As expected, the BMP-2 loaded implants showed a typical heterotopic bone formation. The specimens coupled with both proteins showed a significant decreased bone formation in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion The antagonistic effect of a specific BMP-2 double mutant could be demonstrated in vivo. The dose dependent influence on heterotopic bone formation by preventing rhBMP-2 induced osteoinduction suggests a competitive receptor antagonism.

  2. Ten years of publicly funded biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Proudman, Susanna M; Vitry, Agnes I; Sorich, Michael J; Cleland, Leslie G; Wiese, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment were among the first high-cost medicines to be subsidised in Australia. High-cost medicines pose several challenges to the Australian National Medicines Policy, which aims to provide timely access to effective medicines at a cost individuals and the community can afford. Thus, novel restriction criteria were developed to encourage cost-effective use of bDMARDs. Government expenditure on bDMARD subsidies for RA treatment grew to about $383 million in 2014. Evidence that initiation and continuation criteria for bDMARDs meet usually applied cost-benefit criteria is lacking. The combined expenditure on tocilizumab, certolizumab pegol and golimumab (added to the Australian Government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2010) was $93 million in 2014, which is 210% over the initial estimate. Present and future challenges with regard to bDMARDs for RA and other high-cost drugs include improved expenditure predictions, monitoring of cost-effectiveness in relation to actual use and strategic development, regulation and use of biosimilars. Ten years of documentation on clinical and laboratory findings indicating eligibility to initiate and continue on bDMARDs remains un-used. These data represent an untapped opportunity to promote quality of use of bDMARDs and biosimilars and to improve cost predictions for high-cost drugs. PMID:26821102

  3. Viscoelastic response of anisotropic biological membranes. Part II: Constitutive models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubarda Vlado A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this series [7] we described the structure of the biopolymer interlayers found in the shell of the mollusk Haliotis rufescens (the red abalone. There we described how the layers can be viewed as a viscoelastic composite reinforced by a network of chitin fibrils arranged in an often nearly unidirectional architecture. Mechanical testing documented the response to tensile testing of layers removed via demineralization. Herein in Part II we describe a general viscoelastic constitutive model for such layers that may be both transversely isotropic or orthotropic as would follow from the network of nearly aligned chitin fibrils described by Bezares et al. in Part I [7]. Part III of this series will be concerned with applying the models to more fully describing the response of these types of biological membranes to mechanical loading.

  4. Selection for intrinsic endurance modifies endocrine stress responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, R Parrish; Renner, Kenneth J.; Summers, Cliff H.; Watt, Michael L; Forster, Gina L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Swallow, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise dampens an individual’s stress response and decreases symptoms of anxiety and depression disorders. While the extrinsic relationship of exercise and psychological state are established, their intrinsic relationship is unresolved. We investigated the potential intrinsic relationship of exercise with stress responsiveness using NIH rats bidirectionally selected for intrinsic endurance capacity. Selection resulted in two populations, one with high intrinsic endurance (high capa...

  5. Modified cellular immune responses in dogs infected with Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Nonaka, Nariaki; Oku, Yuzaburo; Kamiya, Masao

    2005-03-01

    Parasite-specific antigen responses and lymphocyte blastogenesis in dogs orally inoculated with Echinococcus multilocuralis metacestodes were examined. Serum IgG1 (Th2-oriented) and IgG2 (Th 1-oriented) levels against somatic and excretory-secretory (ES) antigens of protoscoleces and adult worms increased from 7 days post-infection (DPI), with the highest responses against protoscolex excretory-secretory antigen (PES). Specific blastogenesis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) against the parasite antigens was not observed during the 21-day infection period, but Peyer's patches cells from one out of two dogs at 21 DPI showed blastogenesis against PES (stimulation index: 4.65). Interestingly, only at 7 DPI were concanavalin A (ConA)-induce proliferative responses of PBMC reduced. Moreover, ConA-induced proliferative responses of lymphocytes from various origins were suppressed by the addition of parasite antigens, especially with PES. These data suggest that although both Th1- and Th2-oriented humoral immune responses were observed in E. multilocularis infected dogs, the parasite antigens, especially PES, may have incompletely suppressed lymphocyte responses in these dogs. PMID:15719262

  6. Semantic annotation of biological concepts interplaying microbial cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carreira Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated extraction systems have become a time saving necessity in Systems Biology. Considerable human effort is needed to model, analyse and simulate biological networks. Thus, one of the challenges posed to Biomedical Text Mining tools is that of learning to recognise a wide variety of biological concepts with different functional roles to assist in these processes. Results Here, we present a novel corpus concerning the integrated cellular responses to nutrient starvation in the model-organism Escherichia coli. Our corpus is a unique resource in that it annotates biomedical concepts that play a functional role in expression, regulation and metabolism. Namely, it includes annotations for genetic information carriers (genes and DNA, RNA molecules, proteins (transcription factors, enzymes and transporters, small metabolites, physiological states and laboratory techniques. The corpus consists of 130 full-text papers with a total of 59043 annotations for 3649 different biomedical concepts; the two dominant classes are genes (highest number of unique concepts and compounds (most frequently annotated concepts, whereas other important cellular concepts such as proteins account for no more than 10% of the annotated concepts. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, a corpus that details such a wide range of biological concepts has never been presented to the text mining community. The inter-annotator agreement statistics provide evidence of the importance of a consolidated background when dealing with such complex descriptions, the ambiguities naturally arising from the terminology and their impact for modelling purposes. Availability is granted for the full-text corpora of 130 freely accessible documents, the annotation scheme and the annotation guidelines. Also, we include a corpus of 340 abstracts.

  7. River, delta and coastal morphological response accounting for biological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, W.; Bernardi, D.; Schippa, L.

    2015-03-01

    Management and construction can increase resilience in the face of climate change, and benefits can be enhanced through integration of biogenic materials including shells and vegetation. Rivers and coastal landforms are dynamic systems that respond to intentional and unintended manipulation of critical factors, often with unforeseen and/or undesirable resulting effects. River management strategies have impacts that include deltas and coastal areas which are increasingly vulnerable to climate change with reference to sea level rise and storm intensity. Whereas conventional assessment and analysis of rivers and coasts has relied on modelling of hydrology, hydraulics and sediment transport, incorporating additional biological factors can offer more comprehensive, beneficial and realistic alternatives. Suitable modelling tools can provide improved decision support. The question has been whether current models can effectively address biological responses with suitable reliability and efficiency. Since morphodynamic evolution exhibits its effects on a large timescale, the choice of mathematical model is not trivial and depends upon the availability of data, as well as the spatial extent, timelines and computation effort desired. The ultimate goal of the work is to set up a conveniently simplified river morphodynamic model, coupled with a biological dynamics plant population model able to predict the long-term evolution of large alluvial river systems managed through bioengineering. This paper presents the first step of the work related to the application of the model accounting for stationary vegetation condition. Sensitivity analysis has been performed on the main hydraulic, sedimentology, and biological parameters. The model has been applied to significant river training in Europe, Asia and North America, and comparative analysis has been used to validate analytical solutions. Data gaps and further areas for investigation are identified.

  8. Biological Stress Response Terminology: Integrating the Concepts of Adaptive Response and Preconditioning Stress Within a Hormetic Dose-Response Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stres...

  9. The biological response to nanometre-sized polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiqin; Richards, Laura; Bladen, Catherine L; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nanometre-sized UHMWPE particles generated from hip and knee replacements have been identified in vitro and in vivo. UHMWPE particles in the 0.1-1.0μm size range have been shown to be more biologically active than larger particles, provoking an inflammatory response implicated in late aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. The biological activity of nanometre-sized particles has not previously been studied. The biological response to clinically-relevant UHMWPE wear particles including nanometre-sized and micrometre-sized, along with polystyrene particles (FluoSpheres 20nm, 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm), and nanometre-sized model polyethylene particles (Ceridust 3615®), was determined in terms of osteolytic cytokine release from primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). Nanometre-sized UHMWPE wear particles, nanometre-sized Ceridust 3615® and 20nm FluoSpheres had no significant effect on TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 release from PBMNCs at a concentration of 100μm(3) particles per cell after 12 and 24h. The micrometre-size UHMWPE wear particles (0.1-1.0μm) and 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm FluoSpheres caused significantly elevated osteolytic cytokine release from PBMNCs. These results indicated that particles below circa 50nm fail to activate PBMNCs and that particle size, composition and morphology played a crucial role in cytokine release by particle stimulated macrophages. PMID:26004221

  10. The response of immune cells to hyaluronan modified to resist hyaluronidase digestion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ničková, K.; Kubala, Lukáš; Růžičková, J.; Velebný, V.; Bystrický, S.; Lojek, Antonín

    New Jersey : Matrix Biology Institute, 2006 - (Balasz, E.; Hascall, V.), s. 835-838 ISBN 0-9771359-0-X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/02/0395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : modified hyaluronan * hyaluronidase * human leukocytes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  11. Redox Response of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes to Hydrogen Peroxide and Hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Anzai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The surface of a glassy carbon (GC electrode was modified with reduced graphene oxide (rGO to evaluate the electrochemical response of the modified GC electrodes to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and hydrazine. The electrode potential of the GC electrode was repeatedly scanned from −1.5 to 0.6 V in an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide (GO to deposit rGO on the surface of the GC electrode. The surface morphology of the modified GC electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. SEM and AFM observations revealed that aggregated rGO was deposited on the GC electrode, forming a rather rough surface. The rGO-modified electrodes exhibited significantly higher responses in redox reactions of H2O2 as compared with the response of an unmodified GC electrode. In addition, the electrocatalytic activity of the rGO-modified electrode to hydrazine oxidation was also higher than that of the unmodified GC electrode. The response of the rGO-modified electrode was rationalized based on the higher catalytic activity of rGO to the redox reactions of H2O2 and hydrazine. The results suggest that rGO-modified electrodes are useful for constructing electrochemical sensors.

  12. Biological responses to environmental heterogeneity under future ocean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W; Cornwall, Christopher E; Davison, Andrew; Doney, Scott C; Fourquez, Marion; Hurd, Catriona L; Lima, Ivan D; McMinn, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Organisms are projected to face unprecedented rates of change in future ocean conditions due to anthropogenic climate-change. At present, marine life encounters a wide range of environmental heterogeneity from natural fluctuations to mean climate change. Manipulation studies suggest that biota from more variable marine environments have more phenotypic plasticity to tolerate environmental heterogeneity. Here, we consider current strategies employed by a range of representative organisms across various habitats - from short-lived phytoplankton to long-lived corals - in response to environmental heterogeneity. We then discuss how, if and when organismal responses (acclimate/migrate/adapt) may be altered by shifts in the magnitude of the mean climate-change signal relative to that for natural fluctuations projected for coming decades. The findings from both novel climate-change modelling simulations and prior biological manipulation studies, in which natural fluctuations are superimposed on those of mean change, provide valuable insights into organismal responses to environmental heterogeneity. Manipulations reveal that different experimental outcomes are evident between climate-change treatments which include natural fluctuations vs. those which do not. Modelling simulations project that the magnitude of climate variability, along with mean climate change, will increase in coming decades, and hence environmental heterogeneity will increase, illustrating the need for more realistic biological manipulation experiments that include natural fluctuations. However, simulations also strongly suggest that the timescales over which the mean climate-change signature will become dominant, relative to natural fluctuations, will vary for individual properties, being most rapid for CO2 (~10 years from present day) to 4 decades for nutrients. We conclude that the strategies used by biota to respond to shifts in environmental heterogeneity may be complex, as they will have to

  13. Age modifies the pituitary TSH response to thyroid failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Laurberg, Peter; Pedersen, Inge B.; Perrild, Hans; Ovesen, Lars; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Jorgensen, Torben; Knudsen, Nils

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between serum TSH, total T4 and various patient characteristics when hypothyroidism is diagnosed in a population, and to study how age, sex and serum T4 levels influenced pituitary TSH response. Design: A computer-based register linked to laboratory...... patients. No age dependent variation was observed in serum total T4. Log TSH showed an inverse linear correlation with age. An inverse linear correlation was present between log TSH and total T4 in both young and old patients, but for all total T4 values we observed lower median serum TSH values in elderly...

  14. Social interaction modifies neural response to gaze shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Bristow, D.; Rees, G.; Frith, C D

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring gaze shifts is important for social interactions. The direction of gaze can reveal intentions and help to predict future actions. Here we examined whether behavioural and neural responses to gaze shifts were modulated by the social context of the gaze shift in two linked experiments. Two faces were presented, one gazing directly at the subject (the ‘social’ face) and one with averted gaze (the ’unsocial’ face). One face then made a gaze shift that was either towards a visible targe...

  15. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  16. Ductility-modified response spectra methods for ductile equipment seismic failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach for developing the system ductility of a typical nuclear power plant component is presented, and a comparison of the measured seismic response of a scale model system tested above the elastic range with that calculated by two ductility-modified response spectra methods is shown. (author)

  17. Modified genetic response to X-irradiation of mouse spermatogonial stem cells surviving treatment with TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier studies have shown that the genetic response to X-irradiation of mouse spermatogonial stem-cell populations that are recovering from a previous radiation exposure may differ from that of a normal, unirradiated stem-cell population. Similar modified responses to X-irradiation have now been observed in stem spermatogonia that are recovering from treatment with the chemical mutagen, TEM. (orig.)

  18. Pretreatment with nitrogen dioxide modifies plant response to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runeckles, V. C.; Palmer, K.

    Plant growth inhibition by ozone is significantly affected by previous exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Experiments on the early growth of four crop species showed that daily pretreatment with NO 2 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 3 h) immediately prior to exposure to O 3 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 6 h) increased the inhibition of radish and wheat growth, decreased the inhibition of bush bean growth, but had no effect on the growth of mint. The magnitudes of the interactive effects indicate that in regions where relatively high concentrations of O 3 are produced by photochemical processes, for example, downwind from urban centres, assessments of the impact of O 3 on vegetation based on knowledge of response to O 3 alone may be seriously flawed.

  19. The stress response to surgery: release mechanisms and the modifying effect of pain relief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    This short review updates information on the release mechanisms of the systemic response to surgical injury and the modifying effect of pain relief. Initiation of the response is primarily due to afferent nerve impulses combined with release of humoral substances (such as prostaglandins, kinins...... insufficient afferent blockade during thoracic epidural analgesia. Systemic opiate administration, as well as non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, exert only a small modifying effect on the response. Low-dose combined analgesic regimens may provide total pain relief, but exert no important effect on the...

  20. Risk factors that may modify the innate and adaptive immune responses in periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ellie T; Liu, Jenny; Seymour, Gregory J; Faggion, Clovis M; Cullinan, Mary P

    2016-06-01

    Plaque-induced periodontal diseases occur in response to the accumulation of dental plaque. Disease manifestation and progression is determined by the nature of the immune response to the bacterial complexes in plaque. In general, predisposing factors for these periodontal diseases can be defined as those factors which retain or hinder the removal of plaque and, depending upon the nature of the immune response to this plaque, the disease will either remain stable and not progress or it may progress and result in chronic periodontitis. In contrast, modifying factors can be defined as those factors that alter the nature or course of the inflammatory lesion. These factors do not cause the disease but rather modify the chronic inflammatory response, which, in turn, is determined by the nature of the innate and adaptive immune responses and the local cytokine and inflammatory mediator networks. Chronic inflammation is characterized by vascular, cellular and repair responses within the tissues. This paper will focus on how common modifying factors, such as smoking, stress, hormonal changes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and HIV/AIDS, influence each of these responses, together with treatment implications. As treatment planning in periodontics requires an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease, it is important for all modifying factors to be taken into account. For some of these, such as smoking, stress and diabetic control, supportive health behavior advice within the dental setting should be an integral component for overall patient management. PMID:27045429

  1. Systems Toxicology Assessment of the Biological Impact of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product on Human Organotypic Oral Epithelial Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Filippo; Sewer, Alain; Mathis, Carole; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Schlage, Walter K; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Trivedi, Keyur; Martin, Florian; Elamin, Ashraf; Merg, Céline; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Frentzel, Stefan; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-08-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has been reported to increase predisposition to oral cancer and is also recognized as a risk factor for many conditions including periodontal diseases, gingivitis, and other benign mucosal disorders. Smoking cessation remains the most effective approach for minimizing the risk of smoking-related diseases. However, reduction of harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco, without modifying the amount of nicotine, is a promising new paradigm in harm reduction. In this study, we compared effects of exposure to aerosol derived from a candidate modified risk tobacco product, the tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2, with those of CS generated from the 3R4F reference cigarette. Human organotypic oral epithelial tissue cultures (EpiOral, MatTek Corporation) were exposed for 28 min to 3R4F CS or THS2.2 aerosol, both diluted with air to comparable nicotine concentrations (0.32 or 0.51 mg nicotine/L aerosol/CS for 3R4F and 0.31 or 0.46 mg/L for THS2.2). We also tested one higher concentration (1.09 mg/L) of THS2.2. A systems toxicology approach was employed combining cellular assays (i.e., cytotoxicity and cytochrome P450 activity assays), comprehensive molecular investigations of the buccal epithelial transcriptome (mRNA and miRNA) by means of computational network biology, measurements of secreted proinflammatory markers, and histopathological analysis. We observed that the impact of 3R4F CS was greater than THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity, morphological tissue alterations, and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Analysis of the transcriptomic changes in the exposed oral cultures revealed significant perturbations in various network models such as apoptosis, necroptosis, senescence, xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NFE2L2) signaling. The stress responses following THS2.2 aerosol exposure were markedly decreased, and the exposed cultures recovered more completely compared

  2. Development of molecular biology techniques for the detection of genetically modified organisms in maize food products

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, S.C.; Mafra, I; Silva, C.S. Ferreira da; Amaral, J S; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.

    2008-01-01

    In the last years, the increase in the cultivated area of genetically modified (GM) maize has become a reality. GA21, MON810 and MON 863 maize crops are some of the authorized maize events for food and feed under the European Union (EU) regulations. These crops of transgenic maize bring profit towards the conventional ones, as they confer resistence to some plagues and/or herbices. Concerning the raise of production and consumption of foodstuffs derived from genetically modified organisms (GM...

  3. Inverse Parameter Fitting of Biological Tissues: A Response Surface Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Freed, Alan D.; Stander, Nielen; Fata, Bahar; Vesely, Ivan

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we present the application of a semi-global inverse method for determining material parameters of biological tissues. The approach is based on the successive response surface method, and is illustrated by fitting constitutive parameters to two nonlinear anisotropic constitutive equations, one for aortic sinus and aortic wall, the other for aortic valve tissue. Material test data for the aortic sinus consisted of two independent orthogonal uniaxial tests. Material test data for the aortic valve was obtained from a dynamic inflation test. In each case, a numerical simulation of the experiment was performed and predictions were compared to the real data. For the uniaxial test simulation, the experimental targets were force at a measured displacement. For the inflation test, the experimental targets were the three-dimensional coordinates of material markers at a given pressure. For both sets of tissues, predictions with converged parameters showed excellent agreement with the data, and we found that the method was able to consistently identify model parameters. We believe the method will find wide application in biomedical material characterization and in diagnostic imaging.

  4. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes

  5. Optical Properties and In Vitro Biological Studies of Oligonucleotide-Modified Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie A. Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble semiconducting nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs have attracted much interest in recent years due to their tuneable emission and potential applications in photonics and biological imaging. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET processes are very important for elucidating biochemical mechanisms in vitro, and QDs constitute an excellent substrate for this purpose. In this work, new oligonucleotide-functionalised CdTe-based QDs were prepared, characterised and biologically tested. These QDs demonstrated interesting optical properties as well as remarkable in vitro behaviour and potential for a range of biological applications.

  6. TaBoo SeArch Algorithm with a Modified Inverse Histogram for Reproducing Biologically Relevant Rare Events of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-05-10

    The TaBoo SeArch (TBSA) algorithm [ Harada et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2015 , 36 , 763 - 772 and Harada et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2015 , 630 , 68 - 75 ] was recently proposed as an enhanced conformational sampling method for reproducing biologically relevant rare events of a given protein. In TBSA, an inverse histogram of the original distribution, mapped onto a set of reaction coordinates, is constructed from trajectories obtained by multiple short-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Rarely occurring states of a given protein are statistically selected as new initial states based on the inverse histogram, and resampling is performed by restarting the MD simulations from the new initial states to promote the conformational transition. In this process, the definition of the inverse histogram, which characterizes the rarely occurring states, is crucial for the efficiency of TBSA. In this study, we propose a simple modification of the inverse histogram to further accelerate the convergence of TBSA. As demonstrations of the modified TBSA, we applied it to (a) hydrogen bonding rearrangements of Met-enkephalin, (b) large-amplitude domain motions of Glutamine-Binding Protein, and (c) folding processes of the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A. All demonstrations numerically proved that the modified TBSA reproduced these biologically relevant rare events with nanosecond-order simulation times, although a set of microsecond-order, canonical MD simulations failed to reproduce the rare events, indicating the high efficiency of the modified TBSA. PMID:27070761

  7. Base-modified nucleotides and DNA for applications in diagnostics and chemical biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2015. s. 31. [Liblice 2015. Advances in Organic , Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /50./. 06.11.2015-08.11.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR GA14-04289S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : base-modified nucleotides * DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of asymmetric gramicidin S analogues containing modified D-phenylalanine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, Matthijs; Engels, Eefje; Busscher, Henk J.; Otero, Jose M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H.; Noort, Daan; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Overhand, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of new analogues of the cationic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, having a modified D-phenylalanine residue, their antibacterial properties against several Gram positive and negative strains, as well as their hemolytic activity is reported. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of asymmetric gramicidin S analogues containing modified d-phenylalanine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaap, M. van der; Engels, E.; Busscher, H.J.; Otero, J.M.; Llamas-Saiz, A.L.; Raaij, M.J. van; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Noort, D.; Marel, G.A. van der; Overkleeft, H.S.; Overhand, M.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of new analogues of the cationic antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, having a modified d-phenylalanine residue, their antibacterial properties against several Gram positive and negative strains, as well as their hemolytic activity is reported. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Rats Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modified with mHCN2 Gene to Create Biologic Pacemakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金; 张存泰; 黄深; 王国强; 全小庆

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of rats mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with murine hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 2 (mHCN2) gene as biological pacemakers in vitro was studied. The cultured MSCs were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and mHCN2 gene. The identification using restriction enzyme and sequencing indicated that the mHCN2 gene was inserted to the pIRES2-EGFP. Green fluorescence could be seen in MSCs after transfection for 24-48...

  11. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ENHANCED PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ACACIA SPP.

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil; Irshad ul Haq Bhat,; Khairul B. Awang

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary experimental study was carried out to examine the ability of a chemically modified Acacia spp. to resist biodegradation. The modifications of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid were carried out by propionic anhydride and succinic anhydride in the presence of sodium formate as a catalyst. The treated samples were found resistant to microbial attack, while the untreated ones were damaged on 12 months exposure to a soil burial. The appearance grading, mass loss, mechanical properties...

  12. Anti-tumor response with immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Zhou, Feifan; Boarman, Ellen; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    While successes of different cancer therapies have been achieved in various degrees a systemic immune response is needed to effectively treat late-stage, metastatic cancers, and to establish long-term tumor resistance in the patients. A novel method for combating metastatic cancers has been developed using immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy. Glycated chitosan (GC) is a potent immunological adjuvant capable of increasing host immune responses, including antigen presentation by activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and causing T cell proliferation. GC is also an effective surfactant for nanomaterials. By combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and GC, immunologically modified carbon nanotubes (SWNT-GC) were constructed. The SWNT-GC suspension retains the enhanced light absorption properties in the near infrared (NIR) region and the ability to enter cells, which are characteristic of SWNTs. The SWNT-GC also retains the immunological properties of GC. Cellular SWNT-GC treatments increased macrophage activity, DC activation and T cell proliferation. When cellular SWNT-GC was irradiated with a laser of an appropriate wavelength, these immune activities could be enhanced. The combination of laser irradiation and SWNT-GC induced cellular toxicity in targeted tumor cells, leading to a systemic antitumor response. Immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy is a novel and promising method to produce a systemic immune response for the treatment of metastatic cancers.

  13. Relevance of Crop Biology for Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Crops in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Akinbo, Olalekan; Hancock, James F.; Makinde, Diran

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the crop biology of economic crops in Africa is needed for regulators to accurately review dossiers and conduct comprehensive environmental risk assessments (ERAs). This information allows regulators to decide whether biotech crops present a risk to biodiversity, since crossing between domesticated crops and their wild relatives could affect the adaptations of the wild species. The criteria that should be used in the evaluation of African crops for ERA include growth habit, ce...

  14. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ENHANCED PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ACACIA SPP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary experimental study was carried out to examine the ability of a chemically modified Acacia spp. to resist biodegradation. The modifications of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid were carried out by propionic anhydride and succinic anhydride in the presence of sodium formate as a catalyst. The treated samples were found resistant to microbial attack, while the untreated ones were damaged on 12 months exposure to a soil burial. The appearance grading, mass loss, mechanical properties, and scanning electron microscopy results revealed that chemical modification enhances the resistance of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid wood species to biodegradation.

  15. Biology of sexuality inborn determinants of human sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, R E

    1983-09-01

    Opinions vary on the relative importance of biological and learning processes in the aetiology of sexual expression and deviance. The structure of personality, consistency of fantasy patterns, and the familial nature of homosexuality hint at a biological anlage. Research with the HY-antigen complex and X chromosome, and the elucidation of the interactions of intrauterine testosterone and its products with the foetal brain and neurotransmitters, have given us new models to understand the programming of sexuality. However, gonadotrophin feedback is not relevant as an indicator of brain feminization in primates and man. Finally, the interaction of masculinization and defeminization provides us with a model for understanding homosexual behaviour. PMID:6138111

  16. Rheological and Biological Characteristics of Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Modified by Polyethylene Glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jinghua; CHEN Jingtao; XU Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was chemically modified by polyethylene glycol. Meanwhile,the dynamic mechanics properties of HA derivative and its viscoelastic changes were measured on 3ARES3 Rheometer (Japan) at 25 ℃. Dried cross-linked films of 10×10 mm2 were immersed in phosphate buffered saline(PBS: pH 7.4) at 37 ℃ with different time periods to measure its water content and in vitro degradation. Moreover, cell cultured solutions, which were in the different cultivation vesse with 1 mg/mL Solution of HA derivative as doing experimental sample for 2 d, 4 d and 7 d, were observed, respectively, by an inverted discrepancy microscope. The cell relative growth rate was analyzed with the SPSS10.0 mathematic statistic software. Based on the above experiments,structure-modified HA derivative can meet the requirements of biomaterials in view of rheological and degradation in vitro and cytotoxicity charactereistics from clinical medical aspect under this experiment conditions.

  17. Chemically and biologically synthesized CPP-modified gelonin for enhanced anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; David, Allan E; Trommer, Wolfgang E; Kwon, Young Min; Min, Kyoung Ah; Kim, Jin H; Yang, Victor C

    2013-11-28

    The ineffectiveness of small molecule drugs against cancer has generated significant interest in more potent macromolecular agents. Gelonin, a plant-derived toxin that inhibits protein translation, has attracted much attention in this regard. Due to its inability to internalize into cells, however, gelonin exerts only limited tumoricidal effect. To overcome this cell membrane barrier, we modified gelonin, via both chemical conjugation and genetic recombination methods, with low molecular weight protamine (LMWP), a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) which was shown to efficiently ferry various cargoes into cells. Results confirmed that gelonin-LMWP chemical conjugate (cG-L) and recombinant gelonin-LMWP chimera (rG-L) possessed N-glycosidase activity equivalent to that of unmodified recombinant gelonin (rGel); however, unlike rGel, both gelonin-LMWPs were able to internalize into cells. Cytotoxicity studies further demonstrated that cG-L and rG-L exhibited significantly improved tumoricidal effects, with IC50 values being 120-fold lower than that of rGel. Moreover, when tested against a CT26 s.c. xenograft tumor mouse model, significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed with rG-L doses as low as 2 μg/tumor, while no detectable therapeutic effects were seen with rGel at 10-fold higher doses. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of utilizing CPP-modified gelonin as a highly potent anticancer drug to overcome limitations of current chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23973813

  18. Yield and Early Maturity Response to Four Cycles of Modified Mass Selection in Purple Waxy Corn

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSANUN, Satang; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    High yield and early maturity are important characters in corn breeding. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the responses to four cycles created by modified mass selection method to increase yield and early maturity of a purple waxy and to investigate the correlations between yield and among other important traits in a purple waxy corn (Zea mays L. var. ceratina) population. Four cycles was evaluated for two seasons in 2012/13. A randomized complete block design with four replicatio...

  19. Modified biological training model for percutaneous renal surgery with ultrasound and fluoroscopy guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhi; YANG Yong; ZHANG Yi; SUN Yu-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Background The 12th rib is an important anatomic marker in the process of percutaneous renal surgery; while the previous models without ribs can not provide close simulation conditions to human upper abdomen. To facilitate the learning and training of percutaneous renal access and intrarenal procedures under ultrasound and fluoroscopy guidance, we reported a biological bench model for percutaneous renal surgery. Methods The model was developed using an ex vivo porcine kidney with a longer than 3 cm ureter, a flap of full thickness of thoracic wall with skin, subcutaneous fascia, muscle and two ribs, as well as the standard equipment for percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The porcine kidney with a catheterized ureter was placed within the porcine flap and fixed to a wooden board with two long steel nails. Afterward, contrast medium or physiological saline (0.9% sodium chloride solution) was injected through the ureter, and the urinary system was examined with a fluoroscopy unit or an ultrasound. Artificial stone material was implanted in the renal pelvis. After practicing, the model could be dissected for kidney examination and a technical analysis. Results The advantage of this model was simple to set up and inexpensive, by using widely available material. The biological bench model can be employed for percutanous renal access, tract dilation, nephroscopy, and stone disintegration in the training and learning of clinical practice. Imaging is feasible under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance. The kidney models were utilized in hands on courses with over 100 people, and 90.5% attendants rated the porcine kidney model for simulation of percutaneous renal surgery as 'very helpful" or "helpful". Conclusion This biological training model simulates realistically the clinical procedure of percutaneous nephrolithotomy under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance.

  20. Biological response of soybean and cotton to aerial glyphosate drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    An aerial application drift study was conducted in 2009 to determine biological effects of glyphosate on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Glyphosate at 866 g ae/ha was applied using an Air Tractor 402B agricultural aircraft in an 18.3 m spray swath to crops at the...

  1. Biological invasions – the widening debate: response to Charles Warren

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richardson, D. M.; Pyšek, Petr; Simberloff, D.; Rejmánek, M.; Mader, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2008), s. 295-298. ISSN 0309-1325 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biological invasions * human dimension * native invaders Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.482, year: 2008

  2. Electrochemical treatment of COD in biologically pretreated coking wastewater using Ti/RuO2-IrO2 electrodes combined with modified coke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xu-wen; LIU Li-yuan; GONG Jing-wen; WANG Jian-bing; QIN Qiang; WANG Hao

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical treatment of COD contained in biologically pretreated coking wastewater treated by a three-dimensional electrode system with modified coke as the particle electrode was investigated.And the electrochemical perfomance of the coke modified with various active components was studied.The results show that the coke modified with Fe(NO3)2 has the lowest energy consumption and higher COD removal rate under the same condition,and the modified coke has better surface characteristics for the purpose of this study.In addition,the kinetic constant was also calculated.The study shows that the three-dimensional electrode system with Fe(NO3)2-modified coke can give a satisfactory solution in biologically pretreated coking wastewater.

  3. Biological control of botrytis cinerea growth on apples stored in modified atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dock, Lise Lotte; Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Floros, John D.

    1998-01-01

    The combined effect of modified-atmosphere packaging and theapplication of a bacterial antagonist (Erwinia sp.) on Botrytiscinerea growth on apples (cv. 'Golden Delicious') was investigated.Inoculated apples were stored in polyethylene bags at 5 degrees C. Theinitial gas composition in each bag was...... set according to a centralcomposite experimental design involving five levels of O2 (1 to 15%)and CO2 (0 to 15%). Control samples under ambient conditions were alsoincluded. Without the antagonist, measurements of mold colony diameterover time showed that O2 had no effect on the growth of B. cinerea......,while increased CO2 levels delayed its growth by about 4 days.Application of the antagonist resulted in a significant interactionbetween O2 and CO2. At low O2 levels, CO2 had no effect on moldgrowth, but at high O2, CO2 enhanced mold growth. O2 and theantagonist worked synergistically to reduce mold growth by...

  4. Laccase on Black Pearl 2000 modified glassy carbon electrode: Characterization of direct electron transfer and biological sensing properties for pyrocatechol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Laccase can complete direct electron transfer process on BP2000 matrices. ► Laccase immobilized on BP2000 matrices has catalytic oxidation effect to pyrocatechol. ► A pyrocatechol biosensor has constructed been using Nafion/Lac-BP2000/GC electrode. ► Detection limit and linear range of the biosensor are 0.003 mM and 0.003–5.555 mM. - Abstract: In this paper, it was found that Laccase (Lac) could be stably immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode modified with Black Pearl 2000 (BP2000) and Nafion by a simple technique. The adsorption behavior of Lac immobilized on BP2000 matrix was characterized by environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM), ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), which demonstrated that BP2000 could facilitate the electron exchange between the active center of Lac and modified electrode. The direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis behavior of Lac on the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammogram (CV) which indicated that Lac immobilized on the modified electrode displayed a direct, nearly reversible and surface-controlled redox reaction with an enhanced electron-transfer rate constant of 1.940 s−1 at the scan rate of 100 mV s−1 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH 7.0). Furthermore, it was also discovered that, in the presence of O2, Lac immobilized on the modified electrode exhibited the electrocatalytic response to pyrocatechol, and the kinetic apparent Michaelis-constant (KMapp) obtained from the Lineweaver–Burk equation was 1.79 mM. The detection limit, linear range and sensitivity of the Lac biosensor were 0.003 mM, 0.003–5.555 mM and 99.84 μA mM−1 cm−2, respectively.

  5. Phenological response of a key ecosystem function to biological invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Maria; Cucherousset, Julien; Buoro, Mathieu; Lecerf, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Although climate warming has been widely demonstrated to induce shifts in the timing of many biological events, the phenological consequences of other prominent global change drivers remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of biological invasions on the seasonality of leaf litter decomposition, a crucial freshwater ecosystem function. Decomposition rates were quantified in 18 temperate shallow lakes distributed along a gradient of crayfish invasion and a temperature-based model was constructed to predict yearly patterns of decomposition. We found that, through direct detritus consumption, omnivorous invasive crayfish accelerated decomposition rates up to fivefold in spring, enhancing temperature dependence of the process and shortening the period of major detritus availability in the ecosystem by up to 39 days (95% CI: 15-61). The fact that our estimates are an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported climate-driven phenological shifts indicates that some powerful drivers of phenological change have been largely overlooked. PMID:26931804

  6. Gold nanoparticles decorated poly-melamine modified glassy carbon sensor for the voltammetric estimation of domperidone in pharmaceuticals and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosy; Goyal, Rajendra N

    2015-08-15

    The electrochemical response of an unmodified glassy carbon (GCE), poly-melamine/GCE and gold nanoparticle (AuNP)/poly-melamine/GCE is compared in the present protocol for the sensitive and selective determination of domperidone (DOM). The AuNPs were synthesized in the laboratory and characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Melamine was electropolymerized onto the glassy carbon surface using cyclic voltammetry and was investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The AuNP/poly-melamine/GCE exhibited the best electrochemical response among the three electrodes for the electro-oxidation of DOM, that was inferred from the EIS, cyclic and square wave voltammetry. The modified sensor showed a sensitive, stable and linear response in the concentration range of 0.05-100µM with a detection limit of 6nM. The selectivity of the proposed sensor was assessed in the presence of high concentration of major interfering molecules as xanthine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid. The analytical application of the sensor for the quantification of DOM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids as urine and serum was also investigated and the results demonstrated a recovery of >95% with R.S.D of <5%. PMID:25966380

  7. Effect of substrate concentration on biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol using modified rotating biological contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, G. [Regional Engineering College, Tiruchirapalli 620 015 (India); Ramanujam, T.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-08-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenol used in the manufacture of pesticides, germicides, resins, seed disinfectants and antiseptics, if disposed untreated causes greater havoc for land and aquatic environment. In all the earlier works, 2,4-dichlorophenol has been fed along with easily biodegradable substrate, glucose as one of the constituents. A modified 4-stage RBC was used for the biodegradation studies of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The micro organisms attached to the disks were specially acclimatised to the extent that the 2,4-dichlorophenol alone serves as the sole carbon source supporting their metabolic activities. The RBC was operated at 12 rpm. The toxic substrate removal studies were carried out in the hydraulic loading rates ranging from 0.005 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/d to 0.035 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/d and organic loading rates from 0.35 g/m{sup 2}/d to 6.15 g/m{sup 2}/d. A correlation plot between 2,4-dichlorophenol removal and organic loading rate is presented. A mathematical model is proposed using regression analysis. (orig.) With 10 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs.

  8. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeker, Andrea L.; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outc...

  9. The Effect of Noise Modifying in NICU on Premature Infants’ Behavioral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayyeh Karimi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High auditory stimulation puts preterm infants at high risk for adverse health effects. Present study was conducted with this aim to determine the effect of noise modifying in NICU on premature infants’ behavioral responses. Methods: Research samples were 110 premature infants that divided in experiment and control groups. These infants had 28 days age, hospitalized in NICUs more than 2 days, below 37 week gestational age and below 2500 gram birth weight without mechanical ventilation. In the first section of time, each infant with inclusion criteria, inserted in control group and then in second section of time, infant with inclusion criteria placed in experiment group. In first section, educated nurse measured the LAeq, LC, LA and infants’ behavioral responses. In second section, noise modifying interventions implemented in experimental group for 6 weeks, and then LAeq, LC and LA and infants’ behavioral responses were measured with the same methods. Results: No statistical significant differences were observed in two groups in the mean frequency of crying, sleeping and startle. Moreover, recorded mean LC in experiment group (P=0.021 as well as mean LA (P=0.008 was lower than control group. In addition, no statistical significant difference was observed in LAeq between two groups. Conclusions: This study showed that noise in studied NICUs was higher than standards and had reached to psychological damage. Since, change in NICUs environment in order to modifying noise, had no effect on premature infants’ behavioral responses, as well as, the observed reduction in LC and LA is clinically negligible; it seems that, more research is needed in this area.

  10. Tubulin acetylation: responsible enzymes, biological functions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules have important functions ranging from maintenance of cell morphology to subcellular transport, cellular signaling, cell migration, and formation of cell polarity. At the organismal level, microtubules are crucial for various biological processes, such as viral entry, inflammation, immunity, learning and memory in mammals. Microtubules are subject to various covalent modifications. One such modification is tubulin acetylation, which is associated with stable microtubules and conserved from protists to humans. In the past three decades, this reversible modification has been studied extensively. In mammals, its level is mainly governed by opposing actions of α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (ATAT1) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Knockout studies of the mouse enzymes have yielded new insights into biological functions of tubulin acetylation. Abnormal levels of this modification are linked to neurological disorders, cancer, heart diseases and other pathological conditions, thereby yielding important therapeutic implications. This review summarizes related studies and concludes that tubulin acetylation is important for regulating microtubule architecture and maintaining microtubule integrity. Together with detyrosination, glutamylation and other modifications, tubulin acetylation may form a unique 'language' to regulate microtubule structure and function. PMID:26227334

  11. The Relationship between Stress Levels and Biological Responses in a Clinical Nursing Practicum

    OpenAIRE

    Chikamura, Chiho; Iida, Tadayuki; Ishizaki, Fumiko; Aoi, Satomi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kataoka, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the association between the stress levels and biological responses of nursing students in a clinical practicum. The subjects consisted of 28 third-year nursing students at the nursing department of College A. The degree of stress was evaluated using the Japanese version of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). As parameters of biological responses, serum estrogen, salivary cortisol, and salivary IgA were measured. These measurements were performed twice (before and during the...

  12. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Andrea L; Coombs, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity. PMID:24600511

  13. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea; L; Kroeker; Kevin; M; Coombs

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virusinduced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Older Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Staying the Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, Alla; Lories, Rik J

    2016-06-01

    The population of older individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is rapidly expanding, mainly due to increased life expectancy. While targeted biological therapies are well established for the treatment of this disease, their use may be lower in older patients (age > 65 years) and very old patients (age > 75 years) as a result of perceived higher risks for adverse events in this population, taking into account comorbidity, polypharmacy, and frailty. In this review, we discuss the available evidence for the use of biological therapies in this growing patient group with specific attention towards the eventual reasons for biological treatment failure or withdrawal. The majority of data is found in secondary analyses of clinical trials and in retrospective cohorts. The most information available is on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Older patients seem to have a less robust response to anti-TNF agents than a younger population, but drug survival as a proxy for efficacy does not seem to be influenced by age. Despite an overall rate of adverse effects comparable to that in younger patients, older RA patients are at higher risk of serious infections. Other biologics appear to have an efficacy similar to anti-TNF agents, also in older RA patients. Again, the drug survival rates for tocilizumab, rituximab, and abatacept resemble those in young RA patients with good general tolerability and safety profiles. The cardiovascular risk and the risk of cancer, increased in RA patients and in the older RA patients, do not appear to be strongly influenced by biologicals. PMID:27154398

  15. Assessment of Pathological Response of Breast Carcinoma in Modified Radical Mastectomy Specimens after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Paclitaxel based neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen (NAT in the setting of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC can render inoperable tumor (T4, N2/N3 resectable. The aim of this study was to assess the status of carcinoma in the breast and lymph nodes after paclitaxel based NAT in order to find out the patient and the tumor characteristics that correspond to the pathological responses which could be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the treatment response. Materials and Methods. Clinical and tumor characteristics of patients with breast carcinoma (n=48 were assessed preoperatively. These patients were subjected to modified radical mastectomy after 3 courses of paclitaxel based NAT regimen. The pathological responses of the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes were studied by using Chevallier’s system which graded the responses into pathological complete response (pCR, pathological partial response (pPR, and pathological no response (pNR. Results. Our studies showed a pCR of 27.1% and a pPR of 70.9% . Clinically small sized tumors (2–5 cms and Bloom Richardson’s grade 1 tumors showed a pCR. Mean age at presentation was 50.58 yrs. 79.2% of cases were invasive ductal carcinoma NOS; only 2.1% were invasive lobular carcinoma, their response to NAT being the same. There was no downgrading of the tumor grades after NAT. Ductal carcinoma in situ and lymphovascular invasion were found to be resistant to chemotherapy. The histopathological changes noted in the lymph nodes were similar to that found in the tumor bed. Discussion and Conclusion. From our study we conclude that histopathological examination of the tumor bed is the gold standard for assessing the chemotherapeutic tumor response. As previous studies have shown pCR can be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the tumor response.

  16. A novel method of modifying immune responses by vaccination with lipiodol-siRNA mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijian Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The dendritic cell (DC possesses the ability to stimulate both T helper 1 (Th1 and Th2 responses depending on activation stimuli. Although it is known that chemically or genetically modified DC can be used therapeutically to steer immune responses towards either Th1 or Th2, cellular therapy with ex vivo manipulated DC is clinically difficult. Here we demonstrate a novel method of switching immune responses from Th1 to Th2 through in vivo immune modulation by administration of siRNA. We demonstrate that siRNA targeting of the IL-12p35 gene leads to a Th2 bias in vitro through an IL-10 dependent mechanism. In vivo administration of siRNA admixed with the oil-based contrast agent lipiodol in the presence of antigen and adjuvant induced a deviation in recall response to reduced production of IFN-γ and augmented IL-4 response using either KLH or ovalbumin. This simple method of in vivo modification of immune response possesses therapeutic potential in Th1-mediated diseases such as multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diabetes.

  17. Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Physiology and its DNA Damage Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism in biology, being widely used in fundamental research, the first eukaryotic organism to be fully sequenced and the platform for the development of many genomics techniques. Therefore, it is not surprising that S. cerevisiae has also been widely...... used in the field of systems biology during the last decade. This thesis investigates S. cerevisiae growth physiology and DNA damage response by using a systems biology approach. Elucidation of the relationship between growth rate and gene expression is important to understand the mechanisms regulating...... set of growth dependent genes by using a multi-factorial experimental design. Moreover, new insights into the metabolic response and transcriptional regulation of these genes have been provided by using systems biology tools (Chapter 3). One of the prerequisite of systems biology should be the...

  18. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation

  19. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran; Roh, Changhyun; Shin, Heejune; Ryu, Dongkyoung

    2013-01-15

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation.

  20. An overview of HCV molecular biology, replication and immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Zafar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV causes acute and chronic hepatitis which can eventually lead to permanent liver damage, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Currently, there is no vaccine available for prevention of HCV infection due to high degree of strain variation. The current treatment of care, Pegylated interferon α in combination with ribavirin is costly, has significant side effects and fails to cure about half of all infections. In this review, we summarize molecular virology, replication and immune responses against HCV and discussed how HCV escape from adaptive and humoral immune responses. This advance knowledge will be helpful for development of vaccine against HCV and discovery of new medicines both from synthetic chemistry and natural sources.

  1. Plants modify biological processes to ensure survival following carbon depletion: a Lolium perenne model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants, due to their immobility, have evolved mechanisms allowing them to adapt to multiple environmental and management conditions. Short-term undesirable conditions (e.g. moisture deficit, cold temperatures generally reduce photosynthetic carbon supply while increasing soluble carbohydrate accumulation. It is not known, however, what strategies plants may use in the long-term to adapt to situations resulting in net carbon depletion (i.e. reduced photosynthetic carbon supply and carbohydrate accumulation. In addition, many transcriptomic experiments have typically been undertaken under laboratory conditions; therefore, long-term acclimation strategies that plants use in natural environments are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. was used as a model plant to define whether plants adapt to repetitive carbon depletion and to further elucidate their long-term acclimation mechanisms. Transcriptome changes in both lamina and stubble tissues of field-grown plants with depleted carbon reserves were characterised using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. The RT-qPCR data for select key genes indicated that plants reduced fructan degradation, and increased photosynthesis and fructan synthesis capacities following carbon depletion. This acclimatory response was not sufficient to prevent a reduction (P<0.001 in net biomass accumulation, but ensured that the plant survived. CONCLUSIONS: Adaptations of plants with depleted carbon reserves resulted in reduced post-defoliation carbon mobilization and earlier replenishment of carbon reserves, thereby ensuring survival and continued growth. These findings will help pave the way to improve plant biomass production, for either grazing livestock or biofuel purposes.

  2. Modifying chemotherapy response by targeted inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translation is regulated predominantly at the initiation phase by several signal transduction pathways that are often usurped in human cancers, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis. mTOR exerts unique administration over translation by regulating assembly of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F, a heterotrimeric complex responsible for recruiting 40S ribosomes (and associated factors) to mRNA 5′ cap structures. Hence, there is much interest in targeted therapies that block eIF4F activity to assess the consequences on tumor cell growth and chemotherapy response. We report here that hippuristanol (Hipp), a translation initiation inhibitor that selectively inhibits the eIF4F RNA helicase subunit, eIF4A, resensitizes Eμ-Myc lymphomas to DNA damaging agents, including those that overexpress eIF4E—a modifier of rapamycin responsiveness. As Mcl-1 levels are significantly affected by Hipp, combining its use with the Bcl-2 family inhibitor, ABT-737, leads to a potent synergistic response in triggering cell death in mouse and human lymphoma and leukemia cells. Suppression of eIF4AI using RNA interference also synergized with ABT-737 in murine lymphomas, highlighting eIF4AI as a therapeutic target for modulating tumor cell response to chemotherapy

  3. The Cortisol Awakening Response for Modified Method for Higher Order Logical Relationship Using Different Mean Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Senthil Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the free cortisol response to waking, believed to be genetically influenced, would be elevated in a significant percent age of cases, regard less of the afternoon Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST value based on high-order fuzzy logical relationships. First, the proposed method fuzzifies the historical data into fuzzy sets to form high-order fuzzy logical relationships. Then, it calculates the value of the variable between the subscripts of adjacent fuzzy sets appearing in the antecedents of high-order fuzzy logical relationships. Finally, it chooses a modified high-order fuzzy logical relationships group to forecast the free cortisol response to walking and the short day time profile using various mean techniques like, Arithmetic Mean, Geometric Mean, Heronian Mean, Root Mean Square and Harmonic Mean.

  4. Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kraemer, Otto;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. METHODS: Seventeen patients...... thresholds (P > 0.08) in the burn area before surgery compared to after surgery. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic knee surgery did not modify nociceptive responses to a contralaterally applied experimental burn injury....... scheduled to undergo repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and 16 healthy controls were studied. The first burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery, and the second burn was induced 1 day after surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm2, 47 degrees C for 7 min) placed on the medial aspect of the calf...

  5. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-04-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  6. Infection biology and defence responses in sorghum against Colletotrichum sublineolum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puttalingaiah, Basavaraju; Shetty, Nandini Prasad; Shetty, H. S.;

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the infection biology of Colletotrichum sublineolum (isolate CP2126) and defence responses in leaves of resistant (SC146), intermediately resistant (SC326) and susceptible (BTx623) sorghum genotypes. Methods and Results: Infection biology and defence responses were studied...... decreases in formation of appressoria as well as accumulation of H2O2, HRGPs and phytoalexins. Concomitant with these inducible responses, fungal growth was stopped during or just after penetration in genotypes SC146 and SC326. High levels of H2O2 accumulating at late infection stages (5 days after...

  7. Mechanical and biological complication rates of the modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis in the posterior region: an alternative to the conventional Implant prosthetic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis (LSP) is designed to combine the advantages of screw- and cement-retained implant prostheses. This retrospective study evaluated the mechanical and biological complication rates of implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) inserted with the modified LSP in the posterior region, and determined how these complication rates are affected by clinical factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mechanical complications (i.e., lateral screw loosening [LSL], abutment screw loosening, lateral screw fracture, and ceramic fracture) and biological complications (i.e., peri-implant mucositis [PM] and peri-implantitis) were identified from the patients' treatment records, clinical photographs, periapical radiographs, panoramic radiographs, and clinical indices. The correlations between complication rates and the following clinical factors were determined: gender, age, position in the jaw, placement location, functional duration, clinical crown-to-implant length ratio, crown height space, and the use of a submerged or nonsubmerged placement procedure. RESULTS Mechanical and biological complications were present in 25 of 73 ISSCs with the modified LSP. LSL (n=11) and PM (n=11) were the most common complications. The incidence of mechanical complications was significantly related to gender (P=.018). The other clinical factors were not significantly associated with mechanical and biological complication rates. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the incidence of mechanical and biological complications in the posterior region was similar for both modified LSP and conventional implant prosthetic systems. In addition, the modified LSP is amenable to maintenance care, which facilitates the prevention and treatment of mechanical and biological complications. PMID:27141260

  8. Weak Polyelectrolyte-Clay Assemblies: Physical Mechanisms of Biological Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhishvili, Svetlana; Pavlukhina, Svetlana; Zhuk, Iryna

    2014-03-01

    We report on a highly efficient, non-leachable antibacterial coating, consisting of an ultrathin nanocomposite hydrogel capable of hosting, protecting and delivering antibiofilm agents in response to bacterial infection. Constructed using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of clay nanoplatelets and a weak polyelectrolyte and loaded with an antimicrobial agent (AmA), the coatings was highly resistant to colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. The high antibiofilm activity of the coating results from a combination of highly localized, bacteria-triggered AmA release and hydrogel swelling, as well as retention of AmA by clay nanoplatelets. We discuss the dependence of rheological and swelling properties of weak polyelectrolyte-clay assemblies on film thickness, clay platelet orientation and environmental pH.

  9. Biological response of spontaneously hypertensive rats to the streptozotocin administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Alice Vieira da Costa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR to the diabetogenic effect of streptozotocin (STZ was studied. The animals were subdivided into three groups: control (citrate buffer, streptozotocin 40 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg, and general biologic parameters were analyzed, in addition to systolic blood pressure, blood glucose and insulin levels determinations. Both doses were able to induce hyperglycemia above 300 mg/dl; however, 50 mg/kg provoked a more pronounced physiological alterations in body weight, diuresis, water and food intake. There was no change on systolic blood pressure with either dose. Results suggested that SHRs did not need doses of streptozotocin above 40mg/kg in order to produce diabetes probably because this strain was much more sensible than normotensive rats. In addition, streptozotocin might be a drug choice to induce diabetes without provoking alterations in the blood pressure which allowed the use of this experimental model in the studies of induced hypertension-diabetes.Foi estudada a sensibilidade de ratos espontaneamente hipertensos (SHR adultos ao efeito diabetogênico da estreptozotocina (STZ. Os animais foram subdivididos em grupos: controle (tampão citrato, 40 mg/kg ou 50 mg/kg de estreptozotocina, sendo analisados parâmetros biológicos gerais, pressão arterial sistólica, níveis sanguíneos de glicose e insulina. Ambas doses foram capazes de induzir hiperglicemia acima de 300 mg/dl, entretanto a dose de 50 mg/kg provocou efeitos fisiológicos mais pronunciados no peso corpóreo, diurese, ingestão hídrica e de ração. Não houve alteração da pressão arterial sistólica em qualquer dose. Nossos achados sugerem que SHRs não necessitam de doses de estreptozotocina acima de 40 mg/kg com para produzir diabetes, provavelmente porque essa cepa é muito mais sensível do que ratos normotensos. A estreptozotocina pode ser a droga de escolha para induzir diabetes sem provocar alterações na press

  10. Analysis of eosinophils and myeloid progenitor responses to modified forms of MPIF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewski, K J; Yao, X T; Kreider, B; Olsen, H S; Morris, T S; Zhang, L; Sanyal, I; Nardelli, B; Zukauskas, D; Brewer, L; Bong, G W; Kim, Y; Garotta, G; Salcedo, T W

    2001-02-21

    Myeloid progenitor inhibitory factor (MPIF)-2 is a beta-chemokine with select and potent activities on eosinophils and myeloid progenitors. In the beta-chemokine family, biological activity is modulated by differential processing of the amino-terminus. Here, for MPIF-2, we describe the biological activities of NH(2)-terminal deletion mutants and compare regions necessary for eosinophil and myeloid progenitor activities. Five MPIF-2 proteins with deletions at the amino-terminus were produced in Escherichia coli and assayed for calcium mobilization, chemotaxis and receptor binding activities on eosinophils, and for their ability to inhibit colony formation of human myeloid bone marrow progenitors. For eosinophils, deletion of the first two amino acids did not markedly alter activity, while subsequent truncations result in a complete loss of activity. One of the MPIF-2 mutants, MPIF-2 (P30-R99) was converted from an agonist to an antagonist of eotaxin, MPIF-2 and MCP-4 functional responses in eosinophil calcium flux and chemotaxis assays. Surprisingly, while displaying a complete loss of agonist activity toward eosinophils, MPIF-2 (P30-R99) retains ability to inhibit human bone marrow myeloid progenitor cell colony formation. In addition, processing at the amino terminus of MPIF-2 in vivo, may result in a chemokine with altered biological activities. PMID:11237428

  11. Wear and biological effects of a semi-constrained total disc replacement subject to modified ISO standard test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, P J; Tipper, J; Fisher, J; Hall, R M

    2015-04-01

    Development of pre-clinical testing methodologies is an important goal for improving prediction of artificial replacement joint performance and for guiding future device design. Total disc replacement wear and the potential for osteolysis is a growing concern, therefore a parametric study on the effects on wear of altered kinematics and loading was undertaken. A standard ISO testing protocol was modified in order to study the wear behaviour of lumbar total disc replacements when subject to low cross shear input kinematics, reduced axial loading and smaller flexion-extension magnitude. Volumetric wear, bearing surface topography, and wear debris biological reactivity were assessed. The ISO standard results were expected, however, the very low cross shear test produced a level of wear approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that reported for zero cross shear motions on UHMWPE bearings. When the osteolytic potential of the wear particles was calculated, all total disc replacement simulations had lower predicted osteolytic potential compared to total hip replacements, as a consequence of the generally lower wear rates found. PMID:25598071

  12. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Stuart G.

    2014-01-01

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigm...

  13. The effect of UV-Vis to near-infrared light on the biological response of human dental pulp cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadis, Mohammed A.; Cooper, Paul R.; Milward, Michael R.; Gorecki, Patricia; Tarte, Edward; Churm, James; Palin, William M.

    2015-03-01

    Human dental pulp cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured in phenol-red-free α-MEM/10%-FCS at 37ºC in 5% CO2. DPCs at passages 2-4 were seeded (150μL; 25,000 cell/ml) in black 96-microwell plates with transparent bases. 24h post-seeding, cultures were irradiated using a bespoke LED array consisting of 60 LEDs (3.5mW/cm2) of wavelengths from 400-900nm (10 wavelengths, n=6) for time intervals of up to 120s. Metabolic and mitochondrial activity was assessed via a modified MTT assay. Statistical differences were identified using multi-factorial analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey tests (P=0.05). The biological responses were significantly dependent upon post-irradiation incubation period, wavelength and exposure time (PLLLT in dentistry.

  14. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health

  15. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO2 laser modified polymeric material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, D G; Hussain, I; Lawrence, J; Smith, G C; Cosgrove, D; Toccaceli, C

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO2 laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO2 laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO2 laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO2 laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response. PMID:27287173

  16. Embryo Microinjection of Selenomethionine Reduces Hatchability and Modifies Oxidant Responsive Gene Expression in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. K.; Janz, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies we demonstrated that exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet) causes developmental toxicities in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The objectives of this study were to establish a dose-response relationship for developmental toxicities in zebrafish after embryo microinjection of Se (8, 16 or 32 μg/g dry mass of eggs) in the form of SeMet, and to investigate potential underlying mechanism(s) of SeMet-induced developmental toxicities. A dose-dependent increase in frequencies of mortality and total deformities, and reduced hatchability were observed in zebrafish exposed to excess Se via embryo microinjection. The egg Se concentration causing 20% mortality was then used to investigate transcript abundance of proteins involved in antioxidant protection and methylation. Excess Se exposure modified gene expression of oxidant-responsive transcription factors (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor nrf2a and nrf2b), and enzymes involved in cellular methylation (methionine adenosyltransferase mat1a and mat2ab) in zebrafish larvae. Notably, excess Se exposure up-regulated transcript abundance of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (ahr2), a signalling pathway involved in the toxicity of dioxin-related compounds. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress or modification of methylation, or a combination of these mechanisms, might be responsible for Se-induced developmental toxicities in fishes.

  17. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  18. Production of octyl levulinate biolubricant over modified H-ZSM-5:Optimization by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kakasaheb Y.Nandiwale; Sunil K.Yadava; Vijay V.Bokade

    2014-01-01

    The present study highlighted the use of modified H-ZSM-5 (Meso-HZ-5) as heterogeneous catalyst for the synthesis of octyl levulinate biolubricant by catalytic esterification of biomass derived renewable levulinic acid (LA) with n-octanol. The process variables such as catalyst loading (X1 ), n-octanol to LA molar ratio (X2 ) and reaction temperature (X3 ) were optimized through response surface methodology (RSM), using Box-Behnken model. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the adequacy and significance of the quadratic model. The yield of octyl levulinate was obtained to be 99%at optimum process parameters. The developed quadratic model was found to be adequate and statistically accurate with correlation value (R2) of 0.9971 to predict the yield of octyl levulinate biolubricant. The study was also extended on the validation of theoretical and experimental data, including catalyst reusability.

  19. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique. METHODS: The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical...... parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty-four respondents participated in the Delphi 1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety-two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus 8 new participants) responded in Delphi 2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76% of...... participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

  20. Bidimensional microdosimetry as a tool for evaluating biological response and target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the issue of the relevance of microdosimetric spectra for quantifying the effects of low-level exposures to radiation. Biological response functions derived to date from numerical analyses of radiobiological and microdosimetric observations refer to uniform targets of a preassumed size. The characteristic two-modal shape of functions obtained for several endpoints reflects the importance of two different pathways of damage formation, each of them related in fact to different target sizes. The correlated energy deposition distributions in such a bidimensional system are suggested as a more appropriate physical input for analysing biological response and target structure. (author)

  1. In silico nanodosimetry: new insights into nontargeted biological responses to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncic, Zdenka; Byrne, Hilary L; McNamara, Aimee L; Guatelli, Susanna; Domanova, Westa; Incerti, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The long-held view that radiation-induced biological damage must be initiated in the cell nucleus, either on or near DNA itself, is being confronted by mounting evidence to suggest otherwise. While the efficacy of cell death may be determined by radiation damage to nuclear DNA, a plethora of less deterministic biological responses has been observed when DNA is not targeted. These so-called nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales) and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses. PMID:22701142

  2. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  3. Biological effects of several extreme space flight factors (acceleration, magnetically activated water) on mouse natural or modified radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated and Adeturon-protected mice were used to assess biological effects of several static (magnetically-activated water - MW) and dynamic (acceleration) factors of space flight. The study shows that increased gravitation, 20 G, 5 min, generated by a small radius centrifuge, increases static ability to work, while the number of peripheral blood cells decreases. Continuous exposure of mice to MW induces a decrease in dynamic ability to work, in comparison with the physiological controls, without substantial changes in other indices. Extreme factors in space flight (acceleration MW, radiation, radiation protector), alone or in combination, decrease the animal's growth rate. After administration of 200 mg/kg Adeturone, mouse dynamic ability to work increases, while its capabilities for adaptation and training are lowered, and pronounced leucocytosis is observed. MW, acceleration, or Adeturone pre-treatment of mice increases their survival and dynamic ability to work, following exposure to 600 R, when compared to irradiated animals, but decreases their capabilities for adaptation and training. Acceleration and Adeturone protect peripheral blood from radiation injury, while MW alone intensifies radiation cytopenia. Irradiation does not significantly modify the static ability to work, upon preceding exposure to MW or acceleration. In this case, Adeturone exerts protective effect. ME and Adeturone combined action results in increased survival rate and mean duration of life of irradiated animals, as compared to their single administration. Acceleration reduces MW, Adeturone and MW + Adeturone effect on survival. Peripheral blood parameters do not correlate with survival rates. Combined pre-treatment with two or three of the factors studied increases dynamic ability to work following irradiation, and in many cases the static ability as well. The combination of Adeturone and MW was the only one with negative effect on the static ability to work. (A.B.)

  4. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic process with return activated sludge pre-concentration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lu; Haiyan Wu; Haoyan Li; Dianhai Yang

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) process with pre-concentration of returned activated sludge (RAS) was proposed in this study for the enhanced biological nutrient removal (BNR) of municipal wastewater with limited carbon source. The influent carbon source was fed in step while a novel RAS pre-concentration tank was adopted to improve BNR efficiency, and the effects of an influent carbon source distribution ratio and a RAS pre-concentration ratio were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of TN is mainly influenced by the carbon source distribution ratio while the TP removal relies on the RAS pre-concentration ratio. The optimum carbon source distribution ratio and RAS pre-concentration ratio are 60%and 50%, respectively, with an inner recycling ratio of 100%under the optimum steady operation of pilot test, reaching an average effluent TN concentration of 9.8 mg·L−1 with a removal efficiency of 63%and an average TP removal efficiency of 94%. The mechanism of nutrient removal is discussed and the kinetics is analyzed. The results reveal that the optimal carbon source distribution ratio provides sufficient denitrifying carbon source to each anoxic phase, reducing nitrate accumulation while the RAS pre-concentration ratio improves the condition of anaerobic zone to ensure the phosphorus release due to less nitrate in the returned sludge. Therefore, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and phosphorus accumulation organisms play an important role under the optimum condition, enhancing the performance of nutrient removal in this test.

  5. In Silico Nanodosimetry: New Insights into Nontargeted Biological Responses to Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Kuncic

    2012-01-01

    nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses.

  6. Biological Adsorption and Accumulation Analysis of Hizikia fusiforme Response to Copper Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong LIN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coastal water pollution is an important environmental problem now days. Hizikia fusiforme is cultivated in coastal water, being considered as a healthy food. However, little information exists concerning on this species responses to copper stress conditions. Experiments were conducted to distinguish biological adsorption and biological accumulation of H. fusiforme in regard to copper stress; it was determined the long-term stress with lower concentrations of copper (0.25 mg/L and 0.50 mg/L and short-term stress with higher concentrations of copper (1.5 mg/L and 3.0 mg/L on H. fusiforme. Results suggested that H. fusiforme has different response to various copper stresses; lower concentration stress could significantly enhance the growth of H. fusiforme, while H. fusiforme growth was inhibited and mitigated injured by 0.25-0.50 mg/L copper stress. Under the highest stress, H. fusiforme was extremely harmed, the biomass loss was significant and dry weight/fresh weight was also significantly decreased. Results suggested that lower and higher concentrations of copper stress have different impacts on H. fusiforme; the biological adsorption amount is lower than that of biological accumulation amount under low copper stress conditions, but the biological adsorption amount is much higher under high concentration copper stress. A better understanding of H. fusiforme responses to heavy metal stress should bring more data about its physiological adaptation mechanism under such conditions.

  7. Cellular responses to modified Plasmodium falciparum MSP119 antigens in individuals previously exposed to natural malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awobode Henrietta O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MSP1 processing-inhibitory antibodies bind to epitopes on the 19 kDa C-terminal region of the Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119, inhibiting erythrocyte invasion. Blocking antibodies also bind to this antigen but prevent inhibitory antibodies binding, allowing invasion to proceed. Recombinant MSP119 had been modified previously to allow inhibitory but not blocking antibodies to continue to bind. Immunization with these modified proteins, therefore, has the potential to induce more effective protective antibodies. However, it was unclear whether the modification of MSP119 would affect critical T-cell responses to epitopes in this antigen. Methods The cellular responses to wild-type MSP119 and a panel of modified MSP119 antigens were measured using an in-vitro assay for two groups of individuals: the first were malaria-naïve and the second had been naturally exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection. The cellular responses to the modified proteins were examined using cells from malaria-exposed infants and adults. Results Interestingly, stimulation indices (SI for responses induced by some of the modified proteins were at least two-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type MSP119. A protein with four amino acid substitutions (Glu27→Tyr, Leu31→Arg, Tyr34→Ser and Glu43→Leu had the highest stimulation index (SI up to 360 and induced large responses in 64% of the samples that had significant cellular responses to the modified proteins. Conclusion This study suggests that specific MSP119 variants that have been engineered to improve their antigenicity for inhibitory antibodies, retain T-cell epitopes and the ability to induce cellular responses. These proteins are candidates for the development of MSP1-based malaria vaccines.

  8. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  9. A Novel Naturally Occurring Tandem Promoter in Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Drives Very Early Gene Expression and Potent Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Wennier, Sonia T.; Brinkmann, Kay; Steinhäußer, Charlotte; Mayländer, Nicole; Mnich, Claudia; Wielert, Ursula; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hausmann, Jürgen; Chaplin, Paul; Steigerwald, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the i...

  10. Synthesis of Base-Modified 2 '-Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates and Their Use in Enzymatic Synthesis of Modified DNA for Applications in Bioanalysis and Chemical Biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 21 (2014), s. 9914-9921. ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR GA14-04289S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cross-coupling reactions * modified nucleoside triphosphates * nucleic acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.721, year: 2014

  11. Biological correlates of child and adolescent responses to disaster exposure: a bio-ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Carl F

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to both human-caused and natural disasters is associated with a number of postevent reactions in youth including the experience of symptoms of several mental disorders. There is wide variability in these responses, with some youth having very intense exposure to the disaster and yet showing resilience or even personal growth, while others with low exposure sometimes show intensely negative reactions. Research findings are reviewed in this article to identify biological correlates of risk and resilience focusing on potential genetic, neurobiological, and physiological factors linked to the reactions of children exposed to disasters. A bio-ecological model is presented to couch this review of biological correlates of disaster exposure. The model predicts susceptibility to negative reactions after disaster exposure, and the biological correlates of disaster reactions can be understood in terms of this susceptibility as it relates to biological markers of the fear system. PMID:25980506

  12. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Pontier-Bres

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon at various time periods post-infection (PI. PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1 the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2 reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1 increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2 elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis.

  13. Influence of mineral fillers on the rheological response of polymer-modified bitumens and mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cardone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of the bituminous components (bitumen and bituminous mastic within asphalt mixtures contribute significantly to the major distresses of flexible pavements (i.e. rutting, fatigue and low temperature cracking. Asphalt mixtures are usually composed of mastic-coated aggregates rather than pure bitumen-coated aggregates. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of mineral fillers on the rheological behaviour of several polymer-modified bitumens (PMBs through laboratory mixing. A neat bitumen and two types of polymers (elastomeric and plastomeric were used to produce PMBs, and two fillers with different minerals (limestone and basalt were selected to obtain mastics. The dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR were used to characterize the rheological properties of PMBs and mastics. In particular, multiple stress creep recovery (MSCR tests were performed to evaluate the rutting potential at high temperatures, whereas BBR tests were carried out to investigate the low temperature behaviour of these materials. BBR results for unmodified mastics show that the increase of stiffness is similar regardless of the filler type, whereas results for polymer-modified mastics indicate that the degree of stiffening depends on the combination of filler/polymer types. MSCR results show that adding filler leads to a reduced susceptibility of permanent deformation and an enhanced elastic response, depending on the combination of filler/polymer types. Overall results suggest that a physical–chemical interaction between the filler and bitumen occurs, and that the interaction level is highly dependent on the type of polymer modification.

  14. Training modifies innate immune responses in blood monocytes and in pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frellstedt, Linda; Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe; Pirottin, Dimitri; Bureau, Fabrice; Farnir, Frédéric; Franck, Thierry; Dupuis-Tricaud, Marie-Capucine; Lekeux, Pierre; Art, Tatiana

    2014-07-01

    In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and costimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules. Lower airway diseases are also a common problem in sport and racing horses. Because innate immunity plays an essential role in lung defense mechanisms, we assessed the effect of acute exercise and training on innate immune responses in two different compartments. Blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were collected from horses in untrained, moderately trained, intensively trained, and deconditioned states before and after a strenuous exercise test. The cells were analyzed for TLR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression by real-time PCR in vitro, and cytokine production after in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that training, but not acute exercise, modified the innate immune responses in both compartments. The mRNA expression of TLR3 was down-regulated by training in both cell types, whereas the expression of TLR4 was up-regulated in monocytes. Monocytes treated with LPS and a synthetic diacylated lipoprotein showed increased cytokine secretion in trained and deconditioned subjects, indicating the activation of cells at the systemic level. The production of TNF-α and IFN-β in nonstimulated and stimulated PAMs was decreased in trained and deconditioned horses and might therefore explain the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. Our study reports a dissociation between the systemic and the lung response to training that is probably implicated in the systemic inflammation and in the pulmonary susceptibility to infection. PMID:24502337

  15. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    for "effect modification". Fortunately, in the absence of "seed particles", the complex highly-reactive VOC system used does not create any secondary aerosol in situ. All PM present in these tests were, therefore, introduced by injection of MOA to serve as PM-to-be-modified by the gaseous environment. PM addition was only done during dark periods, either before or after the daylight period. The purpose of this design is to test if a non-toxic PM becomes toxic in initially unreacted ("Fresh", or in reacted ("Aged" complex VOC conditions. To have a complete design, we also tested the effects of clean air and the same VOC conditions, but without introducing any PM. Thus, there were six exposure treatment conditions that were evaluated with the side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-effects exposure systems; five separate chamber experiments were performed: two with clean air and three with the complex VOC/NOx mixture. For all of these experiments and exposures, chemical composition data and matching biological effects results for two end-points were compared. Chemical measurements demonstrate the temporal evolution of oxidized species, with a corresponding increase in toxicity observed from exposed cells. The largest increase in gas-phase toxicity was observed in the two "Aged" VOC exposures. The largest increase in particle-phase toxicity was observed in the "Aged" VOC exposure with the addition of PM after sunset. These results are a clear demonstration that the findings from Part 1 can be extended to the complex urban oxidized environment. This further demonstrates that the atmosphere itself cannot be ignored as a source of toxic species when establishing the risks associated with exposure to PM. Because gases and PM are transported and deposited differently within the atmosphere and lungs, these results have significant consequences. In the next (and final part of the study, testing is further applied to systems with real diesel exhaust, including primary PM from a

  16. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebersviller

    2012-03-01

    target PM for "effect modification". Fortunately, in the absence of "seed particles", the complex highly-reactive VOC system used does not create any secondary aerosol in situ. All PM present in these tests were, therefore, introduced by injection of MOA to serve as PM-to-be-modified by the gaseous environment. PM addition was only done during dark periods, either before or after the daylight period. The purpose of this design is to test if a non-toxic PM becomes toxic in initially unreacted ("Fresh", or in reacted ("Aged" complex VOC conditions. To have a complete design, we also tested the effects of clean air and the same VOC conditions, but without introducing any PM. Thus, there were six exposure treatment conditions that were evaluated with the side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-effects exposure systems; five separate chamber experiments were performed: two with clean air and three with the complex VOC/NOx mixture.

    For all of these experiments and exposures, chemical composition data and matching biological effects results for two end-points were compared. Chemical measurements demonstrate the temporal evolution of oxidized species, with a corresponding increase in toxicity observed from exposed cells. The largest increase in gas-phase toxicity was observed in the two "Aged" VOC exposures. The largest increase in particle-phase toxicity was observed in the "Aged" VOC exposure with the addition of PM after sunset. These results are a clear demonstration that the findings from Part 1 can be extended to the complex urban oxidized environment. This further demonstrates that the atmosphere itself cannot be ignored as a source of toxic species when establishing the risks associated with exposure to PM. Because gases and PM are transported and deposited differently within the atmosphere and lungs, these results have significant consequences. In the next (and final part of the study, testing is further applied to systems with real diesel exhaust

  17. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    modification". Fortunately, in the absence of "seed particles", the complex highly-reactive VOC system used does not create any secondary aerosol in situ. All PM present in these tests were, therefore, introduced by injection of MOA to serve as PM-to-be-modified by the gaseous environment. PM addition was only done during dark periods, either before or after the daylight period. The purpose of this design is to test if a non-toxic PM becomes toxic in initially unreacted ("Fresh"), or in reacted ("Aged") complex VOC conditions. To have a complete design, we also tested the effects of clean air and the same VOC conditions, but without introducing any PM. Thus, there were six exposure treatment conditions that were evaluated with the side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-effects exposure systems; five separate chamber experiments were performed: two with clean air and three with the complex VOC/NOx mixture. For all of these experiments and exposures, chemical composition data and matching biological effects results for two end-points were compared. Chemical measurements demonstrate the temporal evolution of oxidized species, with a corresponding increase in toxicity observed from exposed cells. The largest increase in gas-phase toxicity was observed in the two "Aged" VOC exposures. The largest increase in particle-phase toxicity was observed in the "Aged" VOC exposure with the addition of PM after sunset. These results are a clear demonstration that the findings from Part 1 can be extended to the complex urban oxidized environment. This further demonstrates that the atmosphere itself cannot be ignored as a source of toxic species when establishing the risks associated with exposure to PM. Because gases and PM are transported and deposited differently within the atmosphere and lungs, these results have significant consequences. In the next (and final) part of the study, testing is further applied to systems with real diesel exhaust, including primary PM from a vehicle operated with

  18. Interferon-γ: biological function and application for study of cellular immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lutckii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune response plays a central role in control of intracellular pathogens like viruses, some bacteria and parasites. Evaluation of presence, specificity and strength of cellular immune response can be done by investigation of reaction of immune cells to specific stimulus, like antigen. The major cellular reactions to antigen stimulation are production of cytokines, proliferation and cytotoxicity. This review is focused on interferon-gamma as one of the central Th1 cytokines: its biology, immunological role and application as marker of cellular immune response.

  19. Biological and functional diversity of bird communities in natural and human modified habitats in Northern Flank of Knuckles Mountain Forest Range, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KALYA SUBASINGHE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Subasinghe K, Sumanapala AP. 2014. Biological and functional diversity of bird communities in natural and human modified habitats in Northern Flank of Knuckles Mountain Forest Range, Sri Lanka. Biodiversitas 15: 200-205. The Knuckles Mountain Forest Range (KMFR has a complex mosaic of natural and human modified habitats and the contribution of these habitats to the biological and functional diversities has not been deeply studied. Present study investigated both of these diversities in five habitat types (two natural habitats: Sub-montane forest and Pitawala Patana grassland; three modified habitats: cardamom, pinus and abandoned tea plantations in Northern Flank of KMFR using birds as the indicator group. Bird communities were surveyed using point count method. A total of 1,150 individuals belonging to 56 species were observed. The highest species richness was reported from the cardamom plantation where as sub-montane forest had the highest feeding guild diversity in terms of Shannon Weiner index. The abandoned tea plantation and the Pitawala Patana grasslands with fairly open habitats, showed relatively lower levels of feeding guild diversities. It is clear that the structurally complex habitats contribute more to the area’s biological and functional diversities and need to be taken into consideration when developing conservation plans.

  20. Neuroendocrine Responses to Transvascular Autonomic Modulation: A Modified Balloon Angioplasty in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, M; Sternberg, Z

    2016-02-01

    Balloon angioplasty (BA) is a treatment modality to correct vascular lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, who present with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). We hypothesized that BA clinical benefits stems in part from improvement in cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. We adopted the Transvascular Autonomic Modulation (TVAM), as a modified BA technique, with the objective of further enhancing ANS functional activities. TVAM involved dilation of multiple vascular beds, including IJVs, azygos and renal veins, and application of manual compression. Since the ANS regulates the function of the hypothalamus pituitary (HPA) axis, we examined TVAM effects on HPA axis in MS patients, and determined the relationship between ANS function and HPA activity. The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol serum levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were measured before and 24 h after TVAM procedure in 72 MS patients. Baseline ACTH and cortisol serum levels were lower than normal ranges in 18% and 25% MS patients respectively. The intervention resulted in significant reductions in both ACTH and cortisol (pcounter to the stress-mediated increases in serum levels of these hormones, which are expected following an invasive procedure. The clinical implications of this unexpected response warrant further investigations. PMID:25789986

  1. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  2. Ibuprofen modifies the inflammatory response of the murine lung to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordelli, D O; Cerquetti, M C; el-Tawil, G; Ramwell, P W; Hooke, A M; Bellanti, J A

    1985-08-01

    In chronic P. aeruginosa infection, lung tissue damage is induced by either the microorganism or the inflammatory response. We investigated, in an animal model, whether a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, ibuprofen, reduced lung inflammation produced by P. aeruginosa. Lung lavages, pulmonary clearance of P. aeruginosa and lung pathology were studied in CD-1 mice injected with sodium ibuprofenate. A single dose of the drug, injected immediately after 30 min exposure to the P. aeruginosa aerosol, decreased the recruitment of granulocytes into airways in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 2 doses of the drug 18 and 6 h before the P. aeruginosa challenge was even more effective. The kinetics of changes in prostaglandin E2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 concentrations in lung lavage fluids after P. aeruginosa aerosol were also modified by ibuprofen. Moreover, ibuprofen treatment did not impair lung clearance of the challenge microorganisms, and the animals had less inflammation of the lungs. PMID:3863757

  3. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  4. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel. PMID:27178925

  5. Design, synthesis and biological activity of new polyenolic inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases: a focus on chemically-modified curcumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ying; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Hambardjieva, Elena; Vranková, Kveta; Golub, Lorne M; Johnson, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential for the degradation and turnover of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and, when pathologically elevated, mediate connective tissue loss (including bone destruction) in various inflammatory and other diseases. Tetracyclines (TCs) are known inhibitors of mammalian-derived MMPs, and non-antibiotic formulations of Doxycycline are FDA-approved to treat periodontitis and the chronic inflammatory skin disease, rosacea. Because the C-11/ C-12 diketonic moiety of the tetracyclines is primarily responsible, through zinc-binding, for MMP inhibition, we have uniquely modified curcumin as a "core" molecule, since it contains a similar enolic system and is known to have beneficial effects in diseases where connective-tissue loss occurs. Specifically we have developed new congeners which exhibit improved zinc-binding and solubility, and potent reduction of excessive MMP levels and activity. We now describe a series of curcuminoid bi- and tri-carbonylmethanes in which all of these properties are substantially improved. An N-phenylaminocarbonyl derivative of bis-demethoxycurcumin (CMC2.24) was selected as the "lead" substance because it showed superior potency in vitro (i.e., the lowest IC(50)) against a series of neutral proteases (MMPs) associated with tissue erosion. Moreover, CMC2.24 administered to diabetic rats orally (30mg/kg), reduced the secretion of pathologically-excessive levels of MMP-9 to normal in cultured peritoneal macrophages with no evidence of toxicity. Thus, this (and other similar novel) compound(s) may be useful in various diseases of connective-tissue loss. PMID:22830350

  6. Temperature-responsive liquid chromatography. 2. Effects of hydrophobic groups in N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer-modified silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, H; Kashiwase, Y; Yamamoto, K; Matsushima, Y; Kikuchi, A; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T

    1997-03-01

    We recently reported the new concept of temperature-responsive liquid chromatography using temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-modified surfaces as high-performance liquid chromatography media with aqueous mobile phases. Incorporation of hydrophobic sites is an important factor to improve the efficacy (selectivity and retention) of temperature-responsive chromatography. Toward this goal, we have synthesized semitelechelic copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide (IPAAm) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) having reactive terminal functional groups using telomerization. The lower critical solution temperatures of the copolymers shift to lower temperatures with increasing hydrophobic BMA content in the poly(IPAAm-co-BMA) relative to that of the IPAAm homopolymer. This temperature-responsive semitelechelic copolymer was grafted to the surface of (aminopropyl)silica through the reaction of activated ester-amine coupling. The polymer-modified silica was used as a column packing material. Separation of a mixture of five steroids having various hydrophobicities was investigated. Retention of steroids on poly(IPAAm-co-BMA)-modified columns is increased with an increase in column temperature. The capacity factors for steroids on the copolymer-modified silica beads was much larger than that on homopolymer PIPAAm-modified columns. The capacity factor for testosterone at 50 degrees C was 33.8 for poly(IPAAm-co-BMA) containing 5 mol% BMA, while that for the PIPAAm homopolymer was 15.0 at the same temperature. The influence of column temperature on steroid retention behavior on copolymer-modified stationary phases was significant compared with the case of homopolymer-modified columns. Furthermore, retention times for steroids increased remarkably with increasing BMA composition. The temperature-responsive elution behavior for the steroids was strongly affected by the hydrophobicity of the grafted polymer chains on silica surfaces. Possible protein separation in temperature-responsive

  7. The role of the Biological Weapons Convention in disease surveillance and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, Christian

    2010-11-01

    This article assesses the role and significance of the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) with respect to infectious disease surveillance and response to outbreaks. Increasingly, the BWC is being used as a platform for addressing infectious disease threats arising naturally as well as traditional concerns about malicious dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms. The latter have long had a place on the security agenda, but natural disease outbreaks too are now being partially 'securitized' through the use of the BWC as a forum for exchanging information and ideas on disease surveillance and response. The article focuses on two prominent issues discussed at recent meetings of BWC member states: enhancing capacity for disease surveillance and response; and responding to allegations of biological weapons use and investigating outbreaks deemed suspicious. It concludes, firstly, that the BWC supports the efforts of international health organizations to enhance disease surveillance and response capacity worldwide. And secondly, that the BWC, rather than the World Health Organization (WHO), is the appropriate institution to deal with biological weapons allegations and investigations of suspicious outbreaks. The overall message is that securitization in the health sphere cuts both ways. Adding a security dimension (BW) alongside the task of detecting and responding to naturally occurring disease outbreaks is beneficial, but requiring a non-security organization (the WHO) to assume a security role would be counterproductive. PMID:20961949

  8. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli; Nazia eNisar; Roberts, Andrea C.; Kevin eMurray; Borevitz, Justin O; Barry James Pogson

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzy...

  9. A chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8, is involved in morphological, gene expression, and epigenetic responses to mechanical stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cazzonelli, Christopher I.; Nisar, Nazia; Roberts, Andrea C.; Murray, Kevin D.; Borevitz, Justin O; Pogson, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzym...

  10. Dual-tracer method to estimate coral reef response to a plume of chemically modified seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaren, J. K.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new method, based on measurement of seawater samples, to estimate the response of a reef ecosystem to a plume of an additive (for example, a nutrient or other chemical). In the natural environment, where there may be natural variability in concentrations, it can be difficult to distinguish between changes in concentrations that would occur naturally and changes in concentrations that result from a chemical addition. Furthermore, in the unconfined natural environment, chemically modified water can mix with waters that have not been modified, making it difficult to distinguish between effects of dilution and effects of chemical fluxes or transformations. We present a dual-tracer method that extracts signals from observations that may be affected by both natural variability and dilution. In this dual-tracer method, a substance (in our example case, alkalinity) is added to the water in known proportion to a passive conservative tracer (in our example case, Rhodamine WT dye). The resulting plume of seawater is allowed to flow over the study site. Two transects are drawn across the plume at the front and back of the study site. If, in our example, alkalinity is plotted as a function of dye concentration for the front transect, the slope of the resulting mixing line is the ratio of alkalinity to dye in the added fluid. If a similar mixing line is measured and calculated for the back transect, the slope of this mixing line will indicate the amount of added alkalinity that remains in the water flowing out of the study site per unit of added dye. The ratio of the front and back slopes indicates the fraction of added alkalinity that was taken up by the reef. The method is demonstrated in an experiment performed on One Tree Reef (Queensland, Australia) aimed at showing that ocean acidification is already affecting coral reef growth. In an effort to chemically reverse some of the changes to seawater chemistry that have occurred over the past 200 years, we added

  11. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. PMID:25466762

  12. Lysosome size, motility and stress response regulated by fronto-temporal dementia modifier TMEM106B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagi, Massimiliano; Klein, Zoe A; Gould, Travis J; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2014-07-01

    Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) is a fatal neurodegeneration. TMEM106B variants are linked to FTLD-TDP risk, and TMEM106B is lysosomal. Here, we focus on neuronal TMEM106B, and demonstrate co-localization and traffic with lysosomal LAMP-1. pH-sensitive reporters demonstrate that the TMEM106B C-terminus is lumenal. The TMEM106B N-terminus interacts with endosomal adaptors and other TMEM106 proteins. TMEM106B knockdown reduces neuronal lysosomal number and diameter by STED microscopy, and overexpression enlarges LAMP-positive structures. Reduction of TMEM106B increases axonally transported lysosomes, while TMEM106B elevation inhibits transport and yields large lysosomes in the soma. TMEM106B overexpression alters lysosomal stress signaling, causing a translocation of the mTOR-sensitive transcription factor, TFEB, to neuronal nuclei. TMEM106B loss-of-function delays TFEB translocation after Torin-1-induced stress. Enlarged TMEM106B-overexpressing lysosomes maintain organelle integrity longer after lysosomal photodamage than do control lysosomes, while small TMEM106B-knockdown lysosomes are more sensitive to illumination. Thus, neuronal TMEM106B plays a central role in regulating lysosomal size, motility and responsiveness to stress, highlighting the possible role of lysosomal biology in FTLD-TDP. PMID:25066864

  13. In vivo biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waugh, C. M.; Morrissey, D.; Jones, E.;

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session...... of ESWT was administered to the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon in thirteen healthy individuals (aged 25.7 ± 7.0 years) and patellar or Achilles tendon of six patients with tendinopathies (aged 39.0 ± 14.9 years). Dialysate samples from the surrounding peri-tendon were collected before and...... in tendinopathy by promoting the inflammatory and catabolic processes that are associated with removing damaged matrix constituents. The non-response of some individuals may help to explain why ESWT does not improve symptoms in all patients and provides a potential focus for future research....

  14. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  15. Report of the workshop on biological dosimetry: Increasing capacity for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent events have brought increased attention to the possibility and dangers of a radiological terrorist threat and its potential implication on the national capacity for radiation accident preparedness. In such an event, there is a pressing need to rapidly identify severely irradiated individuals who require prompt medical attention from those who have not been exposed or have been subject to low doses. Initial dose assessment is a key component in rapid triage and treatment, however, the development of accurate methods for rapid dose assessment remains a challenge. In this report, the authors describe a recent workshop supported by the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear and Explosives Research and Technology Initiative regarding the international effort to increase biological dosimetry capacity to effectively mount an emergency response in a mass casualty situation. Specifically, the focus of the workshop was on the current state of biological dosimetry capabilities and capacities in North America, recent developments towards increasing throughput for biological dosimetry and to identify opportunities for developing a North American Biological Dosimetry Network and forming partnerships and collaborations within Canada and the USA. (authors)

  16. Deposition rates in growing tissue: Implications for physiology, molecular biology, and response to environmental variation

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Wendy K.; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Net rates of biosynthesis and mineral deposition are needed to understand the physiology and molecular biology of growth and plant responses to environmental variation. Many popular models ignore cell expansion and displacement. In contrast, the continuity equation, used with empirical data on growth velocity and concentration, allows computation of biosynthesis and deposition rates in growing tissue. This article describes data and methods needed to calculate deposition rates and reviews som...

  17. Chemical biology of mutagenesis and DNA repair: cellular responses to DNA alkylation

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastav, Nidhi; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of DNA-damaging agents with the genome results in a plethora of lesions, commonly referred to as adducts. Adducts may cause DNA to mutate, they may represent the chemical precursors of lethal events and they can disrupt expression of genes. Determination of which adduct is responsible for each of these biological endpoints is difficult, but this task has been accomplished for some carcinogenic DNA-damaging agents. Here, we describe the respective contributions of specific DNA les...

  18. Biologically-Responsive Hybrid Biomaterials A Reference for Material Scientists and Bioengineers

    CERN Document Server

    Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2010-01-01

    Conjugation of synthetic materials with cell-responsive biologically-active molecules, in addition to providing structural support and release of biomolecules in the regenerating region, can provide the signaling factors required to initiate the cascade of cell migration, adhesion, differentiation, maturation, growth factor modulation, maintenance of matrix integrity, and tissue morphogenesis. Nanoparticles conjugated with ligands that preferentially interact with cell surface receptors in the tumor environment have the potential to drastically improve bioavailability, selectivity and residenc

  19. Modified primers for the identification of nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum isolates that have biological control potential against Fusarium wilt of cucumber in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojen Wang

    Full Text Available Previous investigations demonstrated that Fusarium oxysporum (Fo, which is not pathogenic to cucumbers, could serve as a biological control agent for managing Fusarium wilt of cucumber caused by Fo f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc in Taiwan. However, thus far it has not been possible to separate the populations of pathogenic Fo from the nonpathogenic isolates that have biological control potential through their morphological characteristics. Although these two populations can be distinguished from one another using a bioassay, the work is laborious and time-consuming. In this study, a fragment of the intergenic spacer (IGS region of ribosomal DNA from an Fo biological control agent, Fo366, was PCR-amplified with published general primers, FIGS11/FIGS12 and sequenced. A new primer, NPIGS-R, which was designed based on the IGS sequence, was paired with the FIGS11 primer. These primers were then evaluated for their specificity to amplify DNA from nonpathogenic Fo isolates that have biological control potential. The results showed that the modified primer pair, FIGS11/NPIGS-R, amplified a 500-bp DNA fragment from five of seven nonpathogenic Fo isolates. These five Fo isolates delayed symptom development of cucumber Fusarium wilt in greenhouse bioassay tests. Seventy-seven Fo isolates were obtained from the soil and plant tissues and then subjected to amplification using the modified primer pair; six samples showed positive amplification. These six isolates did not cause symptoms on cucumber seedlings when grown in peat moss infested with the isolates and delayed disease development when the same plants were subsequently inoculated with a virulent isolate of Foc. Therefore, the modified primer pair may prove useful for the identification of Fo isolates that are nonpathogenic to cucumber which can potentially act as biocontrol agents for Fusarium wilt of cucumber.

  20. Gender differences in stress response: Role of developmental and biological determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress response is associated with manifestations of various psychosomatic and psychiatric disorders. Hence, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms that influence this association. Moreover, men and women tend to react differently with stress-both psychologically and biologically. These differences also need to be studied in order to have a better understanding in the gender difference observed for many disorders, which are likely to be contributed by the gender difference in stress reactivity and responses. Such an understanding would have a significant impact on our understanding about how adult health is set during early life and how adult disease could be prevented in men and women.

  1. Effects of timber harvest on river food webs: physical, chemical and biological responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Timothy Wootton

    Full Text Available I compared physical, chemical and biological characteristics of nine rivers running through three timber harvest regimes to investigate the effects of land use on river ecosystems, to determine whether these corresponded to changes linked with downstream location, and to compare the response of different types of indicator variables. Physical variables changed with downstream location, but varied little with timber harvest. Most chemical variables increased strongly with timber harvest, but not with downstream location. Most biological variables did not vary systematically with either timber harvest or downstream location. Dissolved organic carbon did not vary with timber harvest or downstream location, but correlated positively with salmonid abundance. Nutrient manipulations revealed no general pattern of nutrient limitation with timber harvest or downstream location. The results suggest that chemical variables most reliably indicate timber harvest impact in these systems. The biological variables most relevant to human stakeholders were surprisingly insensitive to timber harvest, however, apparently because of decoupling from nutrient responses and unexpectedly weak responses by physical variables.

  2. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    variants were significantly associated with greater efficacy of l-DOPA for motor symptoms. The SLC6A3 variants were also associated with greater efficacy of methylphenidate for motor symptoms and gait disorders in the ON l-DOPA condition. The difference between motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores for patients with different SLC6A3 genotypes was statistically significant in a multivariate analysis that took account of other disease-related, treatment-related and pharmacogenetic parameters. Our preliminary results suggest that variants of SLC6A3 are genetic modifiers of the treatment response to l-DOPA and methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease. Further studies are required to assess the possible value of these genotypes for (i) guiding l-DOPA dose adaptations over the long term; and (ii) establishing the risk/benefit balance associated with methylphenidate treatment for gait disorders. PMID:25805645

  3. TOLERIZATION OF A TYPE I ALLERGIC IMMUNE RESPONSE THROUGH TRANSPLANTATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS1

    OpenAIRE

    Baranyi, Ulrike; Linhart, Birgit; Pilat, Nina; Bagley, Jessamyn; Muehlbacher, Ferdinand; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Allergy represents a hypersensitivity disease which affects more than 25% of the population in industrialized countries. The underlying type I allergic immune reaction occurs in predisposed atopic individuals in response to otherwise harmless antigens (i.e. allergens) and is characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE, an allergen-specific T cell response and the release of biologically active mediators such as histamine from mast cells and basophils. Regimens permanently toleriz...

  4. Stock price responses on the German suspension of genetically modified maize

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Finger

    2010-01-01

    This note investigates the effect of the German governments' decision to suspend the cultivation of genetically modified maize on the stock returns of involved companies. Moreover, the first announcement to investigate a ban as well as a court decision rejecting Monsanto's lawsuit against the suspension are considered. This study is motivated by the expectation that these decisions have consequences beyond the small German market for genetically modified maize. An event study is used to evalu...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G. Baker

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species. For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves, heterochrony (different transition times, and heterometry (different magnitudes. The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state, transient (sigmoid missing two steady states, impulse (with peak or trough, step (with intermediate-level plateau, impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter, step+ (step with an extra parameter, further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE. We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  6. Response of an invasive liana to simulated herbivory: implications for its biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, S.; Dhileepan, K.; Treviño, M.

    2006-05-01

    Pre-release evaluation of the efficacy of biological control agents is often not possible in the case of many invasive species targeted for biocontrol. In such circumstances simulating herbivory could yield significant insights into plant response to damage, thereby improving the efficiency of agent prioritisation, increasing the chances of regulating the performance of invasive plants through herbivory and minimising potential risks posed by release of multiple herbivores. We adopted this approach to understand the weaknesses herbivores could exploit, to manage the invasive liana, Macfadyena unguis-cati. We simulated herbivory by damaging the leaves, stem, root and tuber of the plant, in isolation and in combination. We also applied these treatments at multiple frequencies. Plant response in terms of biomass allocation showed that at least two severe defoliation treatments were required to diminish this liana's climbing habit and reduce its allocation to belowground tuber reserves. Belowground damage appears to have negligible effect on the plant's biomass production and tuber damage appears to trigger a compensatory response. Plant response to combinations of different types of damage did not differ significantly to that from leaf damage. This suggests that specialist herbivores in the leaf-feeding guild capable of removing over 50% of the leaf tissue may be desirable in the biological control of this invasive species.

  7. The impact of different dose response parameters on biologically optimized IMRT in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Ferreira, Brigida; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Svensson, Roger; Lind, Bengt K.

    2008-05-01

    The full potential of biologically optimized radiation therapy can only be maximized with the prediction of individual patient radiosensitivity prior to treatment. Unfortunately, the available biological parameters, derived from clinical trials, reflect an average radiosensitivity of the examined populations. In the present study, a breast cancer patient of stage I II with positive lymph nodes was chosen in order to analyse the effect of the variation of individual radiosensitivity on the optimal dose distribution. Thus, deviations from the average biological parameters, describing tumour, heart and lung response, were introduced covering the range of patient radiosensitivity reported in the literature. Two treatment configurations of three and seven biologically optimized intensity-modulated beams were employed. The different dose distributions were analysed using biological and physical parameters such as the complication-free tumour control probability (P+), the biologically effective uniform dose (\\bar{\\bar{D}} ), dose volume histograms, mean doses, standard deviations, maximum and minimum doses. In the three-beam plan, the difference in P+ between the optimal dose distribution (when the individual patient radiosensitivity is known) and the reference dose distribution, which is optimal for the average patient biology, ranges up to 13.9% when varying the radiosensitivity of the target volume, up to 0.9% when varying the radiosensitivity of the heart and up to 1.3% when varying the radiosensitivity of the lung. Similarly, in the seven-beam plan, the differences in P+ are up to 13.1% for the target, up to 1.6% for the heart and up to 0.9% for the left lung. When the radiosensitivity of the most important tissues in breast cancer radiation therapy was simultaneously changed, the maximum gain in outcome was as high as 7.7%. The impact of the dose response uncertainties on the treatment outcome was clinically insignificant for the majority of the simulated patients

  8. The impact of different dose-response parameters on biologically optimized IMRT in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full potential of biologically optimized radiation therapy can only be maximized with the prediction of individual patient radiosensitivity prior to treatment. Unfortunately, the available biological parameters, derived from clinical trials, reflect an average radiosensitivity of the examined populations. In the present study, a breast cancer patient of stage I-II with positive lymph nodes was chosen in order to analyse the effect of the variation of individual radiosensitivity on the optimal dose distribution. Thus, deviations from the average biological parameters, describing tumour, heart and lung response, were introduced covering the range of patient radiosensitivity reported in the literature. Two treatment configurations of three and seven biologically optimized intensity-modulated beams were employed. The different dose distributions were analysed using biological and physical parameters such as the complication-free tumour control probability (P+), the biologically effective uniform dose, dose volume histograms, mean doses, standard deviations, maximum and minimum doses. In the three-beam plan, the difference in P+ between the optimal dose distribution (when the individual patient radiosensitivity is known) and the reference dose distribution, which is optimal for the average patient biology, ranges up to 13.9% when varying the radiosensitivity of the target volume, up to 0.9% when varying the radiosensitivity of the heart and up to 1.3% when varying the radiosensitivity of the lung. Similarly, in the seven-beam plan, the differences in P+ are up to 13.1% for the target, up to 1.6% for the heart and up to 0.9% for the left lung. When the radiosensitivity of the most important tissues in breast cancer radiation therapy was simultaneously changed, the maximum gain in outcome was as high as 7.7%. The impact of the dose-response uncertainties on the treatment outcome was clinically insignificant for the majority of the simulated patients. However, the jump

  9. In vivo biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Waugh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session of ESWT was administered to the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon in thirteen healthy individuals (aged 25.7 ± 7.0 years and patellar or Achilles tendon of six patients with tendinopathies (aged 39.0 ± 14.9 years. Dialysate samples from the surrounding peri-tendon were collected before and immediately after ESWT. Interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, vascular endothelial growth factor and interferon-γ were quantified using a cytometric bead array while gelatinase activity (MMP-2 and -9 was examined using zymography. There were no statistical differences between the biological tissue response to ESWT in healthy and pathological tendons. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 were the cytokines predominantly detected in the tendon dialysate. IL-1β and IL-2 did not change significantly with ESWT. IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were elevated immediately after ESWT and remained significantly elevated for four hours post-ESWT (p < 0.001. Pro-forms of MMP-2 and -9 also increased after ESWT (p < 0.003, whereas there were no significant changes in active MMP forms. In addition, the biological response to ESWT treatment could be differentiated between possible responders and non-responders based on a minimum 5-fold increase in any inflammatory marker or MMP from pre- to post-ESWT. Our findings provide novel evidence of the biological mechanisms underpinning ESWT in humans in vivo. They suggest that the mechanical stimulus provided by ESWT might aid tendon remodelling in tendinopathy by promoting the inflammatory and catabolic processes that are associated with removing damaged matrix constituents. The non-response of some individuals may

  10. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  11. The promise of biological markers for treatment response in first-episode psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane; Tamouza, Ryad; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leweke, Markus; Lewis, Shôn; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Sommer, Iris E; Winter-van Rossum, Inge; Kapur, Shitij; Kahn, René S; Rujescu, Dan; Leboyer, Marion

    2015-05-01

    Successful treatment of first-episode psychosis is one of the major factors that impacts long-term prognosis. Currently, there are no satisfactory biological markers (biomarkers) to predict which patients with a first-episode psychosis will respond to which treatment. In addition, a non-negligible rate of patients does not respond to any treatment or may develop side effects that affect adherence to the treatments as well as negatively impact physical health. Thus, there clearly is a pressing need for defining biomarkers that may be helpful to predict response to treatment and sensitivity to side effects in first-episode psychosis. The present systematic review provides (1) trials that assessed biological markers associated with antipsychotic response or side effects in first-episode psychosis and (2) potential biomarkers associated with biological disturbances that may guide the choice of conventional treatments or the prescription of innovative treatments. Trials including first-episode psychoses are few in number. Most of the available data focused on pharmacogenetics markers with so far only preliminary results. To date, these studies yielded-beside markers for metabolism of antipsychotics-no or only a few biomarkers for response or side effects, none of which have been implemented in daily clinical practice. Other biomarkers exploring immunoinflammatory, oxidative, and hormonal disturbances emerged as biomarkers of first-episode psychoses in the last decades, and some of them have been associated with treatment response. In addition to pharmacogenetics, further efforts should focus on the association of emergent biomarkers with conventional treatments or with innovative therapies efficacy, where some preliminary data suggest promising results. PMID:25759473

  12. Biological markers as predictive factors of response to neoadjuvant taxanes and anthracycline chemotherapy in breast carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bo; YANG De-qi; XIE Fei

    2008-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy provides an excellent model for evaluation of potential predictive factors.The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of different biological factors in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant taxane and anthracycline chemotherapy.Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients treated with 4 cycles of neoadjuvant taxanes and anthracycline were included in this retrospective study.Using pretreatment biopsy materials,immunohistochemical studies were performed for estrogen receptor(ER),progesterone receptor(PgR),HER-2,Ki-67 and p53 protein expression.The associations among biological markers and clinical and pathological complete response (pCR)were analyzed.Results The overall clinical response was 86%,including 33%clinical complete response(cCR)and 53%clinical partial response.The pCR was iust 17%.In the univariate analysis,only HER-2 overexpression was predictive of cCR to neoadjuvant chemotherapy(P=0.018).No significant associations between other biological factors and cCR were found.Absence of ER,PgR expression and overexpression of HER-2 were predictive of the pCR(P=0.002,0.001,0.01,respectively).Ki-67 and p53 failed to show an association with pCR.In multivariate analysis,overexpression of HER-2remained as an independent variable in predicting the cCR(P=0.021).However,negative ER was the only parameter that maintained statistical significance in predicting the pCR(P=0.001).Conclusions Patients with overexoression of HER-2 and negative hormonal receptor status are much more likely to respond to neoadjuvant taxane and anthracycline chemotherapy than those with the opposite characte ristics.These factors could serve as predictive markers for this regimen.

  13. From 'omics to otoliths: responses of an estuarine fish to endocrine disrupting compounds across biological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M; Connon, Richard E; He, Guochun; Hobbs, James A; Smalling, Kelly L; Teh, Swee J; White, J Wilson; Werner, Inge; Denison, Michael S; Cherr, Gary N

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) cause physiological abnormalities and population decline in fishes. However, few studies have linked environmental EDC exposures with responses at multiple tiers of the biological hierarchy, including population-level effects. To this end, we undertook a four-tiered investigation in the impacted San Francisco Bay estuary with the Mississippi silverside (Menidia audens), a small pelagic fish. This approach demonstrated links between different EDC sources and fish responses at different levels of biological organization. First we determined that water from a study site primarily impacted by ranch run-off had only estrogenic activity in vitro, while water sampled from a site receiving a combination of urban, limited ranch run-off, and treated wastewater effluent had both estrogenic and androgenic activity. Secondly, at the molecular level we found that fish had higher mRNA levels for estrogen-responsive genes at the site where only estrogenic activity was detected but relatively lower expression levels where both estrogenic and androgenic EDCs were detected. Thirdly, at the organism level, males at the site exposed to both estrogens and androgens had significantly lower mean gonadal somatic indices, significantly higher incidence of severe testicular necrosis and altered somatic growth relative to the site where only estrogens were detected. Finally, at the population level, the sex ratio was significantly skewed towards males at the site with measured androgenic and estrogenic activity. Our results suggest that mixtures of androgenic and estrogenic EDCs have antagonistic and potentially additive effects depending on the biological scale being assessed, and that mixtures containing androgens and estrogens may produce unexpected effects. In summary, evaluating EDC response at multiple tiers is necessary to determine the source of disruption (lowest scale, i.e. cell line) and what the ecological impact will be (largest scale, i

  14. Biologically Inspired Design Principles for Scalable, Robust, Adaptive, Decentralized Search and Automated Response (RADAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Distributed search problems are ubiquitous in Artificial Life (ALife). Many distributed search problems require identifying a rare and previously unseen event and producing a rapid response. This challenge amounts to finding and removing an unknown needle in a very large haystack. Traditional computational search models are unlikely to find, nonetheless, appropriately respond to, novel events, particularly given data distributed across multiple platforms in a variety of formats and sources with variable and unknown reliability. Biological systems have evolved solutions to distributed search and response under uncertainty. Immune systems and ant colonies efficiently scale up massively parallel search with automated response in highly dynamic environments, and both do so using distributed coordination without centralized control. These properties are relevant to ALife, where distributed, autonomous, robust and adaptive control is needed to design robot swarms, mobile computing networks, computer security system...

  15. Enhanced selective response to nitric oxide (NO) of Au-modified tungsten trioxide nanoplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chen, Deliang, E-mail: dlchen@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); UK–China Centre for Multi-functional Nanomaterials, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Wang, Hailong; Xu, Hongliang; Yang, Daoyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Shao, Guosheng [UK–China Centre for Multi-functional Nanomaterials, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Institute for Renewable Energy and Environmental Technology, University of Bolton, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom); Zhang, Rui, E-mail: zhangray@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Laboratory of Aeronautical Composites, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, University Centre, Zhengdong New District, Zhengzhou 450046 (China)

    2013-12-16

    Au-modified WO{sub 3} nanoplates (Au@plate-WO{sub 3}) were synthesized by chemically reducing HAuCl{sub 4} on the surfaces of two-dimensional WO{sub 3} nanoplates, which were derived from an intercalation–topochemical process. XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and UV–vis DR spectra were used to characterize the WO{sub 3} nanoplates and Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites. The gas-sensing properties of the WO{sub 3} nanoplates and Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites were comparatively investigated using inorganic gases and organic vapors as the target gases, with an emphasis on exploring the response and selectivity of NO gases with low concentrations (0.5–10 ppm) at low operating temperature (130−250 °C). The results indicated that Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) enhance the low-temperature sensitivity and selectivity of the Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors for NO detection when compared with the performance of the WO{sub 3} sensors. The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposite with 1 wt.% Au NPs has the best NO-sensing performance at the optimum operating temperature of ∼170 °C. In addition, the Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors show highly selective to NO gas among various inorganic gases (i.e., H{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and CO) and organic vapors (i.e., alcohol, acetone, methanal and benzene). The enhancement in sensitivity and selectivity for NO detection is probably due to the synergistic effect of Au NPs and the house-of-card structure of WO{sub 3} nanoplates. - Highlights: • Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites were synthesized by a chemical process. • The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors were highly selective to NO gases with low concentrations. • The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors had the highest sensitivity operating at about 170 °C. • The optimum amount of Au nanoparticles was about 1 wt.%. • Au nanoparticles and the loose aggregates enhanced the NO-sensing performance.

  16. Does methyl jasmonate modify the oxidative stress response in Phaseolus coccineus treated with Cu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaka, Agnieszka; Wójcik, Małgorzata; Dresler, Sławomir; Mroczek-Zdyrska, Magdalena; Maksymiec, Waldemar

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of methyl jasmonate (MJ) as a signal molecule able to take part in the defense mechanism against copper (Cu)-imposed oxidative stress was studied in the leaves and roots of runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) plants. Roots of plants cultivated hydroponically were preincubated in MJ (10µM) for 1h or 24h and subsequently exposed to Cu (50µM) for 5h (short-term experiment) or 5 days (long-term experiment). Enzymatic (activity of superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; guaiacol peroxidase, POX) and non-enzymatic (accumulation of malondialdehyde, MDA; homoglutathione, hGSH; proline; anthocyanins; low molecular weight organic acids, LMWOAs) responses were determined in the leaves and roots. The antioxidative defense mechanism was significantly activated after Cu supplementation. In most cases, activities of ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging enzymes like SOD, CAT, APX, POX, as well as MDA, hGSH and proline concentrations increased following Cu exposure. MJ showed a time-dependent effect on antioxidative enzymes activity. In the short-term experiment, MJ elevated CAT, APX and POX activities in the roots, and POX activity in the leaves of non-Cu-treated plants. In the long-term experiment, MJ not only decreased POX and partially CAT activity in the roots, but also increased the MDA level and partially CAT activity in the leaves of the control plants. In Cu-treated plants, MJ reduced APX, but elevated POX activity in the leaves after 5-h exposure. After 5-day-Cu treatment, MJ inhibited POX activity in the leaves and mainly reduced SOD and CAT activities in the roots. Moreover, in the long-term experiment, MJ reduced tartrate and pyruvate in the leaves of Cu-stressed plants, but mostly elevated tartrate and malate in the roots comparing with Cu alone treatment. MJ alone and under Cu excess did not alter accumulation of MDA, hGSH and proline comparing with Cu alone, but partially elevated anthocyanin concentration. The

  17. Peritoneal fluid modifies the response of human spermatozoa to follicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Adriana M; Berta, Cesar L; Cuasnicú, Patricia S; Munuce, Maria Jose

    2012-04-01

    that the exposure to peritoneal fluid modifies the response of spermatozoa to oocyte signals. PMID:22386595

  18. Biologics or tofacitinib for rheumatoid arthritis in incomplete responders to methotrexate or other traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth;

    2016-01-01

    , tocilizumab) and small molecule tofacitinib, versus comparator (MTX, DMARD, placebo (PL), or a combination) in adults with rheumatoid arthritis who have failed to respond to methotrexate (MTX) or other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), i.e., MTX/DMARD incomplete responders (MTX...... serious adverse events on biologic+MTX/DMARD (Peto OR [can be interpreted as RR due to low event rate] 1.12 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.27); absolute risk 1% (0% to 2%), As well, the NMA estimate for TNF biologic+MTX/DMARD (Peto OR 1.20 (95% Crl 1.01 to 1.43)) showed moderate quality evidence of an increase in the...

  19. Subjectivity: A Case of Biological Individuation and an Adaptive Response to Informational Overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkisz, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a perspective on the scientific explanation of the subjectivity of conscious experience. It proposes plausible answers for two empirically valid questions: the ‘how’ question concerning the developmental mechanisms of subjectivity, and the ‘why’ question concerning its function. Biological individuation, which is acquired in several different stages, serves as a provisional description of how subjective perspectives may have evolved. To the extent that an individuated informational space seems the most efficient way for a given organism to select biologically valuable information, subjectivity is deemed to constitute an adaptive response to informational overflow. One of the possible consequences of this view is that subjectivity might be (at least functionally) dissociated from consciousness, insofar as the former primarily facilitates selection, the latter action. PMID:27555835

  20. Biological responses to the chemical recovery of acidified fresh waters in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report biological changes at several UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network lakes and streams that are spatially consistent with the recovery of water chemistry induced by reductions in acid deposition. These include trends toward more acid-sensitive epilithic diatom and macroinvertebrate assemblages, an increasing proportional abundance of macroinvertebrate predators, an increasing occurrence of acid-sensitive aquatic macrophyte species, and the recent appearance of juvenile (<1 year old) brown trout in some of the more acidic flowing waters. Changes are often shown to be directly linked to annual variations in acidity. Although indicative of biological improvement in response to improving water chemistry, 'recovery' in most cases is modest and very gradual. While specific ecological recovery endpoints are uncertain, it is likely that physical and biotic interactions are influencing the rate of recovery of certain groups of organisms at particular sites. - Recently observed changes in the species composition of UK lakes and streams are consistent with chemical recovery from acidification

  1. Broadband 10-300 GHz stimulus-response sensing for chemical and biological entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By illuminating the sample with a broadband 10-300 GHz stimulus and coherently detecting the response, we obtain reflection and transmission spectra of common powdered substances, and compare them as a starting point for distinguishing concealed threats in envelopes and on personnel. Because these samples are irregular and their dielectric properties cannot be modulated, however, the spectral information we obtain is largely qualitative. To show how to gain quantitative information on biological species at micro- and millimetre-wave frequencies, we introduce thermal modulation of a globular protein in solution, and show that changes in single-wavelength microwave reflections coincide with accepted visible absorption spectra, pointing the way towards gaining quantitative chemical and biological spectra from broadband terahertz systems

  2. A meta-analysis of water quality and aquatic macrophyte responses in 18 lakes treated with lanthanum modified bentonite (PHOSLOCK®)

    OpenAIRE

    Spears, Bryan M.; Mackay, Eleanor B.; Yasseri, Said; Gunn, Iain D.M.; Waters, Kate E.; Andrews, Christopher; Cole, Stephanie; de Ville, Mitzi; Kelly, Andrea; Meis, Sebastian; Moore, Alanna L.; Nurnberg, Gertrud K.; van Oosterhout, Frank; Pitt, Jo-Anne; Madgwick, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanum (La) modified bentonite is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. However, little is known about its effectiveness in controlling P across a wide range of lake conditions or of its potential to promote rapid ecological recovery. We combined data from 18 treated lakes to examine the lake population responses in the 24 months following La-bentonite application (range of La-bentonite loads...

  3. Systems-Biology Approaches to Discover Anti-Viral Effectors of the Human Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F.R. Sommer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections elicit an immediate innate response involving antiviral factors. The activities of some of these factors are, in turn, blocked by viral countermeasures. The ensuing battle between the host and the viruses is crucial for determining whether the virus establishes a foothold and/or induces adaptive immune responses. A comprehensive systems-level understanding of the repertoire of anti-viral effectors in the context of these immediate virus-host responses would provide significant advantages in devising novel strategies to interfere with the initial establishment of infections. Recent efforts to identify cellular factors in a comprehensive and unbiased manner, using genome-wide siRNA screens and other systems biology “omics” methodologies, have revealed several potential anti-viral effectors for viruses like Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, West Nile virus (WNV, and influenza virus. This review describes the discovery of novel viral restriction factors and discusses how the integration of different methods in systems biology can be used to more comprehensively identify the intimate interactions of viruses and the cellular innate resistance.

  4. Radiation biology of Caenorhabditis elegans. Germ cell response, aging and behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of radiation effect in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans has been carried out over three decades and now allow for understanding at the molecular, cellular and individual levels. This review describes the current knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing irradiation with a scope of the germ line, aging and behavior. In germ cells, ionizing radiation induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Lots of molecules involved in these responses and functions have been identified in C. elegans, which are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes. Radiosensitivity and the effect of heavy-ion microbeam irradiation on germ cells with relationship between initiation of meiotic recombination and DNA lesions are discussed. In addition to DNA damage, ionizing radiation produces free radicals, and the free radical theory is the most popular aging theory. A first signal transduction pathway of aging has been discovered in C. elegans, and radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress is recently noted for an inducible factor of hormetic response and genetic instability. The hormetic response in C. elegans exposed to oxidative stress is discussed with genetic pathways of aging. Moreover, C. elegans is well known as a model organism for behavior. The recent work reported the radiation effects via specific neurons on learning behavior, and radiation and hydrogen peroxide affect the locomotory rate similarly. These findings are discussed in relation to the evidence obtained with other organisms. Altogether, C. elegans may be a good 'in vivo' model system in the field of radiation biology. (author)

  5. Developing a modified SEBAL algorithm that is responsive to advection by using limited weather data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhwanazi, Mcebisi

    The use of Remote Sensing ET algorithms in water management, especially for agricultural purposes is increasing, and there are more models being introduced. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) and its variant, Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) are some of the models that are being widely used. While SEBAL has several advantages over other RS models, including that it does not require prior knowledge of soil, crop and other ground details, it has the downside of underestimating evapotranspiration (ET) on days when there is advection, which may be in most cases in arid and semi-arid areas. METRIC, however has been modified to be able to account for advection, but in doing so it requires hourly weather data. In most developing countries, while accurate estimates of ET are required, the weather data necessary to use METRIC may not be available. This research therefore was meant to develop a modified version of SEBAL that would require minimal weather data that may be available in these areas, and still estimate ET accurately. The data that were used to develop this model were minimum and maximum temperatures, wind data, preferably the run of wind in the afternoon, and wet bulb temperature. These were used to quantify the advected energy that would increase ET in the field. This was a two-step process; the first was developing the model for standard conditions, which was described as a healthy cover of alfalfa, 40-60 cm tall and not short of water. Under standard conditions, when estimated ET using modified SEBAL was compared with lysimeter-measured ET, the modified SEBAL model had a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of 2.2 % compared to -17.1 % from the original SEBAL. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was lower for the modified SEBAL model at 10.9 % compared to 25.1 % for the original SEBAL. The modified SEBAL model, developed on an alfalfa field in Rocky Ford, was then tested on other crops; beans and wheat. It was also tested on

  6. Simultaneous determination of cysteamine and folic acid in pharmaceutical and biological samples using modified multiwall carbon nanotube paste electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Taherkhani; Hassan Karimi-Maleh; Ali A.Ensafi; Hadi Beitollahi; Ahmad Hosseini; Mohammad A.Khalilzadeh; Hassan Bagheri

    2012-01-01

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) chemically modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes and ferrocene (FC) was used as a selective electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of cysteamine (CA) and folic acid (FA).This modified electrode showed very efficient electrocatalytic activity for the anodic oxidation of CA.The peak current of differential pulse voltammograms of CA and FA increased linearly with their concentration in the ranges of 0.7-200 μmol/L CA and 5.0-700 μmol/L FA.The detection limits for CA and FA were 0.3 μmol/L and 2.0 μ mol/L,respectively.The diffusion coefficient (D) and transfer coefficient (α) of CA were also determined.These conditions are sufficient to allow determination of CA and FA both individually and simultaneously.

  7. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Zhou, Wen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dam, Phuongan [ORNL; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to

  8. Dopamine blockade and clinical response: Evidence for two biological subgroups of schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because CNS neuroleptic concentration cannot be directly measured in patients, the relation between clinical response and extent of dopamine receptor blockade is unknown. This relationship is critical in ascertaining whether nonresponse to neuroleptics is the result merely of inadequate CNS drug levels or of more basic biological differences in pathophysiology. Using [18F]N-methylspiroperidol and positron emission tomography, the authors assessed dopamine receptor occupancy in 10 schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with haloperidol. Responders and nonresponders had virtually identical indices of [18F]N-methylspiroperidol uptake after treatment, indicating that failure to respond clinically was not a function of neuroleptic uptake or binding in the CNS

  9. Similarity criterion analysis of dose-response curves in biological assay and radioimmunoassay of hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difficulties involved in the control of biological and radioimmunological assay systems, and in the maintenance of standard, as well as, the usual heterogeneity of assayed samples require some evidence of similarity between the dose-response curves obtained with the standard and the sample. Nowadays the parallelism test is used to provide such evidence. However, some indications of non-normal errors distribution, such as the presence of out layers, render the parallelism test both conceptually implausible and statistically inefficient. In such a manner we suggest the non-parametric 'frequencial' test as a more sounding option. (author)

  10. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  11. Assessment of the Effects of Student Response Systems on Student Learning and Attitudes over a Broad Range of Biology Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Preszler, Ralph W.; Dawe, Angus; Shuster, Charles B.; Shuster, Michèle

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of wireless technology, new tools are available that are intended to enhance students' learning and attitudes. To assess the effectiveness of wireless student response systems in the biology curriculum at New Mexico State University, a combined study of student attitudes and performance was undertaken. A survey of students in six biology courses showed that strong majorities of students had favorable overall impressions of the use of student response systems and also thought t...

  12. Evaluation of treatment response for breast cancer: are we entering the era of "biological complete remission"?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bian; Tao Wang; Yi Liu; Hui-Qiang Zhang; Jin-Jie Song; Shao-Hua Zhang; Shi-Kai Wu; San-Tai Song; Ze-Fei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women.The post-operative recurrence and metastasis are the leading causes of breast cancer-related mortality.In this study,we tried to explore the role of circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection combination PET/CT technology evaluating the prognosis and treatment response of patients with breast cancer; meanwhile,we attempted to assess the concept of "biological complete remission" (bCR) in this regard.A 56-year-old patient with breast cancer (T2N1M1,stage Ⅳ left breast cancer,with metastasis to axillary lymph nodes and lungs) received 6 cycles of salvage treatment with albumin-bound paclitaxel plus capecitabine and trastuzumab.Then,she underwent CTC detection and PET/CT for efficacy evaluation.CTC detection combination PET/CT is useful for the evaluation of the biological efficacy of therapies for breast cancer.The bCR of the patient appeared earlier than the conventional clinical imaging complete remission and promised the histological (pathological) complete remission.The integrated application of the concepts including bCR,imageological CR,and histological CR can achieve the early and accurate assessment of biological therapeutic reponse and prognosis of breast cancer.

  13. Purification and biochemical characterization of the complete structure of a proteolytically modified beta-2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Thim, L; Christensen, M

    1987-01-01

    . (1985) Clin. Chem. 31, 1411-1412; Nissen et al. (1984) Clin. Chim. Acta 141, 41-50]. In the present study we describe the purification and characterization of this modified human serum beta-2-m from patients with small-cell lung cancer. Purified urinary beta-2-m was added to the serum samples incubated...... analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical isoelectric focusing respectively. Amino acid analysis of m-beta-2-m revealed that the protein is missing one lysine residue compared to the composition deduced from the cDNA sequence of beta-2-m. Amino acid sequence...

  14. Open water processes of the San Francisco Estuary: From physical forcing to biological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Kimmerer

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the open waters of the San Francisco Estuary. This estuary is well known for the extent to which it has been altered through loss of wetlands, changes in hydrography, and the introduction of chemical and biological contaminants. It is also one of the most studied estuaries in the world, with much of the recent research effort aimed at supporting restoration efforts. In this review I emphasize the conceptual foundations for our current understanding of estuarine dynamics, particularly those aspects relevant to restoration. Several themes run throughout this paper. First is the critical role physical dynamics play in setting the stage for chemical and biological responses. Physical forcing by the tides and by variation in freshwater input combine to control the movement of the salinity field, and to establish stratification, mixing, and dilution patterns throughout the estuary. Many aspects of estuarine dynamics respond to interannual variation in freshwater flow; in particular, abundance of several estuarine-dependent species of fish and shrimp varies positively with flow, although the mechanisms behind these relationships are largely unknown. The second theme is the importance of time scales in determining the degree of interaction between dynamic processes. Physical effects tend to dominate when they operate at shorter time scales than biological processes; when the two time scales are similar, important interactions can arise between physical and biological variability. These interactions can be seen, for example, in the response of phytoplankton blooms, with characteristic time scales of days, to stratification events occurring during neap tides. The third theme is the key role of introduced species in all estuarine habitats; particularly noteworthy are introduced waterweeds and fishes in the tidal freshwater reaches of the estuary, and introduced clams there and in brackish water. The

  15. Biologic response to orthopedic sutures: a histologic study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Brian J; Ochoa, Leah; Rankin, David; Owens, Brett D

    2009-11-01

    Biologic reactivity to suture materials can have an effect on patient outcomes. The goal of this study was to determine the histologic response to 8 commonly used orthopedic sutures--Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey), Ticron (Tyco, Waltham, Massachusetts), HiFi (Linvatec, Largo, Florida), Ultrabraid (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee), MaxBraid (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana), Orthocord (Mitek, Raynham, Massachusetts), MagnumWire (Opus Medical, San Juan Capistrano, California), and FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, Florida)--using a rabbit model. The suture granuloms were evaluated at 30, 60, and 120 days with measurement of the fibrous capsule, the number of giant cells in and near the capsule, and the overall inflammatory grade: 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe). MagnumWire and Ticron sutures initiated a more intense inflammatory reaction when compared to the other sutures. By 120 days, MagnumWire (P=.0297) and Ticron (P=.1855) had fewer giant cells at the soft tissue-suture interface, fewer giant cells within the capsule (P=.0074 and P=.0377, respectively), and the greatest capsular thickness of all suture types (P<.0001 and P=.1378, respectively). Differences exist between the biologic reactivity of commonly used orthopedic sutures that may be attributable to their material composition and/or braid characteristics. In comparison to other high-strength sutures, MagnumWire and Ticron stimulated a more intense foreign body inflammatory response. PMID:19902886

  16. Wear Debris Characterization and Corresponding Biological Response: Artificial Hip and Knee Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md J. Nine

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wear debris, of deferent sizes, shapes and quantities, generated in artificial hip and knees is largely confined to the bone and joint interface. This debris interacts with periprosthetic tissue and may cause aseptic loosening. The purpose of this review is to summarize and collate findings of the recent demonstrations on debris characterization and their biological response that influences the occurrence in implant migration. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature is performed, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria addressing mainly debris isolation, characterization, and biologic responses. Results show that debris characterization largely depends on their appropriate and accurate isolation protocol. The particles are found to be non-uniform in size and non-homogeneously distributed into the periprosthetic tissues. In addition, the sizes, shapes, and volumes of the particles are influenced by the types of joints, bearing geometry, material combination, and lubricant. Phagocytosis of wear debris is size dependent; high doses of submicron-sized particles induce significant level of secretion of bone resorbing factors. However, articles on wear debris from engineered surfaces (patterned and coated are lacking. The findings suggest considering debris morphology as an important parameter to evaluate joint simulator and newly developed implant materials.

  17. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements. PMID:27281436

  18. Biological drugs targeting the immune response in the therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Pastore

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Saveria Pastore1, Emanuela Gubinelli2, Luca Leoni2, Desanka Raskovic2, Liudmila Korkina11Laboratory of Tissue Engineering and Cutaneous Physiopathology; 2Second Dermatology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell’Immacolata, IRCCS, Roma, ItalyAbstract: Chronic plaque psoriasis affects more than 2% of world population, has a chronic recurrent behavior, gives a heavy burden to the patients’ quality of life, and hence remains a huge medical and social problem. The clinical results of conventional therapies of psoriasis are not satisfactory. According to the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular basis of psoriasis, it is defined as an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. A new generation of biological drugs, targeting molecules and cells involved into perturbed pro-inflammatory immune response in the psoriatic skin and joints, has been recently designed and applied clinically. These biological agents are bioengineered proteins such as chimeric and humanized antibodies and fusion proteins. In particular, they comprise the antitumor necrosis factor-α agents etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, with clinical efficacy in both moderate-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the anti-CD11a efalizumab with selective therapeutic action exclusively in the skin. Here, we overview recent findings on the molecular pathways relevant to the inflammatory response in psoriasis and present our clinical experience with the drugs currently employed in the dermatologic manifestations, namely etanercept, infliximab, and efalizumab. The growing body of clinical data on the efficacy and safety of antipsoriasis biological drugs is reviewed as well. Particular focus is given to long-term safety concerns and feasibility of combined therapeutic protocols to ameliorate clinical results.Keywords: psoriasis, immune-mediated inflammation, etanercept, infliximab, efalizumab

  19. Nuclear Receptor Liver X Receptor Is O-GlcNAc-modified in Response to Glucose*

    OpenAIRE

    Anthonisen, Elin Holter; Berven, Lise; Holm, Sverre; Nygård, Maria; Nebb, Hilde I.; Grønning-Wang, Line M.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modification of nucleocytoplasmic proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) has for the last 25 years emerged as an essential glucose-sensing mechanism. The liver X receptors (LXRs) function as nutritional sensors for cholesterol-regulating lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and inflammation. LXRs are shown to be post-translationally modified by phosphorylation, acetylation, and sumoylation, affecting their target gene specificity, stability, and transactiva...

  20. RESPONSE TO AN ASYMMETRIC DEMAND FOR ATTRIBUTES: AN APPLICATION TO THE MARKET FOR GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio H. Lence; Hayes, Dermot J.

    2001-01-01

    A framework is developed for examining the price and welfare effects of the introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops. In the short run, non-GM grain generally becomes another niche product. However, more profound market effects are observed under some reasonable parameterizations. In the long run, consumer and producer welfare are usually greater after the introduction of GM technology. Nevertheless, in all instances some consumers and some producers lose. When identity preservation is...

  1. CONSUMER RESPONSE TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: MARKET SEGMENT ANALYSIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRODUCERS AND POLICY MAKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory A. Baker; Burnham, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Conjoint analysis is used to elicit consumer preferences for attributes of genetically modified foods. Market segments are identified based on a cluster analysis of respondents' preferences for brand, price, and GMO content. A logit analysis is used to analyze consumer characteristics associated with the acceptance of GMO foods. Those consumers who were most risk averse, most likely to believe that GMOs improved the quality or safety of food, and most knowledgeable about biotechnology were th...

  2. Degradation of biological weapons agents in the environment: implications for terrorism response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Amy L; Wilkening, Dean A

    2005-04-15

    We investigate the impact on effective terrorism response of the viability degradation of biological weapons agents in the environment. We briefly review the scientific understanding and modeling of agent environmental viability degradation. In general, agent susceptibility to viability loss is greatest for vegetative bacteria, intermediate for viruses, and least for bacterial spores. Survival is greatest in soil and progressively decreases in the following environments: textiles, water, hard surfaces, and air. There is little detailed understanding of loss mechanisms. We analyze the time behavior and sensitivity of four mathematical models that are used to represent environmental viability degradation (the exponential, probability, and first- and second-order catastrophic decay models). The models behave similarly at short times (representation of the hazard. For longer time phenomena, including decontamination, the current model capabilities are likely insufficient. Finally, we implement each model in a simple numerical integration of anthrax dispersion, viability degradation, and dose response. Decay models spanning the current knowledge of airborne degradation result in vastly different predicted hazard areas. This confounds attempts to determine necessary medical and decontamination measures. Hence,the current level of understanding and representation of environmental viability degradation in response models is inadequate to inform appropriate emergency response measures. PMID:15884371

  3. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  4. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ae KIM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSome weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved.Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements.Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol% of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitrorat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC.Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05 and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs.Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials.

  5. Populus Responses to Edaphic and Climatic Cues: Emerging Evidence from Systems Biology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Davis, John M [University of Florida

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of Populus as a model system for tree biology continues to be driven by a community of scientists dedicated to developing the resources needed to undertake genetic and functional genomic studies in this genus. As a result, understanding the molecular processes that underpin the growth and development of cottonwood, aspen, and hybrid poplar has steadily increased over the last several decades. Recently, our ability to examine the basic mechanisms whereby trees respond to a changing climate and resource limitations has benefited greatly from the sequencing of the P. trichocarpa genome. This landmark event has laid a solid foundation upon which biologists can now quantify, in breathtaking and unprecedented detail, the diversity of genes, proteins, and metabolites that govern the growth and development of some of the longest living and tallest growing organisms on Earth. Although the challenges likely to be encountered by scientists who work with trees are many, recent literature provides a few examples where a systems approach, one that focuses on integrating transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses, is beginning to provide insights into the molecular-scale response of poplars to their climatic and edaphic environment. In this review, our objectives are to look at evidence from studies that examine the molecular response of poplar to edaphic and climatic cues and highlight instances where two or more omic-scale measurements confirm and hopefully expand our inferences about mechanisms contributing to observed patterns of response. Based on conclusions drawn from these studies, we propose that three requirements will be essential as systems biology in poplar moves to reveal unique insights. These include use of genetically-defined individuals (e.g., pedigrees or transgenics) in studies; incorporation of modeling as a complement to transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data; and inclusion of whole-tree and stand-level phenotypes to place

  6. Linking Biological Responses of Terrestrial N Eutrophication to the Final Ecosystem Goods and Services Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Clark, C.; Blett, T.

    2015-12-01

    The response of a biological indicator to N deposition can indicate that an ecosystem has surpassed a critical load and is at risk of significant change. The importance of this exceedance is often difficult to digest by policy makers and public audiences if the change is not linked to a familiar ecosystem endpoint. A workshop was held to bring together scientists, resource managers, and policy makers with expertise in ecosystem functioning, critical loads, and economics in an effort to identify the ecosystem services impacted by air pollution. This was completed within the framework of the Final Ecosystem Goods and Services (FEGS) Classification System to produce a product that identified distinct interactions between society and the effects of nitrogen pollution. From each change in a biological indicator, we created multiple ecological production functions to identify the cascading effects of the change to a measureable ecosystem service that a user interacts with either by enjoying, consuming, or appreciating the good or service, or using it as an input in the human economy. This FEGS metric was then linked to a beneficiary group that interacts with the service. Chains detailing the links from the biological indicator to the beneficiary group were created for aquatic and terrestrial acidification and eutrophication at the workshop, and here we present a subset of the workshop results by highlighting for 9 different ecosystems affected by terrestrial eutrophication. A total of 213 chains that linked to 37 unique FEGS metrics and impacted 15 beneficiary groups were identified based on nitrogen deposition mediated changes to biological indicators. The chains within each ecosystem were combined in flow charts to show the complex, overlapping relationships among biological indicators, ecosystem services, and beneficiary groups. Strength of relationship values were calculated for each chain based on support for the link in the scientific literature. We produced the

  7. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    variable reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing......In spite of the fact that our knowledge on the release mechanisms of the surgical stress response is rather incomplete, several techniques are available to modulate the response. However, at present it appears that no technique is capable to effectively suppress all aspects of the injury response...... and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a...

  8. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  9. Responses in sediment phosphorus and lanthanum concentrations and composition across 10 lakes following applications of lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lürling, Miquel;

    2016-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory scale study of 10 European lakes treated between 2006 and 2013 with a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite (LMB) to control sediment phosphorus (P) release was conducted. The study followed the responses in sediment characteristics including La and P fractions and...... were also reported, in the earliest treated lake. Molar ratios between La and P in the sediments were generally above 1, demonstrating excess La relative to P. Lanthanum was vertically mixed in the sediment down to a depth of 10 cm for eight of the ten lakes, and recovery of La in excess of 100% of the...

  10. Epigenetic Mechanisms Shape the Biological Response to Trauma and Risk for PTSD: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Heinzelmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD develops in approximately one-quarter of trauma-exposed individuals, leading us and others to question the mechanisms underlying this heterogeneous response to trauma. We suggest that the reasons for the heterogeneity relate to a complex interaction between genes and the environment, shaping each individual’s recovery trajectory based on both historical and trauma-specific variables. Epigenetic modifications provide a unique opportunity to elucidate how preexisting risk factors may contribute to PTSD risk through changes in the methylation of DNA. Preexisting risks for PTSD, including depression, stress, and trauma, result in differential DNA methylation of endocrine genes, which may then result in a different biological responses to trauma and subsequently a greater risk for PTSD onset. Although these relationships are complex and currently inadequately described, we provide a critical review of recent studies to examine how differences in genetic and proteomic biomarkers shape an individual’s vulnerability to PTSD development, thereby contributing to a heterogeneous response to trauma.

  11. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M Campa

    Full Text Available The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  12. Do interviewers health beliefs and habits modify responses to sensitive questions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Olsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    through computer-assisted telephone interviews. The authors compared interviewer characteristics for 34 interviewers with the responses they obtained in 12,910 interviews carried out for the Danish National Birth Cohort Study. Response data on smoking and alcohol consumption in the first trimester of...... pregnancy were collected during the time period October 1, 1997-February 1, 1999. Overall, the authors found little evidence to suggest that interviewers' personal habits or attitudes toward smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy had consequences for the responses they obtained; neither did the...

  13. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB)-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D)2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic) mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-¿ release, and antibody induction. Gal...... abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells....

  14. Maternal responsiveness: biological aspects and cultural variations / Responsividade materna: aspectos biológicos e variações culturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ferreira Paes Ribas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to critically discuss some biological aspects and cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. It consists of two parts. The first discusses responsiveness and its biological aspects and cultural variations. The second part presents two major research tendencies in the investigations of cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. Our conclusion presents a brief of the critical arguments and highlights the need to recognize that maternal responsiveness is one of the adult-child interaction characteristics that has multiple origins and influences, from which any investigation in this theme must be based on. As a consequence, those initiatives should be included in a wide reference system that involves, for example, biological, contextual, dyads previous history, and cultural variables.

  15. Biologically relevant 3D tumor arrays: treatment response and the importance of stromal partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Xu, Feng; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Muzikansky, Alona; Elrington, Stefan A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Demirci, Utkan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-02-01

    The development and translational potential of therapeutic strategies for cancer is limited, in part, by a lack of biological models that capture important aspects of tumor growth and treatment response. It is also becoming increasingly evident that no single treatment will be curative for this complex disease. Rationally-designed combination regimens that impact multiple targets provide the best hope of significantly improving clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Rapidly identifying treatments that cooperatively enhance treatment efficacy from the vast library of candidate interventions is not feasible, however, with current systems. There is a vital, unmet need to create cell-based research platforms that more accurately mimic the complex biology of human tumors than monolayer cultures, while providing the ability to screen therapeutic combinations more rapidly than animal models. We have developed a highly reproducible in vitro three-dimensional (3D) tumor model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer (OvCa), which in conjunction with quantitative image analysis routines to batch-process large datasets, serves as a high throughput reporter to screen rationally-designed combination regimens. We use this system to assess mechanism-based combination regimens with photodynamic therapy (PDT), which sensitizes OvCa to chemo and biologic agents, and has shown promise in clinic trials. We show that PDT synergistically enhances carboplatin efficacy in a sequence dependent manner. In printed heterocellular cultures we demonstrate that proximity of fibroblasts enhances 3D tumor growth and investigate co-cultures with endothelial cells. The principles described here could inform the design and evaluation of mechanism-based therapeutic options for a broad spectrum of metastatic solid tumors.

  16. The response of tidal morphologies to changing physical and biological forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, A.; da Lio, C.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    In times of natural climate changes and human interferences, tidal ecosystems are most exposed to possibly irreversible transformations, with far-reaching ecological, economical and social implications worldwide. Relative sea-level fluctuations, changes in nutrient and sediment loading, and ecological characteristics expose tidal ecosystems to responses which may or may not be reversible. Improving our understanding of the chief landforming processes which drive their morphogenesis and long-term evolution, is deemed to be a subject of leading theoretical and practical importance. We have modelled the joint evolution of tidal landforms and biota including the dynamics of intertidal vegetation, benthic microbial assemblages, erosional and depositional processes, local and general hydrodynamics, and relative sea-level change. Alternative stable states and punctuated equilibrium dynamics emerge, characterized by possible sudden transitions of the system, governed by vegetation type, disturbances of the benthic biofilm, sediment availability, wind climate, local hydrodynamics, and the vagaries of relative sea level rise. The existence of feedbacks between physical and biological processes affect trajectories characterizing the evolution of these ecosystems and the reversibility of such trajectories. They highlight the importance of the coupling between biological and sediment transport processes in determining the evolution of a tidal system as a whole.

  17. Dithizone chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhefeng; Zhou, Wei

    2006-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3 σ) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% ( c = 0.2 μg/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  18. Dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Zhefeng [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)]. E-mail: zhefengfan@163.com; Zhou Wei [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2006-07-15

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3{sigma}) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% (c = 0.2 {mu}g/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  19. Performance of a modified multi-stage bubble column reactor for lead(II) and biological oxygen demand removal from wastewater using activated rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excessive release of wastewater into the environment is a major concern worldwide. Adsorption is the one of the most effective technique for treatment of wastewater. In this work activated carbon prepared from rice husk has been used as an adsorbent. In the present investigation a three phase modified multi-stage bubble column reactor (MMBCR) has been designed to remove lead and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) from wastewater by means of its adsorption onto the surface of activated rice husk. The multi-staging has been achieved by hydrodynamically induced continuous bubble generation, breakup and regeneration. Under optimum conditions, maximum lead and BOD reduction achieved using activated rice husk was 77.15% and 19.05%, respectively. Results showed MMBCR offered appreciated potential benefits for lead removal from wastewater and BOD removal, even this extent of removal is encouraging and the MMBCR can be used a pretreatment unit before subjecting the wastewater to biological treatment

  20. Fructose modifies the hormonal response and modulates lipid metabolism in aerobic exercise after glucose supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Juan Marcelo; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; Ruano-Ruiz, Juan; Caballero-Villarraso, Javier; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Tunez-Fiñana, Isaac; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martinez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The metabolic response, when aerobic exercise is performed after the ingestion of glucose plus fructose, is unclear. To compare the hormonal and lipid responses provoked by the ingestion of glucose plus fructose in relation to glucose alone, during aerobic exercise and the recovery phase, we administered two beverages containing glucose plus fructose or glucose in a randomised crossover design, to twenty healthy, aerobically trained volunteers. After a 15-minute resting pe...

  1. A simulation method for determining the optical response of highly complex photonic structures of biological origin

    CERN Document Server

    Dolinko, Andrés E

    2013-01-01

    We present a method based on a time domain simulation of wave propagation that allows studying the optical response of a broad range of dielectric photonic structures. This method is particularly suitable for dealing with complex biological structures. One of the main features of the proposed approach is the simple and intuitive way of defining the setup and the photonic structure to be simulated, which can be done by feeding the simulation with a digital image of the structure. We also develop a set of techniques to process the behavior of the evolving waves within the simulation. These techniques include a direction filter, that permits decoupling of waves travelling simultaneously in different directions, a dynamic differential absorber, to cancel the waves reflected at the edges of the simulation space, a multi-frequency excitation scheme based on a filter that allows decoupling waves of different wavelengths travelling simultaneously, and a near-to-far-field approach to evaluate the resulting wavefield o...

  2. Microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological response to functionally graded HA coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] is the primary mineral content, representing 43% by weight, of bone. Applying a thin layer of HA, to the surface of a metal implant, can promote osseointegration and increase the mechanical stability of the implant. In this study, a biocompatible coating comprising an HA film with functionally graded crystallinity is being deposited on a heated substrate in an Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) system. The microstructure of the film was studied using Transmission Electron Microscopy techniques. Finally, initial cell adhesion and cell differentiation on the coating was evaluated using ATCC CRL 1486 human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cell, an osteoblast precursor cell line. The results have shown superior mechanical properties and biological response to the functionally graded HA film

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological response to functionally graded HA coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, 3211 Broughton Hall, 2601 Stinson Dr., Campus Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)]. E-mail: arabiei@eos.ncsu.edu; Blalock, Travis [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, 3211 Broughton Hall, 2601 Stinson Dr., Campus Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States); Thomas, Brent [Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Cuomo, Jerry [Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Yang, Y. [Biomedical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., Suite 1005, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Ong, Joo [Biomedical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., Suite 1005, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}] is the primary mineral content, representing 43% by weight, of bone. Applying a thin layer of HA, to the surface of a metal implant, can promote osseointegration and increase the mechanical stability of the implant. In this study, a biocompatible coating comprising an HA film with functionally graded crystallinity is being deposited on a heated substrate in an Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) system. The microstructure of the film was studied using Transmission Electron Microscopy techniques. Finally, initial cell adhesion and cell differentiation on the coating was evaluated using ATCC CRL 1486 human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cell, an osteoblast precursor cell line. The results have shown superior mechanical properties and biological response to the functionally graded HA film.

  4. Using of ants and earthworm to modify of soil biological quality and its effect on cocoa seedlings growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilowasid, Laode Muhammad Harjoni; Budianto, Wayan; Syaf, Hasbullah; Tufaila, Muhammad; Safuan, La Ode

    2015-09-01

    Ant and earthworm can act as soil ecosystem engineers. Ant and earthworm are very dominant in smallholder cocoa plantation. The first experiment aimed to study the effect of the abundance of ants and earthworms on soil microbial activity and microfauna, and the second experiment to analyse the effect of soil modified by ants and earthworms on the cocoa seedlings growth. Ant (Ponera sp.) and earthworm (Pontoscolex sp.) collected from smallholder cocoa plantation, and kept in a container up to applied. In the first experiment, nine combinations of the abundance of ants and earthworms applied to each pot containing 3 kg of soil from smallholder cocoa plantation, and each combination of the abundance was repeated five times in a completely randomized design. After the soil was incubated for thirty days, ants and earthworms removed from the soil using hand sorting techniques. Soil from each pot was analysed for soil microbial activity, abundance of flagellates and nematodes. In the second experiment, the soil in each pot was planted with cocoa seedlings and maintained up to ninety days. The results showed the FDA hydrolytic activity of microbes, the abundance of flagellates and nematodes between the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms have been significantly different. Dry weight of root, shoot and seedling cacao have been significantly different between the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms. It was concluded that the combination of the abundance of ants and earthworms can be used in ecological engineering to improve soil quality.

  5. Modified arteriolar responses to ATP after impairment of endothelium by light-dye techniques in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, A.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wolin, M.S.; Messina, E.J.; Kaley, G. (Department of Physiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla (USA))

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether endothelial cells are involved in the dilation of third-order arterioles (14 to 22 microns) in response to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cremaster muscle of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Two light/dye (L/D) techniques were employed to achieve selective, local endothelial impairment. One of these techniques utilizes a mercury lamp and sodium fluorescein, the other a Helium-Neon laser and Evans blue dye. L/D treatment (illumination with the appropriate wavelengths of light in the presence of an intravascular dye) of a 20-to 100-microns segment of an arteriole resulted in a complete loss of arteriolar dilation in response to topical administration of acetylcholine (10(-6) M) and arachidonic acid (AA, 10(-5) M). These agents were applied in 100-microl aliquots without interrupting the continuous suffusion with Ringer-gelatin solution and caused a {approximately} 70% increase in vascular diameter before the L/D intervention. Selectivity of the impairment was assessed by arteriolar responses to the nonendothelium-dependent dilator agents adenosine (10(-5) M) and sodium nitroprusside (2 {times} 10(-7) M), which elicited the same degree of dilation before and after L/D treatment. Under control conditions ATP (10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M) elicited dose-dependent increases in arteriolar diameter (from 38 to 74%). After impairment of arteriolar endothelium, dilation in response to all doses of ATP was significantly reduced. Theophylline (30 microM) significantly inhibited arteriolar dilation in response to adenosine (10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M) but did not affect the responses to various doses of ATP. Moreover, impairment of endothelium enhanced constrictor responses of arterioles to norepinephrine (0.6 {times} 10(-8) M).

  6. An in vivo study of bone response to implants topographically modified by laser micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Carin; Reimers, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko; Gold, Julie; Wennerberg, Ann

    2003-02-01

    Dental implants topographically modified by laser ablation of periodic arrays of micron-sized craters, were studied in a two-part laboratory investigation. The patterned and control (turned) implants were inserted in rabbit femur and tibia. After 12 weeks the fixation in the bone was evaluated mechanically or by histomorphometry (all threads along the implant and the three best consecutive threads were analysed). In the pilot study no difference was found with respect to bone-to-implant contact and peak removal torque. Significantly more bone was found for the control implants when measuring the bone area inside the threads in the tibia. In the second part of the study, the pattern was improved and significantly more bone-to-implant contact was found for the laser-machined implants. The second part of the study also demonstrated significantly greater peak removal torque values in the tibia with the test implants than the control implants. PMID:12485789

  7. Human procollagen type I surface-modified PHB-based non-woven textile scaffolds for cell growth: preparation and short-term biological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D fine porous structures obtained by electrospinning a poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (aPHB)/ poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) (85/15 w/w) blend were successfully modified with human procollagen type I by simple immersion of the polyester scaffold in an aqueous solution of the protein. Effective modification of the scaffold with human procollagen I was confirmed by an immunodetection test, which revealed the presence of the procollagen type I as an outer layer even on inner structures of the porous matrixes. Biological tests of 3D fabrics made of the PHB blend provide support for the adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts, while their modification with procollagen type I increased the biocompatibility of the final scaffolds significantly, as shown by the notable increase in the number of attached cells during the early hours of their incubation. Based on these findings, human procollagen type I surface-modified aPHB/PHB scaffolds should be considered a promising material in regenerative medicine. (paper)

  8. Modified linear response for time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to Rydberg and charge-transfer excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an improved ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) approach to electronic excitations. A conventional TDDFT scheme within the local-density approximation (LDA) inaccurately predicts Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies, mainly because the electron-hole (e-h) interaction is inappropriately described in these excitations, as can be found by analyzing the linear response formula [M. Petersilka, U. J. Gossmann, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1212 (1996)]. When the formula is averaged over the electron occupation, the inappropriate e-h interaction within LDA is corrected to become explicitly similar to that of the exact exchange system. As anticipated from the similarity, our proposed scheme of modified linear response greatly improves the prediction of the problematic excitations, which are exemplified for typical molecules

  9. RELIABILITY AND RESPONSIVENESS OF THE DANISH MODIFIED INTERNATIONAL KNEE DOCUMENTATION COMMITTEE SUBJECTIVE KNEE FORM FOR CHILDREN WITH KNEE DISORDERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Knudsen, Pernille; Fynbo, Charlotte;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The modified international Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (Pedi-IKDC) is a widely used patient-reported tool applicable for children with knee disorders ranging on a scale from 0-100. We aimed to translate the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form into Danish, and...... furthermore to assess its reliability and responsiveness. Material and Methods The Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form was translated to Danish according to international guidelines. Reliability was assessed with Bland Altman plots, standard error of measurement (SEM), Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) and the Intra....... Reliability and responsiveness were assessed in 50 children (median 15 years) referred to hospital due to different knee disorders. Results The SEM was 4.2 points and the MDC was 11.5 points. The ICC was 0.91 (0.9-1.0). The change score of the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee form was correlated to the external...

  10. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Corcoran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2 were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1 were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734 contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi at C-24 of 1,25D2. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D2 and 1,25D3, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734. However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D2. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733 or more (52% for PRI-1732 resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist.

  11. Space radiation-induced bystander effect: kinetics of biologic responses, mechanisms, and significance of secondary radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widespread evidence indicates that exposure of cell cultures to a particles results in significant biological changes in both the irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells in the population. The induction of non-targeted biological responses in cell cultures exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation and to radiotherapy. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the induction of stressful effects in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to low fluences of 1000 MeV/u iron ions (linear energy transfer (LET) 151 keV/μm), 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET 50 keV/μm) or 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET 13 keV/μm). We compared the results with those obtained in cell cultures exposed, in parallel, to low fluences of 0.92 MeV/u a particles (LET 109 keV/μm). Induction of DNA damage, changes in gene expression, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation during 24 h after exposure of confluent cultures to mean doses as low as 0.2 cGy of iron or silicon ions strongly supported the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to bystander cells. At a mean dose of 0.2 cGy, only 1 and 3 % of the cells would be targeted through the nucleus by an iron or silicon ion, respectively. Within 24 h post-irradiation, immunoblot analyses revealed significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (also known as CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation. The magnitude of the responses suggested participation of non-targeted cells in the response. Furthermore, when the irradiated cell populations were subcultured in fresh medium shortly after irradiation, greater than expected increases in the levels of these markers were also observed during 24 h. Together, the results imply a rapidly propagated and persistent bystander effect. In situ analyses in confluent cultures showed 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage, in

  12. Use of intrinsic modes in biology: Examples of indicial response of pulmonary blood pressure to ± step hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wei; Shen, Zheng; Huang, Norden E.; Fung, Yuan Cheng

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new method to analyze biological nonstationary stochastic variables has been presented. The method is especially suitable to analyze the variation of one biological variable with respect to changes of another variable. Here, it is illustrated by the change of the pulmonary blood pressure in response to a step change of oxygen concentration in the gas that an animal breathes. The pressure signal is resolved into the sum of a set of oscillatory intrinsic mode functions, which have z...

  13. Back muscle response to sudden trunk loading can be modified by training among healthcare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Essendrop, Morten; Skotte, Jørgen H.;

    2007-01-01

    the trunk (stopping time). Data on the possibilities of a training-induced improvement in the reflex response among workers exposed to sudden trunk loading on the job are, however, nonexistent, and there is no evidence of long-term benefits, i.e., the sustainability of a positive training effect...

  14. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation. PMID:26084921

  15. Apolipoprotein B genetic variants modify the response to fenofibrate: a GOLDN study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertriglyceridemia, defined as a triglyceride measurement > 150 mg/dl, occurs in up to 34% of adults. Fenofibrate is a commonly used drug to treat hypertriglyceridemia, but response to fenofibrate varies considerably among individuals. We sought to determine if genetic variation in apolipoprotein...

  16. Improved Detection of Time Windows of Brain Responses in Fmri Using Modified Temporal Clustering Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) has been proposed recently as a method to detect time windows of brain responses in functional MRI (fMRI) studies when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown. Modifications to the TCA technique are introduced in this report to further improve the sensitivity in detecting brain activation.

  17. SCLC extensive disease – treatment guidance by extent or/and biology of response?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In extensive disease of small cell lung cancer a doubling of the one-year-survival rate was reported in August 2007 by prophylactic cranial irradiation applied to patients who experienced any response to initial chemotherapy. We discuss the treatment concept of extensive disease in the face of the latest results and older studies with additional thoracic irradiation in this subgroup. A randomized trial with prophylactic cranial irradiation published in 1999 demonstrated an improvement of 5-year-overall-survival for complete responders (at least at distant levels) receiving additional thoracic radiochemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone (9.1% vs. 3.7%). But, these results were almost neglected and thoracic radiotherapy was not further investigated for good responders of extensive disease. However, in the light of current advances by prophylactic cranial irradiation these findings are noteworthy on all accounts. Considering both, a possible interpretation of these data could be a survival benefit of local control by simultaneous thoracic radiochemotherapy in the case of improved distant control due to chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. Furthermore the question arises whether the tumor biology indicated by the response to chemotherapy should be integrated in the present classification

  18. Data compilation on the biological response to ocean acidification: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Hansson, L.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    The exponential growth of studies on the biological response to ocean acidification over the last few decades has generated a large amount of data. To facilitate data comparison, a data compilation hosted at the data publisher PANGAEA was initiated in 2008 and is updated on a regular basis (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.149999). By January 2015, a total of 581 data sets (over 4 000 000 data points) from 539 papers had been archived. Here we present the developments of this data compilation 5 years since its first description by Nisumaa et al. (2010). Most of the study sites from which data have been archived are in the Northern Hemisphere and the number of archived data from studies from the Southern Hemisphere and polar oceans is still relatively low. Data from 60 studies that investigated the response of a mix of organisms or natural communities were all added after 2010, indicating a welcome shift from the study of individual organisms to communities and ecosystems. The initial imbalance of considerably more data archived on calcification and primary production than on other processes has improved. There is also a clear tendency towards more data archived from multifactorial studies after 2010. For easier and more effective access to ocean acidification data, the ocean acidification community is strongly encouraged to contribute to the data archiving effort, and help develop standard vocabularies describing the variables and define best practices for archiving ocean acidification data.

  19. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  20. Data compilation on the biological response to ocean acidification: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The exponential growth of studies on the biological response to ocean acidification over the last few decades has generated a large amount of data. To facilitate data comparison, a data compilation hosted at the data publisher PANGAEA was initiated in 2008 and is updated on a regular basis (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.149999. By January 2015, a total of 581 data sets (over 4 000 000 data points from 539 papers had been archived. Here we present the developments of this data compilation five years since its first description by Nisumaa et al. (2010. Most of study sites from which data archived are still in the Northern Hemisphere and the number of archived data from studies from the Southern Hemisphere and polar oceans are still relatively low. Data from 60 studies that investigated the response of a mix of organisms or natural communities were all added after 2010, indicating a welcomed shift from the study of individual organisms to communities and ecosystems. The initial imbalance of considerably more data archived on calcification and primary production than on other processes has improved. There is also a clear tendency towards more data archived from multifactorial studies after 2010. For easier and more effective access to ocean acidification data, the ocean acidification community is strongly encouraged to contribute to the data archiving effort, and help develop standard vocabularies describing the variables and define best practices for archiving ocean acidification data.

  1. Self-assembling multidomain peptides tailor biological responses through biphasic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Shi, Siyu; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C; D'Souza, Rena N; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Delivery of small molecules and drugs to tissues is a mainstay of several tissue engineering strategies. Next generation treatments focused on localized drug delivery offer a more effective means in dealing with refractory healing when compared to systemic approaches. Here we describe a novel multidomain peptide hydrogel that capitalizes on synthetic peptide chemistry, supramolecular self-assembly and cytokine delivery to tailor biological responses. This material is biomimetic, shows shear stress recovery and offers a nanofibrous matrix that sequesters cytokines. The biphasic pattern of cytokine release results in the spatio-temporal activation of THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, macrophage-material interactions are promoted without generation of a proinflammatory environment. Subcutaneous implantation of injectable scaffolds showed a marked increase in macrophage infiltration and polarization dictated by cytokine loading as early as 3 days, with complete scaffold resorption by day 14. Macrophage interaction and response to the peptide composite facilitated the (i) recruitment of monocytes/macrophages, (ii) sustained residence of immune cells until degradation, and (iii) promotion of a pro-resolution M2 environment. Our results suggest the potential use of this injectable cytokine loaded hydrogel scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:25818414

  2. Optimization of integrated chemical-biological degradation of a reactive azo dye using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrated chemical-biological degradation combining advanced oxidation by UV/H2O2 followed by aerobic biodegradation was used to degrade C.I. Reactive Azo Red 195A, commonly used in the textile industry in Australia. An experimental design based on the response surface method was applied to evaluate the interactive effects of influencing factors (UV irradiation time, initial hydrogen peroxide dosage and recirculation ratio of the system) on decolourisation efficiency and optimizing the operating conditions of the treatment process. The effects were determined by the measurement of dye concentration and soluble chemical oxygen demand (S-COD). The results showed that the dye and S-COD removal were affected by all factors individually and interactively. Maximal colour degradation performance was predicted, and experimentally validated, with no recirculation, 30 min UV irradiation and 500 mg H2O2/L. The model predictions for colour removal, based on a three-factor/five-level Box-Wilson central composite design and the response surface method analysis, were found to be very close to additional experimental results obtained under near optimal conditions. This demonstrates the benefits of this approach in achieving good predictions while minimising the number of experiments required

  3. Regulatory and biosafety issues in relation to transgenic animals in food and agriculture, feeds containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) and veterinary biologics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of an effective regulatory system for genetically engineered animals and their products has been the subject of increasing discussion among researchers, industry and policy developers, as well as the public. Since transgenesis and cloning are relatively new scientific techniques, transgenic animals are new organisms for which there is limited information. The issues associated with the regulation and biosafety of transgenic animals pertain to environmental impact, human food safety, animal health and welfare, trade and ethics. To regulate this new and powerful technology predicated on limited background information is a challenge not only for the regulators, but also for the developers of such animals, who strive to prove that the animals are safe and merit bio-equivalency to their conventional counterparts. In principle, an effective regulatory sieve should permit safe products while forming a formidable barrier for those assessed of posing an unacceptable risk. Adoption of transgenic technology for use in agriculture will depend upon various factors that range from perceived benefits for humans and animals, to safe propagation, animal welfare considerations and integrity of species, as well as effects on bio-diversity. A regulatory framework designed to address the concerns connected with the environmental release of transgenic animals needs to also take into account the ability of genetically modified animals to survive and compete with conventional populations. Regulatory initiatives for biotechnology-derived animals and their products should ensure high standards for human and animal health; a sound scientific basis for evaluation; transparency and public involvement; and maintenance of genetic diversity. Feeds obtained by use of biotechnology have to be evaluated for animal and human safety by using parameters that define their molecular characterization, nutritional qualities and toxicological aspects, while veterinary biologics derived from

  4. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions. PMID:26998798

  5. Voltammetric Response of Epinephrine at Carbon Nanotube Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode and Activated Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Juan; TANG Ping; ZHAO Fa-qiong; ZENG Bai-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of epinephrine at activated glassy carbon electrode and carbon nanotube-coated glassy carbon electrode was studied. Epinephrine could exhibit an anodic peak at about 0.2 V (vs. SCE) at bare glassy carbon electrode, but it was very small.However, when the electrode was activated at certain potential (i. e. 1.9V) or modified with carbon nanotube, the peak became more sensitive,resulting from the increase in electrode area in addition to the electrostatic attraction. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to epinephrine concentration in the range of 3.3 × 10-7-1.1 × 10-5mol/L at activated glassy carbon electrode and in the range of 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-5 mol/L at carbon nanotube-coated electrode. The correlation coefficients were 0. 998 and 0. 997, respectively. The determination limit was 1.0 × 10-7 mol/L. The two electrodes have been successfully applied for the determination of epinephrine in adrenaline hydrochloride injection with recovery of 95%-104%.

  6. Optoelectronic Response of GeZn2O4 through the Modified Becke—Johnson Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first-principles technique capable of describing the nearly excited states of semiconductors and insulators, namely the modified Becke—Johnson (mBJ) potential approximation, is used to investigate the electronic band structure and optical properties of spinel oxides: GeZn2O4. The predicted band gaps using the mBJ approximation are significantly more accurate than the proposed previous theoretical work using the common LDA and GGA. Band gap dependent optical parameters, like the dielectric constant, index of refraction, reflectivity and optical conductivity are calculated and analyzed. The results from the dielectric constant shows that the numerical value of the static dielectric, after dropping constantly, becomes less than zero and the material exhibits metallic behavior. The refractive index also drops below unity for photons higher than 18 eV, which indicates that the velocities of incident photons are greater than the velocity of light. However, these phenomena can be explained by the fact that a signal must be transmitted as a wave packet rather than a monochromatic wave. This comprehensive theoretical study of the optoelectronic properties predicts that these materials can effectively be used in optical devices

  7. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals. PMID:25764477

  8. Methods to actively modify the dynamic response of cm-scale FWMAV designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H. J.; Goosen, J. F. L.; van Keulen, F.

    2016-05-01

    Lightweight vibrating structures (such as flapping wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV) designs) often require some form of control. To achieve controllability, local structural property changes (e.g., damping and stiffness changes) might be induced in an active manner. The stroke-averaged lift force production of a FWMAV wing can be modified by changing the structural properties of that wing at carefully selected places (e.g., changing the properties of the elastic hinge at the wing root as studied in this work). To actively change the structural properties, we investigate three different methods which are based on: (1) piezoelectric polymers, (2) electrorheological fluids, and (3) electrostatic softening. This work aims to gain simple yet insightful ways to determine the potential of these methods without focusing on the precise modeling. Analytical models of FWMAV wing designs that include control approaches based on these three methods are used to calculate the achievable lift force modifications after activating these methods. The lift force production as a result of a wing flapping motion is determined using a quasi-steady aerodynamic model. Both piezoelectric polymers and electrostatic softening are found to be promising in changing the structural properties and, hence, the lift force production of FWMAV wings. For the control of lightweight FWMAV designs, numerical simulations reveal a promising roll maneuverability due to the induced lift force difference between a pair of opposite wings. Although applied to a specific FWMAV design, this work is relevant for control of small, lightweight, possible compliant, vibrating structures in general.

  9. A systems biology approach to the characterization of stress response in Dermacentor reticulatus tick unfed larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Villar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius, 1794 is distributed in Europe and Asia where it infests and transmits disease-causing pathogens to humans, pets and other domestic and wild animals. However, despite its role as a vector of emerging or re-emerging diseases, very little information is available on the genome, transcriptome and proteome of D. reticulatus. Tick larvae are the first developmental stage to infest hosts, acquire infection and transmit pathogens that are transovarially transmitted and are exposed to extremely stressing conditions. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to get an insight into the mechanisms active in D. reticulatus unfed larvae, with special emphasis on stress response. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results support the use of paired end RNA sequencing and proteomics informed by transcriptomics (PIT for the analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics data, particularly for organisms such as D. reticulatus with little sequence information available. The results showed that metabolic and cellular processes involved in protein synthesis were the most active in D. reticulatus unfed larvae, suggesting that ticks are very active during this life stage. The stress response was activated in D. reticulatus unfed larvae and a Rickettsia sp. similar to R. raoultii was identified in these ticks. SIGNIFICANCE: The activation of stress responses in D. reticulatus unfed larvae likely counteracts the negative effect of temperature and other stress conditions such as Rickettsia infection and favors tick adaptation to environmental conditions to increase tick survival. These results show mechanisms that have evolved in D. reticulatus ticks to survive under stress conditions and suggest that these mechanisms are conserved across hard tick species. Targeting some of these proteins by vaccination may increase tick susceptibility to natural stress conditions, which in turn reduce tick survival and reproduction, thus reducing

  10. Phytoplankton response to winter warming modified by large-bodied zooplankton: an experimental microcosm study

    OpenAIRE

    Hu He; Xiaolong Zhu; Xiaolan Song; Erik Jeppesen; Zhengwen Liu

    2015-01-01

    While several field investigations have demonstrated significant effects of cool season (winter or spring) warming on phytoplankton development, the role played by large-bodied zooplankton grazers for the responses of phytoplankton to winter warming is ambiguous. We conducted an outdoor experiment to compare the effect of winter warming (heating by 3°C) in combination with presence and absence of Daphnia grazing (D. similis) on phytoplankton standing crops and community structure under eutrop...

  11. Tofacitinib for acute rheumatoid arthritis patients who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingming; Liang, Fuxiang; Yin, Xiaoxue; Xiao, Xiaojuan; Shi, Peiyu; Wei, Dang; Yao, Liang; Wang, Qi; Chen, Yaolong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib for the treatment of patients with acute rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE (1966-2013), Embase (1947-2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1948-2013), WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform (2004-2013), Clinical Trial.gov (1999-2013), and China Biology Medicine disc (1978-2013). The review included 10 studies involving 4,929 patients. A pooled analysis of six studies showed that tofacitinib had a superior effect over placebo (both with background therapy) at weeks 12 and 24. Also, the pooled results of three studies showed that tofacitinib monotherapy had a significantly greater effect over placebo. Compared to adalimumab, tofacitinib was found to be more efficacious as well. For safety, tofacitinib monotherapy had less serious adverse events (sAE) than placebo but not other adverse effects (oAE). In the comparison of tofacitinib and placebo both with background therapy, no difference in sAE and oAE were found. However, the quality of the evidence was quite low when evaluated using GRADE. Tofacitinib alone, or together with non-biologic DMARDs, was associated with more favorable remission in the signs and symptoms of RA than adalimumab or placebo. Also, tofacitinib monotherapy was safer than placebo with regards to reported sAE, but not oAE. However, the quality of evidence is exceedingly low; long-term, large-scale, and high-quality post-marketing research is suggested to further verify the conclusion. PMID:24389749

  12. The Cortisol Awakening Response Using Modified Proposed Method of Forecasting Based on Fuzzy Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. P. Senthil Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of data suggests that a significantly enhanced salivary cortisol response to waking may indicate an enduring tendency to abnormal cortisol regulation. More methods have been proposed to deal with forecasting problems using fuzzy time series. In this paper, our objective was to apply the response test to a population already known to have long-term hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA axis dysregulation. We hypothesized that the free cortisol response to waking, believed to be genetically influenced, would be elevated in a significant percent age of cases, regard less of the afternoon Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST value based on fuzzy time series and genetic algorithms. The proposed method adjusts the length of each interval in the universe of discourse for forecasting the Longitudinal Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST data on a fully remitted lithium responder for past 5 years who was asymptomatic and treated with lithium throughout the experimental results show that the proposed method gets good forecasting results.

  13. Mechanism of the biological response to winter cooling in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; DileepKumar, M.; Raghukumar, S.; Nair, K.K.C.; Ramaiah, N.

    The Arabian Sea is one of the most biologically productive ocean regions, mainly due to the upwelling of nutrients during the summer (southwest) monsoon. But the northern Arabian Sea continues to sustain fairly high biological production after...

  14. A novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in modified vaccinia virus ankara drives very early gene expression and potent immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennier, Sonia T; Brinkmann, Kay; Steinhäußer, Charlotte; Mayländer, Nicole; Mnich, Claudia; Wielert, Ursula; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hausmann, Jürgen; Chaplin, Paul; Steigerwald, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the identification of the MVA13.5L promoter, a unique and novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in MVA composed of two 44 nucleotide long repeated motifs, each containing an early promoter element. The MVA13.5L gene is highly conserved across orthopoxviruses, yet its function is unknown. The unique structure of its promoter is not found for any other gene in the MVA genome and is also conserved in other orthopoxviruses. Comparison of the MVA13.5L promoter activity with synthetic poxviral promoters revealed that the MVA13.5L promoter produced higher levels of protein early during infection in HeLa cells and particularly in MDBK cells, a cell line in which MVA replication stops at an early stage before the expression of late genes. Finally, a recombinant antigen expressed under the control of this novel promoter induced high antibody titers and increased CD8 T cell responses in homologous prime-boost immunization compared to commonly used promoters. In particular, the recombinant antigen specific CD8 T cell responses dominated over the immunodominant B8R vector-specific responses after three vaccinations and even more during the memory phase. These results have identified the native MVA13.5L promoter as a new potent promoter for use in MVA vectored preventive and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23951355

  15. Modified RECIST to assess tumor response after transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma: CT–pathologic correlation in 178 liver explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargellini, Irene, E-mail: irenebargellini@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Bozzi, Elena [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Campani, Daniela [Department of Pathology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Carrai, Paola; De Simone, Paolo [Department of Liver Transplantation, Hepatology, and Infectious Diseases, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Pollina, Luca [Department of Pathology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Cioni, Roberto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Filipponi, Franco [Department of Liver Transplantation, Hepatology, and Infectious Diseases, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, Carlo [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate agreement between modified RECIST (mRECIST) assessed at Computed Tomography (CT) and pathology in a large series of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were transplanted after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. The study included 178 patients (M/F = 155/23; mean age 55.8 ± 6.3 years) with HCC who were transplanted after TACE from January 1996 to December 2010 and with at least one CT examination before liver transplantation (LT). Two blinded independent readers retrospectively reviewed CT examinations, to assess tumor response to TACE according to mRECIST. Patients were classified in responders (complete and partial response) and non-responders (stable and progressive disease). On the explanted livers, percentage of tumor necrosis was classified as 100, >50 and <50%. Results: The mean interval between latest CT and LT was 57.4 ± 39.8 days. At latest CT examination, the objective response rate was 78.1% (139/178), with 86 cases (48.3%) of complete response (CR). A good intra- (k = 0.75 and 0.86) and inter-observer (k = 0.81) agreement was obtained. On a per-patient basis, agreement between mRECIST and pathology was obtained in 120 patients (67.4%), with 19 cases (10.7%) of underestimation and 39 cases (21.9%) of overestimation of tumor response at CT. CT sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between responders and non-responders were 93 and 82.9%, respectively. Out of 302 nodules, sensitivity and specificity of CT in detecting complete necrosis were 87.5 and 68.9%, respectively. Conclusions: CT can overestimate tumor response after TACE. Nonetheless, mRECIST assessed at CT after TACE are reproducible and reliable in differentiating responders and non-responders.

  16. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  17. Responses of bovine lymphocytes to heat shock as modified by breed and antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwanja, L A; Chase, C C; Gutierrez, J A; Guerriero, V; Olson, T A; Hammond, A C; Hansen, P J

    1994-02-01

    We tested whether resistance of lymphocytes to heat stress is modified by breed, intracellular glutathione content, and extracellular antioxidants. In the first experiment, lymphocytes from Angus (Bos taurus, non-heat-tolerant), Brahman (B. indicus, heat-tolerant), and Senepol (B. taurus, heat-tolerant) heifers (12 heifers per breed) were cultured at 45 degrees C for 3 h to evaluate thermal killing, at 42 degrees C for 12 h in a 60-h phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation test, and at 42 degrees C for 1 h to measure induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Killing at 45 degrees C was affected by breed x temperature (P Angus than for Brahman or Senepol. For phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes, heating to 42 degrees C reduced [3H]thymidine incorporation equally for all breeds. Viability at the end of culture was affected (P x temperature interaction because the decrease in viability caused by culture at 42 degrees C was greatest for lymphocytes from Angus heifers. Heat shock for 1 h at 42 degrees C caused a two- to threefold increase in intracellular concentrations of HSP70, but there was no interaction of temperature with breed. In another experiment (with lymphocytes harvested from three Holstein cows), buthionine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, inhibited (P < .01) proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes at 38.5 and 42 degrees C. Addition of the antioxidants glutathione or thioredoxin to culture did not reduce the effects of heating to 42 degrees C on proliferation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8157528

  18. Attractive “Quiet” Courtyards: A Potential Modifier of Urban Residents’ Responses to Road Traffic Noise?

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Gidlöf-Gunnarsson; Evy Öhrström

    2010-01-01

    The present paper explores the influence of the physical environmental qualities of “quiet” courtyards (degree of naturalness and utilization) on residents’ noise responses. A questionnaire study was conducted in urban residential areas with road-traffic noise exposure between LAeq,24h 58 to 68 dB at the most exposed façade. The dwellings had “quiet” indoor section/s and faced a “quiet” outdoor courtyard (LAeq,24h < 48 dB façade reflex included). Data were collected from 385 residents ...

  19. In Vivo Screening of Chemically Modified RNA duplexes for their Ability to Induce Innate Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen; Wengel, Jesper; Lorenzen, Niels

    Due to their sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form with...

  20. Study on drug release of and biological response to UHMWPE wear debris carrying estradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We prepared ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with 17β-estradiol (E2) to treat osteolysis after artificial joint replacement. ► We investigate the in vitro release of E2 and the cell biological response to UHMWPE-E2 wear debris. ► The in vitro E2 release included three stages during the release process: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. ► The UHMWPE-E2 wear debris could promote the proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts and inhibit the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts. ► The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro release of 17β-estradiol (E2), the potential drug to treat osteolysis, and the biological response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with E2 (UHMWPE-E2) wear debris. The osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and macrophages (RAW264.7) were co-cultured with UHMWPE-E2 wear debris via inversion culture technique, respectively. MTT, ALP and ELISA assay were employed to evaluate the cell proliferation, ALP activity and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In vitro E2 release included: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. The E2 released steadily after 40 d and lasted more than 60 d. The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 wear debris promoted the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells at the high debris dosages of 8–10 mg. In particular, the UHMWPE-E2 wear debris inhibited the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts at all dosages in the present study. RAW264.7 cells cultured with UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE wear debris exhibited large sizes about 100 μm in diameter. The small size wear debris presented inside of cells indicated that the wear debris activated the phagocytosis of macrophages. The results indicated the E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the debris induced-osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement.

  1. Drug diffusion and biological responses of arteries using a drug-eluting stent with nonuniform coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Noboru Saito, Yuhei Mori, Sayaka Uchiyama Terumo Corporation R&D Center, Inokuchi, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform coating, abluminal-gradient coating (AGC, which leaves the abluminal surface of the curves and links parts of the stent free from the drug coating, on the diffusion direction of the drug and the biological responses of the artery to drug-eluting stent (DES by comparing the AGC-sirolimus stent and the conventional full-surface coating (CFC sirolimus stent. The study aimed to verify whether the AGC approach was appropriate for the development of a safer DES, minimizing the risks of stent thrombosis due to delayed endothelialization by the drug and distal embolization due to cracking of the coating layer on the hinge parts of the DES on stent expansion. In the in vitro local drug diffusion study, we used rhodamine B as a model drug, and rhodamine B released from the AGC stent diffused predominantly into the abluminal side of the alginate artery model. Conversely, rhodamine B released from the CFC stent quickly spread to the luminal side of the artery model, where endothelial cell regeneration is required. In the biological responses study, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the AGC-sirolimus stent in a rabbit iliac artery for 2 weeks was completely covered with endothelial-like cells. On the other hand, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the CFC-sirolimus stent for 2 weeks only showed partial coverage with endothelial-like cells. While thrombosis was observed in two of the three CFC-sirolimus stents, it was observed in only one of the three AGC-sirolimus stents. Taken together, these findings indicate that the designed nonuniform coating (AGC is an appropriate approach to ensure a safer DES. However, the number of studies is limited and a larger study should be conducted to reach a statistically

  2. Study on drug release of and biological response to UHMWPE wear debris carrying estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu Aiqin; Liu Xiaomin; Bai Yinlong; Weng Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) to treat osteolysis after artificial joint replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the in vitro release of E2 and the cell biological response to UHMWPE-E2 wear debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro E2 release included three stages during the release process: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The UHMWPE-E2 wear debris could promote the proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts and inhibit the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro release of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), the potential drug to treat osteolysis, and the biological response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with E2 (UHMWPE-E2) wear debris. The osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and macrophages (RAW264.7) were co-cultured with UHMWPE-E2 wear debris via inversion culture technique, respectively. MTT, ALP and ELISA assay were employed to evaluate the cell proliferation, ALP activity and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In vitro E2 release included: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. The E2 released steadily after 40 d and lasted more than 60 d. The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 wear debris promoted the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells at the high debris dosages of 8-10 mg. In particular, the UHMWPE-E2 wear debris inhibited the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts at all dosages in the present study. RAW264.7 cells cultured with UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE wear debris exhibited large sizes about 100 {mu}m in diameter. The small size wear debris presented inside of cells indicated that the wear debris activated the phagocytosis of macrophages. The results indicated

  3. Non-Linear Dose Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology, and Medicine (June 8-10, 2004). Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference attracts approximately 500 scientists researching in the area of non-linear low dose effects. These scientists represent a wide range of biological/medical fields and technical disciplines. Observations that biphasic dose responses are frequently reported in each of these areas but that the recognition of similar dose response relationships across disciplines is very rarely appreciated and exploited. By bringing scientist of such diverse backgrounds together who are working on the common area of non-linear dose response relationships this will enhance our understanding of the occurrence, origin, mechanism, significance and practical applications of such dose response relationships

  4. Postnatal maternal separation modifies the response to an obesogenic diet in adulthood in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Paternain

    2012-09-01

    An early-life adverse environment has been implicated in the susceptibility to different diseases in adulthood, such as mental disorders, diabetes and obesity. We analyzed the effects of a high-fat sucrose (HFS diet for 35 days in adult female rats that had experienced 180 minutes daily of maternal separation (MS during lactancy. Changes in the obesity phenotype, biochemical profile, levels of glucocorticoid metabolism biomarkers, and the expression of different obesity- and glucocorticoid-metabolism-related genes were analyzed in periovaric adipose tissue. HFS intake increased body weight, adiposity and serum leptin levels, whereas MS decreased fat pad masses but only in rats fed an HFS diet. MS reduced insulin resistance markers but only in chow-fed rats. Corticosterone and estradiol serum levels did not change in this experimental model. A multiple gene expression analysis revealed that the expression of adiponutrin (Adpn was increased owing to MS, and an interaction between HFS diet intake and MS was observed in the mRNA levels of leptin (Lep and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (Ppargc1a. These results revealed that early-life stress affects the response to an HFS diet later in life, and that this response can lead to phenotype and transcriptomic changes.

  5. Correlation between circulating white blood cell counts and level of protective immune response against bovine viral diarrhea virus elicited by a modified live vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two trials (T1 and T2) were conducted to examine the range of responses elicited against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) by vaccination with modified live vaccine and to determine the level of response required for prevention of clinical disease. For T1, BVDV neutralizing (BVDV VN) titers were de...

  6. Induction of antibody responses to African horse sickness virus (AHSV in ponies after vaccination with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Chiam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: African horse sickness virus (AHSV causes a non-contagious, infectious disease in equids, with mortality rates that can exceed 90% in susceptible horse populations. AHSV vaccines play a crucial role in the control of the disease; however, there are concerns over the use of polyvalent live attenuated vaccines particularly in areas where AHSV is not endemic. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative approaches for AHSV vaccine development. We have carried out a pilot study to investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vaccines expressing VP2, VP7 or NS3 genes of AHSV to stimulate immune responses against AHSV antigens in the horse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VP2, VP7 and NS3 genes from AHSV-4/Madrid87 were cloned into the vaccinia transfer vector pSC11 and recombinant MVA viruses generated. Antigen expression or transcription of the AHSV genes from cells infected with the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Pairs of ponies were vaccinated with MVAVP2, MVAVP7 or MVANS3 and both MVA vector and AHSV antigen-specific antibody responses were analysed. Vaccination with MVAVP2 induced a strong AHSV neutralising antibody response (VN titre up to a value of 2. MVAVP7 also induced AHSV antigen-specific responses, detected by western blotting. NS3 specific antibody responses were not detected. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the immunogenicity of recombinant MVA vectored AHSV vaccines, in particular MVAVP2, and indicates that further work to investigate whether these vaccines would confer protection from lethal AHSV challenge in the horse is justifiable.

  7. A modified choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet reduces morbidity and retains a liver progenitor cell response in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Passman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE dietary model induces chronic liver damage, and stimulates liver progenitor cell (LPC-mediated repair. Long-term CDE administration leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents and lineage-tracing studies show that LPCs differentiate into functional hepatocytes in this model. The CDE diet was first modified for mice by our laboratory by separately administering choline-deficient chow and ethionine in the drinking water (CD+E diet. Although this CD+E diet is widely used, concerns with variability in weight loss, morbidity, mortality and LPC response have been raised by researchers who have adopted this model. We propose that these inconsistencies are due to differential consumption of chow and ethionine in the drinking water, and that incorporating ethionine in the choline-deficient chow, and altering the strength, will achieve better outcomes. Therefore, C57Bl/6 mice, 5 and 6 weeks of age, were fed an all-inclusive CDE diet of various strengths (67% to 100% for 3 weeks. The LPC response was quantitated and cell lines were derived. We found that animal survival, LPC response and liver damage are correlated with CDE diet strength. The 67% and 75% CDE diet administered to mice older than 5 weeks and greater than 18 g provides a consistent and acceptable level of animal welfare and induces a substantial LPC response, permitting their isolation and establishment of cell lines. This study shows that an all-inclusive CDE diet for mice reproducibly induces an LPC response conducive to in vivo studies and isolation, whilst minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  8. Attractive "quiet" courtyards: a potential modifier of urban residents' responses to road traffic noise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidlöf-Gunnarsson, Anita; Ohrström, Evy

    2010-09-01

    The present paper explores the influence of the physical environmental qualities of "quiet". courtyards (degree of naturalness and utilization) on residents' noise responses. A questionnaire study was conducted in urban residential areas with road-traffic noise exposure between L(Aeq,24h) 58 to 68 dB at the most exposed façade. The dwellings had "quiet" indoor section/s and faced a "quiet" outdoor courtyard (L(Aeq,24h) soundscape, opportunities for rest, relaxation and play as well as social relations that potentially reduce the adverse effects of noise. However, access to quietness and a high-quality courtyard can only compensate partly for high sound levels at façades facing the streets, thus, 16% and 29% were still noise annoyed at 58-62 and 63-68 dB, respectively. Implications of the "quiet"-side concept are discussed. PMID:20948929

  9. Attractive “Quiet” Courtyards: A Potential Modifier of Urban Residents’ Responses to Road Traffic Noise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidlöf-Gunnarsson, Anita; Öhrström, Evy

    2010-01-01

    The present paper explores the influence of the physical environmental qualities of “quiet”. courtyards (degree of naturalness and utilization) on residents’ noise responses. A questionnaire study was conducted in urban residential areas with road-traffic noise exposure between LAeq,24h 58 to 68 dB at the most exposed façade. The dwellings had “quiet” indoor section/s and faced a “quiet” outdoor courtyard (LAeq,24h soundscape, opportunities for rest, relaxation and play as well as social relations that potentially reduce the adverse effects of noise. However, access to quietness and a high-quality courtyard can only compensate partly for high sound levels at façades facing the streets, thus, 16% and 29% were still noise annoyed at 58–62 and 63–68 dB, respectively. Implications of the “quiet”-side concept are discussed. PMID:20948929

  10. Phytoplankton response to winter warming modified by large-bodied zooplankton: an experimental microcosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu He

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While several field investigations have demonstrated significant effects of cool season (winter or spring warming on phytoplankton development, the role played by large-bodied zooplankton grazers for the responses of phytoplankton to winter warming is ambiguous. We conducted an outdoor experiment to compare the effect of winter warming (heating by 3°C in combination with presence and absence of Daphnia grazing (D. similis on phytoplankton standing crops and community structure under eutrophic conditions. When Daphnia were absent, warming was associated with significant increases in phytoplankton biomass and cyanobacterial dominance. In contrast, when Daphnia were present, warming effects on phytoplankton dynamics were offset by warming-enhanced grazing, resulting in no significant change in biomass or taxonomic dominance. These results emphasize that large-bodied zooplankton like Daphnia spp. may play an important role in modulating the interactions between climate warming and phytoplankton dynamics in nutrient rich lake ecosystems.

  11. Soil Nitrogen Status Modifies Rice Root Response to Nematode-Bacteria Interactions in the Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanhong; Jiang, Ying; Wu, Yue; Valentine, Tracy A; Li, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that faunal activity in the rhizosphere influences root growth via an auxin-dependent pathway. In this study, two methods were used to adjust nematode and bacterial populations within experimental soils. One is "exclusion", where soil mixed with pig manure was placed in two bags with different mesh sizes (1mm and 5μm diameter), and then surrounded by an outer layer of unamended soil resulting in soil with a greater populations of bacterial-feeding nematodes (1mm) and a control treatment (5μm). The second method is "inoculation", whereby autoclaved soil was inoculated with bacteria (E. coli and Pseudomonas) and Nematodes (Cephalobus and C. elegans). In order to detect the changes in the rice's perception of auxin under different nutrient and auxin conditions in the presence of soil bacterial-feeding nematodes, responses of soil chemistry (NH4+, NO3- and indole acetic acid (IAA)), rice root growth and the expression of an auxin responsive gene GH3-2 were measured. Results showed that, under low soil nutrient conditions (exclusion), low NO3- correlated with increased root branching and IAA correlated with increased root elongation and GH3-2 expression. However, under high soil nutrient conditions (inoculation), a high NH4+ to NO3- ratio promoted an increase in root surface area and there was an additional influence of NH4+ and NO3- on GH3-2 expression. Thus it was concluded that soil bacterial-feeding nematodes influenced soil nutritional status and soil IAA content, promoting root growth via an auxin dependent pathway that was offset by soil nitrogen status. PMID:26841062

  12. Soil Nitrogen Status Modifies Rice Root Response to Nematode-Bacteria Interactions in the Rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Cheng

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that faunal activity in the rhizosphere influences root growth via an auxin-dependent pathway. In this study, two methods were used to adjust nematode and bacterial populations within experimental soils. One is "exclusion", where soil mixed with pig manure was placed in two bags with different mesh sizes (1mm and 5μm diameter, and then surrounded by an outer layer of unamended soil resulting in soil with a greater populations of bacterial-feeding nematodes (1mm and a control treatment (5μm. The second method is "inoculation", whereby autoclaved soil was inoculated with bacteria (E. coli and Pseudomonas and Nematodes (Cephalobus and C. elegans. In order to detect the changes in the rice's perception of auxin under different nutrient and auxin conditions in the presence of soil bacterial-feeding nematodes, responses of soil chemistry (NH4+, NO3- and indole acetic acid (IAA, rice root growth and the expression of an auxin responsive gene GH3-2 were measured. Results showed that, under low soil nutrient conditions (exclusion, low NO3- correlated with increased root branching and IAA correlated with increased root elongation and GH3-2 expression. However, under high soil nutrient conditions (inoculation, a high NH4+ to NO3- ratio promoted an increase in root surface area and there was an additional influence of NH4+ and NO3- on GH3-2 expression. Thus it was concluded that soil bacterial-feeding nematodes influenced soil nutritional status and soil IAA content, promoting root growth via an auxin dependent pathway that was offset by soil nitrogen status.

  13. Packing Density of the Erythropoietin Receptor Transmembrane Domain Correlates with Amplification of Biological Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Verena [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg; Sengupta, D [University of Heidelberg; Ketteler, Robin [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg; Ullmann, G. Matthias [University of Bayreuth; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Klingmuller, Ursula [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2008-10-01

    The formation of signal-promoting dimeric or oligomeric receptor complexes at the cell surface is modulated by self-interaction of their transmembrane (TM) domains. To address the importance of TM domain packing density for receptor functionality, we examined a set of asparagine mutants in the TM domain of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR). We identified EpoR-T242N as a receptor variant that is present at the cell surface similar to wild-type EpoR but lacks visible localization in vesicle-like structures and is impaired in efficient activation of specific signaling cascades. Analysis by a molecular modeling approach indicated an increased interhelical distance for the EpoR-T242N TM dimer. By employing the model, we designed additional mutants with increased or decreased packing volume and confirmed a correlation between packing volume and biological responsiveness. These results propose that the packing density of the TM domain provides a novel layer for fine-tuned regulation of signal transduction and cellular decisions.

  14. Study on drug release of and biological response to UHMWPE wear debris carrying estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Aiqin; Liu, Xiaomin; Bai, Yinlong; Weng, Jie

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro release of 17β-estradiol (E2), the potential drug to treat osteolysis, and the biological response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with E2 (UHMWPE-E2) wear debris. The osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and macrophages (RAW264.7) were co-cultured with UHMWPE-E2 wear debris via inversion culture technique, respectively. MTT, ALP and ELISA assay were employed to evaluate the cell proliferation, ALP activity and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In vitro E2 release included: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. The E2 released steadily after 40 d and lasted more than 60 d. The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 wear debris promoted the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells at the high debris dosages of 8-10 mg. In particular, the UHMWPE-E2 wear debris inhibited the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts at all dosages in the present study. RAW264.7 cells cultured with UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE wear debris exhibited large sizes about 100 μm in diameter. The small size wear debris presented inside of cells indicated that the wear debris activated the phagocytosis of macrophages. The results indicated the E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the debris induced-osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement.

  15. Vertebrate records in polar sediments: Biological responses to past climate change and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. G.; Emslie, S. D.; Huang, T.; Blais, J. M.; Xie, Z. Q.; Liu, X. D.; Yin, X. B.; Wang, Y. H.; Huang, W.; Hodgson, D. A.; Smol, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Biological responses to climate and environmental changes in remote polar regions are of increasing interest in global change research. Terrestrial and marine polar ecosystems have suffered from impacts of both rapid climate change and intense human activities, and large fluctuations in the population sizes of seabirds, seals, and Antarctic krill have been observed in the past decades. To understand the mechanisms driving these regime shifts in polar ecosystems, it is important to first distinguish the influences of natural forcing from anthropogenic activities. Therefore, investigations of past changes of polar ecosystems prior to human contact are relevant for placing recent human-induced changes within a long-term historical context. Here we focus our review on the fossil, sub-fossil, archaeological, and biogeochemical remains of marine vertebrates in polar sediments. These remains include well-preserved tissues such as bones, hairs and feathers, and biogeochemical markers and other proxy indicators, including deposits of guano and excrement, which can accumulate in lake and terrestrial sediments over thousands of years. Analyses of these remains have provided insight into both natural and anthropogenic impacts on marine vertebrates over millennia and have helped identify the causal agents for these impacts. Furthermore, land-based seabirds and marine mammals have been shown to play an important role as bio-vectors in polar environments as they transport significant amounts of nutrients and anthropogenic contaminants between ocean and terrestrial ecosystems.

  16. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

  17. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between ∼ 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ''critical'' to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD50 and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients

  18. Potential Technology for Studying Dosimetry and Response to Airborne Chemical and Biological Pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Trease, Harold E.; Trease, Lynn L.; Minard, Kevin R.; Corley, Rick A.

    2001-06-01

    Advances in computational, and imaging techniques have enabled the rapid development of 3-dimensional (3-D) models of biological systems in unprecedented detail. Using these advances, 3-D models of the lungs and nasal passages of the rat and human are being developed to ultimately improve predictions of airborne pollutant dosimetry. Techniques for imaging the respiratory tract by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were developed to improve the speed and accuracy of geometric data collection for mesh reconstruction. The MR imaging resolution is comparable to that obtained by manual measurements but at much greater speed and accuracy. Newly developed software (NWGrid) was utilized to translate imaging data from MR into 3-D mesh structures. Together, these approaches significantly reduced the time to develop a 3-D model. This more robust airway structure will ultimately facilitate modeling gas or vapor exchange between the respiratory tract and vasculature as well as enable linkages of dosimetry with cell response models. The 3-D, finite volume, visco-elastic mesh structures forms the geometric basis for computational fluid dynamics modeling of inhalation, exhalation and the delivery of individual particles (or concentrations of gas or vapors) to discrete regions of the respiratory tract. The ability of these 3-D models to resolve dosimetry at such a high level of detail will require new techniques to measure regional airflows and particulate deposition for model validation.

  19. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing. PMID:27129711

  20. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose response (BBDR) Model***

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the 1-IPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model...

  1. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose-response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (BPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the HPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model p...

  2. Assessment of the Effects of Student Response Systems on Student Learning and Attitudes over a Broad Range of Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszler, Ralph W.; Dawe, Angus; Shuster, Charles B.; Shuster, Michele

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of wireless technology, new tools are available that are intended to enhance students' learning and attitudes. To assess the effectiveness of wireless student response systems in the biology curriculum at New Mexico State University, a combined study of student attitudes and performance was undertaken. A survey of students in six…

  3. The Personal Response: A Novel Writing Assignment to Engage First Year Students in Large Human Biology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of highly valued scientific writing skills in the first year of university is challenging. This report describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel written assignment, "The Personal Response" and accompanying Peer Review, in the course, Human Biology (BIOL1015) at The University of Queensland. These assignments were…

  4. Therapy response in malignant pleural mesothelioma-role of MRI using RECIST, modified RECIST and volumetric approaches in comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclearmedicine, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Klopp, Michael [Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Thieke, Christian [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix [Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Department of Pneumology, Heidelberg (Germany); Thomas, Andreas [Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Department of Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schmaehl, Astrid [Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    To evaluate and compare early therapy response according to RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumours) and modified RECIST criteria using MRI techniques in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) in comparison with CT. Fifty patients with MPM (32 male/18 female) were included in this study. Early therapy response was evaluated after 9 weeks [three of six chemotherapy (CHT)] cycles. Additionally patients were examined before chemotherapy, 4 weeks after early therapy response evaluation and after six cycles to evaluate diagnostic follow-up. RECIST and modified RECIST criteria were applied using CT and MRI (HASTE, VIBE, T2-TSE sequences). In MRI additionally a volumetric approach measuring tumour weight (overall segmented tumour volume) was applied. Additionally vital capacity (VC) was measured for correlation. Image interpretation was performed by three independent readers independently and in consensus. The 'gold standard' was follow-up examination. Twenty-eight patients showed partial response, 12 patients stable disease and 10 patients progressive disease at early therapy response evaluation. In the follow-up these results remained. For MRI, in 46 cases patients were identically classified using RECIST and modified RECIST criteria. Modified RECIST criteria were identically classified as gold standards in all cases, whereas using RECIST criteria in four cases there was a mismatch (partial response vs. stable disease). Modified RECIST kappa values showed better interobserver variability compared with RECIST criteria ({kappa}=0.9-1.0 vs. 0.7-1.0). For CT, in 44 cases patients were identically classified using RECIST and modified RECIST criteria. Modified RECIST criteria were identically classified as in gold standards in 48 out of 50 patients, whereas using RECIST criteria in 6 cases there was a mismatch (partial response vs. stable disease). Modified RECIST kappa values showed better interobserver variability compared with RECIST

  5. Characterization of cellular response to thiol-modified gold surfaces implanted in mouse peritoneal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, H; Kanagaraja, S; Braide, M; Eriksson, C; Lundström, I

    1999-05-01

    The early inflammatory reaction in vivo to three well defined surfaces-gold, gold coated with glutathione (GSH), and 3-mercapto-1, 2-propanediol (MG)-was assessed as manifested by the adherence and activation of inflammatory cells during implantation intraperitoneally in mice. Evaluation of cell adhesion and activation was done by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies directed against cell differentiation antigens CD11b/CD18, CD74, and CD25 or by measurement by chemoluminescence of reactive oxygen radical species produced by adhering cells. Cell recruitment and activation was slow on the GSH-coated gold surfaces. These surfaces also had the highest percentage of adhering cells with an intact cell membrane. The MG-coated surfaces, on the other hand, rapidly recruited and activated cells and also caused cell membrane leakage to propidium iodide, suggesting cell membrane damage or cell death. The respiratory burst of adhering cells was stimulated by phorbol-myristate acetate on the GSH-coated surface but not on the MG-coated surface and by opsonized zymosan on the Mg-coated surface but only to a small degree on the GSH-coated surface. The respiratory burst following zymosan activation of cells adhering to the MG-coated surface was inhibited by treatment with 2. 3-diphosphoglycerate, a phospholipase D inhibitor. The presented data suggest that peritoneal leukocytes adhering to foreign materials may raise a respiratory burst response via a phospholipase D-dependent and protein kinase C-independent pathway. PMID:10397965

  6. FRET Response of a Modified Ribose Receptor Expressed in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Hanna

    2011-08-26

    The ability to insert complex proteins into silica has many applications including biosensing. Previous research has demonstrated how to direct proteins to the biosilica of diatoms [1]. Here, we show that a complex fusion protein that includes an enzyme, a bacterial ribose periplasmic binding protein, flanked by fluorescent proteins constituting a FRET pair can remain functional in the frustules of living diatoms. A Sil3 tag is attached to the N-terminal end to localize the fusion protein to frustules of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. When ribose was applied, a larger decrease in FRET response was seen in transformed cells than in untransformed cells. Multiple forms of the expression vector were tested to find the optimal system; specifically, a one-vector system was compared to a two-vector system and the gDNA version of the Sil3 localization tag was compared to the cDNA version. The optimal system was found to be a one-vector system with the genomic version of the Sil3 tag to direct the protein to the frustules. Localization of the enzyme to the frustules was further confirmed through cell fluorescence imaging.

  7. Optimizing adsorption of fluoride from water by modified banana peel dust using response surface modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Ria; Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work highlighted the effective application of banana peel dust (BPD) for removal of fluoride (F-) from aqueous solution. The effects of operating parameters such as pH, initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time, agitation speed and temperature were analysed using response surface methodology. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by the analysis of variance and t test statistics. Experimental results revealed that BPD has higher F- adsorption capacity (17.43, 26.31 and 39.5 mg/g). Fluoride adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model with high correlation of coefficient value (0.998). On the other hand, thermodynamic data suggest that adsorption is favoured at lower temperature, exothermic in nature and enthalpy driven. The adsorbents were characterised through scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and point of zero charges (pHZPC) ranges from pH 6.2-8.2. Finally, error analysis clearly demonstrates that all three adsorbents are well fitted with Langmuir isotherm compared to the other isotherm models. The reusable properties of the material support further development for commercial application purpose.

  8. Evaluation of dynamic coastal response to sea-level rise modifies inundation likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Horton, Radley M.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) poses a range of threats to natural and built environments1, 2, making assessments of SLR-induced hazards essential for informed decision making3. We develop a probabilistic model that evaluates the likelihood that an area will inundate (flood) or dynamically respond (adapt) to SLR. The broad-area applicability of the approach is demonstrated by producing 30 × 30 m resolution predictions for more than 38,000 km2 of diverse coastal landscape in the northeastern United States. Probabilistic SLR projections, coastal elevation and vertical land movement are used to estimate likely future inundation levels. Then, conditioned on future inundation levels and the current land-cover type, we evaluate the likelihood of dynamic response versus inundation. We find that nearly 70% of this coastal landscape has some capacity to respond dynamically to SLR, and we show that inundation models over-predict land likely to submerge. This approach is well suited to guiding coastal resource management decisions that weigh future SLR impacts and uncertainty against ecological targets and economic constraints.

  9. Evaluation of Dynamic Coastal Response to Sea-level Rise Modifies Inundation Likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Horton, Radley M.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) poses a range of threats to natural and built environments, making assessments of SLR-induced hazards essential for informed decision making. We develop a probabilistic model that evaluates the likelihood that an area will inundate (flood) or dynamically respond (adapt) to SLR. The broad-area applicability of the approach is demonstrated by producing 30x30m resolution predictions for more than 38,000 sq km of diverse coastal landscape in the northeastern United States. Probabilistic SLR projections, coastal elevation and vertical land movement are used to estimate likely future inundation levels. Then, conditioned on future inundation levels and the current land-cover type, we evaluate the likelihood of dynamic response versus inundation. We find that nearly 70% of this coastal landscape has some capacity to respond dynamically to SLR, and we show that inundation models over-predict land likely to submerge. This approach is well suited to guiding coastal resource management decisions that weigh future SLR impacts and uncertainty against ecological targets and economic constraints.

  10. Programmed Synthesis by Stimuli-Responsive DNAzyme-Modified Mesoporous SiO2 Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Dora; Aleman Garcia, Miguel Angel; Albada, H Bauke; Willner, Itamar

    2015-09-28

    DNAzyme-capped mesoporous SiO2 nanoparticles (MP SiO2 NPs) are applied as stimuli-responsive containers for programmed synthesis. Three types of MP SiO2 NPs are prepared by loading the NPs with Cy3-DBCO (DBCO=dibenzocyclooctyl), Cy5-N3 , and Cy7-N3 , and capping the NP containers with the Mg(2+) , Zn(2+) , and histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequences, respectively. In the presence of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) ions as triggers, the respective DNAzyme-capped NPs are unlocked, leading to the "click" reaction product Cy3-Cy5. In turn, in the presence of Mg(2+) ions and histidine as triggers the second set of DNAzyme-capped NPs is unlocked leading to the Cy3-Cy7 conjugated product. The unloading of the respective NPs and the time-dependent formation of the products are followed by fluorescence spectroscopy (FRET). A detailed kinetic model for the formation of the different products is formulated and it correlates nicely with the experimental results. PMID:25959900

  11. Biological dosimetry in radiological protection: dose response curves elaboration for 60Co and 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sources for pacific uses are being extensively utilized by modern society and the applications of these sources have raised the probability of the occurrence of accidents. The accidental exposition to radiation creates a necessity of the development of methods to evaluate dose quantity. This data could be obtained by the measurement of damage caused by radiation in the exposed person. The radiation dose can be estimated in exposed persons through physical methods (physical dosimetry) but the biological methods can't be dispensed, and among them, the cytogenetic one that makes use of chromosome aberrations (dicentric and centric ring) formed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to ionizing radiation. This method correlates the frequency of radioinduced aberrations with the estimated absorbed dose, as in vitro as in vivo, which is called cytogenetic dosimetry. By the introduction of improved new techniques in culture, in the interpretation of aberrations in the different analysers of slides and by the adoption of different statistical programs to analyse the data, significant differences are observed among laboratories in dose-response curves (calibration curves). The estimation of absorbed dose utilizing other laboratory calibration curves may introduce some uncertainties, so the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) advises that each laboratory elaborates your own dose-response curve for cytogenetic dosimetry. The results were obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes of the healthy and no-smoking donors exposed to 60Co and 137Cs radiation, with dose rate of 5 cGy.min.-1. Six points of dose were determined 20,50,100,200,300,400 cGy and the control not irradiated. The analysed aberrations were of chromosomic type, dicentric and centric ring. The dose response curve for dicentrics were obtained by frequencies weighted in liner-quadratic mathematic model and the equation resulted were for 60Co: Y = (3 46 +- 2.14)10-4 cGy-1 + (3.45 +- 0

  12. Enhancement in biological response of Ag-nano composite polymer membranes using plasma treatment for fabrication of efficient bio materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Narendra Kumar; Sharma, Tamanna Kumari; Chauhan, Manish; Agarwal, Ravi; Vijay, Y. K.; Swami, K. C.

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials are nonviable material used in medical devices, intended to interact with biological systems, which are becoming necessary for the development of artificial material for biological systems such as artificial skin diaphragm, valves for heart and kidney, lenses for eye etc. Polymers having novel properties like antibacterial, antimicrobial, high adhesion, blood compatibility and wettability are most suitable for synthesis of biomaterial, but all of these properties does not exist in any natural or artificial polymeric material. Nano particles and plasma treatment can offer these properties to the polymers. Hence a new nano-biomaterial has been developed by modifying the surface and chemical properties of Ag nanocomposite polymer membranes (NCPM) by Argon ion plasma treatment. These membranes were characterized using different techniques for surface and chemical modifications occurred. Bacterial adhesion and wettability were also tested for these membranes, to show direct use of this new class of nano-biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell response to topographically modified CoCrMo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Niall; Bozec, Laurent; Traynor, Alison; Brett, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Surface roughness on implant materials has been shown to be highly influential on the behavior of osteogenic cells. Four surface topographies were engineered on cobalt chromium molybdenum (CoCrMo) in order to examine this influence on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These treatments were smooth polished (SMO), acid etched (AE) using HCl 7.4% and H2SO4 76% followed by HNO3 30%, sand blasted, and acid etched using either 50 μm Al2O3 (SLA50) or 250 μm Al2 O3 grit (SLA250). Characterization of the surfaces included energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), contact angle, and surface roughness analysis. Human MSCs were cultured onto the four CoCrMo substrates and markers of cell attachment, retention, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and osteogenic differentiation were studied. Residual aluminum was observed on both SLA surfaces although this appeared to be more widely spread on SLA50, whilst SLA250 was shown to have the roughest topography with an Ra value greater than 1 μm. All substrates were shown to be largely non-cytotoxic although both SLA surfaces were shown to reduce cell attachment, whilst SLA50 also delayed cell proliferation. In contrast, SLA250 stimulated a good rate of proliferation resulting in the largest cell population by day 21. In addition, SLA250 stimulated enhanced cell retention, calcium deposition, and hydroxyapatite formation compared to SMO (p < 0.05). The enhanced response stimulated by SLA250 surface modification may prove advantageous for increasing the bioactivity of implants formed of CoCrMo. PMID:26015290

  14. Thermal response for divertor mock-up using surface-modified CFC tile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary for the divertor plate to be actively cooled in order to remove the extremely high heat load from the fusion plasma. CFC material has been considered as one of the candidate plasma-facing materials because of its high thermal shock resistance. However, CFC causes several problems, such as the enhancement of hydrogen recycling, large erosion due to oxygen and radiation enhanced sublimation where the temperature exceeds about 1000 C. In this study the surface of CFC, CX-3002U, was converted to B4C and SiC by using a chemical vapor reaction, CVR. The thermal response properties of divertor mock-ups made by these materials and CFC were examined. These mock-ups were irradiated by electron beams with heat flux up to 15 MW/m2. The surface temperature rise of B4C-converted CFC tile was the highest and that of CFC the lowest. This difference was consistent with the value of the thermal conductivity e.g. B4C-converted CFC has the lowest thermal conductivity, 200 W/m K and CFC has the highest one, 450 W/m K. The heat flux that increases the surface temperature to 1000 C was approximately 8, 10 or 11 MW/m2 for B4C-converted CFC, SiC-converted CFC or CFC, respectively. Thermal cycling tests with more than 2000 shots were also conducted for these mock-ups. No deterioration in the heat transfer for each mock-up was found for the heat flux which increased the surface temperature to 1000 C. (orig.)

  15. The AKR gene family and modifying sex ratios in palms through abiotic stress responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somyong, Suthasinee; Poopear, Supannee; Jomchai, Nukoon; Uthaipaisanwong, Pichahpuk; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Sonthirod, Chutima; Ukoskit, Kittipat; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-05-01

    Sex ratio (SR), the ratio of female inflorescences to total inflorescences, is one of the main yield components of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq). The SR quantitative trait locus (QTL) was recently identified on linkage (LG) 8 with a phenotype variance explained (PVE) of 11.3 %. The use of both genetic and physical mapping is one strategy for uncovering the genetic basis of the traits. Here, we report the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and fosmid libraries, and their use for physical mapping in oil palm. Combined, the libraries consist of more than 200,000 clones, representing 6.35 genome equivalents. Physical mapping at the SR locus was implemented by incorporating the published oil palm genome sequence and positive BAC/fosmid clones as identified by colony PCR screening. Based on the previously published sequences, the interval (about 184 kb) was comprised of 19 contigs of the known sequences (~117 kb, 64 %). After, combining the 454 pyrosequences of 15 positive clones and the previously published sequences, the known sequences were revealed to cover about 82 % of the interval (~150 kb), and were used for identifying the new markers by designing 35 gene-based and 23 simple sequence repeat (SSR)-amplified primers. As a result, a putative aldo-keto reductase gene (named EgAKR1) was revealed to be a promising candidate for sex ratio determination, via controlling female inflorescence number (11 % of PVE). This was predicted from the two newly identified polymorphic marker loci (mEgSSRsr8-21LB and mEgAKR1-9) designing from EgAKR1. The functions of AKR gene families in other plant species and our promoter analysis suggested that EgAKR1 may contribute to the sex ratio through abiotic stress responsiveness. PMID:25504196

  16. Orchiectomy modifies the antidepressant-like response of nicotine in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Limón-Morales, O; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-González, M; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Vázquez-Palacios, G

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that nicotine (NIC) exhibits antidepressant-like effects. In addition, it has been suggested that sexual hormones participate in the antidepressant actions of antidepressives. The present study was designed to analyze the effect of orchiectomy and the supplementation of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on the antidepressant properties of NIC using the forced swimming test (FST), as well as to determine possible changes in the FST during different time periods after orchiectomy. In order to evaluate the influences of orchiectomy on the effects of NIC, the study first evaluated the effects of different time periods on orchiectomized rats (15, 21, 30, 45 and 60 days) that were subjected to the FST. Then, different doses of NIC (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, sc) were administered for 14 days to both intact and orchiectomized rats (after 21 day) which were then also subjected to the FST. Finally, the influence of the TP or E(2) supplementation on the antidepressant-like effect of NIC on orchiectomized rats (after 21 days) was also analyzed. Results reveal that orchiectomy significantly increased immobility behavior and decreased swimming and climbing up to 60 days after castration. In contrast, NIC decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming in intact rats; whereas orchiectomy suppressed this antidepressant effect of NIC. Only with E(2) supplementation was it possible to restore the sensitivity of the castrated rats to NIC. These results suggest that E(2) was able to facilitate the antidepressant response of NIC in orchiectomized rats. PMID:20709090

  17. Attractive "Quiet" Courtyards: A Potential Modifier of Urban Residents' Responses to Road Traffic Noise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Gidlöf-Gunnarsson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the influence of the physical environmental qualities of “quiet” courtyards (degree of naturalness and utilization on residents’ noise responses. A questionnaire study was conducted in urban residential areas with road-traffic noise exposure between LAeq,24h 58 to 68 dB at the most exposed façade. The dwellings had “quiet” indoor section/s and faced a “quiet” outdoor courtyard (LAeq,24h < 48 dB façade reflex included. Data were collected from 385 residents and four groups were formed based on sound-level categories (58–62 and 63–68 dB and classification of the “quiet” courtyards into groups with low and high physical environmental quality. At both sound-level categories, the results indicate that access to high-quality “quiet” courtyards is associated with less noise annoyance and noise-disturbed outdoor activities among the residents. Compared to low-quality “quiet” courtyards, high-quality courtyards can function as an attractive restorative environment providing residents with a positive soundscape, opportunities for rest, relaxation and play as well as social relations that potentially reduce the adverse effects of noise. However, access to quietness and a high-quality courtyard can only compensate partly for high sound levels at façades facing the streets, thus, 16% and 29% were still noise annoyed at 58–62 and 63–68 dB, respectively. Implications of the “quiet”-side concept are discussed.

  18. Visible Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified Ti02 for Air and Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, paul; Clausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The method of photocatalysis utilizing titanium dioxide, TiO2, as the catalyst has been widely studied for trace contaminant control for both air and water applications because of its low energy consumption and use of a regenerable catalyst. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors and are a setback for the technology for space application due to the possibility of Hg contamination. The development of a visible light responsive (VLR) TiO2-based catalyst could lead to the use of solar energy in the visible region (approx.45% of the solar spectrum lies in the visible region; > 400 nm) or highly efficient LEDs (with wavelengths > 400 nm) to make PCO approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Though VLR catalyst development has been an active area of research for the past two decades, there are few commercially available VLR catalysts; those that are available still have poor activity in the visible region compared to that in the UV region. Thus, this study was aimed at the further development of VLR catalysts by a new method - coupling of quantum dots (QD) of a narrow band gap semiconductor (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, ZnSe, etc.) to the TiO2 by two preparation methods: 1) photodeposition and 2) mechanical alloying using a high-speed ball mill. A library of catalysts was developed and screened for gas and aqueous phase applications, using ethanol and 4-chlorophenol as the target contaminants, respectively. Both target compounds are well studied in photocatalytic systems serve as model contaminants for this research. Synthesized catalysts were compared in terms of preparation method, type of quantum dots, and dosage of quantum dots.

  19. Increasing biological diversity in a dynamic vegetation model and consequences for simulated response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keribin, R. M.; Friend, A. D.; Purves, D.; Smith, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation, from tropical rainforests to the tundra, is the basis of the world food chain but is also a key component of the Earth system, with biophysical and biogeochemical impacts on the global climate, and Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) are an important integrative tool for understanding its responses to climate change. DGVMs up to now have treated only a small number of plant types representing broad divisions in vegetation worldwide (e.g. trees and grasses, broadleaf and needleleaf, deciduousness), but these categories ignore most of the variation that exists between plant species and between individuals within a species. Research in community ecology makes it clear however that these variations can affect large-scale ecosystem properties such as productivity and resilience to environmental changes. The current challenge is for DGVMs to account for fine-grained variations between plants and a few such models are being developed using newly-available plant trait databases such as the TRY database and insights from community ecology such as habitat filtering. Hybrid is an individual-based DGVM, first published in 1993, that models plant physiology in a mechanistic way. We modified Hybrid 8, the latest version of the model which uses surface physics taken from the GISS ModelE GCM, to include a mechanistic gap-model component with individual-based variation in tree wood density. This key plant trait is known to be strongly correlated with a trade-off between growth and mortality in the majority of forests worldwide, which allows for otherwise-similar individuals to have different life-history strategies. We investigate how the inclusion of continuous variation in wood density into the model affects the ecosystem's transient dynamics under climate change.

  20. A spatially extensive, 25-year time series of urbanization impacts on stream chemistry and biological response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M. E.; Schley, M. L.; Martin, H. M.; Sexton, J. O.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past quarter-century, urban expansion has posed an increasingly serious threat to freshwater systems, yet most studies investigating urban impacts rely on space-for-time analysis to characterize chemical and biological responses or infer causal mechanisms. Despite a well-articulated rationale, such inference is often confounded by inability to separate gradients of urbanization from strong spatial covariates and historical legacies. Temporal analysis of monitoring can control for these covariates, but continuous urbanization data have been lacking. Thus, we know relatively little about the chemical and biological trajectories of streams during urbanization, from which to derive expectations following mitigation. We used a newly developed 25-y annual time series of 30m impervious cover (IC) encompassing the DC-Baltimore metropolitan corridor to relate urbanization patterns to long-term stream biota and water quality monitoring data in 50 watersheds from Maryland's core/trend program. We assessed seasonal chemical data (3 month average) for trends in magnitude and variation, as well as the frequency of extreme values. Stream macroinvertebrates were analyzed for taxon-specific changes in abundance and/or occurrence frequency using Threshold Indicator Taxon Analysis (TITAN), and change points were compared with shifts in both impervious surface and stream chemistry. At surprisingly low (0-3% IC) levels of watershed urbanization, we noted marked increases in measures of fall and winter dissolved material and pulses of alkalinity corresponding with increases in impervious cover. At moderate (3-8% IC) levels, we found continued correspondence between increasing impervious cover and both dissolved material and alkalinity in all seasons, and marked changes in macroinvertebrate community composition. Changes in macroinvertebrates appeared more closely associated with pulses of development than changes in monthly water chemistry. However, at higher levels of

  1. Predatory hoverflies increase oviposition in response to colour stimuli offering no reward: implications for biological control

    OpenAIRE

    Day, R.L.; Hickman, J.M.; Sprague, R.I.; Wratten, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing efforts worldwide to engineer agroecosystems to enhance ecosystem services such as carbon storage, minimisation of erosion, and biological control of pests. A key group of insect biological control agents is the hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae). While adult Syrphidae are pollen and nectar feeders, the larvae of many species are aphidophagous, thus demonstrating life-history omnivory and their potentially important role in the biological control of aphids and other pests. S...

  2. Molecular biology of the stress response in the early embryo and its stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Yang, Yu; Jiang, Zhongliang; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    to zygotic genome activation, the large mRNA program initiated at compaction, ion pumping required for cavitation, the differentiation of the first lineages, integration with the uterine environment at implantation, rapid proliferation of stem cells, and production of certain lineages which require the highest energy and are most sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition. Stress response mechanisms insure that stem cells for the early embryo and placenta survive at lower stress exposures, and that the organism survives through compensatory and prioritized stem cell differentiation, at higher stress exposures. These servomechanisms include a small set of stress enzymes from the 500 protein kinases in the kinome; the part of the genome coding for protein kinases that hierarchically regulate the activity of other proteins and enzymes. Important protein kinases that mediate the stress response of embryos and their stem cells are SAPK, p38MAPK, AMPK, PI3K, Akt, MEK1/2, MEKK4, PKA, IRE1 and PERK. These stress enzymes have cytosolic function in cell survival at low stress exposures and nuclear function in modifying transcription factor activity at higher stress exposures. Some of the transcription factors (TFs) that are most important in the stress response are JunC, JunB, MAPKAPs, ATF4, XBP1, Oct1, Oct4, HIFs, Nrf2/KEAP, NFKB, MT1, Nfat5, HSF1/2 and potency-maintaining factors Id2, Cdx2, Eomes, Sox2, Nanog, Rex1, and Oct4. Clearly the stress enzymes have a large number of cytosolic and nuclear substrates and the TFs regulate large numbers of genes. The interaction of stress enzymes and TFs in the early embryo and its stem cells are a continuing central focus of research. In vitro regulation of TFs by stress enzymes leads to reprogramming of the stem cell when stress diminishes stem cell accumulation. Since more differentiated product is produced by fewer cells, the process compensates for fewer cells. Coupled with stress-induced compensatory differentiation of stem cells is a

  3. Salt marsh response to the effects of physical and biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roner, Marcella; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Franceschinis, Erica; Realdon, Nicola; Marani, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Salt marshes are widespread features of the tidal landscape governed by the interacting physical and biological processes. These crucially important ecosystems provide valuable services and are currently threatened by the effects of increasing rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR) and decreasing sediment supply. Although a few studies have analyzed the biomorphological evolution of salt marsh systems, a complete understanding of the two-way feedbacks between physical and biological processes is still lacking. The temporal evolution of marsh elevation is governed by the balance between inorganic and organic accretion rates, and the rate of RSLR. Studies based on field observations and modeling suggest that, in equilibrium conditions, marsh inorganic accretion rates, and the related platform elevations, decrease with distance from the main creek whereas the organic deposition gradually increases. In order to analyze salt marsh responses to the effect of physical and biological processes, about 100 sediment samples were collected on the San Felice salt marsh, Venice Lagoon. For each sample, local coordinates, surface elevations and vegetation cover were detected, whereas inorganic and organic sediment content, together with grain size distribution, were determined and analyzed. Loss On Ignition (LOI) and a double treatment with H2O2 and NaClO, were used to estimate the amount of organic matter in each sample. Particle size analysis was carried out on the inorganic fraction with a Mastersizer that uses laser diffraction techniques to measure the grain size. Our results show that the San Felice salt marsh is characterized by a concave-up profile, as commonly displayed by marshes worldwide. Marsh elevation is highest along the boundary and decreases toward the inner marsh. The inorganic deposition, which is maximum along the marsh edge, decreases with distance from the channel network, because as water moves across the marsh, the velocity is reduced and sediment

  4. Assessment of the effects of student response systems on student learning and attitudes over a broad range of biology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszler, Ralph W; Dawe, Angus; Shuster, Charles B; Shuster, Michèle

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of wireless technology, new tools are available that are intended to enhance students' learning and attitudes. To assess the effectiveness of wireless student response systems in the biology curriculum at New Mexico State University, a combined study of student attitudes and performance was undertaken. A survey of students in six biology courses showed that strong majorities of students had favorable overall impressions of the use of student response systems and also thought that the technology improved their interest in the course, attendance, and understanding of course content. Students in lower-division courses had more strongly positive overall impressions than did students in upper-division courses. To assess the effects of the response systems on student learning, the number of in-class questions was varied within each course throughout the semester. Students' performance was compared on exam questions derived from lectures with low, medium, or high numbers of in-class questions. Increased use of the response systems in lecture had a positive influence on students' performance on exam questions across all six biology courses. Students not only have favorable opinions about the use of student response systems, increased use of these systems increases student learning. PMID:17339392

  5. Enhanced Antifungal Activity by Ab-Modified Amphotericin B-Loaded Nanoparticles Using a pH-Responsive Block Copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Dai, Jingjing; Xie, Jun; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Zhi; Xie, Chunmei; Yao, Aixia; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Li; Jiang, Qinglin; Wang, Shulei; Liang, Yong; Xu, Congjing

    2015-06-01

    Fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Amphotericin B (AMB), with broad-spectrum antifungal activity, has long been recognized as a powerful fungicidal drug, but its clinical toxicities mainly nephrotoxicity and poor solubility limit its wide application in clinical practice. The fungal metabolism along with the host immune response usually generates acidity at sites of infection, resulting in loss of AMB activity in a pH-dependent manner. Herein, we developed pH-responsive AMB-loaded and surface charge-switching poly( d, l-lactic- co-glycolic acid)- b-poly( l-histidine)- b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG) nanoparticles for resolving the localized acidity problem and enhance the antifungal efficacy of AMB. Moreover, we modified AMB-encapsulated PLGA-PLH-PEG nanoparticles with anti- Candida albicans antibody (CDA) (CDA-AMB-NPs) to increase the targetability. Then, CDA-AMB-NPs were characterized in terms of physical characteristics, in vitro drug release, stability, drug encapsulation efficiency, and toxicity. Finally, the targetability and antifungal activity of CDA-AMB-NPs were investigated in vitro /in vivo. The result demonstrated that CDA-AMB-NPs significantly improve the targetability and bioavailability of AMB and thus improve its antifungal activity and reduce its toxicity. These NPs may become a good drug carrier for antifungal treatment.

  6. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  7. Psychological and biological responses to race-based social stress as pathways to disparities in educational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dorainne J; Heissel, Jennifer A; Richeson, Jennifer A; Adam, Emma K

    2016-09-01

    We present the race-based disparities in stress and sleep in context model (RDSSC), which argues that racial/ethnic disparities in educational achievement and attainment are partially explained by the effects of race-based stressors, such as stereotype threat and perceived discrimination, on psychological and biological responses to stress, which, in turn, impact cognitive functioning and academic performance. Whereas the roles of psychological coping responses, such as devaluation and disidentification, have been theorized in previous work, the present model integrates the roles of biological stress responses, such as changes in stress hormones and sleep hours and quality, to this rich literature. We situate our model of the impact of race-based stress in the broader contexts of other stressors [e.g., stressors associated with socioeconomic status (SES)], developmental histories of stress, and individual and group differences in access to resources, opportunity and employment structures. Considering both psychological and biological responses to race-based stressors, in social contexts, will yield a more comprehensive understanding of the emergence of academic disparities between Whites and racial/ethnic minorities. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27571526

  8. A multimodal imaging workflow to visualize metal mixtures in the human placenta and explore colocalization with biological response markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiecki, Megan M; Austin, Christine; Remark, Romain; Merad, Miriam; Gnjatic, Sacha; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Espejel-Nuñez, Aurora; Borboa-Olivares, Hector; Guzman-Huerta, Mario; Wright, Rosalind J; Wright, Robert O; Arora, Manish

    2016-04-01

    Fetal exposure to essential and toxic metals can influence life-long health trajectories. The placenta regulates chemical transmission from maternal circulation to the fetus and itself exhibits a complex response to environmental stressors. The placenta can thus be a useful matrix to monitor metal exposures and stress responses in utero, but strategies to explore the biologic effects of metal mixtures in this organ are not well-developed. In this proof-of-concept study, we used laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to measure the distributions of multiple metals in placental tissue from a low-birth-weight pregnancy, and we developed an approach to identify the components of metal mixtures that colocalized with biological response markers. Our novel workflow, which includes custom-developed software tools and algorithms for spatial outlier identification and background subtraction in multidimensional elemental image stacks, enables rapid image processing and seamless integration of data from elemental imaging and immunohistochemistry. Using quantitative spatial statistics, we identified distinct patterns of metal accumulation at sites of inflammation. Broadly, our multiplexed approach can be used to explore the mechanisms mediating complex metal exposures and biologic responses within placentae and other tissue types. Our LA-ICP-MS image processing workflow can be accessed through our interactive R Shiny application 'shinyImaging', which is available at or through our laboratory's website, . PMID:26987553

  9. Information resources and the correlation of response patterns between biological end points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malling, H.V. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper focuses on the analysis of information for mutagenesis, a biological end point that is important in the overall process of assessing possible adverse health effects from chemical exposure. 17 refs.

  10. Biological effects in lymphocytes irradiated with 99mTc: determination of the curve dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry estimates the absorbed dose taking into account changes in biological parameters. The most used biological indicator of an exposition to ionizing radiation is the quantification of chromosomal aberrations of lymphocytes from irradiated individuals. The curves of dose versus induced biological effects, obtained through bionalyses, are used in used in retrospective evaluations of the dose, mainly in the case of accidents. In this research, a simple model for electrons and photons transports was idealized to simulate the irradiation of lymphocytes with 99m Tc, representing a system used for irradiation of blood cells. The objective of the work was to establish a curve of dose versus frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of human blood. For the irradiation of blood samples micro spheres of human serum of albumin (HSAM) market with 99m Tc were used, allowing the irradiation of blood with different administered activities of 99m Tc, making possible the study the cytogenetical effects as a function of such activities. The conditions of irradiation in vivo using HSAM spheres marked with 99m Tc were simulated with MCNP 4C (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code to obtain the dose-response curve. Soft tissue composition was employed to simulate blood tissue and the analyses of the curve of dose versus biological effect showed a linear quadratic response of the unstable chromosomal aberrations. As a result, the response of dose versus chromosomal aberrations of blood irradiation with 99m Tc was best fitted by the curve Y=(8,99 ±2,06) x 1--4 + (1,24 ±0,62) x 10-2 D + (5,67 ± 0,64) x 10-2 D2. (author)

  11. The R.A.P.I.D. System – Rapid Response in Detection of Biological Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Taleski, Vaso; Hafield, Ted

    2006-01-01

    Biological agents (BA) today present the greatest danger of all weapons of mass destruction. A belief that terrorist organizations, groups or individuals, or state sponsored armies, will use this type of weapon, has never been greater, especially after the intentional distribution of anthrax spores through the USA mail delivery system. Different problems during initial stages of biological attack arising from variety and number of clinical and environmental samples, costs, preparedness an...

  12. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  13. Modified Ionic Liquid Cold-Induced Aggregation Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Spectrofluorimetry for Trace Determination of Ofloxacin in Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Norouzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Ofloxacin is a quinolone synthetic antibiotic, which acts against resistant mutants of bacteria by inhibiting DNA gyrase. This antibacterial agent is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract, urinary tract and tissue-based infections, which are caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, an efficient modified ionic liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (M-IL-CIA-DLLME was combined with spectrofluorimetry for trace determination of ofloxacin in real samples.Methods: In this microextraction method, hydrophobic 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim] [PF6] ionic liquid (IL as a microextraction solvent was dispersed into a heated sample solution containing sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF6 (as a common ion and the analyte of interest. Afterwards, the resultant solution was cooled in an ice-water bath and a cloudy condition was formed due to a considerable decrease of IL solubility. After centrifuging, the enriched phase was introduced to the spectrofluorimeter for the determination of ofloxacin.Results and major conclusion: In this technique, the performance of the microextraction method was not influenced by variations in the ionic strength of the sample solution (up to 30% w/v. Furthermore, [Hmim][PF6] IL was chosen as a green microextraction phase and an alternative to traditional toxic organic solvents. Different parameters affecting the analytical performance were studied and optimized. At optimum conditions, a relatively broad linear dynamic range of 0.15-125 μg l-1 and a limit of detection (LOD of 0.029 μg l-1 were obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D. obtained for the determination of five replicates of the 10 ml solution containing 50 μg l-1 ofloxacin was 2.7%. Finally, the combined methodology was successfully applied to ofloxacin determination in actual pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples.

  14. An appraisal of biological responses and network of environmental interactions in non-mining and mining impacted coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christabelle E G; Malik, Ashish; Jineesh, V K; Fernandes, Sheryl O; Das, Anindita; Pandey, Sunita S; Kanolkar, Geeta; Sujith, P P; Velip, Dhillan M; Shaikh, Shagufta; Helekar, Samita; Gonsalves, Maria Judith; Nair, Shanta; LokaBharathi, P A

    2015-08-01

    The coastal waters of Goa and Ratnagiri lying on the West coast of India are influenced by terrestrial influx. However, Goa is influenced anthropogenically by iron-ore mining, while Ratnagiri is influenced by deposition of heavy minerals containing iron brought from the hinterlands. We hypothesize that there could be a shift in biological response along with changes in network of interactions between environmental and biological variables in these mining and non-mining impacted regions, lying 160 nmi apart. Biological and environmental parameters were analyzed during pre-monsoon season. Except silicates, the measured parameters were higher at Goa and related significantly, suggesting bacteria centric, detritus-driven region. At Ratnagiri, phytoplankton biomass related positively with silicate suggesting a region dominated by primary producers. This dominance perhaps got reflected as a higher tertiary yield. Thus, even though the regions are geographically proximate, the different biological response could be attributed to the differences in the web of interactions between the measured variables. PMID:25907627

  15. Polymer Nanoparticles Modified with Photo- and pH-Dual-Responsive Polypeptides for Enhanced and Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiangyang; Yang, Yanfang; Li, Zhiping; Yu, Fanglin; Gong, Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-05-01

    The cationic nature of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their absence of cell selectivity restrains their applications in vivo. In this work, polymer nanoparticles (NPs) modified with photo- and pH-responsive polypeptides (PPPs) were successfully developed and respond to near-infrared (NIR) light illumination at the tumor site and a lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe). In PPPs, the internalization function of CPPs (positively charged) is quenched by a pH-sensitive inhibitory peptide (negatively charged), which is linked via a photocleavable group. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was loaded into NPs by a double-emulsion technique. In vivo experiments included siRNA loading, cellular uptake, cell apoptosis, siRNA transfection, tumor targeting delivery, and the in vivo antitumor efficacy. Results showed that the prepared PPP-NPs could selectively accumulate at the tumor sites and internalized into the tumor cells by the NIR light illumination and the lowered pHe at the tumor site. These studies demonstrated that PPP-NPs are a promising carrier for future tumor gene delivery. PMID:27043442

  16. Stress for invasion success? Temperature stress of preceding generations modifies the response to insecticide stress in an invasive pest insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piiroinen, Saija; Lyytinen, Anne; Lindström, Leena

    2013-02-01

    Adaptation to stressful environments is one important factor influencing species invasion success. Tolerance to one stress may be complicated by exposure to other stressors experienced by the preceding generations. We studied whether parental temperature stress affects tolerance to insecticide in the invasive Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Field-collected pyrethroid-resistant beetles were reared under either stressful (17°C) or favourable (23°C) insecticide-free environments for three generations. Then, larvae were exposed to pyrethroid insecticides in common garden conditions (23°C). Beetles were in general tolerant to stress. The parental temperature stress alone affected beetles positively (increased adult weight) but it impaired their tolerance to insecticide exposure. In contrast, offspring from the favourable temperature regime showed compensatory weight gain in response to insecticide exposure. Our study emphasizes the potential of cross-generational effects modifying species stress tolerance. When resistant pest populations invade benign environments, a re-application of insecticides may enhance their performance via hormetic effects. In turn, opposite effects may arise if parental generations have been exposed to temperature stress. Thus, the outcome of management practices of invasive pest species is difficult to predict unless we also incorporate knowledge of the evolutionary and recent (preceding generations) stress history of the given populations into pest management. PMID:23467574

  17. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Neale, P.J.; A. L. Pritchard; R. Ihnacik

    2014-01-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis–irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically available radiation (PAR)) and two temperatures (20 and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a ...

  18. Effects of antecedent land cover on physical, chemical, and biological responses to urbanization in streams across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, T. F.; Qian, S.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of streams were assessed across gradients of urbanization in 9 metropolitan areas of the conterminous US (Boston, MA; Raleigh; NC, Birmingham, AL; Atlanta, GA; Milwaukee-Green Bay, WI; Denver, CO; Dallas-Fort Worth, TX; Salt Lake City, UT; and Portland, OR) as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program. Gradients of urbanization were established on the basis of a multimetric index of urban intensity that combined land cover, population, and road density. Simple regression models established that the condition of biological communities (e.g., invertebrate responses) showed statistically significant degradation as urbanization increased in six (Boston, Raleigh, Birmingham, Atlanta, Salt Lake, and Portland) of the nine metropolitan areas. Multiple regression models incorporating basin-scale land cover (e.g., forest, agricultural land) and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature, chemistry, hydrology) did not substantially improve the explanatory power of the regressions and could not explain differences in responses among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical models incorporating basin- and regional-scale predictors demonstrated that regional-scale climate (air temperature and precipitation) and antecedent land cover (i.e., land cover being converted to urban) predicted invertebrate responses to urbanization. The lack of identifiable urban responses for Milwaukee-Green Bay, Denver, and Dallas-Fort Worth were associated with high levels of antecedent agriculture (row crops and grazing) that degraded the biological communities and obscured the effects of urbanization. Urbanization was associated with increases in conductivity, nutrients, pesticides, and hydrologic variability. Levels of these variables at background sites were higher in regions with high antecedent agriculture; consequently, the effects of urbanization appeared to be

  19. Microbial response to modified precipitation patterns in tallgrass prairie soil: molecular mechanisms, activity rates and organic matter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglin, L. H.; David, M.; Bottomley, P.; Hettich, R. L.; Jansson, J.; Jumpponen, A.; Rice, C. W.; Tringe, S.; VerBerkmoes, N. C.; Myrold, D.

    2011-12-01

    A significant amount of carbon (C) is processed and stored in prairie soils: grasslands cover 6.1-7.4% of the earth's land surface and hold 7.3-11.4% of global soil C. Global change models predict that the future precipitation regime across the North American Great Plains will entail less frequent but larger rainfall events. The response of prairie soil microbial C processing and allocation to this scenario of higher hydrologic variability is not known, but will be a key determiner of the future capacity for prairie soil C sequestration. We are approaching this problem by assessing soil microbial function (respiration, C utilization efficiency, extracellular enzyme activity) and molecular indicators of dominant C allocation pathways (soil transcriptome, proteome and metabolome) under ambient and experimentally modified precipitation regimes. The rainfall manipulation plots (RaMPs) at the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in eastern Kansas, USA is a replicated field manipulation of the magnitude and frequency of natural precipitation that was established in 1998. We collected soil before, during and after a rainfall event in both ambient and modified precipitation treatments and measured the microbial response. Microbial respiration doubled in both treatments during the water addition, and cellobiohydrolase enzyme potential activity (a catalyst of cellulose hydrolysis) increased slightly, but no significant effect of altered precipitation treatment has emerged. The fungal and bacterial ribosomal gene composition was also similar between precipitation treatments. Although pools of genes and extracellular enzymes may be relatively static during short-term dynamic conditions, transcript and intracellular protein abundances may be more indicative of the active microbial metabolic response to rapid shifts in soil moisture. Thus, analysis of transcript and protein composition is underway. In addition, we have implemented a series of lab experiments

  20. Modified super-long down-regulation protocol improves fertilization and pregnancy in patients with poor ovarian responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-juan; SONG Xue-ru; L(U) Rui; XUE Feng-xia

    2012-01-01

    Background The successful end-point of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is for a woman to give live birth.This outcome is based on various factors including adequate number of retrieved eggs.Failure to recruit adequate follicles,from which the eggs are retrieved,is called a "poor response".How to improve the clinical pregnancy rates of poor responders was one of the tough problems for IVF.Methods The study involved 51 patients who responded poorly to high dose gonadotropin treatment in their previous cycles at our reproductive center,between April 2010 and February 2012.The previous cycle (group A) received routine long protocol; the subsequent cycle (group B) received modified super-long down-regulation protocol.The primary outcome of the study was the number of oocytes fertilized.The increase in the pregnancy rate was the secondary outcome.Differences between the groups were assessed by using Student's t test and x2 test where appropriate.Results The patients' average age was (36.64±3.85) years.The mean duration of ovarian stimulation cycles of the group A patients was longer than those of the group B patients.The total dose of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was significantly lower in the subsequent cycle.The peak value of serum estradiol on human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) day was lower in group A as compared with group B.The number of metaphase Ⅱ oocytes recovered was significantly higher in group B.The cleavage rate in group A was significantly lower than in group B,49 patients in group B reached embryo transfer stage,while 46 patients in group A reached this stage.Patients in group B received significantly more embryos per transfer as compared with group A.More pregnancies and more clinical pregnancies with fetal heart activity were achieved in group B.Conclusions This comparative trial shows that poor responder women undergoing repeated assisted reproduction treatment using modified super-long down-regulation protocol achieve more oocytes

  1. Vaccinations in adults with chronic inflammatory joint disease: Immunization schedule and recommendations for patients taking synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Jacques; Czitrom, Séverine Guillaume; Mallick, Auriane; Sellam, Jérémie; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The risk of infection associated with autoimmune diseases is further increased by the use of biotherapies. Recommendations to minimize this risk include administering the full complement of vaccines on the standard immunization schedule, as well as the pneumococcal and influenza vaccines. Adults with chronic inflammatory joint disease (IJD) may receive a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, as well as a live attenuated vaccine against recurrent herpes zoster, recently licensed by European regulatory authorities. Live attenuated vaccines can be given only after an interval without immunosuppressant and/or glucocorticoid therapy. The effectiveness of vaccines, as assessed based on titers of protective antibodies, varies across vaccine types and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Thus, methotrexate and rituximab are usually associated with decreased vaccine responses. The risks associated with vaccines are often considerably exaggerated by the media, which serve lobbies opposed to immunizations and make some patients reluctant to accept immunizations. Increasing immunization coverage may diminish the risk of treatment-related infections. A physician visit dedicated specifically to detecting comorbidities in patients with chronic IJD may result in improved immunization coverage. In this review, we discuss immunizations for adults with chronic IJD based on the treatments used, as well as immunization coverage. Many questions remain unanswered and warrant investigation by studies coordinated by the French networks IREIVAC (Innovative clinical research network in vaccinology) and IMIDIATE (Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease Alliance for Translational and Clinical Research). PMID:26453106

  2. Characteristic responses of biological and nanoscale systems in the terahertz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Balakin, A V; Evdokimov, M G; Ozheredov, I A; Sapozhnikov, D A; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Esaulkov, M N; Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-31

    This paper briefly examines methods for the generation of pulsed terahertz radiation and principles of pulsed terahertz spectroscopy, an advanced informative method for studies of complex biological and nanostructured systems. Some of its practical applications are described. Using a number of steroid hormones as examples, we demonstrate that terahertz spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics methods and computer simulation allows one to gain information about the structure of molecules in crystals. A 'terahertz colour vision' method is proposed for analysis of pulsed terahertz signals reflected from biological tissues and it is shown that this method can be effectively used to analyse the properties of biological tissues and for early skin cancer diagnosis. (laser biophotonics)

  3. Common market, shared problems: time for a coordinated response to biological invasions in Europe?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulme, P. E.; Nentwig, W.; Pyšek, Petr; Vila, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2009), s. 3-19. ISSN 1619-0033. [European Conference on Biological Invasions /5./. Prague, 23.09.2008-26.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: Evropská komise(XE) GOCE-CT-506675; Evropská komise(XE) SSPI-CT-2003-511202; Evropská komise(XE) KBBE-212459 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biological invasions * Europe * policy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  4. Modifying Children's Responses to Unsecured Firearms and Modifying the Keeping and Storage of Firearms in Families of Elementary School Children: A Possible Role for Child Behavior Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha, Edward F.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Article outlines potential strategies for reducing the disproportionate rate of firearm accidents among low-income children. Suggests this problem stems from risky gun storage practices that are in response to high rates of victimization and fear of crime. Discusses the role that child behavior therapy can have in reducing the risk of firearm…

  5. After the disaster: the hydrogeomorphic, ecological, and biological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Crisafulli, Charlie; Bishop, John

    2009-01-01

    The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens caused instantaneous landscape disturbance on a grand scale. On 18 May 1980, an ensemble of volcanic processes, including a debris avalanche, a directed pyroclastic density current, voluminous lahars, and widespread tephra fall, abruptly altered landscape hydrology and geomorphology, and created distinctive disturbance zones having varying impacts on regional biota. Response to the geological and ecological disturbances has been varied and complex. In general, eruption-induced alterations in landscape hydrology and geomorphology led to enhanced stormflow discharge and sediment transport. Although the hydrological response to landscape perturbation has diminished, enhanced sediment transport persists in some basins. In the nearly 30 years since the eruption, 350 million (metric) tons of suspended sediment has been delivered from the Toutle River watershed to the Cowlitz River (roughly 40 times the average annual preeruption suspended-sediment discharge of the Columbia River). Such prodigious sediment loading has wreaked considerable socioeconomic havoc, causing significant channel aggradation and loss of flood conveyance capacity. Significant and ongoing engineering efforts have been required to mitigate these problems. The overall biological evolution of the eruption-impacted landscape can be viewed in terms of a framework of survivor legacies. Despite appearances to the contrary, a surprising number of species survived the eruption, even in the most heavily devastated areas. With time, survivor “hotspots” have coalesced into larger patches, and have served as stepping stones for immigrant colonization. The importance of biological legacies will diminish with time, but the intertwined trajectories of geophysical and biological successions will influence the geological and biological responses to the 1980 eruption for decades to come.

  6. National Science Foundation funds systems biology study of crop drought responses

    OpenAIRE

    Bland, Susan

    2009-01-01

    An international team of researchers, led by Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Professor Andy Pereira, has been awarded a three-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a systems biology approach to help combat the effects of drought on a variety of staple food crops.

  7. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel produced from soybean oil polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rheological properties of a newly developed biological thermo-hydrogel made from vegetable oil were investigated. The material named HPSO-VI is a hydrolytic product of polymerized soybean oil (PSO). HPSO-VI exhibited viscoelastic behavior above 2% (wt. %) at room temperature and viscous fluid ...

  8. Ablation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abca2 modifies response to estrogen-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jody T; Brown, Carol B; Garrett, Tracy E; Uys, Joachim D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Tew, Kenneth D

    2012-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter 2 (ABCA2) is an endolysosomal protein expressed in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, prostate, ovary and macrophages. In cell cultures, ABCA2 over-expression has been linked with resistance to the anticancer agent, estramustine phosphate (EMP; a nor-nitrogen mustard conjugate of estradiol). The present study shows that Abca2 knockout (KO) mice have greater sensitivity to a variety of side effects induced by EMP treatment. Chronic EMP (12×100 mg/kg body weight) produced mortality in 36% of KO mice, but only 7% of age-matched wild type (WT). Side effects of the drug were also more prevalent in the KO mouse. For example, during the first week of EMP treatments, 67% of KO males (compared to 6% of WT males) responded with episodic erectile events. In WT mice, ABCA2 protein localized within pene corpuscles, (which rely on modified Schwann cells for amplification of tactile signals) suggesting that the transporter may function in the erectile process. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; a source of nitric oxide during erectile response) levels were similar in WT and KO male penile tissue. Treatment with 100 mg/kg EMP (once daily for four days) elevated serum estradiol and estrone in both WT and KO. However, the circulating levels of these estrogens were higher in KO mice implying a reduced plasma clearance of estrogens as a consequence of ABCA2 ablation. Consistent with the pro-convulsant effects of estrogens, KO mice also displayed an increased incidence of seizures following EMP (14% vs. 0%). Taken together, these data indicate that ABCA2 deficiency renders mice more sensitive to EMP treatment-induced effects implying that the transporter has a role in regulating EMP transport and/or metabolism. PMID:22898081

  9. Respiration and protein synthesis in nongrowing cultured pear fruit cells in response to ethylene and modified atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiration of pear fruit (Pyrus communis L. Passe Crassane) cells was monitored after subculture into an auxin-free, mannitol-enriched medium in which the cells remained viable but did not grow. Respiration rates were affected by the presence or absence of sucrose in the medium even though the cells retained reserves of sucrose and starch. Provided the medium contained respirable carbohydrate, exposure to ethylene (1-10 microliters per liter) increased the respiration rate with some acceleration of cell death. In the range from 10 to 2% oxygen by volume, the respiration rate of the cells decreased with oxygen concentration resulting in some prolongation of cell life. Thus, in their responses to ethylene and modified atmospheres, the cells reflected the behavior of harvested fruits. Having defined conditions under which respiration rate could be varied without apparent influence on the quiescent state of the cells, they sought a connection between maintenance respiration and protein turnover. Relative rates of protein synthesis were assessed by measuring ribosome distribution between monosomes and polysomes. In general, the higher the respiration rate the higher the proportion of polysomes supporting the thesis that protein turnover is a variable component of maintenance metabolism. Protein turnover in cells incubated in the presence or absence of sucrose was measured as retained α-amino-3H following a pulse of 3H2O. Turnover was shown to be a quantitatively important component of the maintenance budget and to be more rapidly in cells in media supplemented with sucrose through the chase period. The experiments illustrate that cultured cells may be used to explore aspects of the maintenance metabolism of resting or senescent cells that are not amenable to study in bulky fruit tissues

  10. Dithizone modified magnetic nanoparticles for fast and selective solid phase extraction of trace elements in environmental and biological samples prior to their determination by ICP-OES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guihong; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Hu, Bin

    2012-01-15

    A fast and simple method for analysis of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in environmental and biological samples was developed by combining magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) detection. Dithizone modified silica-coated magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (H(2)Dz-SCMNPs) were prepared and used for MSPE of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The factors affecting the extraction of the target metal ions such as pH, sample volume, eluent, and interfering ions had been investigated and the adsorption mechanism of the target metals on the self-prepared H(2)Dz-SCMNPs was investigated by FT-IR and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of the developed method for Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were 35, 11, 62, and 8ngL(-1), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=10μgL(-1), n=7) were in the range of 1.7-3.1% and the linear range was 0.1-100μgL(-1). The proposed method had been validated by two certified reference materials (GSBZ50009-88 environmental water and GBW07601 human hair), and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also applied for the determination of trace metals in real water and human hair samples with recoveries in the range of 85-110% for the spiked samples. The developed MSPE-ICP-OES method has the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, selectivity, high extraction efficiency and is suitable for the analysis of samples with large volume and complex matrix. PMID:22265534

  11. Responsividade materna: aspectos biológicos e variações culturais Maternal responsiveness: biological aspects and cultural variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ferreira Paes Ribas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir criticamente alguns aspectos biológicos e variações culturais relativos ao conceito de responsividade materna. Está subdividido em duas partes. A primeira delas trata da responsividade e seus aspectos biológicos e variações culturais. A segunda apresenta duas grandes tendências de pesquisa sobre responsividade materna e variações culturais. As considerações finais sistematizam os argumentos críticos apresentados e destacam que as iniciativas de investigar este tema devem estar pautadas pelo reconhecimento de que a responsividade materna é uma das características das interações adulto-criança que tem origens e influências múltiplas. Nesse sentido, a sua compreensão deve estar incluída em um sistema amplo de referência que envolva, por exemplo, variáveis biológicas, contextuais, da história da díade e culturais.The purpose of this article was to critically discuss some biological aspects and cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. It consists of two parts. The first discusses responsiveness and its biological aspects and cultural variations. The second part presents two major research tendencies in the investigations of cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. Our conclusion presents a brief of the critical arguments and highlights the need to recognize that maternal responsiveness is one of the adult-child interaction characteristics that has multiple origins and influences, from which any investigation in this theme must be based on. As a consequence, those initiatives should be included in a wide reference system that involves, for example, biological, contextual, dyads previous history, and cultural variables.

  12. From ‘Omics to Otoliths: Responses of an Estuarine Fish to Endocrine Disrupting Compounds across Biological Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M.; Connon, Richard E.; He, Guochun; Hobbs, James A.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Teh, Swee J.; White, J. Wilson; Werner, Inge; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) cause physiological abnormalities and population decline in fishes. However, few studies have linked environmental EDC exposures with responses at multiple tiers of the biological hierarchy, including population-level effects. To this end, we undertook a four-tiered investigation in the impacted San Francisco Bay estuary with the Mississippi silverside (Menidia audens), a small pelagic fish. This approach demonstrated links between different EDC sources and fish responses at different levels of biological organization. First we determined that water from a study site primarily impacted by ranch run-off had only estrogenic activity in vitro, while water sampled from a site receiving a combination of urban, limited ranch run-off, and treated wastewater effluent had both estrogenic and androgenic activity. Secondly, at the molecular level we found that fish had higher mRNA levels for estrogen-responsive genes at the site where only estrogenic activity was detected but relatively lower expression levels where both estrogenic and androgenic EDCs were detected. Thirdly, at the organism level, males at the site exposed to both estrogens and androgens had significantly lower mean gonadal somatic indices, significantly higher incidence of severe testicular necrosis and altered somatic growth relative to the site where only estrogens were detected. Finally, at the population level, the sex ratio was significantly skewed towards males at the site with measured androgenic and estrogenic activity. Our results suggest that mixtures of androgenic and estrogenic EDCs have antagonistic and potentially additive effects depending on the biological scale being assessed, and that mixtures containing androgens and estrogens may produce unexpected effects. In summary, evaluating EDC response at multiple tiers is necessary to determine the source of disruption (lowest scale, i.e. cell line) and what the ecological impact will be (largest scale, i

  13. Organization and Biology of the Porcine Serum Amyloid A (SAA) Gene Cluster: Isoform Specific Responses to Bacterial Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Helle G; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Nielsen, Ole L;

    2013-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a prominent acute phase protein. Although its biological functions are debated, the wide species distribution of highly homologous SAA proteins and their uniform behavior in response to injury or inflammation in itself suggests a significant role for this protein. The pig...... is increasingly being used as a model for the study of inflammatory reactions, yet only little is known about how specific SAA genes are regulated in the pig during acute phase responses and other responses induced by pro-inflammatory host mediators. We designed SAA gene specific primers and...... quantified the gene expression of porcine SAA1, SAA2, SAA3, and SAA4 by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in liver, spleen, and lung tissue from pigs experimentally infected with the Gram-negative swine specific bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, as well as from...

  14. Signaling pathways for stress responses and adaptation in Aspergillus species: stress biology in the post-genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Kazutoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi in terms of industrial use and because of their pathogenic or toxin-producing features. The genomes of several Aspergillus species have become publicly available in this decade, and genomic analyses have contributed to an integrated understanding of fungal biology. Stress responses and adaptation mechanisms have been intensively investigated using the accessible genome infrastructure. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have been highlighted as being fundamentally important in fungal adaptation to a wide range of stress conditions. Reverse genetics analyses have uncovered the roles of MAPK pathways in osmotic stress, cell wall stress, development, secondary metabolite production, and conidia stress resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the stress biology of Aspergillus species, illuminating what we have learned from the genomic data in this "post-genomic era." PMID:27007956

  15. The biological response of plucked human hair to low-dose radiation: a measure of individual radiosensitivity and a technique for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often assumed that the effects of radiation are linear with dose and that high dose effects can be extrapolated to low dose levels. However, there are a variety of mechanisms which can alter the response at low doses. The most important of these relate to induced sensitivity or induced repair mechanisms. It is therefore important that this area is studied in more depth by looking at the molecular effects and damage to cells at low doses. It is well known that there are certain rare genetic syndromes which predispose individuals to cancer, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. It is also probable that there is a large range of sensitivity in the natural variation of individuals to the risk of radiation-induced cancer. It is proposed that radiosensitivity is studied using stimulated lymphocytes from whole blood and the technique extended to look at the effects in cell cultures established from human hair. Radiation treatment of cell cultures established from plucked human hair has been previously advocated as a non-invasive technique for non-uniform biological dosimetry and it is proposed that these techniques are adapted to the use of hair to estimate individual radiosensitivity. The aim is to establish and optimize these techniques for culturing keratinocytes from plucked human hair follicles with a view to study biological markers for the subsequent assessment of radiosensitivity. Preliminary results are promising and suggest that the technique for culturing keratinocytes from hair presents a feasible approach. Results from this primary cell culture technique and results from the comparison of the micronuclei data obtained from the cell cultures and stimulated lymphocytes will be presented. (author)

  16. Effects of fumonisin B1 on selected biological responses and performance of broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo H. Rauber; Maurício S. Oliveira; Adriano O. Mallmann; Paulo Dilkin; Carlos A. Mallmann; Leandro Z. Giacomini; Vladimir P. Nascimento

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of three doses of fumonisin B1 (0, 100, and 200mg/kg of feed) on biological variables (relative weight of liver [RWL], total plasma protein [TPP], albumin [Alb], calcium [Ca], phosphorus [P], uric acid [UA], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], gamma glutamyltransferase [GGT], alkaline phosphatase [AP], total cholesterol [Chol], triglycerides [Tri], sphinganine-to-sphingosine ratio [SA:SO], and C-reactive pr...

  17. Modeling marrow damage from response data: evolution from radiation biology to benzene toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D T; Morris, M D; Hasan, J S

    1996-01-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments ...

  18. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS life sciences symposium 2011 on advances in molecular and cell biology of stress response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of symposia in life sciences was initiated for the purpose of facilitating strong interactions among the national research fraternity working in the areas of bio-medical and agricultural sciences of relevance and interest for the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India. Dedicated research efforts in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and other DAE institutions for nearly four decades have not only resulted in the development of technologies and products to improve the quality of human life, but have made impactful contributions in several contemporary areas in basic biological sciences. It is natural that keep visiting certain themes more than once. Biology of stress response is one such theme. The first symposium in the series was devoted to this field. And six years is long enough a time for catching up with the new developments. Stress to a system at equilibrium induces homeostatic mechanisms that ameliorate the stress. Entire living world, from microbes to man, have evolved such response mechanisms. Often a given battery of responsive genes may take care of more than one stresses and there may also be some redundancy in signalling or effector pathways to a response. Oxidative stress in one of the most common stresses that most living systems have to endure. Such a stress could be induced by a wide variety of insults including ionizing radiation, visible light, antibiotics, xenobiotics, metal ions, environmental pollutants, carcinogens, infectious agents etc. It may contribute to some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. It also plays an important role in killing of intracellular pathogens. In recent years mechanistic details of body's antioxidant defences are being increasingly revealed. Even more interesting are the new findings that suggest that prooxidants may induce an adaptive response to help cells survive against death induced by higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of prosurvival transcription factors like NRF-2

  19. Abiotic stressors and stress responses: What commonalities appear between species across biological organization levels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organisms are regularly subjected to abiotic stressors related to increasing anthropogenic activities, including chemicals and climatic changes that induce major stresses. Based on various key taxa involved in ecosystem functioning (photosynthetic microorganisms, plants, invertebrates), we review how organisms respond and adapt to chemical- and temperature-induced stresses from molecular to population level. Using field-realistic studies, our integrative analysis aims to compare i) how molecular and physiological mechanisms related to protection, repair and energy allocation can impact life history traits of stressed organisms, and ii) to what extent trait responses influence individual and population responses. Common response mechanisms are evident at molecular and cellular scales but become rather difficult to define at higher levels due to evolutionary distance and environmental complexity. We provide new insights into the understanding of the impact of molecular and cellular responses on individual and population dynamics and assess the potential related effects on communities and ecosystem functioning. - Highlights: • Responses to chemical and thermal stressors are reviewed across organization levels. • Common responses between taxa are evident at the molecular and cellular scales. • At individual level, energy allocation connects species-specific stress responses. • Commonality decreases at higher levels due to increasing environmental complexity. - The commonality of stress responses to chemical and thermal stressors among taxa is evident at the molecular and cellular scales but remains unclear at higher levels of organization

  20. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  1. Use of Constructed-Response Questions to Support Learning of Cell Biology during Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong May Yeong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of class-response systems such as the Clickers to promote active-learning during lectures has been wide-spread. However, the often-used MCQ format in class activities as well as in assessments for large classes might lower students’ expectations and attitudes towards learning. Here, I describe my experience converting MCQs to constructed-response questions for in-class learning activities by removing cues from the MCQs. From the responses submitted, students seemed capable of providing answers without the need for cues. Using class-response systems such as Socrative for such constructed-response questions could be useful to challenge students to express their ideas in their own words. Moreover, by constructing their own answers, mis-conceptions could be revealed and corrected in a timely manner.

  2. Electrocatalytic response of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion modified electrode toward sulfadiazine in urine*

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Xiao-ping; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan-zhen

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive amperometric sulfadiazine sensor fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine) (poly(CoIITAPc)) on the surface of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion (MWCNTs-Nafion) modified electrode is described. This electrode showed a very attractive performance by combining the advantages of CoIITAPc, MWCNTs, and Nafion. Compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the MWCNTs-Nafion modified electrode, the electrocatalytic activity of...

  3. Hydrology modifies ecosystem responses to warming through interactions between soil, leaf and canopy processes in a high Arctic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseyk, K. S.; Welker, J. M.; Lett, C.; Czimczik, C. I.; Lupascu, M.; Seibt, U. H.

    2013-12-01

    . Net carbon and water fluxes in the elevated temperature plots were similar to the control plots, as enhanced soil respiration offset the increased photosynthetic uptake. The T2 plants also had the highest leaf N content and specific leaf area (SLA), whereas watering, both in combination with higher temperatures and alone, reduced leaf SLA and leaf N relative to control plots. Warming increases soil N availability, but this is allocated differently depending on the precipitation regime. Where water limitation prevents increased canopy development the plants direct the N towards increasing the photosynthetic capacity of larger, thinner leaves, increasing leaf-level light use efficiency. However, with additional water, the distribution of N over a larger total leaf area results in overall greater productivity gains. Hydrology clearly modifies the response to warming in high Arctic ecosystems, through soil-plant interactions affecting both leaf and canopy scale processes. Our results provide a unique data set with which to parameterize and test models of ecosystem responses in the coming century.

  4. Superior in vitro biological response and mechanical properties of an implantable nanostructured biomaterial: Nanohydroxyapatite-silicone rubber composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Han, W W; Shah, J; Misra, R D K

    2009-09-01

    A potential approach to achieving the objective of favorably modulating the biological response of implantable biopolymers combined with good mechanical properties is to consider compounding the biopolymer with a bioactive nanocrystalline ceramic biomimetic material with high surface area. The processing of silicone rubber (SR)-nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) composite involved uniform dispersion of nHA via shear mixing and ultrasonication, followed by compounding at sub-ambient temperature, and high-pressure solidification when the final curing reaction occurs. The high-pressure solidification approach enabled the elastomer to retain the high elongation of SR even in the presence of the reinforcement material, nHA. The biological response of the nanostructured composite in terms of initial cell attachment, cell viability and proliferation was consistently greater on SR-5wt.% nHA composite surface compared to pure SR. Furthermore, in the nanocomposite, cell spreading, morphology and density were distinctly different from that of pure SR. Pre-osteoblasts grown on SR-nHA were well spread, flat, large in size with a rough cell surface, and appeared as a group. In contrast, these features were less pronounced in SR (e.g. smooth cell surface, not well spread). Interestingly, an immunofluorescence study illustrated distinct fibronectin expression level, and stronger vinculin focal adhesion contacts associated with abundant actin stress fibers in pre-osteoblasts grown on the nanocomposite compared to SR, implying enhanced cell-substrate interaction. This finding was consistent with the total protein content and SDS-PAGE analysis. The study leads us to believe that further increase in nHA content in the SR matrix beyond 5wt.% will encourage even greater cellular response. The integration of cellular and molecular biology with materials science and engineering described herein provides a direction for the development of a new generation of nanostructured materials. PMID:19435616

  5. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  6. Mechanisms Responsible for High Energy Radiation Induced Damage to Single-Stranded DNA Modified by Radiosensitizing 5-Halogenated Deoxyuridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shoushan; Zhao, Peiwen; Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-03-17

    Experimental studies showed that high energy radiation induced base release and DNA backbone breaks mainly occur at the neighboring 5' nucleotide when a single-stranded DNA is modified by radiosensitizing 5-halogenated deoxyuridines. However, no mechanism can be used to interpret these experimental observations. To better understand the radiosensitivity of 5-halogenated deoxyuridines, mechanisms involving hydrogen abstraction by the uracil-5-yl radical from the C2' and C3' positions of an adjacent nucleotide separately followed by the C3'-O3' or N-glycosidic bond rupture and the P-O3' bond breakage are investigated in the DNA sequence 5'-TU(•)-3' employing density functional theory calculations in the present study. It is found that hydrogen abstractions from both positions are comparable with the one from the C2' site slightly more favorable. The N-glycosidic bond cleavage in the neighboring 5' nucleotide following the internucleotide C2'-Ha abstraction is estimated to have the lowest activation free energies, indicating that the adjacent 5' base release dominates electron induced damage to single-stranded DNA incorporated by 5-halogenated deoxyuridines. Relative to the P-O3' bond breakage after the internucleotide C3'-H abstraction, the C3'-O3' bond rupture in the neighboring 5' nucleotide following the internucleotide C2'-Ha abstraction is predicted to have a lower activation free energy, implying that single-stranded DNA backbone breaks are prone to occur at the C3'-O3' bond site. The 5'-TU(•)-3' species has substantial electron affinity and can even capture a hydrated electron, forming the 5'-TU(-)-3' anion. However, the electron induced C3'-O3' bond rupture in 5'-TU(-)-3' anion via a pathway of internucleotide proton abstraction is only minor in both the gas phase and aqueous solution. The present theoretical predictions can interpret rationally experimental observations, thereby demonstrating that the mechanisms proposed here are responsible for high

  7. Knowlege of, attitudes toward, and acceptance of genetically modified organisms among prospective teachers of biology, home economics, and grade school in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Šorgo, Andrej; Ambrožič-Dolinšek, Jana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, opinions, and attitudes toward, as well as readiness to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) among prospective primary and secondary Slovene teachers. Our findings are that prospective teachers want to take an active role in rejecting or supporting individual GMOs and are aware of the importance of education about genetically modified organism (GMO) items and their potential significance for society. Through cluster analysis, w...

  8. Two color probing of the ultrafast photo-acoustic response in a single biological cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the mechanical properties of single biological cells with a nanometer depth resolution using only coherent light is proposed. A pump-probe set-up based on an ultrafast laser (100 fs pulses) is used to excite and detect acoustic frequencies in the GHz range. Experiments are performed on single fixed mouse MC3T3 cells adhering on titanium alloy substrate. Using two different probe wavelengths, the contributions to the optical detection resulting from the cell interface displacements and from interactions between acoustic waves and the laser light are identified. Semi-analytical calculations allow the determination of acoustic celerities and thicknesses in cells thinner than 150 nm.

  9. A modifying method of recorded earthquake ground motion for matching design response spectrum and peak ground displacement in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modification method of recorded earthquake ground motion was proposed for matching the design pseudo velocity response spectrum and target peak ground displacement in nuclear power plants. The method applies the second cardinal B-spline wavelet to decompose the recorded real records into the finite wavelet components. Then the wavelet components which mostly affect the peak ground displacement and peak ground acceleration can be searched out, By improving the wavelet-based modifying method and wavelet synthesis method, the earthquake ground motions have been modified to match the target response spectrum and target peak values of displacement and acceleration. The results of the numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed algorithms boast high precision. (authors)

  10. Effects of fumonisin B1 on selected biological responses and performance of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo H. Rauber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of three doses of fumonisin B1 (0, 100, and 200mg/kg of feed on biological variables (relative weight of liver [RWL], total plasma protein [TPP], albumin [Alb], calcium [Ca], phosphorus [P], uric acid [UA], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], gamma glutamyltransferase [GGT], alkaline phosphatase [AP], total cholesterol [Chol], triglycerides [Tri], sphinganine-to-sphingosine ratio [SA:SO], and C-reactive protein [CRP], morphological evaluation of the small intestine (villus height [VH], crypt depth [CD], and villus-to-crypt ratio [V:C], histological evaluation, and on performance (body weight [BW], feed intake [FI], and feed conversion rate [FCR] of broiler chickens. Significant effects of FB were observed on BW and FI (reduced, on RWL, TPP, Ca, ALT, AST, GGT, Chol, and Tri (increased at both 14 and 28 days evaluations. In addition, significant increase was observed on FCR, Alb, P, SA:SO, and CRP and significant reduction in UA, VH, and V:C only at the 28 days evaluation. Significant histological lesions were observed on liver and kidney of FB inoculated broilers at 14 and 28 days. Those results show that FB has a significant effect on biological and histological variables and on performance of broiler chickens.

  11. Synthesis by anodic-spark deposition of Ca- and P-containing films on pure titanium and their biological response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakh, Oksana; Journot, Tony; Gay, Pierre-Antoine; Matthey, Joël; Csefalvay, Catherine; Kalinichenko, Oleg; Sereda, Olha; Moussa, Mira; Durual, Stéphane; Snizhko, Lyubov

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the anodized layers formed on titanium by anodic-spark deposition in an electrolyte containing Ca and P ions, Ca3(PO4)2, studied for the first time. The oxidation experiments were performed at different periods of time and using different concentrations of electrolyte. The influence of the process parameters (time of electrolysis and electrolyte concentration) on the surface morphology and chemical composition of the anodized layers was studied. It has been found that it is possible to incorporate Ca and P into the growing layer. A response of the anodized layers in a biological medium was evaluated by their immersion in a simulated body fluid. An enrichment of titanium and a simultaneous loss of calcium and phosphorus in the layer after immersion tests indicate that these coatings should be bioresorbable in a biological medium. Preliminary biological assays were performed on some anodized layers in order to assess their biocompatibility with osteoblast cells. The cell proliferation on one selected anodized sample was assessed up to 21 days after seeding. The preliminary results suggest excellent biocompatibility properties of anodized coatings.

  12. Mutagenic potential scale developed for relative evaluation of biological system response to environments presenting different gamma exposure rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elaboration of a mutagenic potential scale (MPS) will be accomplished through the evaluation of the frequency of induced mutations in a plant biological system in different sites. The selection of these sites will be based on general public perception of risk to health. In this selection, it will include areas such ecological paradises and also neighborhoods of nuclear reactors and uranium mining and milling industry with potential radiological impact. The developed project foresees the contribution of other research groups that will also provide data from different sites. The referred scale will be built based on the response of the genetic system that gives color to the cells of Tradescantia (BNL 4430) stamen hair to mutagenic agents. Methodological improvements has been developed aiming the computerization of mutagenic events evaluation and statistical analysis of data that will significantly increase the efficiency of the system and obtention of results. Other biological systems of environmental quality are being added to the project, for future use. MPS should facilitate the general public and professionals of the nuclear area to understand risks, on a biological basis, of exposure from radiologically impacted environments. (author)

  13. Comprehensive data-driven analysis of the impact of chemoinformatic structure on the genome-wide biological response profiles of cancer cells to 1159 drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Suleiman A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed and systematic understanding of the biological effects of millions of available compounds on living cells is a significant challenge. As most compounds impact multiple targets and pathways, traditional methods for analyzing structure-function relationships are not comprehensive enough. Therefore more advanced integrative models are needed for predicting biological effects elicited by specific chemical features. As a step towards creating such computational links we developed a data-driven chemical systems biology approach to comprehensively study the relationship of 76 structural 3D-descriptors (VolSurf, chemical space of 1159 drugs with the microarray gene expression responses (biological space they elicited in three cancer cell lines. The analysis covering 11350 genes was based on data from the Connectivity Map. We decomposed the biological response profiles into components, each linked to a characteristic chemical descriptor profile. Results Integrated analysis of both the chemical and biological space was more informative than either dataset alone in predicting drug similarity as measured by shared protein targets. We identified ten major components that link distinct VolSurf chemical features across multiple compounds to specific cellular responses. For example, component 2 (hydrophobic properties strongly linked to DNA damage response, while component 3 (hydrogen bonding was associated with metabolic stress. Individual structural and biological features were often linked to one cell line only, such as leukemia cells (HL-60 specifically responding to cardiac glycosides. Conclusions In summary, our approach identified several novel links between specific chemical structure properties and distinct biological responses in cells incubated with these drugs. Importantly, the analysis focused on chemical-biological properties that emerge across multiple drugs. The decoding of such systematic relationships is necessary

  14. Does Fasciola hepatica infection modify the response of acute hepatitis C virus infection to IFN-α treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Sahin; Mehmet Isler; Altug Senol; Mustafa Demirci; Zeynep Dilek Aydin

    2005-01-01

    Immunologic response to acute hepatitis C is mainly a Th1 response, whereas fasciolopsiasis is associated with a diverse T-cell response. Interferon-alpha has immunomodulatory effects and enhances Th1 immune response. Fasciola infection could theoretically interfere with the Th1 immune response, even when acquired after an initial response to interferon-alpha treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report here the case of a male patient who acquired Fasciola hepatica infection after an initial response to IFN-alpha therapy with a favorable outcome

  15. Apparatus and Methods for Manipulation and Optimization of Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Ming (Inventor); Wong, Pak Kin (Inventor); Sun, Ren (Inventor); Yu, Fuqu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides systems and methods for manipulating biological systems, for example to elicit a more desired biological response from a biological sample, such as a tissue, organ, and/or a cell. In one aspect, the invention operates by efficiently searching through a large parametric space of stimuli and system parameters to manipulate, control, and optimize the response of biological samples sustained in the system. In one aspect, the systems and methods of the invention use at least one optimization algorithm to modify the actuator's control inputs for stimulation, responsive to the sensor's output of response signals. The invention can be used, e.g., to optimize any biological system, e.g., bioreactors for proteins, and the like, small molecules, polysaccharides, lipids, and the like. Another use of the apparatus and methods includes is for the discovery of key parameters in complex biological systems.

  16. Evaluation of electro-oxidation of biologically treated landfill leachate using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Ran, Xiaoni; Wu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Daobin

    2011-04-15

    Box-Behnken statistical experiment design and response surface methodology were used to investigate electrochemical oxidation of mature landfill leachate pretreated by sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Titanium coated with ruthenium dioxide (RuO(2)) and iridium dioxide (IrO(2)) was used as the anode in this study. The variables included current density, inter-electrode gap and reaction time. Response factors were ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency and COD removal efficiency. The response surface methodology models were derived based on the results. The predicted values calculated with the model equations were very close to the experimental values and the models were highly significant. The organic components before and after electrochemical oxidation were determined by GC-MS. PMID:21334807

  17. The immune response in Drosophila: pattern of cecropin expression and biological activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Samakovlis, C; Kimbrell, D A; Kylsten, P; Engström, A.; Hultmark, D

    1990-01-01

    Cecropins are antibacterial peptides, induced in Drosophila as part of the humoral immune response to a bacterial invasion. We have used the cloned Drosophila cecropin genes CecA1, A2 and B as probes to study the developmental and tissue specific regulation of this response. The genes are strongly expressed in fat body and hemocytes after injection of bacteria, the CecA genes being much more active than CecB in the fat body. All parts of the fat body and 5-10% of the hemocytes are involved in...

  18. Genome-wide association study and biological pathway analysis for response to Eimeria maxima in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Hérault, Frédéric;

    2015-01-01

    costs for development of efficient vaccines, respectively. Therefore, the present control programs must be expanded with complementary approaches such as the use of genetics for improvement of the host’s response to Eimeria infections. Recently, we have performed a large-scale challenge study on Cobb500...... broilers using E. maxima where we investigated variability among animals in response to the challenge. Taking advantage of size and structure of the large-scale challenge study, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with the aim to identify genomic regions underlying variability of the...

  19. Reproductive biology and functional response of Dineulophus phtorimaeae, a natural enemy of the tomato moth, Tuta absoluta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Vivina; Coviella, Carlos E; Luna, María G

    2012-01-01

    The tomato moth, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a major pest in South America and is at present an important invasive species in the Mediterranean Basin. The larval stadium mines leaves, stems, and fruits, and chemical control is the most used control method in both its original range and the invaded distribution regions. Since current T. absoluta control strategies seem limited, biological control is a prominent tool to be applied abroad. The naturally occurring larval ectoparasitoid in Argentina and Chile Dineulophus phtorimaeae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) has been reported to have potential biocontrol efficiency. In this study, the ovigeny strategy of D. phtorimaeae was analyzed throughout the adult female lifetime, and the functional response of females offered a range of 2-15 T. absoluta larvae was measured over a 48-hour period. Mean D. phtorimaeae egg load was 4.15 eggs, and egg production resulted in extremely synovigenic behavior. Meanwhile, a decreasing number of eggs, due to resorption, was found. Proportions of attacked (host-fed and/or parasitized) and only host-fed hosts by the ectoparasitoid were density independent for the tested host range, exhibiting a type I functional response to T. absoluta, with an attack rate of 0.20 host larvae. Meanings of this reproductive strategy in evolutionary time as well as the consequences for augmentative biological control programs are discussed. PMID:23464576

  20. Field Trial Assessment of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Responses of Soil to Tillage Intensity, Fertilization, and Grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Gil, Silvina; Becker, Analia; Oddino, Claudio; Zuza, Mónica; Marinelli, Adriana; March, Guillermo

    2009-08-01

    Soil microbial populations can fluctuate in response to environmental changes and, therefore, are often used as biological indicators of soil quality. Soil chemical and physical parameters can also be used as indicators because they can vary in response to different management strategies. A long-term field trial was conducted to study the effects of different tillage systems (NT: no tillage, DH: disc harrow, and MP: moldboard plough), P fertilization (diammonium phosphate), and cattle grazing (in terms of crop residue consumption) in maize ( Zea mays L.), sunflower ( Heliantus annuus L.), and soybean ( Glycine max L.) on soil biological, chemical, and physical parameters. The field trial was conducted for four crop years (2000/2001, 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2003/2004). Soil populations of Actinomycetes, Trichoderma spp., and Gliocladium spp. were 49% higher under conservation tillage systems, in soil amended with diammonium phosphate (DAP) and not previously grazed. Management practices also influenced soil chemical parameters, especially organic matter content and total N, which were 10% and 55% higher under NT than under MP. Aggregate stability was 61% higher in NT than in MP, 15% higher in P-fertilized soil, and also 9% higher in not grazed strips, bulk density being 12% lower in NT systems compared with MP. DAP application and the absence of grazing also reduced bulk density (3%). Using conservation tillage systems, fertilizing crops with DAP, and avoiding grazing contribute to soil health preservation and enhanced crop production.

  1. Response of a biological model to a proton beam in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wistar rats were locally irradiated with proton beams. By means of a plastic wedge used as an energy degradator of variable thickness, dorsal portions of skin were irradiated at several tissue depths. This model was used to perform proton irradiations with different doses in both the plateau and the Bragg portions of the Bragg curve. The particular geometry of the wedge, in which the maximum thickness is greater than the proton range, yields a portion of unaffected tissue included in the irradiated area. Thus, it was possible to obtain a reference zone contiguous to the affected area in the same animal. SSNTD were used to establish the spatial configuration and the dose of the proton beams. This methodology allows isodose curve calculations along the different tissue depths which are in agreement with the biologic effects observed. Additionally, the scattering of protons on the shielding material, that affects specific areas of the tissue, is detected by the SSNTD. (author)

  2. Magnetically responsive polycaprolactone nanoparticles for progesterone screening in biological and environmental samples using gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Nezhadali, Azizollah; Khatibi, Aram-Dokht

    2016-08-01

    A new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite nanocomposite was fabricated and used as a sorbent for magnetically mediated PCL microspheres solid-phase extraction (MM-PCL-SPE) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for monitoring of progesterone (PGN) hormone in biological and environmental matrices, namely blood serum, tap water, urine, and hospital wastewater. The nanomagnetite core of the sorbent was synthesized by a co-precipitation method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were then microencapsulated with PCL microspheres using emulsion polymerization. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The magnetite sorbent can be effectively dispersed in aqueous solution and attracted to an external magnetic field. The MM-PCL-SPE process for PGN assay involved (a) dispersion of the sorbent in the donor phase aqueous solution with sonication, (b) exposure to a magnetic field to collect sorbent that had adsorbed the analyte, and (c) solvent desorption of extracted PGN for GC-FID analysis. The work demonstrates the usefulness of MM-PCL-SPE in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of trace amounts of PGN in real samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.00 and 3.30 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries in real samples were adequate. Linearity was observed over a wide range of 2.2-10,000.0 ng/mL in aqueous media and urine and 0.01-70.0 μg/mL in blood serum. Graphical Abstract In this research new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite microspheres were developed as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction of progesterone hormone in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:27299775

  3. Computational Systems Biology and Dose Response Modeling Workshop, September 22-26, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recently published National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century” recommends a new approach to toxicity testing, based on evaluating cellular responses in a suite of toxicity pathway assays in human cells or cells lines in vitro. Such a parad...

  4. The immune response in Drosophila: pattern of cecropin expression and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samakovlis, C; Kimbrell, D A; Kylsten, P; Engström, A; Hultmark, D

    1990-09-01

    Cecropins are antibacterial peptides, induced in Drosophila as part of the humoral immune response to a bacterial invasion. We have used the cloned Drosophila cecropin genes CecA1, A2 and B as probes to study the developmental and tissue specific regulation of this response. The genes are strongly expressed in fat body and hemocytes after injection of bacteria, the CecA genes being much more active than CecB in the fat body. All parts of the fat body and 5-10% of the hemocytes are involved in this response. CecA1 and A2 are most active in larvae and adults; CecB is preferentially active in early pupae. A small peak of constitutive cecropin expression in early pupae appears to be caused by bacteria in the food. Cecropin A, the common product of the CecA1 and A2 genes, was identified in the hemolymph of immunized flies at a concentration of 25-50 microM, enough to kill all tested bacteria except Serratia, a Drosophila pathogen. A useful in vitro system to study the immune response has been found in Schneider's line 2 cells which respond to lipopolysaccharide and laminarin by cecropin expression. PMID:2390977

  5. The promise of biological markers for treatment response in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fond, Guillaume; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane;

    2015-01-01

    -no or only a few biomarkers for response or side effects, none of which have been implemented in daily clinical practice. Other biomarkers exploring immunoinflammatory, oxidative, and hormonal disturbances emerged as biomarkers of first-episode psychoses in the last decades, and some of them have been...

  6. Integrating Responsible Conduct of Research Education into Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these…

  7. Psychology, biology and the market place: response to John Radford’s 'Psychology in its place'

    OpenAIRE

    Dickins, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    This article is a response to John Radford's 'Psychology in its place'. The author argues that psychologists should pay attention to those in the human evolutionary behavioural sciences because academic psychology must be allowed to pursue scientific methods and follow particular interests as the market of ideas dictates in the interests of intellectual progress.

  8. Modified Primers for the Identification of Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Isolates That Have Biological Control Potential against Fusarium Wilt of Cucumber in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chaojen Wang; Yisheng Lin; Yinghong Lin; Wenhsin Chung

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), which is not pathogenic to cucumbers, could serve as a biological control agent for managing Fusarium wilt of cucumber caused by Fo f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc) in Taiwan. However, thus far it has not been possible to separate the populations of pathogenic Fo from the nonpathogenic isolates that have biological control potential through their morphological characteristics. Although these two populations can be distinguished from o...

  9. Knowlege of, attitudes toward, and acceptance of genetically modified organisms among prospective teachers of biology, home economics, and grade school in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Andrej; Ambrožič-Dolinšek, Jana

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, opinions, and attitudes toward, as well as readiness to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) among prospective primary and secondary Slovene teachers. Our findings are that prospective teachers want to take an active role in rejecting or supporting individual GMOs and are aware of the importance of education about genetically modified organism (GMO) items and their potential significance for society. Through cluster analysis, we recognized four clusters of GMOs, separated by degree of genetically modified acceptability. GM plants and microorganisms which are recognized as useful are accepted. They are undecided about organisms used in research or medicine and reject organisms used for food consumption and for fun. There are only weak correlations between knowledge and attitudes and knowledge and acceptance of GMOs, and a strong correlation between attitudes and acceptance. The appropriate strategies and actions for improving university courses in biotechnology are discussed. PMID:21567816

  10. Application of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode for Determination of Mefenamic Acid in Pharmaceutical Preparations and Biological Fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemically modified electrode is constructed based on multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). It is demonstrated that this sensor could be used for determination of pharmaceutically important compound mefenamic acid (MEF). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) experiments of various concentration of MEF showed two linear dynamic ranges. The first linear dynamic range was from 2 micro M to 40 micro M, and the second linear dynamic range was between 50 micro M to 360 micro M. A detection limit of 0.21 micro M (S/N = 3) was obtained. Under optimal conditions the modified electrode exhibited high sensitivity and stability for determination of MEF, making it a suitable sensor for the submicromolar detection of MEF in solutions. The analytical performance of this sensor has been evaluated for the detection of MEF in human serum, human urine and a pharmaceutical preparation with satisfactory results. (author)

  11. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. PMID:26930702

  12. A system biology approach highlights a hormonal enhancer effect on regulation of genes in a nitrate responsive "biomodule"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nero Damion

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrate-induced reprogramming of the transcriptome has recently been shown to be highly context dependent. Herein, a systems biology approach was developed to identify the components and role of cross-talk between nitrate and hormone signals, likely to be involved in the conditional response of NO3- signaling. Results Biclustering was used to identify a set of genes that are N-responsive across a range of Nitrogen (N-treatment backgrounds (i.e. nitrogen treatments under different growth conditions using a meta-dataset of 76 Affymetrix ATH1 chips from 5 different laboratories. Twenty-one biclusters were found to be N-responsive across subsets of this meta-dataset. N-bicluster 9 (126 genes was selected for further analysis, as it was shown to be reproducibly responsive to NO3- as a signal, across a wide-variety of background conditions and datasets. N-bicluster 9 genes were then used as "seed" to identify putative cross-talk mechanisms between nitrate and hormone signaling. For this, the 126 nitrate-regulated genes in N-bicluster 9 were biclustered over a meta-dataset of 278 ATH1 chips spanning a variety of hormone treatments. This analysis divided the bicluster 9 genes into two classes: i genes controlled by NO3- only vs. ii genes controlled by both NO3- and hormones. The genes in the latter group showed a NO3- response that is significantly enhanced, compared to the former. In silico analysis identified two Cis-Regulatory Elements candidates (CRE (E2F, HSE potentially involved the interplay between NO3- and hormonal signals. Conclusion This systems analysis enabled us to derive a hypothesis in which hormone signals are proposed to enhance the nitrate response, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the link between nitrate signaling and the control of plant development.

  13. Biologically Inspired Design Principles for Scalable, Robust, Adaptive, Decentralized Search and Automated Response (RADAR)

    OpenAIRE

    Moses, Melanie; Banerjee, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Distributed search problems are ubiquitous in Artificial Life (ALife). Many distributed search problems require identifying a rare and previously unseen event and producing a rapid response. This challenge amounts to finding and removing an unknown needle in a very large haystack. Traditional computational search models are unlikely to find, nonetheless, appropriately respond to, novel events, particularly given data distributed across multiple platforms in a variety of formats and sources wi...

  14. Biology of lithium response in bipolar disorder : genetic mechanisms and telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Martinsson, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorder is a common, chronic and severe mental illness, causing suffering and large costs. Lithium treatment is the golden standard and works in 2/3 of patients, of which 50% are called lithium responders. There is strong evidence that both bipolar disorder and the degree of lithium response are highly heritable, although many mechanisms are unknown. Short telomere length has been found in both somatic and psychiatric disorders, but little is known about te...

  15. Biological Responses of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Titanium Wear Debris Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Argintar, Evan; Bush, Curtis; Hampton, Daniel; Postma, William F.; Chen, Faye H.; Rimington, Todd; Lamb, Joshua; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2011-01-01

    Wear debris-induced osteolysis is a major cause of orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types, including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. We recently showed that mesenchymal stem/osteoprogenitor cells (MSCs) are another target, and that endocytosis of titanium (Ti) particles causes reduced MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanistic aspects of the endocytosis-mediated responses of MSCs to Ti parti...

  16. Botanical and biological pesticides elicit a similar Induced Systemic Response in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretali, Luca; Bernardo, Letizia; Butterfield, Timothy S; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Natural pesticides have attracted substantial interest due to the increase in organic agriculture and enhanced attention to environmental pollution. Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) are applied for both disease control and growth enhancement; PGPBs are known to elicit Induced Systemic Response (ISR) in plants. However, less is known about the effect of botanical pesticides, such as the azadirachtin-containing neem extracts, on plant metabolism. This study aimed to investigate the effects of foliar application of the above-mentioned natural pesticides on the metabolic profiling of tomato. Leaf application of Bacillus subtilis fostered Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) in treated plants via the Jasmonic acid pathway, and enhanced production of secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, phytoalexins and auxins. Changes in sterols and terpenes, as well as an increase in glucosinolates were also observed. Interestingly, azadirachtin-treated tomatoes also showed an increase in ISR and our results revealed that most of the enriched metabolites are shared with a B. subtilis treatment, suggesting conserved biochemical responses. These (un)expected findings indicate that plants are not insensitive to application of natural pesticide and while Azadirachtin is applied as a direct pesticide, it also stimulates a defense response in tomatoes very similar to B. subtilis induced ISR. PMID:27251587

  17. Biological Features of Human Papillomavirus-related Head and Neck Cancers Contributing to Improved Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, C; Leeman, J E; Higginson, D S; Katabi, N; Sherman, E; Morris, L; McBride, S; Lee, N; Riaz, N

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are the sixth most common malignancy globally, and an increasing proportion of oropharyngeal HNSCCs are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Patients with HPV-associated tumours have markedly improved overall and disease-specific survival compared with their HPV-negative counterparts when treated with chemoradiation. Although the difference in outcomes between these two groups is clearly established, the mechanism underlying these differences remains an area of investigation. Data from preclinical, clinical and genomics studies have started to suggest that an increase in radio-sensitivity of HPV-positive HNSCC may be responsible for improved outcomes, the putative mechanisms of which we will review here. The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have recently documented a multitude of molecular differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumours. Preclinical investigations by multiple groups have explored possible mechanisms of increased sensitivity to therapy, including examining differences in DNA repair, hypoxia and the immune response. In addition to differences in the response to therapy, some groups have started to investigate phenotypic differences between the two diseases, such as tumour invasiveness. Finally, we will conclude with a brief review of ongoing clinical trials that are attempting to de-escalate treatment to minimise long-term toxicity while maintaining cure rates. New insights from preclinical and genomic studies may eventually lead to personalised treatment paradigms for HPV-positive patients. PMID:27052795

  18. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  19. Cholesterol metabolism: A review of how ageing disrupts the biological mechanisms responsible for its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-05-01

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in the human body as a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids, in addition to providing structure to cell membranes. Whole body cholesterol metabolism is maintained by a highly coordinated balancing act between cholesterol ingestion, synthesis, absorption, and excretion. The aim of this review is to discuss how ageing interacts with these processes. Firstly, we will present an overview of cholesterol metabolism. Following this, we discuss how the biological mechanisms which underpin cholesterol metabolism are effected by ageing. Included in this discussion are lipoprotein dynamics, cholesterol absorption/synthesis and the enterohepatic circulation/synthesis of bile acids. Moreover, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathological progression of atherosclerosis and also discuss how cholesterol biosynthesis is effected by both the mammalian target of rapamycin and sirtuin pathways. Next, we examine how diet and alterations to the gut microbiome can be used to mitigate the impact ageing has on cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by discussing how mathematical models of cholesterol metabolism can be used to identify therapeutic interventions. PMID:27045039

  20. Response of the Baltic and North Seas to river runoff from the Baltic watershed - Physical and biological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen, Jari; Vuorinen, Ilppo; Rajasilta, Marjut; Reid, Philip C.

    2015-11-01

    Selected Baltic Sea watershed River Runoff (BSRR) events during 1970-2000 were used as predictor in Generalised Linear Mixed Models (GLIMMIX) for evidence of simultaneous changes/chain of events (including possible time lags) in some chemical, physical and biological variables in the Baltic and North Sea ecosystems. Our aim was to explore for climatic-based explanation for ecological regime shifts that were documented semi-simultaneously in both ecosystems. Certain similarities were identified in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea salinity, oxygen concentration, temperature and phyto- and zooplankton parameters. These findings suggest that BSRR events which originate in the Baltic Sea catchment area modify and contribute to large scale ecosystem changes not only in the Baltic Sea, but also in the adjacent parts of the North Sea. However, the Baltic Sea inter-annual and inter-decadal variabilities of physical and biological parameters are driven by direct atmospheric forcing, typically with a relatively short lag. In contrast, such changes in the North Sea are influenced by both local and direct atmospheric forcing, typically with a longer lag than in the Baltic, and a more regional, indirect forcing from changes in the North Atlantic. We suggest that this interactive system partially is behind large scale ecosystem regime shifts found in both Seas. During our study period two such shifts have been identified independently from us in a study earlier in the Southern and Central Baltic in 1980s and 1990s and a later one in 2001/2002 in the North Sea. As a post hoc test we compared the 0+ year class strength of the North Sea herring with BSRR intensity, and found evidence for higher herring production in high BSRR periods, which further corroborates the idea of a remote effect from the large watershed area of the Baltic. Regime shifts as well as their semi-synchronous appearance in two neighbouring sea areas could be identified. GLIMMIX models provide opportunities for

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of conformationally restricted and nucleobase-modified analogs of the anticancer compound 3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Jepsen, Jan S; Wengel, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    A series of conformationally restricted and nucleobase-modified analogs of the anticancer compound 3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) and its uracil analog (EUrd) have been synthesized. While none of the conformationally restricted analogs displayed anticancer activity, 5-iodo-EUrd and 5-bromo-EUrd disp...

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nucleobase-modified analogs of the anticancer compounds 3'-C-ethynyluridine (EUrd) and 3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Jepsen, Jan S; Nielsen, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    A series of nucleobase-modified analogs of the anticancer compounds 3'-C-ethynyluridine (EUrd) and 3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) were designed to overcome the strict substrate specificity of the activating uridine-cytidine kinase. EUrd, ECyd and target nucleosides were obtained using a short conver...

  3. Knowledge of, Attitudes toward, and Acceptance of Genetically Modified Organisms among Prospective Teachers of Biology, Home Economics, and Grade School in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Andrej; Ambrozic-Dolinsek, Jana

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, opinions, and attitudes toward, as well as readiness to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) among prospective primary and secondary Slovene teachers. Our findings are that prospective teachers want to take an active role in rejecting or supporting individual GMOs and are aware of…

  4. Transition from Bioinert to Bioactive Material by Tailoring the Biological Cell Response to Carboxylated Nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kai; Rocha, Igor; Zhang, Peng; Gustafsson, Simon; Ning, Yi; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Ferraz, Natalia

    2016-03-14

    This work presents an insight into the relationship between cell response and physicochemical properties of Cladophora cellulose (CC) by investigating the effect of CC functional group density on the response of model cell lines. CC was carboxylated by electrochemical TEMPO-mediated oxidation. By varying the amount of charge passed through the electrolysis setup, CC materials with different degrees of oxidation were obtained. The effect of carboxyl group density on the material's physicochemical properties was investigated together with the response of human dermal fibroblasts (hDF) and human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) to the carboxylated CC films. The introduction of carboxyl groups resulted in CC films with decreased specific surface area and smaller total pore volume compared with the unmodified CC (u-CC). While u-CC films presented a porous network of randomly oriented fibers, a compact and aligned fiber pattern was depicted for the carboxylated-CC films. The decrease in surface area and total pore volume, and the orientation and aggregation of the fibers tended to augment parallel to the increase in the carboxyl group density. hDF and Saos-2 cells presented poor cell adhesion and spreading on u-CC, which gradually increased for the carboxylated CC as the degree of oxidation increased. It was found that a threshold value in carboxyl group density needs be reached to obtain a carboxylated-CC film with cytocompatibility comparable to commercial tissue culture material. Hence, this study demonstrates that a normally bioinert nanomaterial can be rendered bioactive by carefully tuning the density of charged groups on the material surface, a finding that not only may contribute to the fundamental understanding of biointerface phenomena, but also to the development of bioinert/bioactive materials. PMID:26886265

  5. Interaction of heavy ions with nuclear chromatin: Spatiotemporal investigations of biological responses in a cellular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beams offer the possibility to generate strictly localized DNA lesions within subregions of a cell nucleus. The distribution of the ion-induced damage can be indirectly visualized by immunocytochemical detection of repair-related proteins as radiation-induced foci. The proteins analyzed here were the double-strand break marker γ-H2AX, the excision repair and replication protein PCNA and the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A. A newly developed adjustable sample holder is now used to apply an irradiation geometry characterized by a small angle between the plane of the cellular monolayer and the incoming ion beam. This allows the spatial analysis of protein accumulations along ion trajectories, revealing an unexpected clustering after irradiation with low-energy zinc ions. The patterns of protein aggregation observed show considerable intrinsic variability, but similar patterns of protein clustering were obtained for functionally different proteins irrespective of the type of ion beam applied, confirming previous observations for lower and higher LET beams. Foci sizes within ion tracks were found to be larger for γ-H2AX foci in comparison to CDKN1A foci, in agreement with the known histone H2AX phosphorylation response. The results suggest that not the pattern of dose deposition but the underlying chromatin structure determines the distribution of protein clusters along tracks. Therefore, the requirement of time-lapse studies using live cells is emphasized for future studies on chromatin movement as a potential component of the DNA damage response

  6. Response of bacteriophage T7 biological dosimeter to dehydration and extraterrestrial solar UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, M.; Fekete, A.; Módos, K.; Kovács, G.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    2007-02-01

    The experiment "Phage and uracil response" (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA will be exposed to different subsets of extreme environmental parameters in space, in order to study the Responses of Organisms to the Space Environment (ROSE). Launch into orbit is preceded by EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) to optimize the methods and the evaluation. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA thin layers were exposed to vacuum ( 10-6Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well as in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated. The effect of temperature fluctuation in vacuum was also studied. The structural/chemical effects on bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum and in the electrophoretic pattern of phage/DNA have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. DNA damage was also determined by quantitative PCR (QPCR) using 555 and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, cyclobutane pirimidine dimers (CPDs) etc.) accumulate throughout exposure. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  7. Application of response surface methodology to optimize uranium biological leaching at high pulp density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Faezeh; Arabieh, Masoud; Jahani, Samaneh [NSTRI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to carry out uranium bioleaching via optimization of the leaching process using response surface methodology. For this purpose, the native Acidithiobacillus sp. was adapted to different pulp densities following optimization process carried out at a high pulp density. Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was used to optimize the uranium bioleaching. The effects of six key parameters on the bioleaching efficiency were investigated. The process was modeled with mathematical equation, including not only first and second order terms, but also with probable interaction effects between each pair of factors.The results showed that the extraction efficiency of uranium dropped from 100% at pulp densities of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% to 68% at 12.5% of pulp density. Using RSM, the optimum conditions for uranium bioleaching (12.5% (w/v)) were identified as pH = 1.96, temperature = 30.90 C, stirring speed = 158 rpm, 15.7% inoculum, FeSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O concentration at 13.83 g/L and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration at 3.22 g/L which achieved 83% of uranium extraction efficiency. The results of uranium bioleaching experiment using optimized parameter showed 81% uranium extraction during 15 d. The obtained results reveal that using RSM is reliable and appropriate for optimization of parameters involved in the uranium bioleaching process.

  8. Biological responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants to the herbicide simetryne in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Yang, Yi; Jia, Lin Xian; Lin, Jing Ling; Liu, Ying; Pan, Bo; Lin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The rotation of rice and wheat is widely used and highly endorsed, and simetryne (s-triazine herbicide) is one of the principal herbicides widely used in this rotation for weed and grass control. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of the ecological and physiological effects of simetryne on wheat crops. In this study, we performed a comprehensive investigation of crop response to simetryne to elucidate the accumulation and phytotoxicity of the herbicide in wheat crops. Wheat plants exposed to 0.8 to 8.0mgkg(-1) simetryne for 7 d exhibited suppressed growth and decreased chlorophyll content. With simetryne concentration in the soil varied from 0.8mgkg(-1) to 8.0mgkg(-1), simetryne was progressively accumulated by the wheat plants. The accumulation of simetryne in the wheat plants not only induced the over production of ROS and injured the membrane lipids but also stimulated the production of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). A test of enzymatic activity and gene expression illustrated that the wheat plants were wise enough to motivate the antioxidant enzymes through both molecular and physiological mechanisms to alleviate the simetryne-induced stress. This study offers an illuminating insight into the effective adaptive response of the wheat plants to the simetryne stress. PMID:26803524

  9. Biological response of Sr-containing coating with various surface treatments on titanium substrate for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sr-containing coating prepared by plasma spraying and micro-arc oxidation process, respectively. • MAO coating stimulated high ECM-like structures of cells on early stage. • Sr-containing specimens had high cell responses on late stage. • Sr-MAO coating is a desirable implant surface treatment for clinical applications. - Abstract: An implant requires a suitable surface to trigger osteointegration. The surface characteristics and chemical composition are important factors in this process. Plasma spraying and micro-arc oxidation can be used to fabricate rough and porous structures for medical applications. Strontium (Sr) has been shown to prevent osteoporosis in vitro and in vivo. However, few scientists have evaluated the biological response of Sr-containing coatings on different surface treatments. In this study, a sand-blasted (SB) surface (as the control), plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and Sr-substituted HA coatings (HAPS and SrHAPS, respectively), calcium phosphate and Sr-containing calcium phosphate micro-arc oxidation surface (CPM and SrCPM, respectively) were analyzed in terms of human osteoblastic cell (MG63) response. Sr was confirmed to be incorporated into the surface. SrHAPS and SrCPM specimens had higher cell responses than those of the HAPS and CPM groups, respectively. The cells cultured on SrCPM and SrHAPS specimens exhibited high proliferation and differentiation. However, CPM and SrCPM specimens stimulated more ECM-like structures than other specimens. The results show that Sr-containing coatings have good characteristics that enhance cell response. The SrCPM coating is a suitable implant surface treatment for clinical applications

  10. Organization and biology of the porcine serum amyloid A (SAA gene cluster: isoform specific responses to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle G Olsen

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA is a prominent acute phase protein. Although its biological functions are debated, the wide species distribution of highly homologous SAA proteins and their uniform behavior in response to injury or inflammation in itself suggests a significant role for this protein. The pig is increasingly being used as a model for the study of inflammatory reactions, yet only little is known about how specific SAA genes are regulated in the pig during acute phase responses and other responses induced by pro-inflammatory host mediators. We designed SAA gene specific primers and quantified the gene expression of porcine SAA1, SAA2, SAA3, and SAA4 by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in liver, spleen, and lung tissue from pigs experimentally infected with the Gram-negative swine specific bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, as well as from pigs experimentally infected with the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that: 1 SAA1 may be a pseudogene in pigs; 2 we were able to detect two previously uncharacterized SAA transcripts, namely SAA2 and SAA4, of which the SAA2 transcript is primarily induced in the liver during acute infection and presumably contributes to circulating SAA in pigs; 3 Porcine SAA3 transcription is induced both hepatically and extrahepatically during acute infection, and may be correlated to local organ affection; 4 Hepatic transcription of SAA4 is markedly induced in pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, but only weakly in pigs infected with S. aureus. These results for the first time establish the infection response patterns of the four porcine SAA genes which will be of importance for the use of the pig as a model for human inflammatory responses, e.g. within sepsis, cancer, and obesity research.

  11. Biological response of Sr-containing coating with various surface treatments on titanium substrate for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shih-Ping [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzer-Min, E-mail: tmlee@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lui, Truan-Sheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sr-containing coating prepared by plasma spraying and micro-arc oxidation process, respectively. • MAO coating stimulated high ECM-like structures of cells on early stage. • Sr-containing specimens had high cell responses on late stage. • Sr-MAO coating is a desirable implant surface treatment for clinical applications. - Abstract: An implant requires a suitable surface to trigger osteointegration. The surface characteristics and chemical composition are important factors in this process. Plasma spraying and micro-arc oxidation can be used to fabricate rough and porous structures for medical applications. Strontium (Sr) has been shown to prevent osteoporosis in vitro and in vivo. However, few scientists have evaluated the biological response of Sr-containing coatings on different surface treatments. In this study, a sand-blasted (SB) surface (as the control), plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and Sr-substituted HA coatings (HAPS and SrHAPS, respectively), calcium phosphate and Sr-containing calcium phosphate micro-arc oxidation surface (CPM and SrCPM, respectively) were analyzed in terms of human osteoblastic cell (MG63) response. Sr was confirmed to be incorporated into the surface. SrHAPS and SrCPM specimens had higher cell responses than those of the HAPS and CPM groups, respectively. The cells cultured on SrCPM and SrHAPS specimens exhibited high proliferation and differentiation. However, CPM and SrCPM specimens stimulated more ECM-like structures than other specimens. The results show that Sr-containing coatings have good characteristics that enhance cell response. The SrCPM coating is a suitable implant surface treatment for clinical applications.

  12. Comparison of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in evaluating the treatment response to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma using modified RECIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Lin, Man-xia; Xu, Zuo-feng; Wang, Wei; Xie, Xiao-yan [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Ultrasound, Guangzhou (China); Lu, Ming-de; Kuang, Ming [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Ultrasound, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Ke-guo [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Zhuang, Wen-quan [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guangzhou (China)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) for evaluating the treatment response to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Treatment responses of 130 patients who underwent TACE were evaluated by CEUS and CECT. We initially compared the abilities of CEUS and CECT to detect residual tumour, which were confirmed by histology or angiography. Then, we compared the tumour response to TACE assessed by CEUS and CECT, according to Modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (mRECIST). The sensitivity and accuracy of detecting residual tumour by CEUS vs. CECT were 95.9 % vs. 76.2 % (p < 0.001) and 96.2 % vs. 77.7 % (p < 0.001), respectively. For target lesions, 13 patients were observed as complete response (CR) by CEUS, compared to 36 by CECT (p < 0.001). For nontarget lesions, 12 patients were observed as CR by CEUS, compared to 22 by CECT (p = 0.006). For overall response, eight patients were observed as CR by CEUS, compared to 31 by CECT (p < 0.001). The diagnostic performance of CEUS was superior to CECT for detecting residual tumour after TACE. In clinical, CEUS should be recommended as an optional procedure for assessing the tumour response to TACE. (orig.)

  13. The Developmental History of IgE and IgG4 Antibodies in Relation to Atopy, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, and the Modified TH2 Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalberse, Rob C; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Rispens, Theo

    2016-06-01

    A common reaction from anyone confronted with allergy is the question: what prevents universal allergy? We will discuss recent findings in the mouse system that have provided us with clues on why allergy is not more common. We will also address one crucial aspect of atopic allergy in humans, which is absent in most mouse model systems, an IgG/IgE ratio response to be more closely related to the "modified TH2" response in humans. We will discuss the similarities and differences between the IgE and IgG4 response to allergens and an update on the IgG4 B cell, partly derived from studies on eosinophilic esophagitis and IgG4-related diseases. PMID:27221343

  14. Ovarian dynamics in response to two modified intravaginal progesterone releasing device and oestradiol benzoate based ovulation synchronisation protocols designed for use in Brahman heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S A A; Atkinson, P C; Satake, N; Boe-Hansen, G; McGowan, M R

    2014-07-01

    The objective was to investigate the ovarian response of Brahman heifers to two modified ovulation synchronisation protocols developed to increase the proportion of normal synchronous ovulations. Experiment 1 characterised the growth of the ovulatory follicle in heifers (n=19) treated with an intravaginal progesterone releasing device (IPRD) and oestradiol benzoate (ODB), to determine the optimal time to induce ovulation. Using the findings from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 investigated the effect of reducing the duration of IPRD insertion and increasing the interval from IPRD removal to ODB treatment (modified protocol 1 - OPO-6; n=20), and omitting ODB treatment at the time of IPRD insertion (modified protocol 2 - PO-6; n=20). An IPRD (0.78 g progesterone) was inserted at Day 0 (OPO-8) or Day 2 (OPO-6 and PO-6) and all heifers also received 1 mg ODB i.m. Day 8: IPRD removed + 500 μg cloprostenol i.m. At 24 h (OPO-8) and 36 h (OPO-6 and PO-6) post IPRD removal: 1 mg ODB i.m. Fixed-time AI (FTAI) occurred at 54 h for OPO-8 and 72 h for OPO-6 and PO-6, post IPRD removal. After IPRD treatment all OPO-6 and OPO-8 heifers initiated a new follicular wave whereas 25% of PO-6 heifers failed. Diameter of the dominant follicle was larger at FTAI in the PO-6 (11.34 ± 0.50 mm) compared to the OPO-8 protocol (9.74 ± 0.51 mm; P<0.05), but similar to the OPO-6 protocol (10.52 ± 0.51 mm). Proportion of ovulations occurring 12 h prior and 24 h post FTAI was similar for the PO-6 (80%) and OPO-6 (75%) protocols but numerically lower in the OPO-8 heifers (60%). The apparent improvement in ovarian response in heifers treated with the modified protocols needs to be confirmed in larger field studies. PMID:24880980

  15. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high......-arctic regions, manipulation experiments with various set-ups have been performed. Activation of plant defence mechanisms by production of UV-B absorbing compounds was significant in ambient UV-B in comparison to a filter treatment reducing the UV-B radiation. Despite the UV-B screening response, ambient UV...... symbionts (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV...

  16. Biological effects and oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana following exposure to uranium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Saenen, E.; Vandenhove, H.; Vanhoudt, N.; Wannijn, J.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Vangronsveld, J.; Cuypers, A. [Hasselt University (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Since organisms are almost always exposed to multiple stressors, it is important to investigate the toxicity effects in plants in a multiple stressor context to provide a more realistic estimate of environmental risks. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of U and Cu individually and in combination. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were exposed during 3 days to 25 μM U, 2.5 μM Cu or 12.5 μM U + 1.25 μM Cu at pH 7.5. The concentrations of U and Cu administered to the plants were the derived EC30 values for plant growth reduction based on the single-dose response curves. When plants were exposed to U or Cu, this resulted in an increased metal concentration in both roots and shoots as compared to the control plants. The increased Cu content of the plant, led to a significant decrease in leaf and root growth, while U exposure did not affect plant growth. By exposing plants to both metals, it seems that Cu interferes with the translocation of U from the roots to the leaves. In addition, U interferes with the Cu uptake, since less Cu was found in the roots than expected. This can probably be explained by the fact that U causes a shift in the Cu speciation in our medium. As such, the percentage of the bioavailable fractions of Cu decreased, while the percentage Cu-EDTA (i.e. non-available fraction) increased. No effects on plant growth were observed by exposing plants to U+Cu. Exposing plants to heavy metals can lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). After U or Cu exposure, the transcript levels of different ROS-producing enzymes (NADPH oxidases and lipoxygenases (LOX)) were up-regulated in the roots. Furthermore, exposing plants to U+Cu resulted in a 20-fold increase in the expression of LOX1 as compared to the single stressor conditions. This possibly indicates an enhanced ROS production. In addition, the increased expression of LOX1 can also indicate an increased production of oxylipins, important molecules in inter-organ signalling. In the

  17. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  18. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P B [Laboratory of Ultrasound, Directory of Scientific and Industrial Metrology (DIMCI), National Institute of Metrology, Standardization, and Industrial Quality (Inmetro), Av. Nossa Sra das Gracas, 50 Predio 1, Duque de Caxias, RJ, ZIP 25250-020 (Brazil); Mermelstein, Claudia S; Costa, Manoel L, E-mail: rpfelix@inmetro.gov.br [Laboratory of Muscle Differentiation and Cytoskeleton, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, ZIP 21949-590 (Brazil)

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm{sup 2} continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm{sup 2} pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm{sup 2} continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  19. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M.; Mermelstein, Claudia S.; Costa, Manoel L.; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  20. Biological responses to dioxin-like compounds and PAHs in eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tairova, Zhanna; Strand, Jakob

    embryo development and reproduction. At present, there is only limited knowledge of the potential effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish from the Danish marine environment. In this project we tried to link exposure to POPs such as DLCs and PAHs to...... biomarker responses have shown capable to facilitate the estimation of POPs impact in different geographical areas and also in the laboratory exposure experiment. Vitamin status and teratogenic effects like abnormal fry development and embryo malformations in eelpout can be indicative of biological effects...... of POPs, although causal relationships between exposure and effects are more difficult to establish. Vitamin status based on retinoids, carotenoids and vitamin E in adult female eelpouts and its fry has shown to vary significantly, according to seasonality and in relation to reproductive cycle of the...

  1. A sensor for determination of tramadol in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemically modified electrode is constructed based on multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). It is demonstrated that this sensor could be used for determination of pharmaceutical important compound tramadol (TRA). The measurements were carried out using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) methods. DPV experiments of various concentration of TRA showed two linear dynamic ranges. The first linear dynamic range was from 4 micro M to 35 micro M, and the second linear dynamic range was between 60 micro M to 550 micro M. A detection limit of 0.38 micro M (S/N = 3) was obtained. The analytical performance of this sensor has been evaluated for the detection of TRA in human serum, human urine and some pharmaceutical preparations with satisfactory results. (author)

  2. Biological response of Tradescantia stamen hairs to high levels of natural radiation on the Pocos de Caldas Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current policy applied in radiation protection is based on the hypothesis of a linear dose response, on the basis of which all procedures and dose limits relating to nuclear activities were established. This policy can be considered to be extremely conservative, although nevertheless efficient in the fulfillment of its protective function. However, due to this efficiency, there is a lack of conclusive studies on the biological effects of exposures to different levels of natural radiation. The Pocos de Caldas region has been identified as one of the most naturally radioactive locations on Earth. The objective of the present study was to contribute additional information relating to this field, by means of the performance of a botanical test of mutagenicity (in the Tradescantia stamen-hair system), assessing biological responses in different environments of the Pocos de Caldas plateau, located in the state of minas gerais, in Brazil. The process of mutagenesis was investigated in environments in which radiation exposure rates within a range from 1.5 μR.min-1 to 100.0 μR.min-1 are to be observed. In the present study, plants of the genus Tradescantia exposed in environments where exposure rates are at levels of respectively 1.5 μR.min-1, 6.0 μR.min-1, 40.0 μR.min-1, and 50.0 μR.min-1, yielded significant differences (p < 0.05) in the number of pink coloration mutagenic events occurring per 1000 hairs, by comparison with plants grown in a greenhouse environment. (orig.)

  3. A pRb-responsive, RGD-modified, and Hyaluronidase-armed Canine Oncolytic Adenovirus for Application in Veterinary Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Rodriguez-García, Alba; Moreno, Rafael; Cascalló, Manel; Pastor, Josep; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Human and canine cancer share similarities such as genetic and molecular aspects, biological complexity, tumor epidemiology, and targeted therapeutic treatment. Lack of good animal models for human adenovirotherapy has spurred the use of canine adenovirus 2-based oncolytic viruses. We have constructed a canine oncolytic virus that mimics the characteristics of our previously published human adenovirus ICOVIR17: expression of E1a controlled by E2F sites, deletion of the pRb-binding site of E1a...

  4. Fluorescence response of hypocrellin B to the environmental changes in a mimic biological membrane--liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Xuanye; ZHAO; Yuewei; XIE; Jie; ZHAO; Jingquan

    2004-01-01

    , Photochem.Photobiol., 2001, 73 (5): 482-488.[13]Mang, T. S., Dougherty, T. J., Potter, W. R. et al., Photobleaching of porphyrins used in photodynamic therapy and implications for therapy, Photochem. Photobiol., 1987, 45: 501-506.[14]Shoko, Y., Tadahiro, T., Masahiko, A., Preparation of ganglioside GM3 liposomes and their membrane properties, Colloid Surface B, 2002, 27: 181-187.[15]Murakami, S., Packer, L., The role of cations in the organization of chloroplast membranes, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 1971, 146:337-347.[16]Angeli, N. G., Lagorio, M. G., San Román, E. et al., Meso-substituted cationic porphyrins of biological interest, Photophysical and physicochemical properties in solution and bound to liposomes,Photochem. Photobiol., 2000, 72(1 ): 49-56.

  5. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors)

  6. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup −1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 μm and −1.72 μm in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 μm. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

  7. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u−1, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 μm and −1.72 μm in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 μm. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions

  8. Development of a stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposite toward biologically optimized, MEMS-based neural probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the development of micromachining processes and mechanical evaluation of a stimuli-responsive, mechanically dynamic polymer nanocomposite for biomedical microsystems. This nanocomposite consists of a cellulose nanofiber network encased in a polyvinyl acetate matrix. Micromachined tensile testing structures fabricated from the nanocomposite displayed a reversible and switchable stiffness comparable to bulk samples, with a Young's modulus of 3420 MPa when dry, reducing to ∼20 MPa when wet, and a stiff-to-flexible transition time of ∼300 s. This mechanically dynamic behavior is particularly attractive for the development of adaptive intracortical probes that are sufficiently stiff to insert into the brain without buckling, but become highly compliant upon insertion. Along these lines, a micromachined neural probe incorporating parylene insulating/moisture barrier layers and Ti/Au electrodes was fabricated from the nanocomposite using a fabrication process designed specifically for this chemical- and temperature-sensitive material. It was found that the parylene layers only slightly increased the stiffness of the probe in the wet state in spite of its much higher Young's modulus. Furthermore, the Ti/Au electrodes exhibited impedance comparable to Au electrodes on conventional substrates. Swelling of the nanocomposite was highly anisotropic favoring the thickness dimension by a factor of 8 to 12, leading to excellent adhesion between the nanocomposite and parylene layers and no discernable deformation of the probes when deployed in deionized water

  9. A Modified Thermal Time Model Quantifying Germination Response to Temperature for C 3 and C 4 Species in Temperate Grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxiang Zhang; Yu Tian; Daowei Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Thermal-based germination models are widely used to predict germination rate and germination timing of plants. However, comparison of model parameters between large numbers of species is rare. In this study, seeds of 27 species including 12 C 4 and 15 C 3 species were germinated at a range of constant temperatures from 5 °C to 40 °C. We used a modified thermal time model to calculate germination parameters at suboptimal temperatures. Generally, the optimal germination temperature was higher...

  10. Ecological responses to UV radiation: interactions between the biological effects of UV on plants and on associated organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nigel D; Moore, Jason P; McPherson, Martin; Lambourne, Cathryn; Croft, Patricia; Heaton, Joanna C; Wargent, Jason J

    2012-08-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation (280-315 nm) has a wide range of effects on terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of how UV-B influences the complex interactions of plants with pest, pathogen and related microorganisms remains limited. Here, we report the results of a series of experiments in Lactuca sativa which aimed to characterize not only key plant responses to UV radiation in a field environment but also consequential effects for plant interactions with a sap-feeding insect, two model plant pathogens and phylloplane microorganism populations. Three spectrally modifying filters with contrasting UV transmissions were used to filter ambient sunlight, and when compared with our UV-inclusive filter, L. sativa plants grown in a zero UV-B environment showed significantly increased shoot fresh weight, reduced foliar pigment concentrations and suppressed population growth of green peach aphid (Myzus persicae). Plants grown under a filter which allowed partial transmission of UV-A radiation and negligible UV-B transmission showed increased density of leaf surface phylloplane microbes compared with the UV-inclusive treatment. Effects of UV treatment on the severity of two plant pathogens, Bremia lactucae and Botrytis cinerea, were complex as both the UV-inclusive and zero UV-B filters reduced the severity of pathogen persistence. These results are discussed with reference to known spectral responses of plants, insects and microorganisms, and contrasted with established fundamental responses of plants and other organisms to solar UV radiation, with particular emphasis on the need for future integration between different experimental approaches when investigating the effects of solar UV radiation. PMID:22150399

  11. Biological toxicity and inflammatory response of semi-single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Park

    Full Text Available The toxicological studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been urgently needed from the emerging diverse applications of CNTs. Physicochemical properties such as shape, diameter, conductance, surface charge and surface chemistry of CNTs gained during manufacturing processes play a key role in the toxicity. In this study, we separated the semi-conductive components of SWCNTs (semi-SWCNTs and evaluated the toxicity on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after intratracheal instillation in order to determine the role of conductance. Exposure to semi-SWCNTs significantly increased the growth of mice and significantly decreased the relative ratio of brain weight to body weight. Recruitment of monocytes into the bloodstream increased in a time-dependent manner, and significant hematological changes were observed 28 days after exposure. In the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, secretion of Th2-type cytokines, particularly IL-10, was more predominant than Th1-type cytokines, and expression of regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, p53, transforming growth factor (TGF-β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS increased in a time-dependent manner. Fibrotic histopathological changes peaked on day 7 and decreased 14 days after exposure. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, mesothelin, and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3 also peaked on day 7, while that of TGF-β peaked on days 7 and 14. Secretion of histamine in BAL fluid decreased in a time-dependent manner. Consequently, we suggest that the brain is the target organ of semi-SWCNTs brought into the lung, and conductance as well as length may be critical factors affecting the intensity and duration of the inflammatory response following SWCNT exposure.

  12. Biological responses of the coral Montastraea annularis to the removal of filamentous turf algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neidy P Cetz-Navarro

    Full Text Available Coral reef degradation increases coral interactions with filamentous turf algae (FTA and macroalgae, which may result in chronic stress for the corals. We evaluated the effects of short (2.5 month and long (10 month periods of FTA removal on tissue thickness (TT, zooxanthellae density (ZD, mitotic index (MI, and concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl a in Montastraea annularis at the beginning and end of gametogenesis. Ramets (individual lobes within a colony consistently surrounded by FTA and ramets surrounded by crustose coralline algae (CCA were used as controls. FTA removal reduced coral stress, indicated by increased TT and ZD and lower MI. The measured effects were similar in magnitude for the short and long periods of algal removal. Ramets were more stressed at the end of gametogenesis compared with the beginning, with lower ZD and Chl a cm(-2, and higher MI. However, it was not possible to distinguish the stress caused by the presence of FTA from that caused by seasonal changes in seawater temperature. Ramets surrounded by CCA showed less stress in comparison with ramets surrounded by FTA: with higher TT, Chl a cm(-2 and ZD, and lower MI values. Coral responses indicated that ramets with FTA suffered the most deleterious effects and contrasted with those measured in ramets surrounded by CCA. According to published studies and our observations, there could be at least six mechanisms associated to FTA in the stress caused to M. annularis by FTA. Owing to the high cover of FTA (in contrast to macroalgae and CCA in the Caribbean, the chronic stress, the overgrowth and mortality that this functional algal group can cause on M. annularis species complex, a further decline of this important reef-building coral in the Caribbean is expected.

  13. Radiological features and therapeutic responses of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving biological agents: a retrospective multicenter study in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Shunsuke; Tokuda, Hitoshi; Sakai, Fumikazu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Mimori, Akio; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Hatta, Kazuhiro; Matsushima, Hidekazu; Kaise, Shunji; Kaneko, Atsushi; Makino, Shigeki; Minota, Seiji; Yamada, Takashi; Akagawa, Shinobu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to evaluate the radiological features of and therapeutic responses to pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the setting of biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of 13 patients from multiple centers who had developed pulmonary NTM disease during biological therapy for RA, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, and tocilizumab. Results Most cases were asymptomatic o...

  14. A Systems Biology Approach in Therapeutic Response Study for Different Dosing Regimens—a Modeling Study of Drug Effects on Tumor Growth using Hybrid Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangfang Li; Lijun Qian; Bittner, Michale L.; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the frustration of translation of research advances in the molecular and cellular biology of cancer into treatment, this study calls for cross-disciplinary efforts and proposes a methodology of incorporating drug pharmacology information into drug therapeutic response modeling using a computational systems biology approach. The objectives are two fold. The first one is to involve effective mathematical modeling in the drug development stage to incorporate preclinical and clinical...

  15. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of γ-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following γ-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by γ-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by γ -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of γ-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In γ-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of γ-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The patterns of altered expressions showed significant

  16. The NF-kB pathway: LET dependence of the biological response to heavy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Arenz, Andrea; Reitz, Guenther; Schmitz, Claudia; Spitta, Luis F.; Ruscher, Roland; Lau, Patrick; Meier, Matthias M.; Testard, Isabelle

    Radiation is an acknowledged primary concern for manned spaceflight and is a potentially limiting factor for long term orbital and interplanetary missions. A solar flare can threaten the astronauts' life, and long-term exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. Understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying these phenomena may allow better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures. A central factor in the cellular stress response is the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). As an antiapoptotic factor, if activated in human cells by ion beam exposure, it could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation and improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown (Radiat. Res. 164: 527-530, 2005). In this work, the dependency of NF-κB activation on LET was examined. Accelerated argon ions (36 Ar, 95 MeV/u, LET 232 keV/` ım) activate the NF-κB pathway already at low particle densities (1-2 particle hits per nucleus), which result in as less as 5-50 induced double strand breaks per cell. Accelerated carbon ions (13 C, 75 MeV/u, LET 30 keV/µm) induce NF-κB-dependent gene expression at higher particle densities (50-500 particle hits per nucleus), but to a lower extent than the argon ions. Intermediate NF-κB activation is initiated by exposure of human cells with carbon ions with an LET of 70 keV/µm. Sparsely ionizing radiation such as X-rays activates the NF-κB pathway at high doses (> 4 Gy), neutrons at doses > 3 Gy. These results suggest a LET dependency of NF-κB activation: high LET radiation activates NF-κB - dependent on initial nuclear DNA damage followed by cytoplasmic signalling events - more efficiently

  17. Common biology of craving across legal and illegal drugs - a quantitative meta-analysis of cue-reactivity brain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The present quantitative meta-analysis set out to test whether cue-reactivity responses in humans differ across drugs of abuse and whether these responses constitute the biological basis of drug craving as a core psychopathology of addiction. By means of activation likelihood estimation, we investigated the concurrence of brain regions activated by cue-induced craving paradigms across studies on nicotine, alcohol and cocaine addicts. Furthermore, we analysed the concurrence of brain regions positively correlated with self-reported craving in nicotine and alcohol studies. We found direct overlap between nicotine, alcohol and cocaine cue reactivity in the ventral striatum. In addition, regions of close proximity were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; nicotine and cocaine) and amygdala (alcohol, nicotine and cocaine). Brain regions of concurrence in drug cue-reactivity paradigms that overlapped with brain regions of concurrence in self-reported craving correlations were found in the ACC, ventral striatum and right pallidum (for alcohol). This first quantitative meta-analysis on drug cue reactivity identifies brain regions underlying nicotine, alcohol and cocaine dependency, i.e. the ventral striatum. The ACC, right pallidum and ventral striatum were related to drug cue reactivity as well as self-reported craving, suggesting that this set of brain regions constitutes the core circuit of drug craving in nicotine and alcohol addiction. PMID:21261758

  18. Proteomic response of the biological control fungus Trichoderma atroviride to growth on the cell walls of Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyer, Jasmine; Hunt, Sybille; McKay, Matthew; Herbert, Ben R; Nevalainen, Helena

    2005-06-01

    Trichoderma atroviride has a natural ability to parasitise phytopathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea, therefore providing an environmentally sound alternative to chemical fungicides in the management of these pathogens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to display cellular protein patterns of T. atroviride (T. harzianum P1) grown on media containing either glucose or R. solani cell walls. Protein profiles were compared to identify T. atroviride proteins up-regulated in the presence of the R. solani cell walls. Twenty-four protein spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. Identified up-regulated proteins include known fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes such as N-acetyl-beta-D: -glucosaminidase and 42-kDa endochitinase. Three novel proteases of T. atroviride were identified, containing sequence similarity to vacuolar serine protease, vacuolar protease A and a trypsin-like protease from known fungal proteins. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4a, superoxide dismutase and a hypothetical protein from Neurospora crassa were also up-regulated as a response to R. solani cell walls. Several cell wall-degrading enzymes were identified from the T. atroviride culture supernatant, providing further evidence that a cellular response indicative of biological control had occurred. PMID:15856359

  19. Periradicular Tissue Responses to Biologically Active Molecules or MTA When Applied in Furcal Perforation of Dogs' Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the comparative evaluation of inflammatory reactions and tissue responses to four growth factors, or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, or a zinc-oxide-eugenol-based cement (IRM as controls, when used for the repair of furcal perforations in dogs’ teeth. Results showed significantly higher inflammatory cell response in the transforming growth factorβ1 (TGFβ1 and zinc-oxide-eugenol-based cement (IRM groups and higher rates of epithelial proliferation in the TGFβ1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I groups compared to the MTA. Significantly higher rates of bone formation were found in the control groups compared to the osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1. Significantly higher rates of cementum formation were observed in the IGF-I and bFGF groups compared to the IRM. None of the biologically active molecules can be suggested for repairing furcal perforations, despite the fact that growth factors exerted a clear stimulatory effect on cementum formation and inhibited collagen capsule formation. MTA exhibited better results than the growth factors.

  20. Emissions from potential Patagonian dust sources and associated biological response in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castagna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Patagonian dust over primary producers in the Southern Ocean has long been disputed. Here we present new remote sensing evidence in favour of dust mediated biological response and postulate a hypothesis to explain the spatial relation observed. A new remote sensing definition of dust source areas based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI correlation is presented and interannual variation in AAI is evaluated within the source regions as a proxy for dust activity. Correlation of this data with annual chlorophyll concentration, phytoplankton biomass, and diatom dominance reveals a spatially coherent latitudinal band of positive correlation concentrated between the Polar Front and the Subtropical Front. This pattern is restricted to western areas in the biomass correlation and extends toward Africa for the chlorophyll and diatom correlation. This region is equivalent to the area of the Subantarctic Mode Water formation, characterized by a ratio Si : N ≪ 1 in late summer, an unfavourable condition for diatom development, especially under iron limitation. Therefore, due to Si–Fe co-limitation, the positive correlation could be the consequence of an enhanced sensibility of this area to external iron addition for diatom growth. For the Argentinean shelf-break, is not clear whether direct dust input and/or wind stress driving water masses upwelling could be responsible for the positive correlation.

  1. Emissions from potential Patagonian dust sources and associated biological response in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, A.; Evangelista, H.; Tilstra, L. G.; Kerr, R.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of Patagonian dust over primary producers in the Southern Ocean has long been disputed. Here we present new remote sensing evidence in favour of dust mediated biological response and postulate a hypothesis to explain the spatial relation observed. A new remote sensing definition of dust source areas based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) correlation is presented and interannual variation in AAI is evaluated within the source regions as a proxy for dust activity. Correlation of this data with annual chlorophyll concentration, phytoplankton biomass, and diatom dominance reveals a spatially coherent latitudinal band of positive correlation concentrated between the Polar Front and the Subtropical Front. This pattern is restricted to western areas in the biomass correlation and extends toward Africa for the chlorophyll and diatom correlation. This region is equivalent to the area of the Subantarctic Mode Water formation, characterized by a ratio Si : N ≪ 1 in late summer, an unfavourable condition for diatom development, especially under iron limitation. Therefore, due to Si-Fe co-limitation, the positive correlation could be the consequence of an enhanced sensibility of this area to external iron addition for diatom growth. For the Argentinean shelf-break, is not clear whether direct dust input and/or wind stress driving water masses upwelling could be responsible for the positive correlation.

  2. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality. PMID:27060638

  3. Safeguarding production agriculture and natural ecosystems against biological terrorism. A U.S. Department of Agriculture emergency response framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, R

    1999-01-01

    Foreign pest introductions and outbreaks represent threats to agricultural productivity and ecosystems, and, thus, to the health and national security of the United States. It is advisable to identify relevant techniques and bring all appropriate strategies to bear on the problem of controlling accidentally and intentionally introduced pest outbreaks. Recent political shifts indicate that the U.S. may be at increased risk for biological terrorism. The existing emergency-response strategies of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) will evolve to expand activities in coordination with other emergency management agencies. APHIS will evolve its information superstructure to include extensive application of simulation models for forecasting, meteorological databases and analysis, systems analysis, geographic information systems, satellite image analysis, remote sensing, and the training of specialized cadres within the emergency-response framework capable of managing the necessary information processing and analysis. Finally, the threat of key pests ranked according to perceived risk will be assessed with mathematical models and "what-if" scenarios analyzed to determine impact and mitigation practices. An infrastructure will be maintained that periodically surveys ports and inland regions for the presence of exotic pest threats and will identify trend abnormalities. This survey and monitoring effort will include cooperation from industry groups, federal and state organizations, and academic institutions. PMID:10681969

  4. Fast response vanes for sensing flow patterns in helicopter rotor environment. [wind tunnel tests of modified helicopter rotary wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, P. S.; Crossman, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted on four small-scale flow-direction vanes for the determination of aerodynamic response. The tests were further extended to include a standard sized low-inertia vane currently employed in aircraft flight testing. The four test vanes had different aspect ratios and were about 35 percent of the surface area of the standard vane. The test results indicate satisfactory damping and frequency response for all vanes tested and compare favorably with the standard design.

  5. A self-consistent study of multipole response in neutron-rich nuclei using a modified realistic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, D; Knapp, F; Iudice, N. Lo; Vesely, P.; Andreozzi, F; G. De Gregorio; Porrino, A.

    2014-01-01

    The multipole response of neutron rich O and Sn isotopes is computed in Tamm-Dancoff and random-phase approximations using the canonical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov quasi-particle basis. The calculations are performed using an intrinsic Hamiltonian composed of a $V_{lowk}$ potential, deduced from the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interaction, corrected with phenomenological density dependent and spin-orbit terms. The effect of these two pieces on energies and multipole responses is discussed. The probl...

  6. The scaling law of climate change and its relevance to assessing (palaeo)biological responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Wolfgang; Eichenseer, Kilian

    2014-05-01

    interglacials, are not monotonic, but punctuated by short-term cooling intervals. The fossil record tells us that biodiversity responded dramatically to ancient intervals of climate warming. We can now see that the apparently slower rates of change in some mass extinctions (Permian-Triassic, Triassic-Jurassic) were greater than today when the scaling law is considered. This reassures us that studying deep time patterns of organismic response to climate change is a worthwhile endeavor that is relevant for predicting the future. References Burrows, M. T., Schoeman, D. S., Buckley, L. B., Moore, P., Poloczanska, E. S., Brander, K. M., Brown, C., Bruno, J. F., Duarte, C. M., Halpern, B. S., Holding, J., Kappel, C. V., Kiessling, W., O'Connor, M. I., Pandolfi, J. M., Parmesan, C., Schwing, F. B., Sydeman, W. J., and Richardson, A. J.: The pace of shifting climate in marine and terrestrial ecosystems, Science, 334, 652-655, 2011. Gingerich, P. D.: Quantification and comparison of evolutionary rates, American Journal of Science, 293A, 453-478, 1993. Sadler, P. M.: Sediment accumulation rates and the completeness of stratigraphic sections, Journal of Geology, 89, 569-584, 1981. Sun, Y., Joachimski, M. M., Wignall, P. B., Yan, C., Chen, Y., Jiang, H., Wang, L., and Lai, X.: Lethally hot temperatures during the Early Triassic greenhouse, Science, 338, 366-370, 2012.

  7. Determination of morphological characteristics of metallic nanoparticles based on modified Maxwell-Garnett fitting of optical responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr; Resano-Garcia, A.; En Naciri, A.; Akil, S.; Chaoui, N. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France)

    2015-10-05

    A modified effective medium theory (MEMT) is introduced to determine morphological characteristics and the volume fraction of colloidal metallic nanoparticles. By analyzing the optical absorption spectra of gold nanoparticles (NPs), this model is used to determine the distribution of prolate and oblate NPs and to demonstrate the presence of spherical NPs. In addition to interband transition, the model takes into account the longitudinal and transversal surface plasmon resonances. The results predicted by the MEMT theory were found to be in very good agreement with the shape distributions obtained by transmission electron microscopy. We found that fitting optical absorption spectra using MEMT provides a robust tool for measuring the shape and concentration of metallic NPs.

  8. Determination of morphological characteristics of metallic nanoparticles based on modified Maxwell-Garnett fitting of optical responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battie, Y.; Resano-Garcia, A.; En Naciri, A.; Akil, S.; Chaoui, N.

    2015-10-01

    A modified effective medium theory (MEMT) is introduced to determine morphological characteristics and the volume fraction of colloidal metallic nanoparticles. By analyzing the optical absorption spectra of gold nanoparticles (NPs), this model is used to determine the distribution of prolate and oblate NPs and to demonstrate the presence of spherical NPs. In addition to interband transition, the model takes into account the longitudinal and transversal surface plasmon resonances. The results predicted by the MEMT theory were found to be in very good agreement with the shape distributions obtained by transmission electron microscopy. We found that fitting optical absorption spectra using MEMT provides a robust tool for measuring the shape and concentration of metallic NPs.

  9. Mucosal immunization with PLGA-microencapsulated DNA primes a SIV-specific CTL response revealed by boosting with cognate recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemically administered DNA encoding a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) derived immunogen effectively primes a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in macaques. In this further pilot study we have evaluated mucosal delivery of DNA as an alternative priming strategy. Plasmid DNA, pTH.HW, encoding a multi-CTL epitope gene, was incorporated into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles of less than 10 μm in diameter. Five intrarectal immunizations failed to stimulate a circulating vaccine-specific CTL response in 2 Mamu-A*01+ rhesus macaques. However, 1 week after intradermal immunization with a cognate modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine MVA.HW, CTL responses were detected in both animals that persisted until analysis postmortem, 12 weeks after the final boost. In contrast, a weaker and less durable response was seen in an animal vaccinated with the MVA construct alone. Analysis of lymphoid tissues revealed a disseminated CTL response in peripheral and regional lymph nodes but not the spleen of both mucosally primed animals

  10. An attempt to distinguish a modified genetic response of the mouse testis to X-ray exposure by the action of a spermatogonial chalone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an experiment designed to distinguish whether the action of a spermatogonial chalone in the mouse testis could modify the genetic response of a depleted stem spermatogonial population to X-radiation are reported. The results are consistent with the view that the stem cell population of the depleted adult testis a few days after damage closely approximates that of the early post-natal or immature animal, do not provide any indication that the testis extract in any way influence the response of the depleted testis to the 500-rad challenging dose. The yield of genetic damage was almost identical to that in the two control groups and the sterile period and testis weight data provided little reason to suspect that the amount of spermatogonial killing was altered. (Auth.)

  11. Using the pea aphid Acrythociphon pisum as a tool for screening biological responses to chemicals and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledger Terence

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though the biological process of aphid feeding is well documented, no one to date has sought to apply it as a tool to screen the biological responses to chemicals and drugs, in ecotoxicology, genotoxicology and/or for interactions in the cascade of sequential molecular events of embryogenesis. Parthenogenetic insect species present the advantage of an anatomical system composed of multiple germarium/ovarioles in the same mother with all the intermediate maturation stages of embryos from oocyte to first instar larva birth. This could be used as an interesting model to visualize at which step drugs interact with the cell signalling pathway during the ordered developmental process. Findings We designed a simple test for screening drugs by investigating simultaneously zygote mitotic division, the progression of embryo development, cell differentiation at early developmental stages and finally organogenesis and population growth rate. We aimed to analyze the toxicology effects of compounds and/or their interference on cellular signalling by examining at which step of the cascade, from zygote to mature embryo, the developmental process is perturbed. We reasoned that a parthenogenetic founder insect, in which the ovarioles shelter numerous embryos at different developmental stages, would allow us to precisely pinpoint the step of embryogenesis in which chemicals act through specific molecular targets as the known ordered homeobox genes. Conclusion Using this method we report the results of a genotoxicological and demographic analysis of three compound models bearing in common a bromo group: one is integrated as a base analog in DNA synthesis, two others activate permanently kinases. We report that one compound (Br-du altered drastically embryogenesis, which argues in favor of this simple technique as a cheap first screening of chemicals or drugs to be used in a number of genotoxicology applications.

  12. A self-consistent study of multipole response in neutron-rich nuclei using a modified realistic potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, D; Iudice, N Lo; Vesely, P; Andreozzi, F; De Gregorio, G; Porrino, A

    2014-01-01

    The multipole response of neutron rich O and Sn isotopes is computed in Tamm-Dancoff and random-phase approximations using the canonical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov quasi-particle basis. The calculations are performed using an intrinsic Hamiltonian composed of a $V_{lowk}$ potential, deduced from the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interaction, corrected with phenomenological density dependent and spin-orbit terms. The effect of these two pieces on energies and multipole responses is discussed. The problem of removing the spurious admixtures induced by the center of mass motion and by the violation of the number of particles is investigated. The differences between the two theoretical approaches are discussed quantitatively. Attention is then focused on the dipole strength distribution, including the low-lying transitions associated to the pygmy resonance. Monopole and quadrupole responses are also briefly investigated. A detailed comparison with the available experimental spectra contributes to clarify the extent of val...

  13. Infliximab therapy increases the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes and modifies macrophage cytokine response to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, N; Magro, F; Silva, J; Duro, M; Gracio, D; Coelho, R; Appelberg, R; Macedo, G; Sarmento, A

    2014-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has been correlated with altered macrophage response to microorganisms. Considering the efficacy of infliximab treatment on CD remission, we investigated infliximab effects on circulating monocyte subsets and on macrophage cytokine response to bacteria. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were obtained from CD patients, treated or not with infliximab. Macrophages were infected with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) or M. avium subsp avium, and cytokine levels [tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10] were evaluated at different time-points. To evaluate infliximab-dependent effects on monocyte subsets, we studied CD14 and CD16 expression by peripheral blood monocytes before and after different infliximab administrations. We also investigated TNF secretion by macrophages obtained from CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes and the frequency of TNF(+) cells among CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocyte-derived macrophages from CD patients. Infliximab treatment resulted in elevated TNF and IL-10 macrophage response to bacteria. An infliximab-dependent increase in the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes (particularly the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset) was also observed (before infliximab: 4·65 ± 0·58%; after three administrations: 10·68 ± 2·23%). In response to MAP infection, macrophages obtained from CD16(+) monocytes were higher TNF producers and CD16(+) macrophages from infliximab-treated CD patients showed increased frequency of TNF(+) cells. In conclusion, infliximab treatment increased the TNF production of CD macrophages in response to bacteria, which seemed to depend upon enrichment of CD16(+) circulating monocytes, particularly of the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset. Infliximab treatment of CD patients also resulted in increased macrophage IL-10 production in response to bacteria, suggesting an infliximab-induced shift to M2 macrophages. PMID:24816497

  14. Chemo-Electrical Signal Transduction by Using Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Gate-Modified Field Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Matsumoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A glucose-responsive polymer brush was designed on a gold electrode and exploited as an extended gate for a field effect transistor (FET based biosensor. A permittivity change at the gate interface due to the change in hydration upon specific binding with glucose was detectable. The rate of response was markedly enhanced compared to the previously studied cross-linked or gel-coupled electrode, owing to its kinetics involving no process of the polymer network diffusion. This finding may offer a new strategy of the FET-based biosensors effective not only for large molecules but also for electrically neutral molecules such as glucose with improved kinetics.

  15. 活化炉渣作为生物滤料在循环式海水工厂化养殖中的应用%The application of modified cinder as biological substrate in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王际英; 乔洪金; 李宝山; 张利民; 陈玮; 宋向军

    2014-01-01

    为筛选适合于海水循环水养殖系统的高效价廉的生物滤料,研究了炉渣的活化方法,比较了活化炉渣与其它生物滤料在氨氮和亚硝酸盐氮处理效率上的差异,测定了活化炉渣生物包处理氨氮的速率,并在循环式海水工厂化养殖系统中检测了以活化炉渣填充的生物滤池去除营养盐的效果。结果显示,活化炉渣与常见生物滤料相比,在氨氮和亚硝酸盐氮处理效率上差异不显著(P<0.05);熟化的炉渣生物包处理氨氮的速率为4.21μg/( h·m2);以活化炉渣填充循环水养殖系统的生物滤池,经50 d熟化和处理后,养殖池内的氨氮浓度符合渔业水质标准。研究表明,活化炉渣是一种高效价廉的生物滤料,适合在循环式海水工厂化养殖中应用,但其发挥作用至少需要50 d的熟化。%To screen efficient and cheap biological substrate for marine recirculating aquaculture systems, in this paper, the modified method of cinder was studied, the removing efficiency of the ammonia and nitrite with modified cinder and other biological substrates were compared, and the treatment rate of ammonia with the maturated cinder package was determined as well. The removing efficiency of nutrient salts with bio-filter ponds containing modified cinder in marine recirculating aquaculture systems was also evaluated. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the removing efficiency of ammonia and nitrite( P<0.05) for modified cinder and other substrates. The treatment rate of ammonia by the maturated cinder package was 4. 21 μg/( h·m2 ) . When filling the bio-filter ponds in recirculating aquaculture systems with modified cinder, the concentrations of ammonia in culture ponds were comformed to the water quality standard for fisheries after 50 days maturation. Therefore, the modified cinder is an efficient and cheap biological substrate, and suitable for application in the

  16. Hyaluronic Acid-Modified Cationic Lipid-PLGA Hybrid Nanoparticles as a Nanovaccine Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Cao, Fengqiang; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Hongfan; Wang, Chun; Leng, Xigang; Song, Cunxian; Kong, Deling; Ma, Guilei

    2016-05-18

    Here, we investigated the use of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated cationic lipid-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) hybrid nanoparticles (HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs) as vaccine delivery vehicles, which were originally developed for the cytosolic delivery of genes. Our results demonstrated that after the NPs uptake by dendritic cells (DCs), some of the antigens that were encapsulated in HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs escaped to the cytosolic compartment, and whereas some of the antigens remained in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment, where both MHC-I and MHC-II antigen presentation occurred. Moreover, HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs led to the up-regulation of MHC, costimulatory molecules, and cytokines. In vivo experiments further revealed that more powerful immune responses were induced from mice immunized with HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs when compared with cationic lipid-PLGA nanoparticles and free ovalbumin (OVA); the responses included antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, the production of antigen-specific IgG antibodies and the generation of memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Overall, these data demonstrate the high potential of HA-DOTAP-PLGA NPs for use as vaccine delivery vehicles to elevate cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:27088457

  17. Posintro™-HBsAg, a modified ISCOM including HBsAg, induces strong cellular and humoral responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiött, Asa; Larsson, Kristina; Manniche, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    HBsAg vaccine formulation, Posintro™-HBsAg, was compared to two commercial hepatitis B vaccines including aluminium or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and the two adjuvant systems MF59 and QS21 in their efficiency to prime both cellular and humoral immune responses. The Posintro™-HBsAg induced...

  18. NOVEL COMPOSITES OF POLY(L-LACTIDE) AND SURFACE MODIFIED BIOACTIVE SiO2-CaO-P2O5 GEL NANOPARTICLES: MECHANICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-xue Liu; Jun-chao Wei; Xue-si Chen; Xia-bin Jing; Yang Cui; Yi Liu

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 gel (BAG) nanoparticles with 40 nm in diameter were synthesized by the sol-gel route and further modified via the ring-opening polymerization of lactide on the surface of particles. Surface modified BAG (mBAG) was introduced in poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) matrix as bioactive filler. The dispersibility of mBAG in PLLA matrix was much higher than that of rough BAG particles. Tensile strength of the mBAG/PLLA composite could be increased to 61.2 Mpa at 2 vet% filler content from 53.4 Mpa for pure PLLA. The variation of moduli of the BAG/PLLA and mBAG/PLLA composites always showed an enhancement tendency with the increasing content of filler loading. The SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces showed that mBAG could be homogeneously dispersed in the PLLA matrix, and the corrugated deformation could absorb the rupture energy effectively during the breaking of materials. In vitro bioactivity tests showed that both BAG and mBAG particles could endow the composites with ability of the calcium sediment in SBF, but the surface modification of BAG particles could weaken this capability to some extent. Biocompatibility tests showed that both BAG and mBAG particles could facilitate the attachment and proliferation of the marrow cells on the surface of the composite. All these results showed that the mBAG/PLLA composite would be a promising material for bone tissues regeneration.

  19. Optical response of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenides for solar cell applications using the modified Becke-Johnson potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy bands and density of states (DOS) of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenides like MoS2, MoSeS, MoSe2, MoTe2, MoTeS, and MoTe0.5S1.5 are reported for the first time using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential within full potential-linearised augmented plane wave technique. From the partial DOS, a strong hybridisation between the Mo-d and chalcogen-p states is observed below the Fermi energy EF. In addition, the dielectric constants, absorption coefficients, and refractivity spectra of these compounds have also been deduced. The integrated absorption coefficients derived from the frequency-dependent absorption spectra within the energy range of 0-4.5 eV show a possibility of using molybdenum dichalcogenides, particularly MoTe0.5S1.5, in solar cell applications. Birefringence and degree of anisotropy are also discussed using the data on refractivity and imaginary components of the dielectric constant.

  20. The structural, electronic and optical response of IIA-VIA compounds through the modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Roshan; Mohammad, S.; Ullah, Hamid; Khan, S. A.; Uddin, H.; Khan, M.; Khan, N. U.

    2013-02-01

    The structural, electronic and optical properties of IIA-VIA compounds are performed, by using the full-potential linearized augmented plan wave (FP-LAPW) method within DFT, by using the (PBEsol-GGA 2008) version. We have compared the modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential to LDA, GGA and EV-GGA approximations. The IIA-VIA compounds have rock salt structure (B1) and zinc-blend structure (B3). The results obtained for band structure using mBJ show a significant improvement over previous theoretical work and give closer values to the experimental results. The bandgaps less than 3.1 eV are used in the visible light devices applications, while those with bandgaps bigger than 3.1 eV, used in UV devices applications. Optical parameters, like the dielectric constant, refractive indices, reflectivity, optical conductivity and absorption coefficient are calculated and analyzed. Refractive index lesser than unity (vg=c/n) shows that the group velocity of the incident radiation is greater than the speed of light.

  1. Thermostatic and rheological responses of DPD fluid to extreme shear under modified Lees-Edwards boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshfegh, Abouzar; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and rheological interactions between velocity-dependent thermostats of Lowe-Andersen (LA) and Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen (NHLA), and modified Lees-Edwards (M-LEC) boundary condition were studied in the context of Dissipative Particle Dynamics method. Comparisons were made with original Lees-Edwards method to characterise the improvements that M-LEC offers in conserving the induced shear momentum. Different imposed shear velocities, heat bath collision/exchange frequencies and thermostating probabilities were considered. The presented analyses addressed an unusual discontinuity in momentum transfer that appeared in form of nonphysical jumps in velocity and temperature profiles. The usefulness of M-LEC was then quantified by evaluating the enhancements in obtained effective shear velocity, effective shear rate, Péclet number, and dynamic viscosity. System exchange frequency (Γ) with Maxwellian heat bath was found to play an important role, in that its larger values facilitated achieving higher shear rates with proper temperature control at the cost of deviation from an ideal momentum transfer. Similar dynamic viscosities were obtained under both shearing modes between LA and NHLA thermostats up to Γ = 10, whilst about twice the range of viscosity (1 %). The main benefits of this modification were to facilitate momentum flow from shear boundaries to the system bulk. In addition, it was found that there exist upper thresholds for imposing shear on the system beyond which temperature cannot be controlled properly and nonphysical jumps reappear. PMID:26701709

  2. A Modified Thermal Time Model Quantifying Germination Response to Temperature for C3 and C4 Species in Temperate Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-based germination models are widely used to predict germination rate and germination timing of plants. However, comparison of model parameters between large numbers of species is rare. In this study, seeds of 27 species including 12 C4 and 15 C3 species were germinated at a range of constant temperatures from 5 °C to 40 °C. We used a modified thermal time model to calculate germination parameters at suboptimal temperatures. Generally, the optimal germination temperature was higher for C4 species than for C3 species. The thermal time constant for the 50% germination percentile was significantly higher for C3 than C4 species. The thermal time constant of perennials was significantly higher than that of annuals. However, differences in base temperatures were not significant between C3 and C4, or annuals and perennial species. The relationship between germination rate and seed mass depended on plant functional type and temperature, while the base temperature and thermal time constant of C3 and C4 species exhibited no significant relationship with seed mass. The results illustrate differences in germination characteristics between C3 and C4 species. Seed mass does not affect germination parameters, plant life cycle matters, however.

  3. Optical response of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenides for solar cell applications using the modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, Ushma [Sardar Patel College of Engineering, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Joshi, Ritu; Venugopalan, K. [M.L. Sukhadia Univ., Udaipur (India). Dept. of Physics; Kothari, D.C. [Mumbai Univ. (India). National Center for Nanosciences and Nanotechnology; Tiwari, Harpal [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Energy bands and density of states (DOS) of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenides like MoS{sub 2}, MoSeS, MoSe{sub 2}, MoTe{sub 2}, MoTeS, and MoTe{sub 0.5}S{sub 1.5} are reported for the first time using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential within full potential-linearised augmented plane wave technique. From the partial DOS, a strong hybridisation between the Mo-d and chalcogen-p states is observed below the Fermi energy E{sub F}. In addition, the dielectric constants, absorption coefficients, and refractivity spectra of these compounds have also been deduced. The integrated absorption coefficients derived from the frequency-dependent absorption spectra within the energy range of 0-4.5 eV show a possibility of using molybdenum dichalcogenides, particularly MoTe{sub 0.5}S{sub 1.5}, in solar cell applications. Birefringence and degree of anisotropy are also discussed using the data on refractivity and imaginary components of the dielectric constant.

  4. Modified cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  5. Low doses of a neonicotinoid insecticide modify pheromone response thresholds of central but not peripheral olfactory neurons in a pest insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabhi, Kaouther K; Deisig, Nina; Demondion, Elodie; Le Corre, Julie; Robert, Guillaume; Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Lucas, Philippe; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2016-02-10

    Insect pest management relies mainly on neurotoxic insecticides, including neonicotinoids, leaving residues in the environment. There is now evidence that low doses of insecticides can have positive effects on pest insects by enhancing various life traits. Because pest insects often rely on sex pheromones for reproduction, and olfactory synaptic transmission is cholinergic, neonicotinoid residues could modify chemical communication. We recently showed that treatments with different sublethal doses of clothianidin could either enhance or decrease behavioural sex pheromone responses in the male moth, Agrotis ipsilon. We investigated now effects of the behaviourally active clothianidin doses on the sensitivity of the peripheral and central olfactory system. We show with extracellular recordings that both tested clothianidin doses do not influence pheromone responses in olfactory receptor neurons. Similarly, in vivo optical imaging does not reveal any changes in glomerular response intensities to the sex pheromone after clothianidin treatments. The sensitivity of intracellularly recorded antennal lobe output neurons, however, is upregulated by a lethal dose 20 times and downregulated by a dose 10 times lower than the lethal dose 0. This correlates with the changes of behavioural responses after clothianidin treatment and suggests the antennal lobe as neural substrate involved in clothianidin-induced behavioural changes. PMID:26842577

  6. Total dose radiation response of modified commercial silicon-on-insulator materials with nitrogen implanted buried oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Yu Fang; Li Ning

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen ions of various doses are implanted into the buried oxide (BOX) of commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI)materials,and subsequent annealings are carried out at various temperatures.The total dose radiation responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are characterized by the high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique after irradiation using a Co-60 source.It is found that there exist relatively complex relationships between the radiation hardness of the nitrogen implanted BOX and the nitrogen implantation dose at different irradiation doses.Fhe experimental results also suggest that a lower dose nitrogen implantation and a higher post-implantation annealing temperature are suitable for improving the radiation hardness of SOI wafer.Based on the measured C-V data,secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS),and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy,the total dose responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are discussed.

  7. A Novel Biological Role of α-Mangostin in Modulating Inflammatory Response Through the Activation of SIRT-1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschelli, Sara; Pesce, Mirko; Ferrone, Alessio; Patruno, Antonia; Pasqualone, Livia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Carlucci, Maura; de Lutiis, Maria Anna; Grilli, Alfredo; Felaco, Mario; Speranza, Lorenza

    2016-11-01

    Several studies have shown that xanthones obtained from Garcinia Mangostana (GM) have remarkable biological activities. α-mangostin (α-MG) is the main constituent of the fruit hull of the GM. Several findings have suggested that SIRT-1, a nuclear histone deacetylase, could influence cellular function by the inhibition of NF-kB signaling. ROS can inhibit SIRT-1 activity by initiating oxidative modifications on its cysteine residues, and suppression of SIRT-1 enhances the NF-κB signaling resulting in inflammatory responses. The goals of the present study were to evaluate the quantity of α-MG in the methanolic extract of GM (Vithagroup Spa) and to investigate the activity of this xanthone in U937 cell line and in human monocytes from responsive to inflammatory insult analyzing the possible changes on the activation of SIRT-1 protein via NF-Kb. Cells were treated with the methanolic extract of GM and/or LPS. The chromatographic separation of α-MG was performed by an HPLC analysis. EX 527, a specific SIRT-1 inhibitor, was used to determine if SIRT-1/NfkB signaling pathway might be involved in α-MG action on cells. Our results show that α-MG inhibits p65 acetylation and down-regulates the pro-inflammatory gene products as COX-2, iNOS via SIRT-1 activation. Cells treated with EX 527 showed an up-regulation of NFkB acetylation and an over expression of inducible enzymes and their product of catalysis (NO and PGE2). These results suggest that α-MG may be useful for the development of alternative pharmacological strategies aimed at reducing the inflammatory process. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2439-2451, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895796

  8. Variability of projected terrestrial biosphere responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 due to uncertainty in biological nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerholt, Johannes; Zaehle, Sönke; Smith, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    Including a terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle in Earth system models has led to substantial attenuation of predicted biosphere-climate feedbacks. However, the magnitude of this attenuation remains uncertain. A particularly important but highly uncertain process is biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), which is the largest natural input of N to land ecosystems globally. In order to quantify this uncertainty and estimate likely effects on terrestrial biosphere dynamics, we applied six alternative formulations of BNF spanning the range of process formulations in current state-of-the-art biosphere models within a common framework, the O-CN model: a global map of static BNF rates, two empirical relationships between BNF and other ecosystem variables (net primary productivity and evapotranspiration), two process-oriented formulations based on plant N status, and an optimality-based approach. We examined the resulting differences in model predictions under ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and found that the predicted global BNF rates and their spatial distribution for contemporary conditions were broadly comparable, ranging from 108 to 148 Tg N yr-1 (median: 128 Tg N yr-1), despite distinct regional patterns associated with the assumptions of each approach. Notwithstanding, model responses in BNF rates to elevated levels of atmospheric [CO2] (+200 ppm) ranged between -4 Tg N yr-1 (-3 %) and 56 Tg N yr-1 (+42 %) (median: 7 Tg N yr-1 (+8 %)). As a consequence, future projections of global ecosystem carbon (C) storage (+281 to +353 Pg C, or +13 to +16 %) as well as N2O emission (-1.6 to +0.5 Tg N yr-1, or -19 to +7 %) differed significantly across the different model formulations. Our results emphasize the importance of better understanding the nature and magnitude of BNF responses to change-induced perturbations, particularly through new empirical perturbation experiments and improved model representation.

  9. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2013-12-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria, Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and two temperatures (20 °C and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 77-91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 15-27% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  10. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2014-05-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically available radiation (PAR)) and two temperatures (20 and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs. weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 78 to 91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 17-29% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  11. Response surface methodology for evaluation and optimization of process parameter and antioxidant capacity of rice flour modified by enzymatic extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Enbo; Pan, Xiaowei; Wu, Zhengzong; Long, Jie; Li, Jingpeng; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Jiao, Aiquan

    2016-12-01

    For the purpose of investigating the effect of enzyme concentration (EC), barrel temperature (BT), moisture content (MC), and screw speed (SS) on processing parameters (product temperature, die pressure and special mechanical energy (SME)) and product responses (extent of gelatinization (GE), retention rate of total phenolic content (TPC-RR)), rice flour extruded with thermostable α-amylase was analyzed by response surface methodology. Stepwise regression models were computed to generate response surface and contour plots, revealing that both TPC-RR and GE increased as increasing MC while expressed different sensitivities to BT during enzymatic extrusion. Phenolics preservation was benefited from low SME. According to multiple-factor optimization, the conditions required to obtain the target SME (10kJ/kg), GE (100%) and TPC-RR (85%) were: EC=1.37‰, BT=93.01°C, MC=44.30%, and SS=171.66rpm, with the actual values (9.49kJ/kg, 99.96% and 87.10%, respectively) showing a good fit to the predicted values. PMID:27374518

  12. Short communication. In vitro embryo production can be modified by the previous ovarian response to a superovulatory treatment in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Forcada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two ewes were used to study how the ovarian response to a superovulatory treatment determines quality of oocytes recovered from ovaries after embryo collection, and their developmental capacity after in vitro maturation (IVM and fertilization (IVF. Ewes were superovulated, and seven days after oestrus, embryos were collected and ewes divided into three groups: (+ +, n=19, ewes responding to the treatment with embryos collected after flushing; (+ –, n=8, ewes responding, but only oocytes were found; and (– –, n=5, ewes not responding to the treatment and no embryos collected. Ovaries were recovered and oocytes collected from the three groups. A significant effect of the response to the treatment was observed for oocyte quality, so that (– – ewes presented the higher number of oocytes per ewe (p<0.001. Total number of oocytes selected for IVM and IVF was significantly higher in the same group, in comparison with (+ + and (+ – (p<0.001. Group (+ – ewes presented the lowest maturation (p<0.001, fertilization (p<0.05 and cleavage rates (p<0.001. In conclusion, the ovarian response to a superovulatory treatment determines the number and quality of the oocytes recovered 7 days after the oestrus induced by the hormonal treatment. In vitro techniques could be an important tool to increase embryo production by particular ewes when they are not able to produce a significant amount of in vivo embryos.

  13. A self-consistent study of multipole response in neutron-rich nuclei using a modified realistic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multipole response of neutron-rich O and Sn isotopes is computed in Tamm–Dancoff and random-phase approximations using the canonical Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov quasi-particle basis. The calculations are performed using an intrinsic Hamiltonian composed of a Vlowk potential, deduced from the CD-Bonn nucleon–nucleon interaction, corrected with phenomenological density dependent and spin–orbit terms. The effect of these two pieces on energies and multipole responses is discussed. The problem of removing the spurious admixtures induced by the center-of-mass motion and by the violation of the number of particles is investigated. The differences between the two theoretical approaches are discussed quantitatively. Attention is then focused on the dipole strength distribution, including the low-lying transitions associated with the pygmy resonance. Monopole and quadrupole responses are also briefly investigated. A detailed comparison with the available experimental spectra contributes to clarify the extent of validity of the two self-consistent approaches. (paper)

  14. Preparation, characterization and investigation of in vitro and in vivo biological properties of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cement for bone defect repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Masaeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the invitro and invivo performance of a 3 wt% of strontium additive hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate cements (CPC. Materials and Methods: The prepared calcium phosphate cement was characterized with XRD, FTIR, setting time, STA and in vitro and in vivo biological analyses. The MTT assay ALP activities as in vitro study and radiological and histological examinations as in vivo study between the three groups of 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC, CPC and control were performed and compared. Data were analyzed using T-test and One-way ANOVA. Results: XRD analysis demonstrated that by increasing the ratio of Powder/Liquid (P/L, the crystallinity of the prepared cement increased. The substitution of strontium instead of calcium in CPC could also alter the crystal structure, including some structural disorder. However, in the CPC with no strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, no significant increase in the crystallinity was observed. SEM observations revealed CPC with increasing P/L ratio, the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals arising from the interaction of solid and liquid phase of cement was decreased. Also, the addition of Sr within Ca site culminated in a dramatic increase in crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. In vitro biological properties ascertained that addition of 3 wt. % Sr-HA into CPC enhanced MTT assay and ALP activity, which could be due to the presence of strontium ions. The histological study showed that greater remodeling was seen at 4 weeks after implantation when the 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC was used. Conclusion: The obtained results cleared that CPC can be a potential candidate as a carrier with strontium additives for bone remodeling and regeneration.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Novel Mechanistic Insight into Murine Biological Responses to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs and Cultured Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Søs Poulsen; Nicklas R. Jacobsen; Sarah Labib; Dongmei Wu; Mainul Husain; Andrew Williams; Bøgelund, Jesper P.; Ole Andersen; Carsten Købler; Kristian Mølhave; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Saber, Anne T.; Håkan Wallin; Yauk, Carole L.; Ulla Vogel

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in substituting animal work with in vitro experimentation in human health risk assessment; however, there are only few comparisons of in vitro and in vivo biological responses to engineered nanomaterials. We used high-content genomics tools to compare in vivo pulmonary responses of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to those in vitro in cultured lung epithelial cells (FE1) at the global transcriptomic level. Primary size, surface area and other properties of MWCNT- X...

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Novel Mechanistic Insight into Murine Biological Responses to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs and Cultured Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Nicklas R. Jacobsen; Labib, Sarah; Wu, Dongmei; Husain, Mainul; Williams, Andrew; Bøgelund, Jesper P.; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Saber, Anne T.; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in substituting animal work with in vitro experimentation in human health risk assessment; however, there are only few comparisons of in vitro and in vivo biological responses to engineered nanomaterials. We used high-content genomics tools to compare in vivo pulmonary responses of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to those in vitro in cultured lung epithelial cells (FE1) at the global transcriptomic level. Primary size, surface area and other properties of MWCNT-XN...

  17. Monotonicity, frustration, and ordered response: an analysis of the energy landscape of perturbed large-scale biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altafini Claudio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For large-scale biological networks represented as signed graphs, the index of frustration measures how far a network is from a monotone system, i.e., how incoherently the system responds to perturbations. Results In this paper we find that the frustration is systematically lower in transcriptional networks (modeled at functional level than in signaling and metabolic networks (modeled at stoichiometric level. A possible interpretation of this result is in terms of energetic cost of an interaction: an erroneous or contradictory transcriptional action costs much more than a signaling/metabolic error, and therefore must be avoided as much as possible. Averaging over all possible perturbations, however, we also find that unlike for transcriptional networks, in the signaling/metabolic networks the probability of finding the system in its least frustrated configuration tends to be high also in correspondence of a moderate energetic regime, meaning that, in spite of the higher frustration, these networks can achieve a globally ordered response to perturbations even for moderate values of the strength of the interactions. Furthermore, an analysis of the energy landscape shows that signaling and metabolic networks lack energetic barriers around their global optima, a property also favouring global order. Conclusion In conclusion, transcriptional and signaling/metabolic networks appear to have systematic differences in both the index of frustration and the transition to global order. These differences are interpretable in terms of the different functions of the various classes of networks.

  18. Adaptive plasticity of Laguncularia racemosa in response to different environmental conditions: integrating chemical and biological data by chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Souza, Iara; Bonomo, Marina Marques; Morozesk, Mariana; Rocha, Lívia Dorsch; Duarte, Ian Drumond; Furlan, Larissa Maria; Arrivabene, Hiulana Pereira; Monferrán, Magdalena Victoria; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Milanez, Camilla Rozindo Dias; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are dynamic environments under constant influence of anthropic contaminants. The correlation between environmental contamination levels and possible changes in the morphology of plants, evaluated by multivariate statistics helps to highlight matching between these variables. This study aimed to evaluate the uptake and translocation of metals and metalloids in roots and leaves as well as the changes induced in both anatomy and histochemistry of roots of Laguncularia racemosa inhabiting two estuaries of Espírito Santo (Brazil) with different pollution degrees. The analysis of 14 elements in interstitial water, sediments and plants followed by multivariate statistics, allowed the differentiation of studied sites, showing good match between levels of elements in the environment with the corresponding in plants. L. racemosa showed variations in their root anatomy in different collection areas, with highest values of cortex/vascular cylinder ratio, periderm thickness and air gap area in Vitória Bay, the most polluted sampling area. These three parameters were also important to differentiate the mangrove areas by linear discriminant analysis. The development stage of aerenchyma in roots reflected the oxygen availability in the water, being found a negative correlation between these variables. The combined use of chemical and biological analyses responded quite well to different pollution scenarios, matching morphological responses to physical and chemical parameters, measured at different partitions within the estuary. Thus, L. racemosa can be confirmed as a reliable sentinel plant for biomonitoring of estuaries impacted by anthropic pollution. PMID:24445776

  19. Mutagenic potential scale (MPS) for evaluation of biological response in various ambients with different radiation exposure rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutagenic potential scale is being elaborated through the evaluation of the frequency of mutations induced in an exposed biological system to several atmospheres (study sites). The selection of these sites will be based on the perception of the public in general, of his/her impact to the public individuals' health. There will be included, in that selection, from considered areas 'ecological paradises' until surroundings of reactors, nuclear and radioactive facilities, as well as miners that extract and/or benefit ores with uranium and thorium associated, potentially generators of radiological impact. The developed project foresees the contribution of other research groups with objective of being obtained data in other ranches. Referred its scale will be built with base in the answer of the responsible genetic system for the alteration of coloration of the cells of the hair estaminais of Tradescantia (BNL 4430) to agents inductors of mutations. Methodological innovations are being introduced to the described system, through automation of the counting of mutagenic events, more specifically for image analysis with forecast of a significant increase on the efficiency of the processing of the analysis and counting of mutagenic events. (author)

  20. Teach Softly and Debunk with a Big Stick: A Response to "Evolution, Biology, and Society--A Conversation for the 21st-Century Sociology Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Evolution, Biology, and Society: A Conversation for the 21st-Century Sociology Classroom" by Richard Machalek and Michael Martin. Their work serves as a reminder that the discipline is diverse and dynamic. The author appreciates the effort to urge sociology teachers to include genetic concepts in…