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Sample records for biological research reactor janus

  1. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  2. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Garlock, G.A. [MOTA Corp., Cayce, SC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  3. Photon spectrum behind biological shielding of the LVR-15 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.; Vins, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research reactor situated at the Research Centre Rez, near Prague. It operates as a multipurpose facility with a maximum thermal power of 10 MW. The reactor core usually contains from 28 to 32 fuel assemblies with a total mass of {sup 235}U of about 5 kg. Emitted radiation from the fuel caused by fission is shielded by moderating water, a steel reactor vessel, and heavy concrete. This paper deals with measurement and analysis of the gamma spectrum near the outer surface of the concrete wall, behind biological shielding, mainly in the 3- to 10-MeV energy range. A portable HPGe detector with a portable multichannel analyzer was used to measure gamma spectra. The origin of energy lines in gamma detector spectra was identified. (authors)

  4. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Dismantling of the biological shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e.g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given.

  5. Theoretical research on Janus-Helmholtz underwater acoustic transducer%Janus-Helmholtz水声换能器理论问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑永杰; 蓝宇

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the reason for increase of the longitudinal resonant frequency of a Janus transducer in water are analyzed through the equivalent circuit of Janus-Helmholtz underwater acoustic transducer by taking into account mutual radiation in order to solve the theoretical questions on Janus-Helmholtz acoustic transducer. The mechanism of broadband transmitting of Janus-Helmholtz underwater acoustic transducers is obtained by analyzing phase fre-quency curves of the vertical vibration and liquid cavity vibrations. The influence of cavity wall's elasticity on acous-tic performance of Helmholtz resonator is researched. A prototype that operates in the band between 1 kHz and 3 kHz is designed. Test results showed that the vibration and acoustic characteristics of the prototype are consistent with the theoretical research results.%为了解决Janus-Helmholtz水声换能器研究中的理论问题,通过互辐射模型时的Janus-Helmholtz水声换能器等效电路,分析了Janus换能器纵振动谐振频率在水中升高的原因;通过对Janus换能器纵振动和液腔振动的相频曲线的分析,得出了Janus-Helmholtz水声换能器宽带发射的机理,研究了腔体弹性对Helmholtz声学性能的影响规律. 设计了工作频段为1~3 kHz的Janus-Helmholtz换能器试验样机,样机的测试结果表明其振动及声学特性与理论研究结果相符.

  6. PEAR SHOOT SAWFLY (JANUS COMPRESSUS FABRICIUS – LIFE CYCLE AND BIOLOGICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC

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    Tihomir Validžić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the thesis was to investigate life cycle, biological and morphological characteristics of pear shoot sawfly (Janus compressus Fabricius, Hymenoptera Cephidae, furthermore to identify natural enemies in order to protect pear from this pest. The trial was conducted in the period of three years: 2010, 2011 and 2012 in pear orchards at five localities. Monitoring of adult sawfly was done by yellow sticky traps. Laboratory research was done at the Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Plant Protection, Section of Entomology and Nematology. In this study, pear shoot sawfly in Eastern Slavonia occurred in the period of four weeks, starting from the third decade of April with the peak population at the beginning of the May. Adults flight is the most intensive during warm and sunny days, when temperatures are above 14°C. Adult sawflies are characterized by elongated body and antennae, usually 7-12 mm long and sexual dimorphism is present. Pest is univoltine. Basic colour of adult sawfly is black. Antennae are moniliform and consist of 20 (male - 22 (female segments. Females have red or dark red colored abdomen, while males have yellow or orange one. Eggs are cylindrically shaped, 0.8-1.0 mm long. Female lays approximately 30 eggs. Embryonic development of pear shoot sawfly eggs lasts from 11 to 14 days. Larvae are 8-10 mm long, white or pale yellow. Larvae molt three times. Pear shoot sawfly larvae were parasitized by insects from Hymenoptera order, from five identified and one unidentified genera. Level of parasitism by genera is as follows: Eurytoma sp. (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae – 9.83%, Tetrastichus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae – 2.01%, Eupelmus sp. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae – 1.66%, Pteromalus sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae – 0.55%, Ichneumonida sp. (Hymenoptera: Pimplinae – 0.35% and unidentified genera – 0.62%. Plant parasitic species Metopoplax origani (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae was found in 1.80% of analyzed shoots. Larvae were

  7. Multi purpose research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raina, V.K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: vkrain@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Sasidharan, K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sengupta, Samiran [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, Tej [Research Reactor Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2006-04-15

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor.

  8. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  9. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Villarino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors.

  10. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  11. Comparison study of Janus and JLINK

    OpenAIRE

    Pearman, Gerald M.

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. The Janus simulation model was initially designed to operate in a stand-alone mode. There is an ongoing research project to link Janus to other constructive simulations and virtual simulators. The present standard used to connect different models is Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS). Janus can operate in a DIS environment using a cell adapter unit called the World Modeler. The combination of Janus and the World Modeler is known...

  12. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  13. JANUS characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The JANUS Reactor was operated from 1965 to 1992. All of the fuel was removed and shipped offsite in 1993. To provide information for use in finalizing the planning for the decommissioning of the reactor, the Health Physics Section of Argonne National Laboratory performed a characterization of the facility in January and February 1996. The characterization included measurements for radioactivity, hazardous materials, lead in wall paint, and asbestos. Measurements and smear samples for surface contamination were collected from every wall, ceiling and floor of the facility. Samples to determine activity concentrations were collected from vertical and horizontal corings into the reactor shield and foundation, and from coring into walls of the high dose and low dose rooms. Soil samples were collected outdoors from two drill holes, one south and one north of the JANUS exhaust stack. The predominant radionuclides detected were {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The highest exposure rate was 175 mR/h at the center of the reactor core. No hazardous materials were found in pits or sumps. There are 20 identified areas with asbestos and 7 objects with lead based paint.

  14. Dispositivo de posicionamiento de muestras biológicas para su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear // Biological samples positioning device for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Rodríguez - Gual

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ResumenPor la demanda de un dispositivo experimental para el posicionamiento de las muestras biológicaspara su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear de investigaciones en funcionamiento, seconstruyó y se puso en marcha un dispositivo para la colocación y retirada de las muestras en laposición de irradiación de dicho canal. Se efectuaron las valoraciones económicas comparando conotro tipo de dispositivo con las mismas funciones. Este trabajo formó parte de un proyectointernacional entre Cuba y Brasil que abarcó el estudio de los daños inducidos por diferentes tipos deradiación ionizante en moléculas de ADN. La solución propuesta es comprobada experimentalmente,lo que demuestra la validez práctica del dispositivo. Como resultado del trabajo, el dispositivoexperimental para la irradiación de las muestras biológicas se encuentra instalado y funcionando yapor 5 años en el canal radial # 3(BH#3 Palabras claves: reactor nuclear de investigaciones, dispositivo para posicionamiento de muestras,___________________________________________________________________________AbstractFor the demand of an experimental device for biological samples positioning system for irradiationson a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor in operation was constructed and started up adevice for the place and remove of the biological samples from the irradiation channels withoutinterrupting the operation of the reactor. The economical valuations are effected comparing withanother type of device with the same functions. This work formed part of an international projectbetween Cuba and Brazil that undertook the study of the induced damages by various types ofionizing radiation in DNA molecules. Was experimentally tested the proposed solution, whichdemonstrates the practical validity of the device. As a result of the work, the experimental device forbiological samples irradiations are installed and operating in the radial beam hole #3(BH#3

  15. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR) and sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR ...

  16. "Shoot and Sense" Janus Micromotors-Based Strategy for the Simultaneous Degradation and Detection of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Food and Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, D; Jurado-Sánchez, B; Escarpa, A

    2016-04-05

    A novel Janus micromotor-based strategy for the direct determination of diphenyl phthalate (DPP) in food and biological samples is presented. Mg/Au Janus micromotors are employed as novel analytical platforms for the degradation of the non-electroactive DPP into phenol, which is directly measured by difference pulse voltammetry on disposable screen-printed electrodes. The self-movement of the micromotors along the samples result in the generation of hydrogen microbubbles and hydroxyl ions for DPP degradation. The increased fluid transport improves dramatically the analytical signal, increasing the sensitivity while lowering the detection potential. The method has been successfully applied to the direct analysis of DPP in selected food and biological samples, without any sample treatment and avoiding any potential contamination from laboratory equipment. The developed approach is fast (∼5 min) and accurate with recoveries of ∼100%. In addition, efficient propulsion of multiple Mg/Au micromotors in complex samples has also been demonstrated. The advantages of the micromotors-assisted technology, i.e., disposability, portability, and the possibility to carry out multiple analysis simultaneously, hold considerable promise for its application in food and biological control in analytical applications with high significance.

  17. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes; Reactores biologico hibrido innovadores utilizando membranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  18. Application of the k{sub 0}-INAA method for analysis of biological samples at the pneumatic station of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerta, Daniel C.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.; Semmler, Renato, E-mail: dcpuerta@hotmail.com, E-mail: anamaria@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jacimovic, Radojko, E-mail: radojko.jacimovic@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Ljubljana, LJU (Slovenia). Department of Environmental Sciences

    2013-07-01

    As part of the process of implementation of the k{sub 0}-INAA standardization method at the Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, this study presents the results obtained for the analysis of short and medium-lived nuclides in biological samples by k{sub 0}-INAA using the program k{sub 0}-IAEA, provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The elements Al, Ba, Br, Na, K, Mn, Mg, Sr and V were determined with respect to gold ({sup 197}Au) using the pneumatic station facility of the IEA-R1 4.5 MW swimming pool nuclear research reactor, Sao Paulo. Characterization of the pneumatic station was carried out by using the 'bare triple-monitor' method with {sup 197}Au-{sup 96}Zr-{sup 94}Zr. The Certified Reference Material IRMM-530R Al-0.1%Au alloy and high purity zirconium comparators were used. The efficiency curves of the gamma-ray spectrometer used were determined by measuring calibrated radioactive sources at the usually utilized counting geometries. The method was validated by analyzing the reference materials NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves, INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The concentration results obtained agreed with certified, reference and recommended values, showing relative errors (bias, %) less than 30% for most elements. The Coefficients of Variation were below 20%, showing a good reproducibility of the results. The E{sub n}-number showed that all results, except Na in NIST SRM 1547 and NIST SRM 1573a and Al in INCT-MPH-2, were within 95% confidence interval. (author)

  19. Space biology research development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is to conduct and promote research related activities regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, particularly intelligent life. Such research encompasses the broad discipline of 'Life in the Universe', including all scientific and technological aspects of astronomy and the planetary sciences, chemical evolution, the origin of life, biological evolution, and cultural evolution. The primary purpose was to provide funding for the Principal Investigator to collaborate with the personnel of the SETI Institute and the NASA-Ames Research center in order to plan and develop space biology research on and in connection with Space Station Freedom; to promote cooperation with the international partners in the space station; to conduct a study on the use of biosensors in space biology research and life support system operation; and to promote space biology research through the initiation of an annual publication 'Advances in Space Biology and Medicine'.

  20. INTERVAL OBSERVER FOR A BIOLOGICAL REACTOR MODEL

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    T. A. Kharkovskaia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The method of an interval observer design for nonlinear systems with parametric uncertainties is considered. The interval observer synthesis problem for systems with varying parameters consists in the following. If there is the uncertainty restraint for the state values of the system, limiting the initial conditions of the system and the set of admissible values for the vector of unknown parameters and inputs, the interval existence condition for the estimations of the system state variables, containing the actual state at a given time, needs to be held valid over the whole considered time segment as well. Conditions of the interval observers design for the considered class of systems are shown. They are: limitation of the input and state, the existence of a majorizing function defining the uncertainty vector for the system, Lipschitz continuity or finiteness of this function, the existence of an observer gain with the suitable Lyapunov matrix. The main condition for design of such a device is cooperativity of the interval estimation error dynamics. An individual observer gain matrix selection problem is considered. In order to ensure the property of cooperativity for interval estimation error dynamics, a static transformation of coordinates is proposed. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by computer modeling of the biological reactor. Possible applications of these interval estimation systems are the spheres of robust control, where the presence of various types of uncertainties in the system dynamics is assumed, biotechnology and environmental systems and processes, mechatronics and robotics, etc.

  1. Performance of a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henquin, E.R. [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina); Bisang, J.M., E-mail: jbisang@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > For this reactor configuration the current distribution is uniform. > For this reactor configuration with bipolar connection the leakage current is small. > The mass-transfer conditions are closely uniform along the electrode. > The fluidodynamic behaviour can be represented by the dispersion model. > This reactor represents a suitable device for laboratory trials. - Abstract: This paper reports on a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor with an innovative design feature, which is based on a filter press arrangement with inclined segmented electrodes and under a modular assembly. Under bipolar connection, the fraction of leakage current is lower than 4%, depending on the bipolar Wagner number, and the current distribution is closely uniform. When a turbulence promoter is used, the local mass-transfer coefficient shows a variation of {+-}10% with respect to its mean value. The fluidodynamics of the reactor responds to the dispersion model with a Peclet number higher than 10. It is concluded that this reactor is convenient for laboratory research.

  2. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  3. Power Control Method for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baang, Dane; Suh, Yongsuk; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Considering safety-oriented design concept and other control environment, we developed a simple controller that provides limiting function of power change- rate as well as fine tracking performance. The design result has been well-proven via simulation and actual application to a TRIGA-II type research reactor. The proposed controller is designed to track the PDM(Power Demand) from operator input as long as maintaining the power change rate lower than a certain value for stable reactor operation. A power control method for a TRIGA-II type research reactor has been designed, simulated, and applied to actual reactor. The control performance during commissioning test shows that the proposed controller provides fine control performance for various changes in reference values (PDM), even though there is large measurement noise from neutron detectors. The overshoot at low power level is acceptable in a sense of reactor operation.

  4. Research Reactor Design for Export to Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Win Naing, Lay Lay Myint and Myung-Hyun Kim [Kyunghee Univ. Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Myanmar is striving to acquire the innovative technology in all field areas including maritime, aerospace and nuclear engineering. There is a high intention to construct a new research reactor for peaceful purposes. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) and Ministry of Education (MOE) are the important government organizations for Myanmar's education and they control most of institutes, universities and colleges. The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), one of the departments under MOST, leads research projects such as for radiation protection as well as radiation application and coordinates government departments and institutions regarding nuclear energy and its applications. Myanmar's Scientific and Technological Research Department (MSTRD) under MOST guides researches in metallurgy, polymer, pharmacy and biotechnology and so on, and acts as an official body for Myanmar industrial standard. The Department of Higher Education (DHE) under MOE controls art and science universities and colleges including research centers such as Asia Research Center (ARC), Universities Research Center (URC), Microbiology Research Center and so on and does to expand research areas and to utilize advanced technology in science. The wide use of radiation and radioisotopes is developed in Myanmar especially for the field areas such as Medical Science and Agricultural Science. Co{sup 60}, I{sup 131} and Tc{sup 99} are the major use of radioisotopes in diagnosis and therapy. In Agricultural Science, H{sup 3}, C{sup 14}, C{sup 60} etc are used to provide biological effects of radiations on plants, radio-isotopic study of soil physics and tracer studies.

  5. Supply of enriched uranium for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Since the RERTR-meeting In Newport/USA in 1990 the author delivered a series of papers in connection with the fuel cycle for research reactors dealing with its front-end. In these papers the author underlined the need for unified specifications for enriched uranium metal suitable for the production of fuel elements and made proposals with regard to the re-use of in Europe reprocessed highly enriched uranium. With regard to the fuel cycle of research reactors the research reactor community was since 1989 more concentrating on the problems of its back-end since the USA stopped the acceptance of spent research reactor fuel on December 31, 1988. Now, since it is apparent that these back-end problem have been solved by AEA`s ability to reprocess and the preparedness of the USA to again accept physically spent research reactor fuel the author is focusing with this paper again on the front-end of the fuel cycle on the question whether there is at all a safe supply of low and high enriched uranium for research reactors in the future.

  6. Strengthening IAEA Safeguards for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Bruce D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anzelon, George A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    During their December 10-11, 2013, workshop in Grenoble France, which focused on the history and future of safeguarding research reactors, the United States, France and the United Kingdom (UK) agreed to conduct a joint study exploring ways to strengthen the IAEA’s safeguards approach for declared research reactors. This decision was prompted by concerns about: 1) historical cases of non-compliance involving misuse (including the use of non-nuclear materials for production of neutron generators for weapons) and diversion that were discovered, in many cases, long after the violations took place and as part of broader pattern of undeclared activities in half a dozen countries; 2) the fact that, under the Safeguards Criteria, the IAEA inspects some reactors (e.g., those with power levels under 25 MWt) less than once per year; 3) the long-standing precedent of States using heavy water research reactors (HWRR) to produce plutonium for weapons programs; 4) the use of HEU fuel in some research reactors; and 5) various technical characteristics common to some types of research reactors that could provide an opportunity for potential proliferators to misuse the facility or divert material with low probability of detection by the IAEA. In some research reactors, for example, such characteristics include rapid on-line refueling, and a core design with room for such a large number of assemblies or targets that it is difficult to detect diversion or undeclared irradiation. In addition, infrastructure associated with research reactors, such as hot cells, where plutonium could be separated, could pose a safeguards challenge because, in some cases, they are not declared (because they are not located in the facility or because nuclear materials are not foreseen to be processed inside) and may not be accessible to inspectors in States without an Additional Protocol in force.

  7. PAC research in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, C. Y., E-mail: yamil@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP (Argentina); Ceolin, M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas, Dto de Quimica, Fac. Cs. Exactas, UNLP (Argentina); Pasquevich, A. F. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    In this paper possible applications of the Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC) technique in Biology are considered. Previous PAC experiments in biology are globally analyzed. All the work that appears in the literature has been grouped in a few research lines, just to make the analysis and discussion easy. The commonly used radioactive probes are listed and the experimental difficulties are analyzed. We also report applications of {sup 181}Hf and {sup 111}In isotopes in life sciences other than their use in PAC. The possibility of extending these studies using the PAC technique is discussed.

  8. Facility for a Low Power Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalker, R. G.

    1949-09-14

    Preliminary investigation indicates that a reactor facility with ample research provisions for use by University or other interested groups, featuring safety in design, can be economically constructed in the Los Angeles area. The complete installation, including an underground gas-tight reactor building, with associated storage and experiment assembly building, administration offices, two general laboratory buildings, hot latoratory and lodge, can be constructed for approxinately $1,500,000. This does not include the cost of the reactor itself or of its auxiliary equipment,

  9. Strengthening IAEA Safeguards for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Bruce D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anzelon, George A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    During their December 10-11, 2013, workshop in Grenoble France, which focused on the history and future of safeguarding research reactors, the United States, France and the United Kingdom (UK) agreed to conduct a joint study exploring ways to strengthen the IAEA’s safeguards approach for declared research reactors. This decision was prompted by concerns about: 1) historical cases of non-compliance involving misuse (including the use of non-nuclear materials for production of neutron generators for weapons) and diversion that were discovered, in many cases, long after the violations took place and as part of broader pattern of undeclared activities in half a dozen countries; 2) the fact that, under the Safeguards Criteria, the IAEA inspects some reactors (e.g., those with power levels under 25 MWt) less than once per year; 3) the long-standing precedent of States using heavy water research reactors (HWRR) to produce plutonium for weapons programs; 4) the use of HEU fuel in some research reactors; and 5) various technical characteristics common to some types of research reactors that could provide an opportunity for potential proliferators to misuse the facility or divert material with low probability of detection by the IAEA. In some research reactors it is difficult to detect diversion or undeclared irradiation. In addition, infrastructure associated with research reactors could pose a safeguards challenge. To strengthen the effectiveness of safeguards at the State level, this paper advocates that the IAEA consider ways to focus additional attention and broaden its safeguards toolbox for research reactors. This increase in focus on the research reactors could begin with the recognition that the research reactor (of any size) could be a common path element on a large number of technically plausible pathways that must be considered when performing acquisition pathway analysis (APA) for developing a State Level Approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP). To

  10. Janus black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  11. Decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramenkovs Andris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor and to dispense with nuclear energy in the future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study on the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor was drawn up by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH in 1998-1999. On October 26th, 1999, the Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to “green-field” in 2001. The upgrading of the decommissioning and dismantling plan was carried out from 2003-2004, resulting in a change of the primary goal of decommissioning. Collecting and conditioning of “historical” radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall became the primary goal. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons were conditioned for disposal in concrete containers at the radioactive wastes depository “Radons” at the Baldone site. Protective and radiation measurement equipment of the personnel was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and materials outside the reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Contaminated materials from the reactor hall were collected and removed for clearance measurements on a weekly basis.

  12. Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

    2005-06-01

    Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

  13. Reactor pulse repeatability studies at the annular core research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePriest, K.R. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1146, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Trinh, T.Q. [Nuclear Facility Operations, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 0614, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Luker, S. M. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1146, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories is a water-moderated pool-type reactor designed for testing many types of objects in the pulse and steady-state mode of operations. Personnel at Sandia began working to improve the repeatability of pulse operations for experimenters in the facility. The ACRR has a unique UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel that makes the task of producing repeatable pulses difficult with the current operating procedure. The ACRR produces a significant quantity of photoneutrons through the {sup 9}Be({gamma}, n){sup 8}Be reaction in the fuel elements. The photoneutrons are the result of the gammas produced during fission and in fission product decay, so their production is very much dependent on the reactor power history and changes throughout the day/week of experiments in the facility. Because the photoneutrons interfere with the delayed-critical measurements required for accurate pulse reactivity prediction, a new operating procedure was created. The photoneutron effects at delayed critical are minimized when using the modified procedure. In addition, the pulse element removal time is standardized for all pulse operations with the modified procedure, and this produces less variation in reactivity removal times. (authors)

  14. The Janus fluid a theoretical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Fantoni, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in the theoretical statistical physics treatment of the Janus fluid is reported with a bridge between new research results published in journal articles and a contextual literature review. Recent Monte Carlo simulations on the Kern and Frenkel model of the Janus fluid have revealed that in the vapor phase, below the critical point, there is the formation of preferred inert clusters made up of a well-defined number of particles: the micelles and the vesicles. This is responsible for a re-entrant gas branch of the gas-liquid binodal. Detailed account of this findings are given in the first chapter where the Janus fluid is introduced as a product of new sophisticated synthesis laboratory techniques. In the second chapter a cluster theory is developed to approximate the exact clustering properties stemming from the simulations. It is shown that the theory is able to reproduce semi-quantitatively the micellization phenomenon.

  15. Wastewater Treatment in a Hybrid Biological Reactor (HBR) :Nitrification Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; LI-BO WU

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the nitrifying characteristics of both suspended- and attached- biomass in a hybrid bioreactor. Methods The hybrid biological reactor was developed by introducing porous ceramic particles into the reactor to provide the surface for biomass attachment. Microorganisms immobilized on the ceramics were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All chemical analyses were performed in accordance with standard methods. Results The suspended- and attached-biomass had approximately the same nitrification activity. The nitrifying kinetic was independent of the initial biomass concentration, and the attached-biomass had a stronger ability to resist the nitrification inhibitor. Conclusion The attached biomass is superior to suspended-biomass for nitrifying wastewater, especially that containing toxic organic compounds. The hybrid biological reactor consisting of suspended- and attached-biomass is advantageous in such cases.

  16. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košťál Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1–10 MeV and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1. Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  17. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  18. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR and sequencing batch reactors (SBR were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR was more than MBBR, but the difference was not significant statistically. According to the results, the best efficiencies were obtained for influent formaldehyde COD of 200 mg/L in MBBR and SBR which were 93% and 99.4%, respectively. The systems were also capable to treat higher formaldehyde concentrations (up to 2500 mg/L with lower removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics followed the Stover-Kincannon second order model. The gram-positive and gram-negative bacillus and coccus as well as the gram-positive binary bacillus were found to be the most dominant species. The results of 13C-NMR analysis have shown that formaldehyde and urea were converted into N-{[(aminocarbonyl amino] methyl}urea and the residual formaldehyde was polymerized at room temperature.

  19. Complete dismantling of the research reactor DIORIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Hans-Frieder [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-08-01

    The research reactor DIORIT at the Paul Scherrer Institute was a natural uranium reactor moderated by D{sub 2}O. It was put into operation in August 1960 and finally shut down in August 1977. The original dismantling plan, developed in 1980, comprised 3 phases and 13 steps. The dismantling started in 1982. It was interrupted for several times due to financial restrictions and during the last dismantling step due to the unexpected occurrence of asbestos. The dismantling could be successfully finished on September 11{sup th}, 2012. (orig.)

  20. Janus and Gemini Nanoplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhengdong; Mejia, Andres; Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Diaz, Agustin; Clearfield, Abraham

    2011-03-01

    Janus particles were used to make stable Pickering emulsions (emulsions stabilized by particles). Here we demonstrated a novel method to produce high aspect ratio Janus plates with atomic thickness. Gemini plates with only the edges functionalized are also fabricated. These novel nanoplates are observed to have super surface activity. Most importantly, these particles overcome the two opposite effects in the stabilization of Pickering emulsions using spherical particles: stabilization requires particles as small as possible; but smaller particles are easy to escape the interface due to Brownian motion since the adsorption energy to the oil-water interface is proportional to the diameter of the spheres. Our nanoplates have a large aspect ratio due to the extremely thin thickness, which offers extraordinary stability to the liquid film between two emulsions to prevent coalescence. In the meantime, their large lateral surface area offers strong adsorption energy at the oil-water interface.

  1. Neutron scattering at Australia's replacement research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Kennedy, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    On August 25 1999, the Australian government gave final approval to build a research reactor to replace the existing HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights. The replacement reactor, which will commence operation in 2005, will be multipurpose in function, with capabilities for both neutron-beam research and radioisotope production. Regarding beams, cold and thermal neutron sources are to be installed and the intent is to use supermirror guides, with coatings with critical angles up to 3 times that of natural Ni, to transport cold and thermal neutron beams into a large modern guide hall. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP, SE and subcontractors in a turnkey contract. The goal is to have at least eight leading-edge neutron-beam instruments ready in 2005, and they will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations, in consultation with the Australian user community and interested overseas parties. A review of the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a status report on the activities so far is given.

  2. The current status of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tri Wulan Tjiptono; Syarip

    1998-10-01

    The Kartini reactor reached the first criticality on January 25, 1979. In the first three years, the reactor power is limited up to 50 kW thermal power and on July 1, 1982 has been increased to 100 kW. It has been used as experiments facility by researcher of Atomic Energy National Agency and students of the Universities. Three beam tubes used as experiments facilities, the first, is used as a neutron source for H{sub 2}O-Natural Uranium Subcritical Assembly, the second, is developed for neutron radiography facility and the third, is used for gamma radiography facility. The other facilities are rotary rack and two pneumatic transfer systems, one for delayed neutron counting system and the other for the new Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) facility. The rotary rack used for isotope production for NAA purpose (for long time irradiation), the delayed neutron counting system used for analysis the Uranium contents of the ores and the new NAA is provided for short live elements analysis. In the last three years the Reactor Division has a joint use program with the Nuclear Component and Engineering Center in research reactor instrumentation and control development. (author)

  3. Hybrid Adsorption-Membrane Biological Reactors for Improved Performance and Reliability of Perchlorate Removal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    carbon supply for the autotrophic perchlorate reducing bacteria. The membrane used in the reactor is a hollow-fiber microfiltration membrane made from...1 HYBRID ADSORPTION- MEMBRANE BIOLOGICAL REACTORS FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE AND RELIABILITY OF PERCHLORATE REMOVAL PROCESSES L.C. Schideman...Center Champaign, IL 61826, USA ABSTRACT This study introduces the novel HAMBgR process (Hybrid Adsorption Membrane Biological Reactor) and

  4. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsorn, S. [Reactor Operation Division, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-10-01

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U{sub 3}O{sub 8}- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  5. The AFR. An approved network of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Betriebs- und Sicherheitsfragen an Forschungsreaktoren (AFR)

    2012-10-15

    AFR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Betriebs- und Sicherheitsfragen an Forschungsreaktoren) is the German acronym for 'Association for Research Reactor Operation and Safety Issues' which was founded in 1959. Reactor managers of European research reactors mainly from the German linguistic area meet regularly for their mutual benefit to exchange experience and knowledge in all areas of operating, managing and utilization of research reactors. In the last 2 years joint meetings were held together with the French association of research reactors CER (Club d'Exploitants des Reacteurs). In this contribution the AFR, its members, work and aims as well as the French partner CER are presented. (orig.)

  6. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  7. Research reactor de-fueling and fuel shipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, R.D.; Jawdeh, E.; Strydom, J.

    1998-08-01

    Planning for the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor operations during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games began in early 1995. Before any details could be outlined, several preliminary administrative decisions had to be agreed upon by state, city, and university officials. The two major administrative decisions involving the reactor were (1) the security level and requirements and (2) the fuel status of the reactor. The Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) was a heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with high-enriched uranium. The reactor was first licensed in 1964 with an engineered lifetime of thirty years. The reactor was intended for use in research applications and as a teaching facility for nuclear engineering students and reactor operators. Approximately one year prior to the olympics, the Georgia Tech administration decided that the GTRR fuel would be removed. In addition, a heightened, beyond regulatory requirements, security system was to be implemented. This report describes the scheduling, operations, and procedures.

  8. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  9. Advancing vector biology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K.; Kersey, Paul J.; Maslen, Gareth L.; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J.M.; Oliva, Clelia F.; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F.X.; Failloux, Anna Bella; Levashina, Elena A.; Wilson, Anthony J.; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target t

  10. Radiological characterization of the concrete biological shield of the APSARA reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Priya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Indian research reactor, APSARA, was utilized for various R&D programmes from 1956 until its shutdown in 2009. The biological shield of the reactor developed residual activity due to neutron irradiation during the operation of the reactor. Dose rate mapping and in-situ gamma spectrometry of the concrete structures of the reactor pool were carried out. Representative concrete samples collected from various locations were subjected to high-resolution gamma spectrometry analysis. 60Co and 152Eu were found to be the dominant gamma-emitting radionuclides in most of the locations. 133Ba was also found in some of the concrete structures. The separation of 3H from concrete was achieved using an acid digestion method and beta activity measured using liquid scintillation counting. The depth profile of radionuclide specific activity in the concrete wall of the shielding corner was also studied. Specific activities of the radionuclides were found to decrease exponentially with depth inside the concrete walls. This study would be helpful in bulk waste management during the decommissioning of the reactor.

  11. The current status of nuclear research reactor in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittichai, C.; Kanyukt, R.; Pongpat, P. [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1998-10-01

    Since 1962, the Thai Research Reactor has been serving for various kinds of activities i.e. the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and research and development on nuclear science and technology, for more than three decades. The existing reactor site should be abandoned and relocated to the new suitable site, according to Thai cabinet`s resolution on the 27 December 1989. The decommissioning project for the present reactor as well as the establishment of new nuclear research center were planned. This paper discussed the OAEP concept for the decommissioning programme and the general description of the new research reactor and some related information were also reported. (author)

  12. Boson/Fermion Janus Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamically, bosons and fermions differ by their statistics only. A general entropy functional is proposed by superposition of entropic terms, typical for different quantum gases. The statistical properties of the corresponding Janus particles are derived by variation of the weight of the boson/fermion fraction. It is shown that di-bosons and anti-fermions separate in gas and liquid phases, while three-phase equilibrium appears for poly-boson/fermion Janus particles.

  13. Meteodiffusive Characterization of Algiers' Nuclear Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Messaci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the environmental impact studies of the nuclear research reactor of Algiers, we will present the work related to the atmospheric dispersion of releases due to the installation in normal operation, which dealt with the assessment of spatial distribution of yearly average values of atmospheric dilution factor. The aim of this work is a characterization of the site in terms of diffusivity, which is basic for the radiological impact evaluation of the reactor. The meteorological statistics result from the National Office of Meteorology and concern 15 years of hourly records. According to the nature and features of these data, a Gaussian-type model with wind direction sectors was used. Values of wind speed at release height were estimated from measurement values at 10 m from ground. For the assessment of vertical dispersion coefficient, we used Briggs' formulas related to a sampling time of one hour. Areas of maximum impact were delimited and points of highest concentration within these zones were identified.

  14. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics; Les reacteurs de recherche leur apport sur la physique des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Zaetta, A. [CEA/Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Johner, J. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mathoniere, G. [CEA/Saclay, DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  15. Researchers Discover Plants Biological Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全良

    1996-01-01

    Scientists who created glow-in-the-dark plants by shooting up seedlingswith firefly DNA have identified the first biological clock gene in plants. Discovery of the timepiece gene, which controls such biological rhythmsas daily leaf movements and proe openings, flower-blooming schedules andphotosynthesis cycles, could lead to a host of applications in ornamental horti-culture, agriculture and even human health. Many researchers believe that

  16. Materials science research for sodium cooled fast reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baldev Raj

    2009-06-01

    The paper gives an insight into basic as well as applied research being carried out at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for the development of advanced materials for sodium cooled fast reactors towards extending the life of reactors to nearly 100 years and the burnup of fuel to 2,00,000 MWd/t with an objective of providing fast reactor electricity at an affordable and competitive price.

  17. Technical Research for Dedicated Isotope Production Reactor of South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; Yao; LIU; Xing-min; CHEN; Hui-qiang; SUN; Zhen; WU; Yuan-yuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>Research reactor plays an important part in nuclear science and technology, application and power development. Currently, many countries in Middle East and Africa are ready to develop their own nuclear industry. South Africa sent its User Requirements Specification (URS) for a dedicated isotope production reactor to several institutes or companies, among of which Department of Reactor Engineering Research and Design (DRERD) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is a competitive candidate.

  18. Initial decommissioning planning for the Budapest research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Budapest Research Reactor is the first nuclear research facility in Hungary. The reactor is to remain in operation for at least another 13 years. At the same time, the development of a decommissioning plan is a mandatory requirement under national legislation. The present paper describes the current status of decommissioning planning which is aimed at a timely preparation for the forthcoming decommissioning of the reactor.

  19. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  20. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  1. Development of a decommissioning strategy for the MR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylkin, Boris; Gorlinsky, Yury; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Pavlenko, Vitaly [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Craig, David; Fecitt, Lorna [NUKEM Limited, Dounreay (United Kingdom); Harman, Neil; Jackson, Roger [Serco Technical and Assurance Services, Warrington (United Kingdom); Lobach, Yury [Inst. for Nuclear Research of NASU, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2010-03-15

    A description of the selected decommissioning strategy for the research reactor MR at the site of the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow is presented. The MR reactor hall is planned to be used as a temporary fuel store for the other research reactors on the site. On the basis of the site-specific conditions and over-all decommissioning goals, it was identified that phased immediate decommissioning is the preferable option. The current status of the reactor, expected final conditions and the sequence of decommissioning works are shown. (orig.)

  2. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: (1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, (2) operating experiences, (3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, (4) irradiation studies, (5) irradiation facilities, (6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and (7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Related activities on management of ageing of Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Van Lam [Reactor Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the previous 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed. The renovated reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. Since then DNRR has been operated safely. Retained structures of the former reactor such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, the horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding are 35 years old. During the recent years, in-service inspection has been carried out, the reactor control and instrumentation system were renovated due to ageing and obsolescence of its components, reactor general inspection and refurbishment were performed. Efforts are being made to cope with ageing of old reactor components to maintain safe operation of the DNRR. (author)

  4. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), 8400 S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    A general method (RRMCQ) has been developed by introducing a microscopic burn up scheme which uses the Monte Carlo calculated spatial power distribution of a research reactor core and a depletion code for burn up calculations, as a basis for solving nuclide material balance equations for each spatial region in which the system is divided. Continuous energy dependent cross-section libraries and full 3D geometry of the system is input for the calculations. The resulting predictions for the system at successive burn up time steps are thus based on a calculation route where both geometry and cross-sections are accurately represented, without geometry simplifications and with continuous energy data. The main advantage of this method over the classical deterministic methods currently used is that RRMCQ System is a direct 3D method without the limitations and errors introduced on the homogenization of geometry and condensation of energy of deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo and burn up codes adopted until now are the widely used MCNP5 and ORIGEN2 codes, but other codes can be used also. For using this method, there is a need of a well-known set of nuclear data for isotopes involved in burn up chains, including burnable poisons, fission products and actinides. For fixing the data to be included on this set, a study of the present status of nuclear data is performed, as part of the development of RRMCQ method. This study begins with a review of the available cross-section data of isotopes involved in burn up chains for research nuclear reactors. The main data needs for burn up calculations are neutron cross-sections, decay constants, branching ratios, fission energy and yields. The present work includes results of selected experimental benchmarks and conclusions about the sensitivity of different sets of cross-section data for burn up calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files. Basically, the RRMCQ detailed burn up method includes four

  5. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  6. Scattering behaviour of Janus particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, H

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer synthesis has produced so-called Janus micelles: tailor-made copolymer structures in which the blocks constitute separate moieties. We present expressions for the form factors, P(Q), and the radii of gyration, R sub g , of Janus particles with spherical and cylindrical morphology and check their validity by comparison to simulated scattering data, calculated from Monte Carlo generations of the pair-distance distribution function, p(r). The effect of block incompatibilities on the scattering is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  7. Circulating fluidized bed biological reactor for nutrients removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo CUI; Hongbo LIU; Chunxue BAI

    2008-01-01

    A new biological nitrogen removal process, which is named herein "The circulating fluidized bed bio-reactor (CFBBR)", was developed for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic matter. This process was composed of an anaerobic bed (Riser), aerobic bed (Downer) and connecting device. Influent and nitrified liquid from the aerobic bed enters the anaerobic bed from the bottom of the anaerobic bed, completing the removal of nitrogen and organic matter. The system performance under the conditions of different inflow loadings and nitrified liquid recirculation rates ranging from 200% to 600% was examined. From a technical and economic point of view, the optimum nitrified liquid recirculation rate was 400%. With a shortest total retention time of 2.5 h (0.8 h in the anaerobic bed and 1.5 h in the aerobic bed) and a nitrified liquid recir-culation rate of 400% based on the intluent flow rate, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) and sol-uble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were found to be 88% and 95%, respectively. The average effluent concentra-tions of TN and SCOD were 3.5 mg/L and 16 mg/L, respectively. The volatile suspended solid (VSS) concentra-tion, nitrification rate and denitrification rate in the system were less than 1.0 g/L, 0.026-0.1 g NH4+-N/g VSS.d, and 0.016-0.074 g NOx--N/g VSS.d, respectively.

  8. Integrated photocatalytic-biological reactor for accelerated phenol mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Lei; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-05-01

    An integrated photocatalytic-biological reactor (IPBR) was developed for accelerated phenol degradation and mineralization. In the IPBR, photodegradation and biodegradation occurred simultaneously, but in two separated zones: a piece of mat-glass plate coated with TiO(2) film and illuminated by UV light was connected by internal circulation to a honeycomb ceramic that was the biofilm carrier for biodegradation. This arrangement was designed to give intimate coupling of photocatalysis and biodegradation. Phenol degradation was investigated by following three protocols: photocatlysis with TiO(2) film under ultraviolet light, but no biofilm (photodegradation); biofilm biodegradation with no UV light (biodegradation); and simultaneous photodegradation and biodegradation (intimately coupled photobiodegradation). Photodegradation alone could partly degrade phenol, but was not able to achieve significant mineralization, even with an HRT of 10 h. Biodegradation alone could completely degrade phenol, but it did not mineralize the COD by more than 74%. Photobiodegradation allowed continuous rapid degradation of phenol, but it also led to more complete mineralization of phenol (up to 92%) than the other protocols. The results demonstrate that intimate coupling was achieved by protecting the biofilm from UV and free-radical inhibition. With phenol as the target compound, the main advantage of intimate coupling in the IPBR was increased mineralization, presumably because photocatalysis made soluble microbial products more rapidly biodegradable.

  9. Study on secondary shutdown systems in Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, H.R.; Fadaei, A.H., E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.ir; Gharib, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A study was undertaken to summarize the techniques for secondary shutdown systems (SSS). • Neutronic calculation performed for proposed systems as SSS. • Dumping the heavy water stored in the reflector vessel is capable to shut down reactor. • Neutronic and transient calculation was done for validating the selected SSS. • All calculation shown that this system has advantages in safety and neutron economy. - Abstract: One important safety aspect of any research reactor is the ability to shut down the reactor. Usually, research reactors, currently in operation, have a single shutdown system based on the simultaneous insertion of the all control rods into the reactor core through gravity. Nevertheless, the International Atomic Energy Agency currently recommends use of two shutdown systems which are fully independent from each other to guarantee secure shutdown when one of them fails. This work presents an investigative study into secondary shutdown systems, which will be an important safety component in the research reactor and will provide another alternative way to shut down the reactor emergently. As part of this project, a study was undertaken to summarize the techniques that are currently used at world-wide research reactors for recognizing available techniques to consider in research reactors. Removal of the reflector, removal of the fuels, change in critical shape of reactor core and insertion of neutron absorber between the core and reflector are selected as possible techniques in mentioned function. In the next step, a comparison is performed for these methods from neutronic aspects. Then, chosen method is studied from the transient behavior point of view. Tehran research reactor which is a 5 MW open-pool reactor selected as a case study and all calculations are carried out for it. It has 5 control rods which serve the purpose of both reactivity control and shutdown of reactor under abnormal condition. Results indicated that heavy

  10. Role of research reactors for nuclear power program in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soentono, S.; Arbie, B. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Batan (Indonesia)

    1994-12-31

    The main objectives of nuclear development program in Indonesia are to master nuclear science and technology, as well as to utilise peaceful uses of nuclear know-how, aiming at stepwisely socioeconomic development. A Triga Mark II, previously of 250 kW, reactor in Bandung has been in operation since 1965 and its design power has been increased to 1000 kW in 1972. Using core grid of the Triga 250 kW, BATAN designed and constructed the Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of these Triga reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilisation, such as training of manpower in nuclear engineering as well as radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research activities in solid state physics. In order to support the nuclear power development program in general and to suffice the reactor experiments further, simultaneously meeting the ever increasing demand for radioisotope, the third reactor, a multipurpose reactor of 30 MW called GA. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) has been in operation since 1987 at Serpong near Jakarta. Each of these reactors has strong cooperation with Universities, namely the Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung, the Gadjah Mada University at Yogyakarta, and the Indonesia University at Jakarta and has facilitated the man power development required. The role of these reactors, especially the multipurpose GA. Siwabessy reactor, as essential tools in nuclear power program are described including the experience gained during preproject, construction and commissioning, as well as through their operation, maintenance and utilisation.

  11. DISMANTLING OF THE UPPER RPV COMPONENTS OF THE KARLSRUHE MULTI-PURPOSE RESEARCH REACTOR (MZFR), GERMANY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.

    2003-02-27

    The Multi-purpose Research Reactor was a pressurized-water reactor cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966 and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After nineteen years of successful operation, the reactor was de-activated on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW and an electrical output of 50 MW. The MZFR not only served to supply electrical power, but also as a test bed for: - research into various materials for reactor building (e. g. zirkaloy), - the manufacturing and operating industry to gain experience in erection and operation, - training scientific and technical reactor staff, and - power supply (first nuclear combined-heat-and-power system, 1979-1984). The experience gained in operating the MZFR was very helpful for the development and operation of power reactors. At first, safe containment and enclosure of the plant was planned, but then it was decided to dismantle the plant completely, step by step, in view o f the clear advantages of this approach. The decommissioning concept for the complete elimination of the plant down to a green-field site provides for eight steps. A separate decommissioning license is required for each step. As part of the dismantling, about 72,000 Mg [metric tons] of concrete and 7,200 Mg of metal (400 Mg RPV) must be removed. About 700 Mg of concrete (500 Mg biological shield) and 1300 Mg of metal must be classified as radioactive waste.

  12. Monitoring of Biological Nitrogen Removal in Tannery Wastewater Using a Sequencing Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasquero-Ferrer Sedolfo José

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to relate the biological nitrogen removal in tannery wastewater with profiles of pH, alkalinity and redox potential (ORP using a sequencing batch reactor (SBR with a working volume of 2 L. The reactor worked under two operational sequences: anoxic-aerobic-anoxic (Ax/Ae/Ax and aerobic-anoxic (Ae/Ax, which were combined with two cell retention times (CRT (15 and 25 days, with an operation cycle time (OCT of 11 hours. The profiles were performed by measuring each 15 minutes the following parameters: pH, dissolved oxygen (DO, ORP, and each hour the parameters: total alkalinity, total chemical oxygen demand (DQOT, soluble chemical oxygen demand (DQOS, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN, nitrite (NO2-, nitrate (NO3- and ammonia nitrogen (N-NH4+. Alkalinity and ORP profile were excellent indicators of the processes of biological nitrogen removal. However, pH could not be used as a control parameter, due to the buffering capacity of tannery wastewater. Finally, this research work showed that alkalinity and ORP values can be used as on-line control parameters to monitor the evolution of the nitrogen removal in tannery wastewater (nitrification and denitrification processes.

  13. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Project finished the B stage commissioning and resolved the relative technical problems. Meanwhile, the acceptance items and the cold neutron source were carrying out.

  14. Biological sulphide removal from anaerobically treated domestic sewage: reactor performance and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Graziella Patrício Pereira; Diniz, Renata Côrtes Oliveira; Bicalho, Sarah Kinaip; Franco, Vitor Araujo de Souza; Gontijo, Eider Max de Oliveira; Toscano, Rodrigo Argolo; Canhestro, Kenia Oliveira; Santos, Merly Rita Dos; Carmo, Ana Luiza Rodrigues Dias; Lobato, Livia Cristina S; Brandt, Emanuel Manfred F; Chernicharo, Carlos A L; Calabria de Araujo, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    We developed a biological sulphide oxidation system and evaluated two reactors (shaped similar to the settler compartment of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket [UASB] reactor) with different support materials for biomass retention: polypropylene rings and polyurethane foam. The start-up reaction was achieved using microorganisms naturally occurring on the open surface of UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater. Sulphide removal efficiencies of 65% and 90% were achieved with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 24 and 12 h, respectively, in both reactors. However, a higher amount of elemental sulphur was formed and accumulated in the biomass from reactor 1 (20 mg S(0) g(-1) VTS) than in that from reactor 2 (2.9 mg S(0) g(-1) VTS) with an HRT of 24 h. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that the the pink and green biomass that developed in both reactors comprised a diverse bacterial community and had sequences related to phototrophic green and purple-sulphur bacteria such as Chlorobium sp., Chloronema giganteum, and Chromatiaceae. DGGE band patterns also demonstrated that bacterial community was dynamic over time within the same reactor and that different support materials selected for distinct bacterial communities. Taken together, these results indicated that sulphide concentrations of 1-6 mg L(-1) could be efficiently removed from the effluent of a pilot-scale UASB reactor in two sulphide biological oxidation reactors at HRTs of 12 and 24 h, showing the potential for sulphur recovery from anaerobically treated domestic wastewater.

  15. Microwave-ultrasound combined reactor suitable for atmospheric sample preparation procedure of biological and chemical products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagha, A.; Chemat, S.; Bartels, P.V.; Chemat, F.

    1999-01-01

    A compact apparatus in which a specific position can be irradiated by microwaves (MW) and ultrasound (US) simultaneously has been developed. The MW-US reactor has been designed for atmospheric pressure digestion and dissolution of biological and chemical products. The reactor can treat a range of th

  16. Renewing Liquid Fueled Molten Salt Reactor Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Rusty; NEXT Lab Team

    2016-09-01

    Globally there is a desperate need for affordable, safe, and clean energy on demand. More than anything else, this would raise the living conditions of those in poverty around the world. An advanced reactor that utilizes liquid fuel and molten salts is capable of meeting these needs. Although, this technology was demonstrated in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL in the 60's, little progress has been made since the program was cancelled over 40 years ago. A new research effort has been initiated to advance the technical readiness level of key reactor components. This presentation will explain the motivation and initial steps for this new research initiative.

  17. Biological Psychiatry, Research And Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this section, we look at how the biological paradigm shift in psychiatry has been aided and abetted by industry for serving its own needs; which stymies other promising approaches; but which, nonetheless, can serve to advance biomedicine if checks and balances are in place. Industry, Biological Psychiatry And Non-pharmacological Advance The larger issue of benefit to society also concerns us when we realize that industry sponsorship is mainly for potential medications, not for trying to determine whether there may be non-pharmacological interventions that may be equally good, if not better. …a lack of balance in research activities, with a focus mainly on potential medications, is likely to divert talented researchers from the pursuit of profound scientific questions or divert them from the pursuit of questions without market relevance but with an aspect of public good. A company has little incentive to support trials evaluating whether inexpensive, off-patent drugs or whether non-pharmaceutical interventions, could replace their profitable patented drug (Baird, 2003 This is the reason why methods like yoga, psychotherapy, meditation, non-medicated non-mechanised relaxation will not find industry sponsors readily and may never be proved useful apart from anecdotal reporting.In which case to expect industry sponsorship to develop a larger therapeutic armamentarium, especially non-drug based, is wishful thinking. Moreover, non-pharmacological treatment procedures may not get desirable funding. This may not be as much of a problem in other branches of medicine as in psychiatry, wherein non-pharmacological interventions like psychotherapy still hold promise of therapeutic relief.If we do not see rigorous experimental research in psychotherapy or other non-drug modalities to the extent that we should, let us be careful before blaming the researchers for it. Where are the funds? Also, let us note that behind the great thrust towards Biological

  18. Cooling Performance of Natural Circulation for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Suki; Chun, J. H.; Yum, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper deals with the core cooling performance by natural circulation during normal operation and a flow channel blockage event in an open tank-in-pool type research reactor. The cooling performance is predicted by using the RELAP5/ MOD3.3 code. The core decay heat is usually removed by natural circulation to the reactor pool water in open tank-in-pool type research reactors with the thermal power less than several megawatts. Therefore, these reactors have generally no active core cooling system against a loss of normal forced flow. In reactors with the thermal power less than around one megawatt, the reactor core can be cooled down by natural circulation even during normal full power operation. The cooling performance of natural circulation in an open tank-in-pool type research reactor has been investigated during the normal natural circulation and a flow channel blockage event. It is found that the maximum powers without void generation at the hot channel are around 1.16 MW and 820 kW, respectively, for the normal natural circulation and the flow channel blockage event.

  19. Development of an educational nuclear research reactor simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Engineering Dept.; Ashoub, Nagieb [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor Physics Dept.

    2014-12-15

    This paper introduces the development of a research reactor educational simulator based on LabVIEW that allows the training of operators and studying different accident scenarios and the effects of operational parameters on the reactor behavior. Using this simulator, the trainee can test the interaction between the input parameters and the reactor activities. The LabVIEW acts as an engine implements the reactor mathematical models. In addition, it is used as a tool for implementing the animated graphical user interface. This simulator provides the training requirements for both of the reactor staff and the nuclear engineering students. Therefore, it uses dynamic animation to enhance learning and interest for a trainee on real system problems and provides better visual effects, improved communications, and higher interest levels. The benefits of conducting such projects are to develop the expertise in this field and save costs of both operators training and simulation courses.

  20. Experimental research on sewage treatment with a concrete eco-membrane biological reactor with micro aeration%微曝气混凝土生态膜法污水处理试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋娜莎; 金腊华

    2011-01-01

    为提高污染物去除效率,在渠式混凝土膜生物反应器内部的部分反应槽中增加间歇性的微曝气,增强反应器的好氧氧化作用;采用连续流运行方式,对实际生活污水进行了污水处理实验.实验结果表明,微曝气混凝土生态膜法的污水处理效率高:CODcx去除率>70%、BOD5去除率>80%、氨氮去除率>75%、总氮和总磷的去除率均>50%,出水水质基本达到《城镇污水处理厂污染物排放标准》(GB 18918-2002)的一级B标准要求.%In order to improve pollutant removal effects,sewage treatment experiments have been made with a homemade channel concrete eco-membrane biological reactor,in which micro aeration is adopted at some bed of the channel to increase intermittent micro aeration and enhance aerobic oxidation of the reactor. Experiments on treating actual sewage are carried out by continuous flowing operations. The results show that the technology of concrete eco-membrane with micro aeration has optimal sewage purification effects,I.e. GODcr removal rate>70% , BOD5 removal rate>80% , ammonia nitrogen removal rate>75% ,and both of total nitrogen and total phosphorus removal rate >50%. The effluent water quality can basically reach the requirements of B standard of the first class of the Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002).

  1. Activities for extending the lifetime of MINT research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Adnan; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear reactor commissioned in June 1982. Since then, it has been used for research, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography and manpower training. The total operating time till the end on September 1997 is 16968 hours with cumulative total energy release of 11188 MW-hours. After more than fifteen years of successful operation, some deterioration in components and associated systems has been observed. This paper describes some of the activities carried out to increase the lifetime and to reduce the shutdown time of the reactor. (author)

  2. Model Based Cyber Security Analysis for Research Reactor Protection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sho, Jinsoo; Rahman, Khalil Ur; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hanseong [Joongbu Univ., Geumsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The study on the qualitative risk due to cyber-attacks into research reactors was performed using bayesian Network (BN). This was motivated to solve the issues of cyber security raised due to digitalization of instrumentation and control (I and C) system. As a demonstrative example, we chose the reactor protection system (RPS) of research reactors. Two scenarios of cyber-attacks on RPS were analyzed to develop mitigation measures against vulnerabilities. The one is the 'insertion of reactor trip' and the other is the 'scram halt'. The six mitigation measures are developed for five vulnerability for these scenarios by getting the risk information from BN.

  3. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenfelter, J. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Balantekin, B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Baldenegro, C.X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Band, H.R. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Barclay, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bass, C.D. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY 13214 (United States); Berish, D. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Bowden, N.S., E-mail: nbowden@llnl.gov [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bryan, C.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Cherwinka, J.J. [Physical Sciences Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Chu, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Classen, T. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Davee, D. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Dean, D.; Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dolinski, M.J. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dolph, J. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dwyer, D.A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fan, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); and others

    2016-01-11

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  4. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  5. Janus Nematic Colloids with Designable Valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Čopar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Janus nematic colloids based on various morphologies of particle surface patches imposing homeotropic and planar surface anchoring are demonstrated. By using mesoscopic numerical modeling, multiple types of Janus particles are explored, demonstrating a variety of novel complex colloidal structures. We also show binding of Janus particles to a fixed Janus post in the nematic cell, which acts as a seed and a micro-anchor for the colloidal structure. Janus colloidal structures reveal diverse topological defect configurations, which are effectively combinations of surface boojum and bulk defects. Topological analysis is applied to defects, importantly showing that topological charge is not a well determined topological invariant in such patchy nematic Janus colloids. Finally, this work demonstrates colloidal structures with designable valence, which could allow for targeted and valence-conditioned self-assembly at micro- and nano-scale.

  6. Stability analysis of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Della, Richard; Alhassan, Erwin; Adoo, Nana Ansah; Bansah, Yaw Christopher; Nyarko, Benjamin J. B.; Edward H. K. Akaho

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to study the stability of the Ghana Research Reactor one(GHARR-1). The closed-loop transfer function of GHARR-1 was established based on the model, which involved the neutronics and the thermal hydraulics transfer functions. The reactor kinetics was described by the point kinetics model for a single group of delayed neutrons, whilst the thermal hydraulics transfer function was based on the modified lumped parameter concept. The inherent internal feedback ...

  7. Development of a research nuclear reactor simulator using LABVIEW®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Aldo Marcio Fonseca; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency recommends the use of safety and friendly interfaces for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters of the nuclear reactors. The most important variable in the nuclear reactors control is the power released by fission of the fuel in the core which is directly proportional to neutron flux. It was developed a digital system to simulate the neutron evolution flux and monitoring their interaction on the other operational parameters. The control objective is to bring the reactor power from its source level (mW) to a few W. It is intended for education of basic reactor neutronic principles such as the multiplication factor, criticality, reactivity, period, delayed neutron and control by rods. The 250 kW IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN (Belo Horizonte/Brazil) was used as reference. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world. They are cooled by light water under natural convection and are characterized by being inherently safety. The simulation system was developed using the LabVIEW® (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) software, considering the modern concept of virtual instruments (VI's). The main purpose of the system is to provide to analyze the behavior, and the tendency of some processes that occur in the reactor using a user-friendly operator interface. The TRIGA simulator system will allow the study of parameters, which affect the reactor operation, without the necessity of using the facility.(author)

  8. DNA-Grafted Janus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ching; Lin, Keng-Hui; Juan, Wen-Tau

    2008-03-01

    Recently there have been advances in generating Janus microspheres whose two hemispheres have different chemical compositions [1-4]. The new types of particles open up possibilities for assembly of complex structures. Here we attach DNA molecules onto one side of Janus microspheres. The new type of colloidal particles resembles surfactant molecules and may give us interesting new structures.Reference: [1] Y. Lu, H. Xiong, X. Jiang, Y.Xia, M. Prentiss and G. M.Whitesides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 12724 (2003) [2] O.Cayre, V. N.Paunov and O. D. Velev, J. Mater. Chem. 13, 2445 (2003) [3] R. F. Shepherd, J. C. Conrad, S. K. Rhodes, D. R. Link, M. Marquez, D. A. Weitz and J. A. Lewis, Langmuir 22, 8618 (2006) [4] L. Hong, S. Jiang and S. Granick, Langmuir 22, 9495 (2006)

  9. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  10. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Helness, Herman

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) removal from municipal wastewater is performed to prevent or reduce eutrophication in the receiving water.Both P and N can be removed physical/chemically as well as biologically. While biological processes have always dominated in N-removal, chemical P-removal is used in many cases. Biological P-removal using enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is normally carried out in suspended culture (activated sludge) processes while biological N-removal (throug...

  11. Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Greenberg, D.D.; Reciniello, R.N.

    1998-12-31

    Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron irradiation facility (ENIF) on the east side of the BMRR reactor core and the thermal neutron irradiation facility (TNIF) on the west side of the core. Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry performed from 1994 to the present in both facilities are described and the results are presented and discussed.

  12. The rehabilitation/upgrading of Philippine Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renato, T. Banaga [Philippines Nuclear Research Inst., Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    The Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) is the only research reactor in the Philippines. It was acquired through the Bilateral Agreement with the United States of America. The General Electric (G.E.) supplied PRR-1 first become operational in 1963 and used MTR plate type fuel. The original one-megawatt G.E. reactor was shutdown and converted into a 3 MW TRIGA PULSING REACTOR in 1984. The conversion includes the upgrading of the cooling system, replacement of new reactor coolant pumps, heat exchanger, cooling tower, replacement of new nuclear instrumentation and standard TRIGA console, TRIGA fuel supplied by General Atomic (G.A.). Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) provided the old reactor, did the detailed design of the new cooling system, provided the new non-nuclear instrumentation and electrical power supply system and performed all construction, installation and modification work on site. The TRIGA conversion fuel is contained in a shrouded 4-rod cluster which fit into the original grid plate. The new fuel is a E{sub 1}-U-Z{sub 1}-H{sub 1.6} TRIGA fuel, has a 20% wt Uranium loading with 19.7% U-235 enrichment and about 0.5 wt % Erbium. The Start-up, calibration and Demonstration of Pulsing and Full Power Operation were completed during a three week start-up phase which were performed last March 1968. A few days after, a leak in the pool liner was discovered. The reactor was shutdown again for repair and up to present the reactor is still in the process of rehabilitation. This paper will describe the rehabilitation/upgrading done on the PRR-1 since 1988 up to present. (author)

  13. The Janus Head Article - How Much Terminology Theory Can Practical Terminology Management Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Drewer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The god Janus in Greek mythology was a two-faced god; each face had its own view of the world. Our idea behind the Janus Head article is to give you two different and maybe even contradicting views on a certain topic. This issue’s Janus Head Article, however, features not two but three different views on terminology work, as researchers, professionals and students (the professionals of tomorrow discuss “How Much Terminology Theory Can Practical Terminology Management Use?” at DaimlerChrysler AG. 

  14. The Janus Head Article - How Much Terminology Theory Can Practical Terminology Management Use?

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Drewer; Sybille Horend

    2012-01-01

    The god Janus in Greek mythology was a two-faced god; each face had its own view of the world. Our idea behind the Janus Head article is to give you two different and maybe even contradicting views on a certain topic. This issue’s Janus Head Article, however, features not two but three different views on terminology work, as researchers, professionals and students (the professionals of tomorrow) discuss “How Much Terminology Theory Can Practical Terminology Management Use?” at DaimlerChrysler...

  15. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  16. Operating manual for the Health Physics Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    This manual is intended to serve as a guide in the operation and maintenance of the Health Physics Researh Reactor (HPRR) of the Health Physics Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility. It includes descriptions of the HPRR and of associated equipment such as the reactor positioning devises and the derrick. Procedures for routine operation of the HPRR are given in detail, and checklists for the various steps are provided where applicable. Emergency procedures are similarly covered, and maintenance schedules are outlined. Also, a bibliography of references giving more detailed information on the DOSAR Facility is included. Changes to this manual will be approved by at least two of the following senior staff members: (1) the Operations Division Director, (2) the Reactor Operations Department Head, (3) the Supervisor of Reactor Operations TSF-HPRR Areas. The master copy and the copy of the manual issued to the HPRR Operations Supervisor will always reflect the latest revision. 22 figs.

  17. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-15

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells.

  18. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  19. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  20. Biological research for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by {gamma}-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by {gamma}-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate {gamma}-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by {gamma}-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  1. Radiation protection personnel training in Research Reactors; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica para reactores de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Carlos Dario; Lorenzo, Nestor Pedro de [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Rio Negro (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Instituto Balseiro

    1996-07-01

    The RA-6 research reactor is considering the main laboratory in the training of different groups related with radiological protection. The methodology applied to several courses over 15 years of experience is shown in this work. The reactor is also involved in the construction, design, start-up and sell of different installation outside Argentina for this reason several theoretical and practical courses had been developed. The acquired experience obtained is shown in this paper and the main purpose is to show the requirements to be taken into account for every group (subjects, goals, on-job training, etc) (author)

  2. RADIATION DOSIMETRY AT THE BNL HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR AND MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10

    RADIATION DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS HAVE BEEN PERFORMED OVER A PERIOD OF MANY YEARS AT THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR (HFBR) AND THE MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR (BMRR) AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ON THE ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEUTRON FLUX, NEUTRON DOSE RATES, GAMMA-RAY FLUXES AND GAMMA-RAY DOSE RATES. THE MCNP PARTICLE TRANSPORT CODE PROVIDED MONTE CARLO RESULTS TO COMPARE WITH VARIOUS DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED AT THE EXPERIMENTAL PORTS, AT THE TREATMENT ROOMS AND IN THE THIMBLES AT BOTH HFBR AND BMRR.

  3. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors. Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  4. Decommissioning Project for the Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T. (and others)

    2009-02-15

    In 2008, tried to complete the whole decommissioning project of KRR-1 and KRR-2 and preparing work for memorial museum of KRR-1 reactor. Now the project is delayed for 3 months because of finding unexpected soil contamination around facility and treatment of. To do final residual radioactivity assessment applied by MARSSIM procedure. Accumulated decommissioning experiences and technologies will be very usefully to do decommissioning other nuclear related facility. At the decommissioning site of the uranium conversion plant, the decontamination of the dismantled carbon steel waste are being performed and the lagoon 1 sludge waste is being treated this year. The technologies and experiences obtained from the UCP dismantling works are expected to apply to other fuel cycle facilities decommissioning. The lagoon sludge treatment technology is the first applied technology in the actual field and it is expected that this technology could be applied to other country.

  5. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  6. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L-Y [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  7. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  8. Redox regulation of Janus kinase: The elephant in the room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhé, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The redox regulation of Janus kinases (JAKs) is a complex subject. Due to other redox-sensitive kinases in the kinome, redox-sensitive phosphatases, and cellular antioxidant systems and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production systems, the net biological outcomes of oxidative stress on JAK-dependent signal transduction vary according to the specific biological system examined. This review begins with a discussion of the biochemical evidence for a cysteine-based redox switch in the catalytic domain of JAKs, proceeds to consider direct and indirect regulatory mechanisms involved in biological experiments, and ends with a discussion of the role(s) of redox regulation of JAKs in various diseases.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF INTERMITTENT CHLORINATION SYSTEM IN BIOLOGICAL EXCESS SLUDGE REDUCTION BY SEQUENCING BATCH REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Takdastan ، N. Mehrdadi ، A. A. Azimi ، A. Torabian ، G. Nabi Bidhendi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The excessive biological sludge production is one of the disadvantages of aerobic wastewater treatment processes such as sequencing batch reactors. To solve the problem of excess sludge production, oxidizing some of the sludge by chlorine, thus reducing the biomass coefficient as well as the sewage sludge disposal may be a suitable idea. In this study, two sequencing batch reactors, each with 20 L volume and controlled by on-line system were used. After providing the steady state conditions in the reactors, sampling and testing of parameters were done during 8 months. The results showed that during the solid retention time of 10 days the kinetic coefficient of Y and Kd were 0.58 mg biomass/mg COD and 0.058/day, respectively. At the next stage, different concentrations of chlorine were used in the reactors intermittently. Results showed that 15 mg chlorine/gMLSS in the reactor was able to reduce the yield coefficient from 0.58 to 0.3 mg biomass/mg COD. In other words, the biological excess sludge was reduced about 48%. But the soluble chemical oxygen demand increased slightly in the effluent and the removal percentage decreased from 95% in the blank reactor to 55% in the test reactor.

  10. Develop and demonstrate a methodology using Janus(A) to analyze advanced technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jerry Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited This thesis presents a study of a methodology for analyzing advanced technologies using the Janus(A) High Resolution Combat Model. The goal of this research was to verify that the methodology using Janus(A) gave expected or realistic results. The methodology used a case where the results were known: the addition of a long range direct fire weapon into a force on force battle. Both the weapon characteristics and force mixes were used as...

  11. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallows surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on a shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  12. A Friendly-Biological Reactor SIMulator (BioReSIM for studying biological processes in wastewater treatment processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Molina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological processes for wastewater treatments are inherently dynamic systems because of the large variations in the influent wastewater flow rate, concentration composition and the adaptive behavior of the involved microorganisms. Moreover, the sludge retention time (SRT is a critical factor to understand the bioreactor performances when changes in the influent or in the operation conditions take place. Since SRT are usually in the range of 10-30 days, the performance of biological reactors needs a long time to be monitored in a regular laboratory demonstration, limiting the knowledge that can be obtained in the experimental lab practice. In order to overcome this lack, mathematical models and computer simulations are useful tools to describe biochemical processes and predict the overall performance of bioreactors under different working operation conditions and variations of the inlet wastewater composition. The mathematical solution of the model could be difficult as numerous biochemical processes can be considered. Additionally, biological reactors description (mass balance, etc. needs models represented by partial or/and ordinary differential equations associated to algebraic expressions, that require complex computational codes to obtain the numerical solutions. Different kind of software for mathematical modeling can be used, from large degree of freedom simulators capable of free models definition (as AQUASIM, to closed predefined model structure programs (as BIOWIN. The first ones usually require long learning curves, whereas the second ones could be excessively rigid for specific wastewater treatment systems. As alternative, we present Biological Reactor SIMulator (BioReSIM, a MATLAB code for the simulation of sequencing batch reactors (SBR and rotating biological contactors (RBC as biological systems of suspended and attached biomass for wastewater treatment, respectively. This BioReSIM allows the evaluation of simple and complex

  13. A novel concept for CRIEC-driven subcritical research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.; Miley, G.H. [Illinois Univ., Fusion Studies Lab., Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A novel scheme is proposed to drive a low-power subcritical fuel assembly by means of a long Cylindrical Radially-convergent Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (CRIEC) used as a neutron source. The concept is inherently safe in the sense that the fuel assembly remains subcritical at all times. Previous work has been done for the possible implementation of CRIEC as a subcritical assembly driver for power reactors. However, it has been found that the present technology and stage of development of IEC-based neutron sources can not meet the neutron flux requirements to drive a system as big as a power reactor. Nevertheless, smaller systems, such as research and training reactors, could be successfully driven with levels of neutron flux that seem more reasonable to be achieved in the near future by IEC devices. The need for custom-made expensive nuclear fission fuel, as in the case of the TRIGA reactors, is eliminated, and the CRIEC presents substantial advantages with respect to the accelerator-driven subcritical reactors in terms of simplicity and cost. In the present paper, a conceptual design for a research/training CRIEC-driven subcritical assembly is presented, emphasizing the description, principle of operation and performance of the CRIEC neutron source, highlighting its advantages and discussing some key issues that require study for the implementation of this concept. (author)

  14. Neutron flux optimization in irradiation channels at NUR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meftah, B. [Division Reacteur, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala DRARIA, Alger (Algeria)]. E-mail: b_meftah@yahoo.com; Zidi, T. [Division Reacteur, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala DRARIA, Alger (Algeria); Bousbia-Salah, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleari e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2 - 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Optimization of neutron fluxes in experimental channels is of great concern in research reactor utilization. The general approach used at the NUR research reactor for neutron flux optimization in irradiation channels is presented. The approach is essentially based upon a judicious optimization of the core configuration combined with the improvement of reflector characteristics. The method allowed to increase the thermal neutron flux for radioisotope production purposes by more than 800%. Increases of up to 60% are also observed in levels of useful fluxes available for neutron diffraction experiments (small angle neutron scattering (SANS), neutron reflectometry, etc.). Such improvements in the neutronic characteristics of the NUR reactor opened new perspectives in terms of its utilization. More particularly, it is now possible to produce at industrial scales major radio-isotopes for medicine and industry and to perform, for the first time, material testing experiments. The cost of the irradiations in the optimized configuration is generally small when compared to those performed in the old configuration and an average reduction factor of about of 10 is expected in the case of production of Molybdenum-99 (isotope required for the manufacturing of Technetium-99 medical kits). In addition to these important results, safety analysis studies showed that the more symmetrical nature of the core geometry leads to a more adequately balanced reactivity control system and contributes quite efficiently to the operational safety of the NUR reactor. Results of comparisons between calculations and measurements for a series of parameters of importance in reactor operation and safety showed good agreement.

  15. Neutron spectrometric methods for core inventory verification in research reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ellinger, A; Hansen, W; Knorr, J; Schneider, R

    2002-01-01

    In consequence of the Non-Proliferation Treaty safeguards, inspections are periodically made in nuclear facilities by the IAEA and the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate. The inspection methods are permanently improved. Therefore, the Core Inventory Verification method is being developed as an indirect method for the verification of the core inventory and to check the declared operation of research reactors.

  16. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Tie-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, all the commissioning for the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) had been finished and the diffraction pattern had been successfully obtained on the neutron scattering spectrometer. Meanwhile, the cold neutron source project and the acceptance items of CARR project had been carrying out.

  17. Kartini Research Reactor prospective studies for neutron scattering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widarto [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, BATAN (Indonesia)

    1999-10-01

    The Kartini Research Reactor (KRR) is located in Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, Yogyakarta - Indonesia. The reactor is operated for 100 kW thermal power used for research, experiments and training of nuclear technology. There are 4 beam ports and 1 column thermal are available at the reactor. Those beam ports have thermal neutron flux around 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s each other and used for sub critical assembly, neutron radiography studies and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Design of neutron collimator has been done for piercing radial beam port and the calculation result of collimated neutron flux is around 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s. This paper describes experiment facilities and parameters of the Kartini research reactor, and further more the prospective studies for neutron scattering application. The purpose of this paper is to optimize in utilization of the beam ports facilities and enhance the manpower specialty. The special characteristic of the beam ports and preliminary studies, pre activities regarding with neutron scattering studies for KKR is presented. (author)

  18. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  19. Identification of a novel group of bacteria in sludge from a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Liu, Wen-Tso; Filipe, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The microbial diversity of a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor was investigated by methods not requiring direct cultivation. The reactor was fed with media containing acetate and high levels of phosphate (P/C weight ratio, 8:100) but failed to completely remove phosphate...... in the effluent and showed very limited biological phosphorus removal activity. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA was used to investigate the bacterial diversity. Up to 11 DGGE bands representing at least 11 different sequence types were observed; DNA from the 6...

  20. Biology Education Research: Lessons and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susan R.; Nielsen, Natalie R.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2013-01-01

    Biologists have long been concerned about the quality of undergraduate biology education. Over time, however, biology faculty members have begun to study increasingly sophisticated questions about teaching and learning in the discipline. These scholars, often called biology education researchers, are part of a growing field of inquiry called…

  1. Determination of the optimal positions for installing gamma ray detection systems at Tehran Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah, A.; Rahmani, F.; Khalafi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric instruments must constantly monitor radiation dose levels in different areas of nuclear reactor. Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has seven beam tubes for different research purposes. All the beam tubes extend from the reactor core to Beam Port Floor (BPF) of the reactor facility. During the reactor operation, the gamma rays exiting from each beam tube outlet produce a specific gamma dose rate field in the space of the BPF. To effectively monitor the gamma dose rates on the BPF, gamma ray detection systems must be installed in optimal positions. The selection of optimal positions is a compromise between two requirements. First, the installation positions must possess largest gamma dose rates and second, gamma ray detectors must not be saturated in these positions. In this study, calculations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the optimal positions of the gamma ray detection systems. Eight three dimensional models of the reactor core and related facilities corresponding to eight scenarios have been simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the gamma dose equivalent rate field in the space of the BPF. These facilities are beam tubes, thermal column, pool, BPF space filled with air, facilities such as neutron radiography facility, neutron powder diffraction facility embedded in the beam tubes as well as biological shields inserted into the unused beam tubes. According to the analysis results of the combined gamma dose rate field, three positions on the north side and two positions on the south side of the BPF have been recognized as optimal positions for installing the gamma ray detection systems. To ensure the consistency of the simulation data, experimental measurements were conducted using TLDs (600 and 700) pairs during the reactor operation at 4.5 MW.

  2. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  3. Iaea Activities Supporting the Applications of Research Reactors in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peld, Nathan D.; Ridikas, Danas

    2014-02-01

    As the underutilization of research reactors around the world persists as a primary topic of concern among facility owners and operators, the IAEA responded in 2013 with a broad range of activities to address the planning, execution and improvement of many experimental techniques. The revision of two critical documents for planning and diversifying a facility's portfolio of applications, TECDOC 1234 “The Applications of Research Reactors” and TECDOC 1212 “Strategic Planning for Research Reactors”, is in progress in order to keep this information relevant, corresponding to the dynamism of experimental techniques and research capabilities. Related to the latter TECDOC, the IAEA convened a meeting in 2013 for the expert review of a number of strategic plans submitted by research reactor operators in developing countries. A number of activities focusing on specific applications are either continuing or beginning as well. In neutron activation analysis, a joint round of inter-comparison proficiency testing sponsored by the IAEA Technical Cooperation Department will be completed, and facility progress in measurement accuracy is described. Also, a training workshop in neutron imaging and Coordinated Research Projects in reactor benchmarks, automation of neutron activation analysis and neutron beam techniques for material testing intend to advance these activities as more beneficial services to researchers and other users.

  4. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaojing; Zhou, Weili; He, Shengbing

    2013-09-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable. Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP, the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system. The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2, i.e., BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1. The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated. After the saturation, the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average. Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation. A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria, which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp., was isolated, enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor. When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3 x day), the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment. Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective, cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L.

  5. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  6. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipaun, Susan, E-mail: susan@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Industrial Technology Division, Blok 29T, Bangi 43200, Selangor (Malaysia); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering, 222 Fulton Hall 301 W.14th St., Rolla 64509 MO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  7. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeger, Karsten M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  8. Multipurpose epithermal neutron beam on new research station at MARIA research reactor in Swierk-Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzinski, M.A.; Maciak, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    MARIA reactor is an open-pool research reactor what gives the chance to install uranium fission converter on the periphery of the core. It could be installed far enough not to induce reactivity of the core but close enough to produce high flux of fast neutrons. Special design of the converter is now under construction. It is planned to set the research stand based on such uranium converter in the near future: in 2015 MARIA reactor infrastructure should be ready (preparation started in 2013), in 2016 the neutron beam starts and in 2017 opening the stand for material and biological research or for medical training concerning BNCT. Unused for many years, horizontal channel number H2 at MARIA research rector in Poland, is going to be prepared as a part of unique stand. The characteristics of the neutron beam will be significant advantage of the facility. High flux of neutrons at the level of 2x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} will be obtainable by uranium neutron converter located 90 cm far from the reactor core fuel elements (still inside reactor core basket between so called core reflectors). Due to reaction of core neutrons with converter U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} material it will produce high flux of fast neutrons. After conversion neutrons will be collimated and moderated in the channel by special set of filters and moderators. At the end of H2 channel i.e. at the entrance to the research room neutron energy will be in the epithermal energy range with neutron intensity at least at the level required for BNCT (2x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). For other purposes density of the neutron flux could be smaller. The possibility to change type and amount of installed filters/moderators which enables getting different properties of the beam (neutron energy spectrum, neutron-gamma ratio and beam profile and shape) is taken into account. H2 channel is located in separate room which is adjacent to two other empty rooms under the preparation for research laboratories (200 m2). It is

  9. Investigation of biological reactor designs for treatment of methanol and thiodiglycol waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sines, B.J.; Teather, E.W.; Weigand, W.A. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)); Harvey, S.P. (Army Edgewood, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States))

    Biological reactor designs for the degradation of the toxic compounds methanol and thiodiglycol are compared to determine the smallest volume. Both compounds exhibit substrate-inhibited cell growth behavior. Design equations were used to simulate a continuous stirred tanks in series, and an optimized repeated fed-batch reactor. Thiodiglycol is the primary hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard (2,2[prime]-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), commonly referred to as [open quotes]mustard gas[close quotes]. Experimental data for the growth of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans xylosoxidans (SH42) on thiodiglycol was fit by an Andrews type inhibition equation, while the data and model for the growth of methanol was taken from the literature. The simulation results indicate that the repeated fed-batch reactor leads to significant volume reduction compared to the other two reactor configurations. 11 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Biological Treatment of Leachate using Sequencing Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WDMC Perera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE TA Abstract   In Sri Lanka municipal solid waste is generally disposed in poorly managed open dumps which lack liner systems and leachate collection systems. Rain water percolates through the waste layers to produce leachate which drains in to ground water and finally to nearby water bodies, degrading the quality of water. Leachate thus has become a major environmental concern in municipal waste management and treatment of leachate is a major challenge for the existing and proposed landfill sites.   The study was conducted to assess the feasibility of the usage of the Sequencing Batch Reactor in the treatment of the landfill leachate up to the proposed levels in the draft report of “Proposed Sri Lankan standard for landfill leachate to be disposed to the inland waters". Leachate collected from the open dumpsite at Meethotamulla, Western Province, Sri Lanka was used for leachate characterization.   SBR was constructed with a 10-liter working volume operated in an 18 hour cycle mode and each cycle consists of 15hours of aerobic, 2h settle and 0.5 h of fill/decant stages. The Dissolved Oxygen level within the SBR was maintained at 2 mg/l through the aerobic stage. Infeed was diluted with water during the acclimatization period and a leachate to water ratio of 55:45 was maintained. The removal efficiencies for different parameters were; COD (90.5%, BOD (92.6%, TS (92.1%, Conductivity (83.9%, Alkalinity (97.4%, Hardness (82.2%, Mg (80.5%, Fe (94.2%, Zn (63.4%, Cr (31.69%, Pb (99.6%, Sulphate (98.9%, and Phosphorus (71.4% respectively. In addition Ni and Cd were removed completely during a single SBR cycle. Thus the dilution of leachate in the dumpsites using municipal wastewater, groundwater or rainwater was identified as the most cost effective dilution methods. The effluent from the Sequencing batch reactor is proposed to be further treated using a constructed wetland before releasing to surface water.

  11. Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gehin, Jess C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-10

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a vital national and international resource for neutron science research, production of radioisotopes, and materials irradiation. While HFIR is expected to continue operation for the foreseeable future, interest is growing in understanding future research reactors features, needs, and requirements. To clarify, discuss, and compile these needs from the perspective of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research and development (R&D) missions, a workshop, titled “Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors”, was held at ORNL on May 12, 2015. The workshop engaged ORNL staff that is directly involved in research using HFIR to collect valuable input on the reactor’s current and future missions. The workshop provided an interactive forum for a fruitful exchange of opinions, and included a mix of short presentations and open discussions. ORNL staff members made 15 technical presentations based on their experience and areas of expertise, and discussed those capabilities of the HFIR and future research reactors that are essential for their current and future R&D needs. The workshop was attended by approximately 60 participants from three ORNL directorates. The agenda is included in Appendix A. This document summarizes the feedback provided by workshop contributors and participants. It also includes information and insights addressing key points that originated from the dialogue started at the workshop. A general overview is provided on the design features and capabilities of high performance research reactors currently in use or under construction worldwide. Recent and ongoing design efforts in the US and internationally are briefly summarized, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Paper and board mill effluent treatment with the combined biological-coagulation-filtration pilot scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shabir, Ghulam; Hussain, Irshad; Khalid, Zafar M

    2008-10-01

    Pilot scale reactor based on combined biological-coagulation-filtration treatments was designed and evaluated for the treatment of effluent from a paper and board mill. Biological treatment by fed batch reactor (FBR) followed by coagulation and sand filtration (SF) resulted in a total COD and BOD reduction of 93% and 96.5%, respectively. A significant reduction in both COD (90%) and BOD (92%) was also observed by sequencing batch reactor (SBR) process followed by coagulation and filtration. Untreated effluent was found to be toxic, whereas the treated effluents by either of the above two processes were found to be non-toxic when exposed to the fish for 72h. The resultant effluent from FBR-coagulation-sand filtration system meets National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) of Pakistan and can be discharged into the environment without any risks.

  13. Water chemistry management of research reactor in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshijima, Tetsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The JRR-3M cooling system consists of four systems, namely; (1) primary cooling system, (2) heavy water cooling system, (3) helium system and (4) secondary cooling system. The heavy water is used for reflector and pressurized with helium gas. Water chemistry management of the JRR-3M cooling systems is one of the important subject for the safety operation. The main objects are to prevent the corrosion of cooling system and fuel elements, to suppress the plant radiation build-up and to minimize the generation of radioactive waste. All measured values were within the limits of specifications and JRR-3M reactor was operated with safety in 1996. Spent fuels of JRR-3M reactor are stored in the spent fuel pool. This pool water has been analyzed to prevent corrosion of aluminum cladding of spent fuels. Water chemistry of spent fuel pool water is applied to the prevention of corrosion of aluminum alloys including fuel cladding. The JRR-2 reactor was eternally stopped in December 1996 and is now under decommissioning. The JRR-2 reactor is composed of heavy water tank, fuel guide tube and horizontal experimental hole. These are constructed of aluminum alloy and biological shield and upper shield are constructed of concrete. Three types of corrosion of aluminum alloy were observed in the JRR-2. The Alkaline corrosion of aluminum tube occurred in 1972 because of the mechanical damage of the aluminum fuel guide tube which is used for fuel handling. Modification of the reactor top shield was started in 1974 and completed in 1975. (author)

  14. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  15. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  16. Initiatives in biological research in Indian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivatava, Amresh

    2010-01-01

    Biological psychiatry is an exploratory science for mental health. These biological changes provide some explicit insight into the complex area of 'brain-mind and behavior'. One major achievement of research in biological field is the finding to explain how biological factors cause changes in behavior. In India, we have a clear history of initiatives in research from a biological perspective, which goes back to 1958. In the last 61 years, this field has seen significant evolution, precision and effective utilization of contemporary technological advances. It is a matter of great pride to see that in spite of difficult times in terms of challenges of practice and services, administration, resource, funding and manpower the zest for research was very forthcoming. There was neither dedicated time nor any funding for conducting research. It came from the intellectual insight of our fore fathers in the field of mental health to gradually grow to the state of strategic education in research, training in research, international research collaborations and setting up of internationally accredited centers. During difficult economic conditions in the past, the hypothesis tested and conclusions derived have not been so important. It is more important how it was done, how it was made possible and how robust traditions were established. Almost an entire spectrum of biological research has been touched upon by Indian researchers. Some of these are electroconvulsive therapy, biological markers, neurocognition, neuroimaging, neuroendocrine, neurochemistry, electrophysiology and genetics. A lot has been published given the limited space in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry and other medical journals published in India. A large body of biological research conducted on Indian patients has also been published in International literature (which I prefer to call non-Indian journals). Newer research questions in biological psychiatry, keeping with trend of international standards are

  17. Biological Treatment of Wastewater by Sequencing Batch Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetko Prokopov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the operation of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP in the town of Hisarya which includes a biological stage with aeration basins of cyclic type (SBR-method was studied. The values of the standard indicators of input and output water from the wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Moreover, the reached effects due to the biological treatment of the wastewater in terms of the COD (95.7%, BOD5 (96.6%, total nitrogen (81.3%, total phosphorus (53.7% and suspended solids (95.7% were established. It was concluded that the indexes of the treated water were significantly below the emission limits specified in the discharge permit

  18. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Colombia (United States). Departments of Radiology, Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta `crossfire` and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet{sup TM}, a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere{sup TM}, an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  19. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  20. IAEA designated international centre based on research reactors (ICERR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Tigliole, Andrea Borio; Bradley, Edward; Khoroshev, Mikhail; Marshall, Frances; Morris, Charles; Tozser, Sandor [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Energy

    2016-04-15

    International activities in the back end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. These programmes will soon have achieved their goals. However, the needs of the nuclear community dictate that the majority of the research reactors continues to operate using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in order to meet the varied mission objectives. As a result, inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. In view of this fact, the IAEA drew up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF.

  1. Performance and characterization of a newly developed self-agitated anaerobic reactor with biological desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Li, Yu-You

    2011-05-01

    The continuous operation of a newly developed methane fermentation reactor, which requires no electricity for the agitation of the fermentation liquid was investigated, and the extent of the biological desulfurization was monitored. Inside the reactor, the continual change in the liquid level and the self-agitation, occurring between 5 and 16 times every day, distributed the organic load near the inlet port of the reactor, as well as providing a nutrient supply to the hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria. At different COD(Cr) loading rates (5, 7, 10 kg m(3)d(-1)), the reactor achieved a biogas production yield of 0.72-0.82 m(3)g(-1)-TS, a COD(Cr) reduction of 79.4-85.5% and an average of 99% hydrogen sulfide removal. This investigation demonstrated that the self-agitated reactor is comparable in digestion performance to the completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) investigated in a previous study, and that the desulfurization performance was significantly enhanced compared to the CSTR.

  2. 给水管网生物膜反应器及分子生物学研究方法进展%Progress on Research Methods of Biofilm Reactor and Molecular Biology in Drinking Water Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文芳; 余志晟; 陈曦; 张洪勋

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to the inner surface of drinking water network and form biofilms during delivery to endpoint consumers. The biofilms lead to series of water quality problem such as growth of pathogenic bacteria, undesirable color and turbidity, pipeline corrosion, which would arouse a potential health risk. Moreover the organisms are protected from disinfectant once integrated in drinking water biofilms, therefore the biofilms are always the hot and difficult research subject of drinking water distribution systems. However biofilms in the real distribution are difficult to be obtained, and their dynamic formation cannot be continuously monitored, so biofilms with model rector in labs are very important. With the development of technologies, cultivation method is not the only technique used to study the biofilms, and new research tools like modem molecular methods and microscopic image techniques are introduced, which provide a scientific and reasonable understanding of biofilras, thereby guarantee security to high quality drinking water. A comprehensive overview of several common model reactors and their working principles, advantages and disadvantages were discussed.%饮用水在经管道输送到用户的过程中,微生物附着到管网内壁生长形成生物膜.生物膜的存在会引起一系列水质问题如病原菌的生长、色度和浊度的变化、管道的腐蚀等,对人类饮用水安全构成威胁.而且生物膜对消毒剂有顽强的抗性,一旦形成就难以控制.所以生物膜一直是给水管网研究的热点和难点.但是给水管网中生物膜的实际采样研究比较困难,而且实际取样无法连续监测生物膜形成的动态变化过程,因此用反应器实验模拟研究生物膜显得尤为重要.另外,随着技术的进步,研究给水管网生物膜不仅仅局限于传统的培养方法,还出现了一些新手段如现代分子生物学技术和显微镜图像分析技术,以便更加科学、合理

  3. Preparation Before Signature of Upgrade of Algeria Heavy Water Research Reactor Contract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Song; ZAN; Huai-qi; XU; Qi-guo; JIA; Yu-wen

    2012-01-01

    <正>Algeria heavy water research reactor (Birine) is a multiple-purpose research reactor, which was constructed with the help of China more than 20 years ago. By request of Algeria, China will upgrade the research reactor; so as to improve the status of current reactor such as equipment ageing, shortage of spare parts, several systems do not meet requirements of current standards and criteria etc.

  4. Interactions between Janus particles and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles interact with cell membranes is of great importance in drug/gene delivery. In this paper, we investigate the interactions between Janus particles and membranes by using dissipative particle dynamics, and find that there exist two different modes (i.e., insertion and engulfment) in the Janus particle-membrane interactions. The initial orientation and properties of Janus particles have an important impact on the interactions. When the hydrophilic part of the particle is close to the membrane or the particle has a larger section area and higher hydrophilic coverage, the particle is more likely to be engulfed by the membrane. We also provide insights into the interactions between Janus particles and membranes containing lipid rafts, and find that a Janus particle could easily detach from a membrane after it is engulfed by the raft. The present study suggests a potential way to translocate Janus particles through membranes, which may give some significant suggestions on future nanoparticle design for drug delivery.

  5. Characterization of radioactive aerosols in Tehran research reactor containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to determine the levels of radioactivity in the Tehran research reactor containment and to investigate the mass-size distribution, composition, and concentration of radionuclides during operation of the reactor. A cascade impactor sampler was used to determine the size-activity distributions of radioactive aerosols in each of the sampling stations. Levels of a and b activities were determined based on a counting method using a liquid scintillation counter and smear tests. The total average mass fractions of fine particles (particle diameter dp < 1 mm in all of the sampling stations were approximately 26.75 %, with the mean and standard deviation of 52.15 ± 19.75 mg/m3. The total average mass fractions of coarse particles were approximately 73.2%, with the mean and standard deviation of 71.34 ± 24.57 mg/m3. In addition to natural radionuclides, artificial radionuclides, such as 24Na, 91Sr, 131I, 133I, 103Ru, 82Br, and 140La, may be released into the reactor containment structure. Maximum activity was associated with accumulation-mode particles with diameters less than 400 nm. The results obtained from liquid scintillation counting suggested that the mean specific activity of alpha particles in fine and coarse-modes were 89.7 % and 10.26 %, respectively. The mean specific activity of beta particles in fine and coarse-modes were 81.15 % and 18.51 %, respectively. A large fraction of the radionuclides' mass concentration in the Tehran research reactor containment was associated with coarse-mode particles, in addition, a large fraction of the activity in the aerosol particles was associated with accumulation-mode particles.

  6. Present status and future perspectives of research and test reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaieda, Keisuke [Department of Research Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Since 1957, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed several research and test reactors to fulfill a major role in the study of nuclear energy and fundamental research. At present four reactors, the Japan Research Reactor No. 3 and No. 4 (JRR-3M and JRR-4 respectively), the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) are in operation, and a new High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has recently reached first criticality and now in the power up test. In 1966, the Kyoto University built the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and started its operation for joint use program of the Japanese universities. This paper introduces these reactors and describes their present operational status and also efforts for aging management. The recent tendency of utilization and future perspectives is also reported. (author)

  7. Field applications demonstrate capabilities of upflow biological reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohl, H.M. (Celgene Corp., Warren, NJ (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Biological solutions for treating hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams have existed for more than 100 years. Secondary treatment starting with the trickling filter evolved into activated sludge processes that today are used routinely to reduced organics in water streams. However, such treatment processes are limited to relatively narrow operating parameters. Temperature, pH and organic loading are only some of the operating parameters that must fall into narrow ranges to facilitate degradation. Upsets occur when parameters go outside these ranges. Two case studies are discussed where methylene chloride is successfully removed from industrial plant discharges by biodegradation. In another study, phenol and aromatics were effectively removed from industrial waste water by an in-process biotreatment system.

  8. A microscopic model for chemically-powered Janus motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-07-07

    Very small synthetic motors that make use of chemical reactions to propel themselves in solution hold promise for new applications in the development of new materials, science and medicine. The prospect of such potential applications, along with the fact that systems with many motors or active elements display interesting cooperative phenomena of fundamental interest, has made the study of synthetic motors an active research area. Janus motors, comprising catalytic and noncatalytic hemispheres, figure prominently in experimental and theoretical studies of these systems. While continuum models of Janus motor systems are often used to describe motor dynamics, microscopic models that are able to account for intermolecular interactions, many-body concentration gradients, fluid flows and thermal fluctuations provide a way to explore the dynamical behavior of these complex out-of-equilibrium systems that does not rely on approximations that are often made in continuum theories. The analysis of microscopic models from first principles provides a foundation from which the range of validity and limitations of approximate theories of the dynamics may be assessed. In this paper, a microscopic model for the diffusiophoretic propulsion of Janus motors, where motor interactions with the environment occur only through hard collisions, is constructed, analyzed and compared to theoretical predictions. Microscopic simulations of both single-motor and many-motor systems are carried out to illustrate the results.

  9. Feasibility of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery from Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byunghee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A thermoelectric generator has the most competitive method to regenerate the waste heat from research reactors, because it has no limitation on operating temperature. In addition, since the TEG is a solid energy conversion device converting heat to electricity directly without moving parts, the regenerating power system becomes simple and highly reliable. In this regard, a waste heat recovery using thermoelectric generator (TEG) from 15-MW pool type research reactor is suggested and the feasibility is demonstrated. The producible power from waste heat is estimated with respect to the reactor parameters, and an application of the regenerated power is suggested by performing a safety analysis with the power. The producible power from TEG is estimated with respect to the LMTD of the HX and the required heat exchange area is also calculated. By increasing LMTD from 2 K to 20K, the efficiency and the power increases greatly. Also an application of the power regeneration system is suggested by performing a safety analysis with the system, and comparing the results with reference case without the power regeneration.

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  11. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  12. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, H. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, J. S.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-12-01

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system.

  13. Developing strategic plans for effective utilization of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridikas, Danas [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Sciences and Applications

    2015-12-15

    Strategic plans are indispensable documents for research reactors (RRs) to ensure their efficient, optimized and well managed utilization. A strategic plan provides a framework for increasing utilization, while helping to create a positive safety culture, a motivated staff, a clear understanding of real costs and a balanced budget. A strategic plan should be seen as an essential tool for a responsible manager of any RR, from the smallest critical facility to the largest reactor. Results and lessons learned are shown from the IAEA efforts to help the RR facilities developing strategic plans, provide review and advise services, organize national and regional stakeholder/user workshops, prepare further guidance and recommendations, document and publish guidance documents and other supporting materials.

  14. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties.

  15. Return of spent fuel from the Portuguese research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalho, A.J.G.; Marques, J.G.; Cardeira, F.M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, PO-2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2000-07-01

    Thirty-nine spent MTR fuel assemblies from the Portuguese Research Reactor were recently returned to the US. Prior to the shipment all assemblies were inspected for corrosion and sipped for determination of fission product leakage. Limitations on the floor loading of the reactor building and on the capacity of the crane prevented the placement and loading of the Transnucleaire IU04 transport cask inside the containment building. The transport cask was thus placed outside, under permanent surveillance, in a support structure built around it. A small transfer cask was used to carry individually the assemblies from the storage racks to the transport cask. A forklift was used as a shuttle between the pool and the IU04. A detailed description of the procedures is given. (author)

  16. Joint KAERI/VAEC pre-possibility study on a new research reactor for Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol; Lee, B. C.; Chae, H. T.; Kim, H.; Lee, C. S.; Choi, C. O.; Jun, B. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Vien, Luong Ba; Dien, Nguyen Nhi [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2004-05-01

    Based on the agreement on the technical cooperation for nuclear technology between Korea and Vietnam, a KAERI/VAEC joint study on the pre-possibility of a new research reactor for Vietnam has been carried out in the research reactor area from Nov. 2003 to May 2004. In this report, the results of the pre-possibility study on a new research reactor are described. The report presents the necessity of a new research reactor in Vietnam, and the desired performance requirements of the new research reactor if necessary. The major design characteristics of some existing research reactors and those under planning were also reviewed and the main characteristics which should be considered in selecting a new multipurpose research reactor for Vietnam were drawn. Some recommendations on the considerations for the next step of the feasibility study such as the project formulation, manpower requirements and international co-operation were also briefly touched upon.

  17. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Dong; Weili Zhou; Shengbing He

    2013-01-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable.Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP,the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system.The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2,i.e.,BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1.The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated.After the saturation,the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average.Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation.A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria,which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp.,was isolated,enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor.When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3·day),the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment.Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective,cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L.

  18. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  19. Feasibility of hydraulic separation in a novel anaerobic-anoxic upflow reactor for biological nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Montero, Rubén; De Florio, Loredana; González-Viar, Marta; Volcke, Eveline I P; Tejero, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    This contribution deals with a novel anaerobic-anoxic reactor for biological nutrient removal (BNR) from wastewater, termed AnoxAn. In the AnoxAn reactor, the anaerobic and anoxic zones for phosphate removal and denitrification are integrated in a single continuous upflow sludge blanket reactor, aiming at high compactness and efficiency. Its application is envisaged in those cases where retrofitting of existing wastewater treatment plants for BNR, or the construction of new ones, is limited by the available surface area. The environmental conditions are vertically divided up inside the reactor with the anaerobic zone at the bottom and the anoxic zone above. The capability of the AnoxAn configuration to establish two hydraulically separated zones inside the single reactor was assessed by means of hydraulic characterization experiments and model simulations. Residence time distribution (RTD) experiments in clean water were performed in a bench-scale (48.4 L) AnoxAn prototype. The required hydraulic separation between the anaerobic and anoxic zones, as well as adequate mixing in the individual zones, were obtained through selected mixing devices. The observed behaviour was described by a hydraulic model consisting of continuous stirred tank reactors and plug-flow reactors. The impact of the denitrification process in the anoxic zone on the hydraulic separation was subsequently evaluated through model simulations. The desired hydraulic behaviour proved feasible, involving little mixing between the anaerobic and anoxic zones (mixing flowrate 40.2 % of influent flowrate) and negligible nitrate concentration in the anaerobic zone (less than 0.1 mgN L(-1)) when denitrification was considered.

  20. Process of inorganic nitrogen transformation and design of kinetics model in the biological aerated filter reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gang; Xu, Xia; Yao, Lirong; Lu, Liqiao; Zhao, Tingting; Zhang, Wenyi

    2011-04-01

    As one of the plug-flow reactors, biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor was divided into four sampling sectors to understand the characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation during the reaction process, and then the different characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation caused by different NH(3)-N loadings, biological quantities and activities in each section were obtained. The results showed that the total transformation ratio in the nitrifying reactor was more than 90% in the absence of any organic carbon resource, at the same time, more than 65% NH(3)-N in the influent were nitrified at the filter height of 70 cm below under the conditions of the influent runoff 9-19 L/h, the gas-water ratio 4-5:1, the dissolved oxygen 3.0-5.8 mg/L and the NH(3)-N load 0.28-0.48 kg NH(3)-N/m(3) d. On the base of the Eckenfelder mode, the kinetics equation of the NH(3)-N transformation along the reactor was S(e)=S(0) exp(-0.0134D/L(1.2612)).

  1. Ageing implementation and refurbishment development at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor: a 15 years experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio N.; Ricci Filho, Walter; Carvalho, Marcos R. de; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Marra Neto, Adolfo, E-mail: ahiru@ipen.b, E-mail: wricci@ipen.b, E-mail: carvalho@ipen.b, E-mail: jrretta@ipen.b, E-mail: amneto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) is a nuclear research center established into the Secretary of Science and Technology from the government of the state of Sao Paulo, and administered both technically and financially by Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), a federal government organization under the Ministry of Science and Technology. The institute is located inside the campus of the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo city, Brazil. One of major nuclear facilities at IPEN is the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. It is the unique Brazilian research reactor with substantial power level suitable for application with research in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering, as well as radioisotope production for medical and other applications. Designed and built by Babcok-Wilcox, in accordance with technical specifications established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, and financed by the US Atoms for Peace Program, it is a swimming pool type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water and uses graphite and beryllium as reflector elements. The first criticality was achieved on September 16, 1957 and the reactor is currently operating at 4.0 MW on a 64h per week cycle. Since 1996, an IEA-R1 reactor ageing study was established at the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) related with general deterioration of components belonging to some operational systems, as cooling towers from secondary cooling system, piping and pumps, sample irradiation devices, radiation monitoring system, fuel elements, rod drive mechanisms, nuclear and process instrumentation and safety operational system. Although basic structures are almost the same as the original design, several improvements and modifications in components, systems and structures had been made along reactor life. This work aims to show the development of the ageing program in the IEA-R1 reactor and the upgrading (modernization) that was carried out, concerning several equipment and system in the

  2. Progress report on neutron activation analysis at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2003-03-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is one of most powerful techniques for the simultaneous multi-elements analysis. This technique has been studied and applied to analyze major, minor and trace elements in Geological, Biological and Environmental samples at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. At the sixth Workshop, February 8-11, 1999, Yojakarta, Indonesia we had a report on Current Status of Neutron Activation Analysis using Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. Another report on Neutron Activation Analysis at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor also was presented at the seventh Workshop in Taejon, Korea from November 20-24, 2000. So in this report, we would like to present the results obtained of the application of NAA at NRI for one year as follows: (1) Determination of the concentrations of noble, rare earth, uranium, thorium and other elements in Geological samples according to requirement of clients particularly the geologists, who want to find out the mineral resources. (2) The analysis of concentration of radionuclides and nutrient elements in foodstuffs to attend the program on Asian Reference Man. (3) The evaluation of the contents of trace elements in crude oil and basement rock samples to determine original source of the oil. (4) Determination of the elemental composition of airborne particle in the Ho Chi Minh City for studying air pollution. The analytical data of standard reference material, toxic elements and natural radionuclides in seawater are also presented. (author)

  3. A Janus Chelator Enables Biochemically Responsive MRI Contrast with Exceptional Dynamic Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Eric M; Jones, Chloe M; Ramsay, Ian; Farrar, Christian T; Caravan, Peter

    2016-12-14

    We introduce a new biochemically responsive Mn-based MRI contrast agent that provides a 9-fold change in relaxivity via switching between the Mn(3+) and Mn(2+) oxidation states. Interchange between oxidation states is promoted by a "Janus" ligand that isomerizes between binding modes that favor Mn(3+) or Mn(2+). It is the only ligand that supports stable complexes of Mn(3+) and Mn(2+) in biological milieu. Rapid interconversion between oxidation states is mediated by peroxidase activity (oxidation) and l-cysteine (reduction). This Janus system provides a new paradigm for the design of biochemically responsive MRI contrast agents.

  4. Biology Education Research Trends in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Seyda; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a content analysis of 633 biology education research [BER] papers published by Turkish science educators in national and international journals. The findings indicate that more research has been undertaken in environment and ecology, the cell and animal form and functions. In addition learning, teaching and attitudes were in…

  5. The Denitrifying Biological Phosphorus Removal Performance in Anaerobic/Anoxic Sequencing Batch Reactor: The Effect of Carbon Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gürtekin, Engin; ŞEKERDAĞ, Nusret

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of carbon source on denitrifying biological phosphorus removal performance in acetate and glucose fed two anaerobic/anoxic sequencinq batch reactor (SBR) was investigated. Glucose and acetate were used as the substrates. In acetate and glucose fed reactors, the COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiencies were 91,90% and PO4-P removal efficiencies were 87,51% respectively. These results shows that the phosphorus removal efficiency is lower in glucose fed reactor.

  6. Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Robinson

    2008-11-01

    Australian science is entering a new `golden age', with the start-up of bright new neutron and photon sources in Sydney and Melbourne, in 2006 and 2007 respectively. The OPAL reactor and the Australian Synchrotron can be considered as the greatest single investment in scientific infrastructure in Australia's history. They will essentially be `sister' facilities, with a common open user ethos, and a vision to play a major role in international science. Fuel was loaded into the reactor in August 2006, and full power was (20 MW) achieved in November 2006. The first call for proposals was made in 2007, and commissioning experiments have taken place well before then. The first three instruments in operation are high-resolution powder diffractometer (for materials discovery), high-intensity powder diffractometer (for kinetics experiments and small samples) and a strain scanner (for mechanical engineering and industrial applications). These are closely followed by four more instruments with broad application in nanoscience, condensed matter physics and other scientific disciplines. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere. To date there is committed funding for nine instruments, with a capacity to install a total of ∼ 18 beamlines. An update will be given on the status of OPAL, its thermal and cold neutron sources, its instruments and the first results.

  7. Radioisotope Production Plan and Strategy of Kijang Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Jun Sig [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This reactor will be located at Kijang, Busan, Korea and be dedicated to produce mainly medical radioisotopes. Tc-99m is very important isotope for diagnosis and more than 80% of radiation diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine depend on this isotope. There were, however, several times of insecure production of Mo-99 due to the shutdown of major production reactors worldwide. OECD/NEA is leading member countries to resolve the shortage of this isotope and trying to secure the international market of Mo-99. The radioisotope plan and strategy of Kijang Research Reactor (KJRR) should be carefully established to fit not only the domestic but also international demand on Mo-99. The implementation strategy of 6 principles of HLG-MR should be established that is appropriate to national environments. Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and Ministry of Health and welfare should cooperate well to organize the national radioisotope supply structure, to set up the reasonable and competitive pricing of radioisotopes, and to cope with the international supply strategy.

  8. Contribution of CAD and PLM Research Reactors Design and Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnetain, Xavier [AREVA TA, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    As all the reactors, the main stakes in the engineering of design and construction of the research reactors consist of the management and sharing of the technical data, the functional, physical and contractual interfaces data between the various contributors on the whole designs and construction cycle project. For 40 years, AREVA TA designs and builds reactors. Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools were introduced for 30 years into the engineering processes of AREVA TA, completed for 15 years by Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) tools. For 15 years AREVA TA pursues the integration since the feasibility of its newest Information Technologies (IT). In the first part, the paper presents IN the second part, the paper presents how the schematics and CAD tools support the engineering processes during the different phases of the project. CAD was used during the studies and now supports the management of the layout and design studies, including interfaces between suppliers, up to the constitution of the as built CAD mock-up. In the third part, the paper presents the relations between the various tools and the PLM solution implemented by AREVA TA to ensure the consistency between all tools and data for the benefit of the project.

  9. Review of the status of low power research reactors and considerations for its development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, In Cheol; Wu, Sang Ik; Lee, Byung Chul; Ha, Jae Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    At present, 232 research reactors in the world are in operation and two thirds of them have a power less than 1 MW. Many countries have used research reactors as the tools for educating and training students or engineers and for scientific service such as neutron activation analysis. As the introduction of a research reactor is considered a stepping stone for a nuclear power development program, many newcomers are considering having a low power research reactor. The IAEA has continued to provide forums for the exchange of information and experiences regarding low power research reactors. Considering these, the Agency is recently working on the preparation of a guide for the preparation of technical specification possibly for a member state to use when wanting to purchase a low power research reactor. In addition, ANS has stated that special consideration should be given to the continued national support to maintain and expand research and test reactor programs and to the efforts in identifying and addressing the future needs by working toward the development and deployment of next generation nuclear research and training facilities. Thus, more interest will be given to low power research reactors and its role as a facility for education and training. Considering these, the status of low power research reactors was reviewed, and some aspects to be considered in developing a low power research reactor were studied.

  10. Upgrading of neutron radiography/tomography facility at research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El Bar, Waleed; Mongy, Tarek [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). ETRR-2; Kardjilov, Nikolay [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) for Materials and Energy, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    A state-of-the-art neutron tomography imaging system was set up at the neutron radiography beam tube at the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) and was successfully commissioned in 2013. This study presents a set of tomographic experiments that demonstrate a high quality tomographic image formation. A computer technique for data processing and 3D image reconstruction was used to see inside a copy module of an ancient clay article provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The technique was also able to uncover tomographic imaging details of a mummified fish and provided a high resolution tomographic image of a defective fire valve. (orig.)

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagle, C.D. (comp.)

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included.

  12. UCLA research reactor relicensing, or guilty until proven innocent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegst, W.F.

    1985-11-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history and experiences of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in attempting to relicense its 100-kW Argonaut research reactor. The process of intervention in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing hearings is briefly reviewed. The intervention in the UCLA case, by an antinuclear group called the Committee to Bridge the Gap (CBG), is described. The outcome of the entire proceeding is summarized and opinions are presented on the validity and viability of the licensing/intervention process.

  13. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  14. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, Stefan [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Djuricic, Mile [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Villa, Mario; Boeck, Helmuth [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg, E-mail: georg.steinhauser@ati.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. - Highlights: > Neutron activation is an important process for the waste management of nuclear facilities. > Biological shield of the TRIGA reactor Vienna has been topic of investigation. > Flux values allow a categorization of the concrete concerning radiation protection legislation. > Reactor installations are of great importance as neutron sources into the biological shield. > Every installation shows distinguishable flux profiles.

  15. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    With remarkably interesting surface activities, two-dimensional Janus materials arouse intensive interests recently in many fields. We demonstrate by molecular dynamic simulations that hydrofluorinated Janus graphene (J-GN) can self-assemble into Janus nanoscroll (J-NS) at room temperature. The van...

  16. Amaranth decoloration by Trametes versicolor in a rotating biological contacting reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Juliana; Shin, Maria; Wong, Sunny; Goode, Christopher

    2006-09-01

    Sequential batch and continuous operation of a rotating biological contacting (RBC) reactor and the effects of dissolved oxygen on the decoloration of amaranth by Trametes versicolor were evaluated. Amaranth belongs to the group of azo dyes which are potential carcinogens and/or mutagens that can be transformed into toxic aryl amines under anaerobic conditions. Cultivation of T. versicolor in a stirred tank reactor was found to be unsuitable for amaranth decoloration due to significant biomass fouling and increase in medium viscosity. Assuming that decoloration follows first-order kinetics, amaranth was decolorized more rapidly when T. versicolor was immobilized on jute twine in a RBC reactor operated either in a sequential batch (k=0.25 h(-1)) or in a continuous (0.051 h(-1)) mode compared to a stirred tank reactor (0.015 h(-1)). Oxygen was found to be essential for decoloration with the highest decoloration rates occurring at oxygen saturation. Although longer retention times resulted in more decoloration when the RBC was operated in the continuous mode (about 33% amaranth decoloration), sequential batch operation gave better results (>95%) under similar nutrient conditions. Our data indicate that the fastest decoloration should occur in the RBC using nitrogen-free Kirk's medium with 1 g/l glucose in sequential batch operation at rotational speeds and/or aeration rates which maintain oxygen saturation in the liquid phase.

  17. Biological treatment of shrimp aquaculture wastewater using a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, C; Boopathy, R; Fontenot, Q; Kilgen, M

    2008-12-01

    To improve the water quality in the shrimp aquaculture, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has been tested for the treatment of shrimp wastewater. A SBR is a variation of the activated sludge biological treatment process. This process uses multiple steps in the same tank to take the place of multiple tanks in a conventional treatment system. The SBR accomplishes equalization, aeration, and clarification in a timed sequence in a single reactor basin. This is achieved in a simple tank, through sequencing stages, which include fill, react, settle, decant, and idle. A laboratory scale SBR and a pilot scale SBR was successfully operated using shrimp aquaculture wastewater. The wastewater contained high concentration of carbon and nitrogen. By operating the reactor sequentially, viz, aerobic and anoxic modes, nitrification and denitrification were achieved as well as removal of carbon in a laboratory scale SBR. To be specific, the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 1,593 mg/l was reduced to 44 mg/l within 10 days of reactor operation. Ammonia in the sludge was nitrified within 3 days. The denitrification of nitrate was achieved by the anaerobic process and 99% removal of nitrate was observed. Based on the laboratory study, a pilot scale SBR was designed and operated to remove excess nitrogen in the shrimp wastewater. The results mimicked the laboratory scale SBR.

  18. Continuous biological waste gas treatment in stirred trickle-bed reactor with discontinuous removal of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, A; Heits, H; Wübker, S; Heinze, U; Friedrich, C; Werner, U

    1998-02-20

    A new reactor for biological waste gas treatment was developed to eliminate continuous solvents from waste gases. A trickle-bed reactor was chosen with discontinuous movement of the packed bed and intermittent percolation. The reactor was operated with toluene as the solvent and an optimum average biomass concentration of between 5 and 30 kg dry cell weight per cubic meter packed bed (m3pb). This biomass concentration resulted in a high volumetric degradation rate. Reduction of surplus biomass by stirring and trickling caused a prolonged service life and prevented clogging of the trickle bed and a pressure drop increase. The pressure drop after biomass reduction was almost identical to the theoretical pressure drop as calculated for the irregular packed bed without biomass. The reduction in biomass and intermittent percolation of mineral medium resulted in high volumetric degradation rates of about 100 g of toluene m-3pb h-1 at a load of 150 g of toluene m-3pb h-1. Such a removal rate with a trickle-bed reactor was not reported before.

  19. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbalm, K.F. [comp.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  20. Geometric Monte Carlo and Black Janus Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Dongsu; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Min, Hyunsoo; Song, Jeong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    We describe an application of the Monte Carlo method to the Janus deformation of the black brane background. We present numerical results for three and five dimensional black Janus geometries with planar and spherical interfaces. In particular, we argue that the 5D geometry with a spherical interface has an application in understanding the finite temperature bag-like QCD model via the AdS/CFT correspondence. The accuracy and convergence of the algorithm are evaluated with respect to the grid spacing. The systematic errors of the method are determined using an exact solution of 3D black Janus. This numerical approach for solving linear problems is unaffected initial guess of a trial solution and can handle an arbitrary geometry under various boundary conditions in the presence of source fields.

  1. IAEA Assistance in the development of new research reactor projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio di Tigliole, Andrea; Bradley, Ed; Zhukova, Anastasia; Adelfang, Pablo [International Atomic Energy Agency, Research Reactor Section, Vienna (Austria); Shokr, Amgad [International Atomic Energy Agency, Research Reactor Safety Section, Vienna (Austria); Ridikas, Danas [International Atomic Energy Agency, Physics Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    A research reactor (RR) project is a major undertaking that requires careful preparation, planning, implementation and investment in time, money, and human resources. In recent years, the interest of IAEA Member States in developing RR programmes has grown significantly, and currently, several Member States are in different stages of new RR projects. The majority of these countries are building their first RR as a key national facility for the development of their nuclear science and technology programmes, including nuclear power. In order to support Member States in such efforts, the IAEA in 2012 published the Nuclear Energy Series Report No. NP-T-5.1 on Specific Considerations and Milestones for a Research Reactor Project. To provide further support, the IAEA also published a document to assist Member States in the preparation of the bid invitation specification for the purchase of a RR. The IAEA will also continue to provide assistance for human resources development of the Member States establishing their first RR, and to facilitate sharing experience and knowledge among Member States through its programmatic activities including expert mission services, technical meetings, training courses and workshops addressing relevant technical and safety topics. This paper presents the IAEA assistance and services provided to the Member States considering new RRs, with particular emphasis on those establishing their first RR, including elaboration on the services mentioned above.

  2. Analysis of Nigeria research reactor-1 thermal power calibration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbo, Sunday Arome; Ahmed, Yusuf Aminu; Ewa, Ita Okon; Jibrin, Yahaya [Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria (Nigeria)

    2016-06-15

    This paper analyzes the accuracy of the methods used in calibrating the thermal power of Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1), a low-power miniature neutron source reactor located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The calibration was performed at three different power levels: low power (3.6 kW), half power (15 kW), and full power (30 kW). Two methods were used in the calibration, namely, slope and heat balance methods. The thermal power obtained by the heat balance method at low power, half power, and full power was 3.7 ± 0.2 kW, 15.2 ± 1.2 kW, and 30.7 ± 2.5 kW, respectively. The thermal power obtained by the slope method at half power and full power was 15.8 ± 0.7 kW and 30.2 ± 1.5 kW, respectively. It was observed that the slope method is more accurate with deviations of 4% and 5% for calibrations at half and full power, respectively, although the linear fit (slope method) on average temperature-rising rates during the thermal power calibration procedure at low power (3.6 kW) is not fitting. As such, the slope method of power calibration is not suitable at lower power for NIRR-1.

  3. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew

    2000-07-01

    This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for

  4. Research on Power Ramp Testing Method for PWR Fuel Rod at Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop high performance fuel assembly for domestic nuclear power plant, it is necessary to master some fundamental test technology. So the research on the power ramp testing methods is proposed. A tentative power ramp test for short PWR fuel rod has been conducted at the heavy water research reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in May of 2001. The in-pile test rig was placed into the central channel of the reactor . The test rig consists of pressure pipe assembly, thimble, solid neutron absorbing screen and its driving parts, etc.. The test

  5. Antineutrino emission and gamma background characteristics from a thermal research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, V M; Fallot, M; Communeau, V; Cormon, S; Estienne, M; Lenoir, M; Peuvrel, N; Shiba, T; Cucoanes, A S; Elnimr, M; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Remoto, A; Thiolliere, N; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the antineutrino emission from research reactors is mandatory for any high sensitivity experiments either for fundamental or applied neutrino physics, as well as a good control of the gamma and neutron backgrounds induced by the reactor operation. In this article, the antineutrino emission associated to a thermal research reactor: the OSIRIS reactor located in Saclay, France, is computed in a first part. The calculation is performed with the summation method, which sums all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products, coupled for the first time with a complete core model of the OSIRIS reactor core. The MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution code was used, allowing to take into account the contributions of all beta decayers in-core. This calculation is representative of the isotopic contributions to the antineutrino flux which can be found at research reactors with a standard 19.75\\% enrichment in $^{235}$U. In addition, the required off-equilibrium correction...

  6. Reprocessing of research reactor fuel the Dounreay option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, P.

    1997-08-01

    Reprocessing is a proven process for the treatment of spent U/Al Research Reactor fuel. At Dounreay 12679 elements have been reprocessed during the past 30 years. For reactors converting to LEU fuel the uranium recovered in reprocessing can be blended down to less than 20% U{sub 235}, enrichment and be fabricated into new elements. For reactors already converted to LEU it is technically possible to reprocess spent silicide fuel to reduce the U{sub 235} burden and present to a repository only stable conditioned waste. The main waste stream from reprocessing which contains the Fission products is collected in underground storage tanks where it is kept for a period of at least five years before being converted to a stable solid form for return to the country of origin for subsequent storage/disposal. Discharges to the environment from reprocessing are low and are limited to the radioactive gases contained in the spent fuel and a low level liquid waste steam. Both of these discharges are independently monitored, and controlled within strict discharge limits set by the UK Government`s Scottish Office. Transportation of spent fuel to Dounreay has been undertaken using many routes from mainland Europe and has utilised over the past few years both chartered and scheduled vessel services. Several different transport containers have been handled and are currently licensed in the UK. This paper provides a short history of MTR reprocessing at Dounreay, and provides information to show reprocessing can satisfy the needs of MTR operators, showing that reprocessing is a valuable asset in non-proliferation terms, offers a complete solution and is environmentally acceptable.

  7. 75 FR 6651 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy; Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Biological and... of Biological and Environmental Research, SC-23/Germantown Building, 1000 Independence Avenue,...

  8. 78 FR 6087 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Biological and.... Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research,...

  9. 77 FR 4028 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy; Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Biological and... of Biological and Environmental Research, SC-23/Germantown Building, 1000 Independence Avenue...

  10. System Requirements Analysis for a Computer-based Procedure in a Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaek Wan; Jang, Gwi Sook; Seo, Sang Moon; Shin, Sung Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This can address many of the routine problems related to human error in the use of conventional, hard-copy operating procedures. An operating supporting system is also required in a research reactor. A well-made CBP can address the staffing issues of a research reactor and reduce the human errors by minimizing the operator's routine tasks. A CBP for a research reactor has not been proposed yet. Also, CBPs developed for nuclear power plants have powerful and various technical functions to cover complicated plant operation situations. However, many of the functions may not be required for a research reactor. Thus, it is not reasonable to apply the CBP to a research reactor directly. Also, customizing of the CBP is not cost-effective. Therefore, a compact CBP should be developed for a research reactor. This paper introduces high level requirements derived by the system requirements analysis activity as the first stage of system implementation. Operation support tools are under consideration for application to research reactors. In particular, as a full digitalization of the main control room, application of a computer-based procedure system has been required as a part of man-machine interface system because it makes an impact on the operating staffing and human errors of a research reactor. To establish computer-based system requirements for a research reactor, this paper addressed international standards and previous practices on nuclear plants.

  11. Ageing investigation and upgrading of components/systems of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip; Widi Setiawan [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    Kartini research reactor has been operated in good condition and has demonstrated successful operation for the past 18 years, utilized for: reactor kinetic and control studies, instrumentation tests, neutronic and thermohydraulic studies, routine neutron activation analysis, reactor safety studies, training for research reactor operators and supervisors, and reactor physics experiments. Several components of Kartini reactor use components from the abandoned IRT-2000 Project at Serpong and from Bandung Reactor Centre such as: reactor tank, reactor core, heat exchanger, motor blower for ventilation system, fuel elements, etc. To maintain a good operating performance and also for aging investigation purposes, the component failure data collection has been done. The method used is based on the Manual on Reliability Data Collection For Research Reactor PSAs, IAEA TECDOC 636, and analyzed by using Data Entry System (DES) computer code. Analysis result shows that the components/systems failure rate of Kartini reactor is around 1,5.10{sup -4} up to 2,8.10{sup -4} per hour, these values are within the ranges of the values indicated in IAEA TECDOC 478. Whereas from the analysis of irradiation history shows that the neutron fluence of fuel element with highest burn-up (2,05 gram U-235 in average) is around 1.04.10{sup 16} n Cm{sup -2} and this value is still far below its limiting value. Some reactor components/systems have been replaced and upgraded such as heat exchanger, instrumentation and control system (ICS), etc. The new reactor ICS was installed in 1994 which is designed as a distributed structure by using microprocessor based systems and bus system technology. The characteristic and operating performance of the new reactor ICS, as well as the operation history and improvement of the Kartini research reactor is presented. (J.P.N.)

  12. Design and Construction of Operation Bridge for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Choi, Jinbok; Lee, Jongmin; Oh, Jinho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The operation bridge contains a lower working deck mounted on a saddle that travels on rails. Upright members are mounted on the saddle to support the upper structure and two hoist monorails. The saddle contains an anti-derail system that is composed of seismic lugs and guide rollers. The operation bridge travels along the rails to transport the fuel assembly, irradiated object, and reactor components in the pools by using tools. Hoists are installed at the top girder. The hoist is suspended from the monorail by means of a motor driven trolley that runs along the monorail. Movements of hoist and trolley are controlled by using the control pendant switch. Processes of design and construction of the operation bridge for the research reactor are introduced. The operation bridge is designed under consideration of functions of handling equipment in the pool and operational limits for safety. Structural analysis is carried out to evaluate the structural integrity in the seismic events. Tests and inspections are also performed during fabrication and installation to confirm the function and safety of the operation bridge.

  13. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, L.; Diamond, D.; Xu, J.; Carew, J.; Rorer, D.

    2004-03-31

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the

  14. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  15. Biologically Inspired Micro-Flight Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Waszak, Martin R.

    2003-01-01

    Natural fliers demonstrate a diverse array of flight capabilities, many of which are poorly understood. NASA has established a research project to explore and exploit flight technologies inspired by biological systems. One part of this project focuses on dynamic modeling and control of micro aerial vehicles that incorporate flexible wing structures inspired by natural fliers such as insects, hummingbirds and bats. With a vast number of potential civil and military applications, micro aerial vehicles represent an emerging sector of the aerospace market. This paper describes an ongoing research activity in which mechanization and control concepts for biologically inspired micro aerial vehicles are being explored. Research activities focusing on a flexible fixed- wing micro aerial vehicle design and a flapping-based micro aerial vehicle concept are presented.

  16. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P., E-mail: pradip.saha@ge.com [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Aksan, N. [GRNSPG Group, University of Pisa (Italy); Andersen, J. [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Columbia, SC (United States); Simoneau, J.P. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Leung, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Bertrand, F. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aoto, K.; Kamide, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs.

  17. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  18. Janus microgels produced from functional precursor polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Romanowsky, Mark B; Weitz, David A

    2010-09-21

    Micrometer-sized Janus particles of many kinds can be formed using droplet microfluidics, but in existing methods, the microfluidic templating is strongly coupled to the material synthesis, since droplet solidification occurs through rapid polymerization right after droplet formation. This circumstance limits independent control of the material properties and the morphology of the resultant particles. In this paper, we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to produce functional Janus microgels from prefabricated, cross-linkable precursor polymers. This approach separates the polymer synthesis from the particle gelation, thus allowing the microfluidic droplet templating and the functionalization of the matrix polymer to be performed and controlled in two independent steps. We use microfluidic devices to emulsify semidilute solutions of cross-linkable, chemically modified or unmodified poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) precursors and solidify the drops via polymer-analogous gelation. The resultant microgel particles exhibit two distinguishable halves which contain most of the modified precursors, and the unmodified matrix polymer separates these materials. The spatial distribution of the modified precursors across the particles can be controlled by the flow rates during the microfluidic experiments. We also form hollow microcapsules with two different sides (Janus shells) using double emulsion droplets as templates, and we produce Janus microgels that are loaded with a ferromagnetic additive which allows remote actuation of the microgels.

  19. Janus neodymium glass laser operations manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Trainor, R.J.

    1978-09-29

    A manual, prepared to guide personnel in operating and maintaining the Janus glass laser system, is presented. System components are described in detail. Step-by-step procedures are presented for firing the laser and for performing routine maintenance and calibration procedures.

  20. The neutron texture diffractometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Tao; Tian, Geng-Fang; Gao, Jian-Bo; Yu, Zhou-Xiang; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Qi; Yang, Lin-Feng; Sun, Kai; Wang, Hong-Li; Santisteban, J. r.; Chen, Dong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at the China Advanced Research Reactor, due to strong demand for texture measurement with neutrons from the domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study texture in commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of zirconium alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurements with the results obtained in HIPPO at LANSCE and Kowari at ANSTO illustrates the reliability of the texture diffractometer. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11105231, 11205248, 51327902) and International Atomic Energy Agency-TC program (CPR0012)

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Day, D.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, {sup 153}Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet{trademark}) and {sup 90}Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere{trademark}). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes.

  2. Updating of PGAA system at HANARO research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeo, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Moon, J. H.; Jeong, Y. S.; Kim, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    In this study, updating of Prompt Gamma-ray neutron Activation Analysis system (PGAA) has been carried out to obtain the best, optimal condition through the improvement of neutron flux and reduction of background of PGAA facility which is installed on the ST 1 horizontal beam port at HANARO research reactor. Both diffracted beam profiling's conditions and the neutron diffraction of pyrolytic graphite crystals are investigated by BF{sub 3} counter, laser and optical diffraction angle control method to confirm the beam convergence rate. Also, the effects of interference materials such as aluminum sample holder, teflon holder and Teflon wire appeared from analyzing elemental constituent are investigated with single - and Compton mode. After readjusting of system, the neutron flux measured was 8.1{+-}0.2 x 10{sup 7} n{center_dot}cm{sup -2}{center_dot}s{sup -1} increasing about 40%, to be expected the improved analytical sensitivity.

  3. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  4. The Janus serum bank and biomarkers of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Gislefoss

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Janus serum bank, established in 1973, contains sera stored at –25 degrees collected from 330,000 originally healthy individuals. The number of cancer cases have increased from zero in 1973 to more than 50,000 in 2005, including invasive and non-invasive cancers. Information on cases have been obtained by coupling the Janus file against the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The sera have been used in over 70 different cancers research projects, usually in case-control studies and in collaboration with national and international research groups. The type of biomarker analysed include antibodies against Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV and Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, long chain fatty acids, androgens and other hormones, vitamins as well as environmental toxins such as organochlorines are other types of cancer biomarkers investigated. Mutation analyses (BRCA-1 etc have been possible using PCR and the trace amounts of DNA remaining in the sera.Janus serum bank ble etablert i 1973 og inneholder sera lagret ved –25 grader, innsamlet fra 330.000 opprinnelig friske personer. Antall krefttilfeller har steget fra null i 1973 til over 50.000 i år 2005, inkludert både invasiv og ikke-invasiv kreft. Informasjon om kasus er tilgjengelig ved å koble Janus-filene mot Kreftregisterets databaser. Serumprøvene er blitt benyttet i over 70 forskjellige kreftforskningsprosjekter, som oftest i kasus-kontroll studier og i samarbeide med en rekke nasjonale og internasjonale forskningsgrupper. Mange ulike biomarkører på kreft er blitt analysert, bl.a. antistoffer mot Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV og Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, lange fettsyrer, androgener og andre hormoner, vitaminer såvel som miljøgifter av typen organiske klorforbindelser er eksempler på andre kreftbiomarkører som er undersøkt. Det har også vært mulig å gjøre mutasjonsanalyser (BRCA-1 etc ved å bruke PCR til å amplifisere opp den spormengden DNA som finnes i serum.

  5. Biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in sequencing batch biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnz, P.

    2001-07-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) has only been put into practice in activated sludge systems. In recent years, the Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) has emerged as an alternative allowing EBPR to be achieved in a biofilm reactor. High efficiency of phosphate removal was demonstrated in a SBBR fed with synthetic wastewater containing acetate. The aim of this study was to investigate EBPR from municipal wastewater in semi full-scale and laboratory-scale SBBRs. The focus of the investigation in the semi full-scale reactor was on determination of achievable reaction rates and effluent concentrations under varying influent conditions throughout all seasons of a year. Interactions between nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the influence of backwashing on the reactor performance was examined. Summing up, it can be stated that the SBBR proved to be an attractive alternative to activated sludge systems. Phosphorus elimination efficiency was comparable to common systems but biomass sedimentation problems were avoided. In order to further exploit the potential of the SBBR and to achieve reactor performances superior to those of existing systems designing a special biofilm carrier material may allow to increase the phenomenon of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification while maintaining EBPR activity. (orig.) [German] Die vermehrte biologische Phosphorelimination (Bio-P) aus Abwasser wurde bisher nur in Belebtschlammsystemen praktiziert. In den letzten Jahren konnte jedoch gezeigt werden, dass sich durch die Anwendung des Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) - Verfahrens auch in Biofilmreaktoren Bio-P verwirklichen laesst. Versuche in Laboranlagen haben ergeben, dass sich eine weitgehende Phosphorelimination aufrecht erhalten laesst, wenn die Reaktoren mit einem ideal zusammengesetzten, synthetischen Abwasser beschickt werden. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Bio-P aus kommunalem Abwasser in SBBR-Versuchsanlagen im halbtechnischen und im Labormassstab zu

  6. Neutron Imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Application to Biological Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cekanova, Maria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Bailey, William Barton [ORNL; Keener, Wylie S [ORNL; Davis, Larry E [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) has recently installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. The CG-1D beamline supports a broad range of user research spanning from engineering to material research, energy storage, additive manufacturing, vehicle technologies, archaeology, biology, and plant physiology. The beamline performance (spatial resolution, field of view, etc.) and its utilization for biological research are presented. The NScD is also considering a proposal to build the VENUS imaging beamline (beam port 10) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Unlike CG-1D which provides cold neutrons, VENUS will offer a broad range of neutron wavelengths, from epithermal to cold, and enhanced contrast mechanisms. This new capability will also enable the imaging of thicker biological samples than is currently available at CG-1D. A brief overview of the VENUS capability for biological research is discussed.

  7. Onchocerciasis control: biological research is still needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussinesq M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Achievements obtained by the onchocerciasis control programmes should not lead to a relaxation in the biological research on Onchocerca volvulus. Issues such as the Loa loa-related postivermectin serious adverse events, the uncertainties as to whether onchocerciasis can be eliminated by ivermectin treatments, and the possible emergence of ivermectin-resistant O. volvulus populations should be addressed proactively. Doxycycline, moxidectin and emodepside appear to be promising as alternative drugs against onchocerciasis but support to researches in immunology and genomics should also be increased to develop new control tools, including both vaccines and macrofilaricidal drugs.

  8. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  9. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  10. Implementation of a management system for operating organizations of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibrit, Eduardo, E-mail: kibrit@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de; Zouain, Desiree Moraes, E-mail: araquino@ipen.b, E-mail: dmzouain@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the requirements established by an IAEA draft technical document for the implementation of a management system for operating organisations of research reactors. The following aspects will be discussed: structure of IAEA draft technical document, management system requirements, processes common to all research reactors, aspects for the implementation of the management system, and a formula for grading the management system requirements. (author)

  11. Removal Characteristics of Organic Pollutants from Eutrophic Raw Water by Biological Pretreatment Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangcan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two biological contact oxidation reactors, cascade biofilm reactor (CSBR and one-step biofilm reactor (OSBR, were used in this paper for pretreatment of eutrophic water from Lake Taihu in China. The CSBR was more effective and stable for eutrophic water treatment than OSBR, in terms of extracellular microcystin-LR, chlorophyll-a, DOC, and biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC removal. Removal efficiencies of extracellular microcystin-LR and chlorophyll-a were 75.8% and 59.7% in CSBR and 60.5% and 53.0% after 2 h in OSBR. CSBR had much higher removal efficiency (34.3% than OSBR (22.7% for DOC, and CSBR could remove 67% BDOC, accounting for 34% of total DOC in source water. 11.5% of DOC was removed through means other than biological degradation, such as biofilm adsorption and bioflocculation. In CSBR at 5.5~13°C, 57.5% of atrazine was removed at 2 h hydraulic retention time, with background concentration of 136.5 ng/L. Meanwhile, removal efficiencies of three phthalic acid esters (PAEs (dimethyl phthalate, di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate, and di-n-butyl phthalate were 78.7%, 52.4%, and 85.3%, respectively. Only 35.2% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs could be removed by CSBR with initial concentration of 21.5 μg/L. The results indicated that CSBR is effective in low-molecular-weight organic pollution pretreatment and provides benefits in terms of effluent quality.

  12. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  13. Advanced reactor material research requirements; Necesidades de investigacion en materiales para reactores avanzados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, C. A.; Muscara, J.; Srinivasan, M.

    2003-07-01

    The metal and graphite components used in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) may suffer physical-chemical alterations, irradiation damage and mechanical alterations. Their failure may call the security of these reactors into question by affecting the integrity of the pressure control system, core geometry or its cooling, among other aspects. This article analyses the work currently being done in the matter by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (Author)

  14. Japan sets up program for biological research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepkowski, W.

    1988-05-16

    Japanese officials have put final touches on plans for a global biological research program, called the Human Frontier Science Program, that they hope will launch their country into a new era of international science. Japan will establish a nongovernmental secretariat for the program and will manage it through an international governing council. Almost all the funding in the countries involved- Japan, the U.S., Canada, and the European Community countries- will be provided by Japan, at least at first. In its present design, the program consists of two thrusts- one in the neurosciences with emphasis on brain function, the other on the chemistry and molecular biology of gene expression. The program in the first year would consist of 30 to 50 direct research grants to researchers working in teams, 100 to 200 postdoctoral fellowships, and 10 to 20 workshops. Young researchers would be favored for funding. The average annual grant size would total $500,000, and postdoctoral awards would average $50,000.

  15. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE.

  16. Computational systems biology for aging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Auley, Mark T; Mooney, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Computational modelling is a key component of systems biology and integrates with the other techniques discussed thus far in this book by utilizing a myriad of data that are being generated to quantitatively represent and simulate biological systems. This chapter will describe what computational modelling involves; the rationale for using it, and the appropriateness of modelling for investigating the aging process. How a model is assembled and the different theoretical frameworks that can be used to build a model are also discussed. In addition, the chapter will describe several models which demonstrate the effectiveness of each computational approach for investigating the constituents of a healthy aging trajectory. Specifically, a number of models will be showcased which focus on the complex age-related disorders associated with unhealthy aging. To conclude, we discuss the future applications of computational systems modelling to aging research.

  17. Progress of Research on Demonstration Fast Reactor Main Pipe Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The main characteristics of the sodium pipe system in demonstration fast reactor are high-temperature, thin-wall and big-caliber, which is different from the high-pressure and thick-wall of the pressurized water reactor system, and the system is long-term

  18. Modeling of operating history of the research nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naymushin, A.; Chertkov, Yu; Shchurovskaya, M.; Anikin, M.; Lebedev, I.

    2016-06-01

    The results of simulation of the IRT-T reactor operation history from 2012 to 2014 are presented. Calculations are performed using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCU-PTR. Comparison is made between calculation and experimental data for the critical reactor.

  19. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  20. Research and development on next generation reactor (phase I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyoon; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the study is to improve the volume of nuclear power plant which adopts passive safety system concept. The passive safety system reactor is characterized by excellent safety and reliability. But the volume of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) of the passive safety system reactor is so small that it should be upgraded for commercial operation. For volume upgrade, detailed analyses are performed as follows; core design, hydraulics, design and mechnical structures, and safety analysis. In addition to above analysis, some investigations must be supplied as follows: power density vs. DNB margin decrease, outlet temperature vs. EPRI-URD, additional tests for upgraded reactor, dynamic analysis of mechanical vibration according to expanded reactor vessel and expanded in-core structures, and Merit loss of passive safety system reactor according to design margin decrease. (Author).

  1. Research about reactor operator's personability characteristics and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Li; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan [Tsinghua Univ., Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Beijing (China)

    2003-03-01

    To predict and evaluate the reactor operator's performance by personality characteristics is an important part of reactor operator safety assessment. Using related psychological theory combined with the Chinese operator's fact and considering the effect of environmental factors to personality analysis, paper does the research about the about the relationships between reactor operator's performance and personality characteristics, and offers the reference for operator's selection, using and performance in the future. (author)

  2. Future development of the research nuclear reactor IRT-2000 in Sofia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolov, T.G. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1999-07-01

    The present paper presents a short description of the research reactor IRT-2000 Sofia, started in 1961 and operated for 28 years. Some items are considered, connected to the improvements made in the contemporary safety requirements and the unrealized project for modernization to 5 MW. Proposals are considered for reconstruction of reactor site to a 'reactor of low power' for education purposes and as a basis for the country's nuclear technology development. (author)

  3. The application of research reactor Maria for analysis of thorium use in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Andrzejewski, K.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pytel, B.; Szczurek, J. [Dep. Thorium Project, Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Polkowska-Motrenko, H. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul.Dorodna 16 03-195 Warszawa (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    The MARIA reactor, pool-type light-water cooled and beryllium moderated nuclear research reactor was used to evaluate the {sup 233}U breeding during the experimental irradiation of the thorium samples. The level of impurities concentrations was determined using ICP-MS method. The associated development of computer programs for analysis of application of thorium in EPR reactor consist of PC version of CORD-2/GNOMER system are presented. (authors)

  4. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  5. Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  6. Research Status and Prospect of Biological Manufacturing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuiying; LIU; Xinsheng; LI; Zhiyong; YANG; Hao; HAN

    2014-01-01

    The concept,research content and direction of biological manufacturing were elaborated in this text. The biological manufacturing progress in China,application situation,development trend and existing problems were analyzed,and the prospect of the development of biological manufacturing was put forward,in order to provide reference and guidance for the manufacture of biological research and industrial development.

  7. Biological Phosphorus Release and Uptake Under Alternating Anaerobic and Anoxic Conditions In a Fixed-Film Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, Jens Peter; Henze, Mogens; Strube, Rune

    1994-01-01

    Biological phosphorus removal was investigated in a fixed-film reactor with alternating anaerobic and anoxic conditions. The tests showed that biological phosphorus removal can be obtained in a fixed-film reactor with nitrate as oxidising agent. In the anaerobic period, 0.52 mg of PO4-P...... potassium taken up and phosphate taken up in the anoxic phase was determined to be 0.36 mg K/mg P. The phosphorus concentration in the sludge was determined at 8–10% of dry solids....

  8. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    CERN Document Server

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, $60\\; {\\rm \\mu m/s}$ and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers. The paper was finalized and submitted by Denis S. Goldobin after Sergey Sklyaev had sadly passed away on June 2, 2014.

  9. Integration of improved decontamination and characterization technologies in the decommissioning of the CP-5 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Boing, L. E.

    2000-02-17

    The aging of research reactors worldwide has resulted in a heightened awareness in the international technical decommissioning community of the timeliness to review and address the needs of these research institutes in planning for and eventually performing the decommissioning of these facilities. By using the reactors already undergoing decommissioning as test beds for evaluating enhanced or new/innovative technologies for decommissioning, it is possible that new techniques could be made available for those future research reactor decommissioning projects. Potentially, the new technologies will result in: reduced radiation doses to the work force, larger safety margins in performing decommissioning and cost and schedule savings to the research institutes in performing the decommissioning of these facilities. Testing of these enhanced technologies for decontamination, dismantling, characterization, remote operations and worker protection are critical to furthering advancements in the technical specialty of decommissioning. Furthermore, regulatory acceptance and routine utilization for future research reactor decommissioning will be assured by testing and developing these technologies in realistically contaminated environments prior to use in the research reactors. The decommissioning of the CP-5 Research Reactor is currently in the final phase of dismantlement. In this paper the authors present results of work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the development, testing and deployment of innovative and/or enhanced technologies for the decommissioning of research reactors.

  10. Jordan's First Research Reactor Project: Driving Forces, Present Status and the Way Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xoubi, Ned, E-mail: Ned@Xoubi.co [Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), P.O.Box 70, Shafa Badran, 11934 Amman (Jordan)

    2011-07-01

    In a gigantic step towards establishing Jordan's nuclear power program, Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) is building the first nuclear research and test reactor in the Kingdom. The new reactor will serve as the focal point for Jordan Center for Nuclear Research (JCNR), a comprehensive state of the art nuclear center not only for Jordan but for the whole region, the center will include in addition to the reactor a radioisotopes production plant, a nuclear fuel fabrication plant, a cold neutron source (CNS), a radioactive waste treatment facility, and education and training center. The JRTR reactor is the only research reactor new build worldwide in 2010, it is a 5 MW light water open pool multipurpose reactor, The reactor core is composed of 18 fuel assemblies, MTR plate type, with 19.75% enriched uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) in an aluminum matrix. It is reflected on all sides by beryllium and graphite blocks. Reactor power is upgradable to 10 MW with a maximum thermal flux of 1.45x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The reactor reactivity is controlled by four Hafnium Control Absorber Rods (CAR). Jordan Center for Nuclear Research is located in Ramtha city, it is owned by Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), and is contracted to Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Daewoo E and C. The JCNR project is a 56 months EPC fixed price contract for the design engineering, construction, and commissioning the JCNR reactor, and other nuclear facilities. The project presents many challenges for both the owner and the contractor, being the first nuclear reactor for Jordan, and the first nuclear export for Korea. The driving forces, present status and the way ahead will be presented in this paper. (author)

  11. Research on the usage of a deep sea fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsubo, Akira; Kowata, Yasuki [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-09-01

    Many new types of fast reactors have been studied in PNC. A deep sea fast reactor has the highest realization probability of the reactors studied because its development is desired by many specialists of oceanography, meteorology, deep sea bottom oil field, seismology and so on and because the development does not cost big budget and few technical problems remain to be solved. This report explains the outline and the usage of the reactor of 40 kWe and 200 to 400 kWe. The reactor can be used as a power source at an unmanned base for long term climate prediction and the earth science and an oil production base in a deep sea region. On the other hand, it is used for heat and electric power supply to a laboratory in the polar region. In future, it will be used in the space. At the present time, a large FBR development plan does not proceed successfully and a realization goal time of FBR has gone later and later. We think that it is the most important to develop the reactor as fast as possible and to plant a fast reactor technique in our present society. (author)

  12. Validation of Reactor Physics-Thermal hydraulics Calculations for Research Reactors Cooled by the Laminar Flow of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K. A.; Schubring, D. [Univ. of Florida, Florida (United States); Girardin, G.; Pautz, A. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    domains will be expanded and the validation base of commonlyused calculation methods will be expanded to cover a new range of research reactor types. From a practical perspective, CROCUS and the UFTR will have fully validated reactor dynamic and transient models for dynamic and accident analysis. With these validated models, both facilities will have improved capabilities and flexibility for extended operations in the future. CROCUS and the UFTR will be able to make future reactor modifications with reduced regulatory resistance. A feasibility analysis of future power uprates at these facilities will also result.

  13. Current status, research progress and future plan of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardjono, Y.; Syarip; Tjiptono, T.W. [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, Batan (Indonesia)

    1999-10-01

    The current status, research progress and future plan of the Kartini Research Reactor (KRR) is presented. The measurements of axial burn-up distributions for each fuel element by gamma scanning techniques, core axial power distribution display, fuel management for safeguards purpose as well as some research progress activities i.e.; utilization of beamport for: neutron radiography, application neutron activation analysis and history record of KRR power operations is also presented. The KRR is 100 kW pool water reactor type which uses natural circulation and provided by: five beamports in which one of them already coupled with natural uranium subcritical assembly, two thermalizing columns in which one of them is prepared for developing Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), two rabbit systems utilized for special analysis uranium ore by delayed neutron counting techniques, one center timbre and 40 irradiation rack (lazy susan) for neutron activation analysis. The KRR was constructed as a second research reactor in Indonesia with special purpose for training and education, high safety margin with involve in high negative temperature coefficient which achieved its first criticality on January 25, 1979. The maximum power level on first criticality is 50 kW and since August 1981 up to now is operating 100 kW. Base on the KRR design limit, it is planned to increase the power level up to 250 kW in the future plan. The preliminary activities such as Non Destructive Testing (NDT) for some reactor components especially water tank and thermal column should be done before decided to increase power level. (author)

  14. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehr Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field – a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response.

  15. A neutron tomography facility at a low power research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, S; Von Tobel, P; Rauch, H

    2001-01-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) provides a very efficient tool in the field of non-destructive testing as well as for many applications in fundamental research. A neutron beam penetrating a specimen is attenuated by the sample material and detected by a two-dimensional (2D) imaging device. The image contains information about materials and structure inside the sample because neutrons are attenuated according to the basic law of radiation attenuation. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, as for example, hydrogen and boron, but penetrate many heavy materials. Therefore, NR can yield important information not obtainable by more traditional methods. Nevertheless, there are many aspects of structure, both quantitative and qualitative, that are not accessible from 2D transmission images. Hence, there is an interest in three-dimensional neutron imaging. At the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Austria a neutron tomography facility has been installed. The neutron flux at ...

  16. Continuous treatment of coloured industry wastewater using immobilized Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating biological contactor reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakshirajan, Kannan; Kheria, Sumeet

    2012-06-30

    Coloured industry wastewaters often contain dyes and other toxic ingredients, and, therefore, pose serious threat to the receiving environment. Among the available methods the eco-friendly biological method has gained maximum attention due to its many advantages over the traditional methods. In the present study, continuous biological treatment of coloured wastewater from a textile dyeing industry was investigated using the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) reactor. The raw wastewater was diluted with an equal volume of either distilled water or media containing glucose at varying concentrations to study its effect on the decolourization process. Results revealed that the wastewater could be decolourized to an extent of more than 64% when diluted with media containing glucose; and, a maximum decolourization efficiency of 83% was obtained with 10 g/l glucose concentration. COD removal efficiencies were also found to be consistent with the decolourization efficiencies of the wastewaters. Further, the results were correlated with the enzyme activities of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP) by the fungus, which were found to play some significant role in decolourization of the wastewater. Results of replacing the costly carbon source glucose in the decolourization media with the more cheap molasses, however, revealed very high COD removal efficiency, but low decolourization efficiency of the industry wastewater.

  17. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luis M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2009-12-30

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD(5) and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  18. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  19. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Flow-guide Tank of China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The flow-guide tank of China advanced research reactor (CARR) is located at the top of the reactor vessel and connected with the inlet coolant pipe. It acts as a reactor inlet coolant distributor and plays an important role in reducing the flow-induced vibration of the internal components of the reactor core. Several designs of the flow-guide tank have been proposed, however, the final design option has to be made after detailed investigation of the velocity profile within the flow-guide tank for each configuration.

  20. Rotating biological contactor reactor with biofilm promoting mats for treatment of benzene and xylene containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2012-12-01

    A novel rotating biological contactor (RBC) bioreactor immobilized with microorganisms was designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC), such as benzene and xylene from emissions, and its performance was investigated. Gas-phase VOCs stripped by air injection were 98 % removed in the RBC when the superficial air flow rate was 375 ml/h (1,193 and 1,226 mg/l of benzene and xylene, respectively). The maximum removal rate was observed to be 1,007 and 1,872 mg/m(3)/day for benzene and xylene, respectively. The concentration profile of benzene and xylene along the RBC was dependent on the air flow rate and the degree of microbial adaptation. Air flow rate and residence time were found to be the most important operational parameters for the RBC reactor. By manipulating these operational parameters, the removal efficiency and capacity of the bioreactor could be enhanced. The kinetic constant K (s) demonstrated a linear relationship that indicated the maximum removal of benzene and xylene in RBC reactor. The phylogenic profile shows the presence of bacterium like Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Enterococcus sp., which belonged to the phylum Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria that were responsible for the 98 % organic removal in the RBC.

  1. Integrated photocatalytic-biological reactor for accelerated 2,4,6-trichlorophenol degradation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Sun, Xia; Chen, Lujun; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    An integrated photocatalytic-biological reactor (IPBR) was used for accelerated degradation and mineralization of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) through simultaneous, intimate coupling of photocatalysis and biodegradation in one reactor. Intimate coupling was realized by circulating the IPBR's liquid contents between a TiO(2) film on mat glass illuminated by UV light and honeycomb ceramics as biofilm carriers. Three protocols-photocatalysis alone (P), biodegradation alone (B), and integrated photocatalysis and biodegradation (photobiodegradation, P&B)-were used for degradation of different initial TCP concentrations. Intimately coupled P&B also was compared with sequential P and B. TCP removal by intimately coupled P&B was faster than that by P and B alone or sequentially coupled P and B. Because photocatalysis relieved TCP inhibition to biodegradation by decreasing its concentration, TCP biodegradation could become more important over the full batch P&B experiments. When phenol, an easy biodegradable compounds, was added to TCP in order to promote TCP mineralization by means of secondary utilization, P&B was superior to P and B in terms of mineralization of TCP, giving 95% removal of chemical oxygen demand. Cl(-) was only partially released during P experiments (24%), and this corresponded to its poor mineralization in P experiments (32%). Thus, intimately coupled P&B in the IPBR made it possible obtain the best features of each: rapid photocatalytic transformation in parallel with mineralization of photocatalytic products.

  2. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  3. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  4. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  5. Highest average burnups achieved by MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damy, Margaret A.; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Silva, Jose E.R.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Castanheira, Myrthes; Teodoro, Celso A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear (CEN)]. E-mail: madamy@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Different nuclear fuels were employed in the manufacture of plate type at IPEN , usually designated as Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements. These fuel elements were used at the IEA-R1 research reactor. This work describes the main characteristics of these nuclear fuels, emphasizing the highest average burn up achieved by these fuel elements. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy was the way of the future; 50 anniversary of the research reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2013-01-01

    It was the hidden jewel of TU Delft, according to the employees of the nuclear reactor. Others protested against it and insisted that it be eliminated. Following a major mid-life crisis, the Delft research reactor is now in better shape than ever before.

  7. Factors affecting biological denitrifying dephosphatation in anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to verify and discuss the denitrifying dephosphatation under different levels of nitrate concentration and retention time of anoxic/aerobic process in a Sequencing Batch Reactor ( SBR ).The results of tests demonstrated that there were two kinds of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in the biological excess phosphorus removal (BEPR) system. One was non-DNPAOs that could only use oxygen as terminal electron acceptors, the other was denitrifying PAOs (DNPAOs) that could use both nitrate and oxygen as terminal electron acceptors. Phosphorus uptake efficiency could be attained under anoxic period ranging from 28.7%-96.7% in an anacrobic/anoxic/aerobic system. Experimental results showed that nitrate concentration and retention time of anoxic/aerobic process were the key factors affecting the course of denitrifying dephosphatation.

  8. Effect of Hydraulic Retention Time on Nitrification in an AirLift Biological Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtado A.A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of nitrogenous compounds in industrial effluents at concentration levels above legal limits, is a well-known and serious pollution problem for the receiving body. The biological process for the removal of these substances, commonly referred to as ammoniacal nitrogen, is known as nitrification. Bacteria involved are mainly of the genuses Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT on the efficiency of ammonia removal from a petroleum refinery effluent using activated carbon particles as a biofilm support in an airlift bioreactor. The experiments were carried out using HRTs, equal to six, eight and ten hours. The results show that HRT equal to 8 and 10 hours were enough to reduce ammoniacal nitrogen concentration to levels below permited legal limits (5mg/L NH3-N. The reactor nitrifying performance was maximized at 85% removal of ammoniacal nitrogen, for a HRT equal to 10 hours.

  9. MCNP Calculations for the Shielding Design of a Beam Tube to Be Installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, I. F.; Ramalho, A. G.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Salgado, J.

    The work presented concerns the calculation of the external biological shielding for a neutron beam tube that will be installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor, RPI. This tube will have enough versatility to be used in fields so different as the analysis of the composition of samples or research work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. The calculation was made by using the MCNP code. This code is a well validated and widely used code, and has therefore become an important tool in the design and optimisation work of experiences related to neutrons and gamma radiation.

  10. Status of neutron beam utilization at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Hai, Nguyen Canh [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2003-03-01

    The 500-kW Dalat nuclear research reactor was reconstructed from the USA-made 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor. After completion of renovation and upgrading, the reactor has been operating at its nominal power since 1984. The reactor is used mainly for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam researches and reactor physics study. In the framework of the reconstruction and renovation project of the 1982-1984 period, the reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems, as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed by the former Soviet Union. Some structures of the reactor, such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding have been remained from the previous TRIGA reactor. As a typical configuration of the TRIGA reactor, there are four neutron beam ports, including three radial and one tangential. Besides, there is a large thermal column. Until now only two-neutron beam ports and the thermal column have been utilized. Effective utilization of horizontal experimental channels is one of the important research objectives at the Dalat reactor. The research program on effective utilization of these experimental channels was conducted from 1984. For this purpose, investigations on physical characteristics of the reactor, neutron spectra and fluxes at these channels, safety conditions in their exploitation, etc. have been carried out. The neutron beams, however, have been used only since 1988. The filtered thermal neutron beams at the tangential channel have been extracted using a single crystal silicon filter and mainly used for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron radiography (NR) and transmission experiments (TE). The filtered quasi-monoenergetic keV neutron beams using neutron filters at the piercing channel have been used for nuclear data measurements, study on

  11. Multicavity Janus-Helmholtz underwater acoustic transducer%多液腔Janus-Helmholtz水声换能器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑永杰; 蓝宇

    2013-01-01

    In order to expand the operating bandwidth of the Janus-Helmholtz transducer, a multicavity Janus-Helm-holtz transducer was presented,and the structure parameters of the multicavity Janus-Helmholtz transducer were op-timized by the finite element method. A multicavity Janus-Helmholtz transducer experiment prototype was produced on basis of the optimization results. The test result shows that, the simulation results agree with the experimental re-sult. Compared to the traditional Janus-Helmholtz transducer, the multicavity Janus-Helmholtz transducer may effec-tively expand the operating bandwidth, it is an ideal low-frequency, broadband, high-power, small-size, and deep-water transducer.%为了进一步拓展Janus-Helmholtz换能器的工作带宽,提出一种多液腔Janus-Helmholtz换能器结构,采用有限元的方法对多液腔Janus-Helmholtz换能器的结构参数进行优化设计。依据优化结果制作了一个多液腔Janus-Helmholtz换能器试验样机。测试结果显示,仿真结果和实验结果基本相符。相比传统的Janus-Helmholtz换能器,多液腔Janus-Helm-holtz换能器可有效地拓展工作带宽,是一种理想的低频、宽带、大功率、小体积、深水换能器。

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  13. Conceptual Nuclear Design of a 20 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Kim, Hak Sung; Park, Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Vinh, Le Vinh; Dang, Vo Doan Hai [Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2007-08-15

    A conceptual nuclear design of a 20 MW multi-purpose research reactor for Vietnam has been jointly done by the KAERI and the DNRI (VAEC). The AHR reference core in this report is a right water cooled and a heavy water reflected open-tank-in-pool type multipurpose research reactor with 20 MW. The rod type fuel of a dispersed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al with a density of 4.0 gU/cc is used as a fuel. The core consists of fourteen 36-element assemblies, four 18-element assemblies and has three in-core irradiation sites. The reflector tank filled with heavy water surrounds the core and provides rooms for various irradiation holes. Major analyses have been done for the relevant nuclear design parameters such as the neutron flux and power distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths, etc. For the analysis, the MCNP, MVP, and HELIOS codes were used by KAERI and DNRI (VAEC). The results by MCNP (KAERI) and MVP (DNRI) showed good agreements and can be summarized as followings. For a clean, unperturbed core condition such that the fuels are all fresh and there are no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the fast neutron flux (E{sub n}{>=}1.0 MeV) reaches 1.47x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s and the maximum thermal neutron flux (E{sub n}{<=}0.625 eV) reaches 4.43x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s in the core region. In the reflector region, the thermal neutron peak occurs about 28 cm far from the core center and the maximum thermal neutron flux is estimated to be 4.09x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s. For the analysis of the equilibrium cycle core, the irradiation facilities in the reflector region were considered. The cycle length was estimated as 38 days long with a refueling scheme of replacing three 36-element fuel assemblies or replacing two 36-element and one 18-element fuel assemblies. The excess reactivity at a BOC was 103.4 mk, and 24.6 mk at a minimum was reserved at an EOC. The assembly average discharge burnup was 54.6% of initial U-235 loading. For the proposed fuel management

  14. [Research progress of cardiac systems biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Shang, Tong

    2009-04-01

    Systems Biology is one of the most widely discussed fields among emerging post-genomic disciplines. Medical systems biology is an important component of systems biology. The goals of medical systems biology are gaining a complete understanding of human body in normal and disease states. Driven by the great importance of cardiovascular diseases, cardiac systems biology is improving rapidly. This review provides an overview of major themes in the developing field of cardiac systems biology, including some of the high-throughput experiments and strategies used to integrate the datasets, various types of computational approaches used for developing useful quantitative models, and successful examples, future directions of cardiac systems biology.

  15. Reactor in search for money. Cooled neutrons for unique research; Reactor zoekt geld. Gekoelde neutronen maken onderzoek mogelijk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdult, E.

    2010-12-17

    The modernization of radiation research at the Delft University of Technology depends on subsidies for new instruments. OYSTER (Optimised Yield for Science, Technology and Education of Radiation) is the plan of the Reactor Institute Delft (RID) to realize such a modernization. The article comprises detailed drawings of the inside of the reactor and illustrates the CNIF (Cold Neutron Irradiation Facility) to fight cancer and POSH-PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrometry) to visualize the atomic structure of materials. [Dutch] De modernisering van het stralingsonderzoek aan de Technische Universiteit Delft staat of valt met subsidie voor een nieuwe opzet van het instrumentarium. OYSTER (Optimised Yield for Science, Technology and Education of Radiation) is het plan van het Reactor Instituut Delft (RID) om de installatie te moderniseren. Het artikel bevat gedetailleerde tekeningen van de binnenkant van de reactor en illustreert de CNIF (Cold Neutron Irradiation Facility) voor de bestrijding van kanker en POSH-PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrometry) waarmee de structuur van materialen op atoomniveau inzichtelijk kan worden gemaakt.

  16. Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular biology tools in the field of bioadhesion is still in its infancy. For new research groups who are considering taking a molecular approach, the techniques presented here are essential to unravelling the sequence of a gene, its expression and its biological function. Here we provide an outline for addressing adhesion-related genes in diverse organisms. We show how to gradually narrow down the number of candidate transcripts that are involved in adhesion by (1 generating a transcriptome and a differentially expressed cDNA list enriched for adhesion-related transcripts, (2 setting up a BLAST search facility, (3 perform an in situ hybridization screen, and (4 functional analyses of selected genes by using RNA interference knock-down. Furthermore, latest developments in genome-editing are presented as new tools to study gene function. By using this iterative multi-technologies approach, the identification, isolation, expression and function of adhesion-related genes can be studied in most organisms. These tools will improve our understanding of the diversity of molecules used for adhesion in different organisms and these findings will help to develop innovative bio-inspired adhesives.

  17. Biological data sciences in genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    The last 20 years have been a remarkable era for biology and medicine. One of the most significant achievements has been the sequencing of the first human genomes, which has laid the foundation for profound insights into human genetics, the intricacies of regulation and development, and the forces of evolution. Incredibly, as we look into the future over the next 20 years, we see the very real potential for sequencing more than 1 billion genomes, bringing even deeper insight into human genetics as well as the genetics of millions of other species on the planet. Realizing this great potential for medicine and biology, though, will only be achieved through the integration and development of highly scalable computational and quantitative approaches that can keep pace with the rapid improvements to biotechnology. In this perspective, I aim to chart out these future technologies, anticipate the major themes of research, and call out the challenges ahead. One of the largest shifts will be in the training used to prepare the class of 2035 for their highly interdisciplinary world.

  18. Space plant biology research in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ričkienė, Aurika

    2012-09-01

    In 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial Earth satellite, initiating its space exploration programs. Throughout the rest of the twentieth century, the development of these space programs received special attention from Soviet Union authorities. Scientists from the former Soviet Republics, including Lithuania, participated in these programs. From 1971 to 1990, Lithuanians designed more than 20 experiments on higher plant species during space flight. Some of these experiments had never before been attempted and, therefore, made scientific history. However, the formation and development of space plant biology research in Lithuania or its origins, context of formation, and placement in a worldwide context have not been explored from a historical standpoint. By investigating these topics, this paper seeks to construct an image of the development of a very specific field of science in a small former Soviet republic.

  19. Proceedings of the 1997 workshop on the utilization of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The 1997 Workshop on the Utilization of Research Reactors, which is the sixth Workshop on the theme of research reactor utilization was held in Bandung, Indonesia from November 6 to 13. This Workshop was executed based on the agreement in the Eighth International conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (ICNCA) held in Tokyo, March 1997. The whole Workshop consists of the preceding Sub-workshop carried out the demonstration experiment of Radioisotope Production, and the Workshop on the theme of three fields (Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of Research Reactor). The total number of participants for the workshop was about 100 people from 8 countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippine, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. It consists of the papers for Sub-workshop, Neutron Scattering, Radioisotope Production, Safe Operation and Maintenance of research reactor, and summary reports. The 53 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Has Modern Biology Entered the Mouth? The Clinical Impact of Biological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Three areas of biological research that are beginning to have an impact on clinical medicine are examined, including molecular biology, cell biology, and biotechnology. It is concluded that oral biologists and educators must work cooperatively to bring rapid biological and biomedical advances into dental training in a meaningful way. (MSE)

  1. Integrated Decision-Making Tool to Develop Spent Fuel Strategies for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Randy L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    IAEA Member States operating or having previously operated a Research Reactor are responsible for the safe and sustainable management and disposal of associated radioactive waste, including research reactor spent nuclear fuel (RRSNF). This includes the safe disposal of RRSNF or the corresponding equivalent waste returned after spent fuel reprocessing. One key challenge to developing general recommendations lies in the diversity of spent fuel types, locations and national/regional circumstances rather than mass or volume alone. This is especially true given that RRSNF inventories are relatively small, and research reactors are rarely operated at a high power level or duration typical of commercial power plants. Presently, many countries lack an effective long-term policy for managing RRSNF. This paper presents results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) #T33001 on Options and Technologies for Managing the Back End of the Research Reactor Nuclear Fuel Cycle which includes an Integrated Decision Making Tool called BRIDE (Back-end Research reactor Integrated Decision Evaluation). This is a multi-attribute decision-making tool that combines the Total Estimated Cost of each life-cycle scenario with Non-economic factors such as public acceptance, technical maturity etc and ranks optional back-end scenarios specific to member states situations in order to develop a specific member state strategic plan with a preferred or recommended option for managing spent fuel from Research Reactors.

  2. McCARD for Neutronics Design and Analysis of Research Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Ho Jin; Kwon, Soonwoo; Seo, Geon Ho; Hyo Kim, Chang

    2014-06-01

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO, and YALINA.

  3. Core calculations for the upgrading of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Perrotta, Jose A.; Bastos, Jose Luis F.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: asantos@net.ipen.br; perrotta@net.ipen.br; mitsuo@net.ipen.br

    1998-07-01

    The IEA-R1 Research Reactor is a multipurpose reactor. It has been used for basic and applied research in the nuclear area, training and radioisotopes production since 1957. In 1995, the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) took the decision to modernize and upgrade the power from 2 to 5 MW and increase the operational cycle. This work presents the design requirements and the calculations effectuated to reach this goal. (author)

  4. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions Stabilized by Janus Dumbbells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-03-01

    Janus particles have two sides with different, often opposite, surface properties. Janus dumbbell is one type of Janus particles that consists of two partially fused spherical lobes. It is possible to independently control the geometry and surface wettability of Janus dumbbells. Janus dumbbells can also be produced in a large quantity, making them useful for practical applications such as emulsion stabilization. In this work, we calculate the free energy of emulsion formation using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells as solid surfactants. In contrast to kinetically stable emulsions stabilized by homogeneous particles, emulsion stabilized by Janus dumbbells can be thermodynamically stable. There also exists an optimal radius of droplets that can be stabilized by infinite or limited number of amphiphilic dumbbells in the continuous phase. We demonstrate that the optimal radius of dumbbell-stabilized droplets can be predicted based on the volume of the dispersed phase and the volume fraction of dumbbells in the continuous phase. We believe our calculation will provide guidelines for using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants to generate stable emulsions.

  5. pClone: Synthetic Biology Tool Makes Promoter Research Accessible to Beginning Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; Eckdahl, Todd; Cronk, Brian; Andresen, Corinne; Frederick, Paul; Huckuntod, Samantha; Shinneman, Claire; Wacker, Annie; Yuan, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The "Vision and Change" report recommended genuine research experiences for undergraduate biology students. Authentic research improves science education, increases the number of scientifically literate citizens, and encourages students to pursue research. Synthetic biology is well suited for undergraduate research and is a growing area…

  6. Status and some safety philosophies of the China advanced research reactor CARR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzheng Yuan [China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China). Reactor Engineering Research and Design Dept.

    2001-07-01

    The existing two research reactors, HWRR (heavy water research reactor) and SPR (swimming pool reactor), have been operated by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) since, respectively, 1958 and 1964, and are both in extending service and facing the aging problem. It is expected that they will be out of service successively in the beginning decade of the 21{sup st} century. A new, high performance and multipurpose research reactor called China advanced research reactor (CARR) will replace these two reactors. This new reactor adopts the concept of inverse neutron trap compact core structure with light water as coolant and heavy water as the outer reflector. Its design goal is as follows: under the nuclear power of 60MW, the maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux in peripheral D{sub 2}O reflector not less than 8 x 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. s while in central experimental channel, if the central cell to be replaced by an experimental channel, the corresponding value not less than 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. s. The main applications for this research reactor will cover RI production, neutron scattering experiments, NAA and its applications, neutron photography, NTD for monocrystaline silicon and applications on reactor engineering technology. By the end of 1999, the preliminary design of CARR was completed, then the draft of preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) was submitted to the relevant authority at the end of 2000 for being reviewed. Now, the CARR project has entered the detail design phase and safety reviewing procedure for obtaining the construction permit from the relevant licensing authority. This paper will only briefly introduce some aspects of safety philosophy of CARR design and PSAR. (orig.)

  7. Biological research for the radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Chan Kug; Shim, Hae Won; Jung, Il Lae; Byun, Hee Sun; Moon, Myung Sook; Cho, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Sik

    2003-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about polyamine effect on cell death triggered ionizing radiation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and toxic agents. In this paper, to elucidate the role of polyamines as mediator in lysosomal damage and stress(H{sub 2}O{sub 2})- induced apoptosis, we utilized {alpha}-DiFluoroMethylOrnithine (DFMO), which inhibited ornithine decarboxylase and depleted intracellular putrescine, and investigated the effects of polyamine on the apoptosis caused by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, ionizing radiation and paraquat. We also showed that MGBG, inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis, treatment affected intracellular redox steady states, intracellular ROS levels and protein oxidation. Thereafter we also investigated whether MGBG may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing effects. In addition, ceruloplasmin and thioredoxin, possible antioxidant proteins, were shown to have protective effect on radiation- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or chemicals)-induced macromolecular damage or cell death.

  8. Simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal in anoxic-aerobic circulating fluidized bed biological reactor (CFBBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Nakhla, G; Zhu, J; Patel, A

    2004-06-01

    Biological nutrient removal (BNR) in municipal wastewater treatment to remove carbonaceous substrates and nutrients, has recently become increasingly popular worldwide due to increasingly stringent regulations. Biological fluidized bed (BFB) technology, which could be potentially used for BNR, can provide some advantages such as high efficiency and a compact structure. This work shows the results of simultaneous elimination of organic carbon and nitrogen using a circulating fluidized bed biological reactor (CFBBR, which has been developed recently for chemical engineering processes. The CFBBR has two fluidized beds, running as anoxic and aerobic processes to accomplish simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, with continuous liquid recirculation through the anoxic bed and the aerobic bed. Soluble COD concentrations in the effluent ranging from 4 to 20 mg l(-1) were obtained at varying COD loading rates; ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies averaged in excess of 99% at a minimum total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.0 hours over a temperature range of 25 degrees C to 28 degrees C. Effluent nitrate nitrogen concentration of less than 5 mg l(-1) was achieved by increasing effluent recycle rate. No nitrite accumulation was observed either in the anoxic bed or in the aerobic bed. The system was able to treat grit chamber effluent wastewater at a HRT of 2.0 hours while achieving average effluent BOD, COD, NH3-N, TKN, nitrates, total phosphate, TSS and VSS concentrations of 10 mg l(-1), 18 mg l(-1), 1.3 mg l(-1), 1.5 mg l(-1), 7 mg l(-1), 2.0 mg l(-1), 10 mg l(-1) and 8 mg l(-1) respectively. The CFBBR appears to be not only an excellent alternative for conventional activated sludge type BNR technologies but also capable of processing much higher loadings that are suitable for industrial applications.

  9. Proceedings of the first symposium on utilization of research reactors and JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The first symposium on utilization of research reactors (JRR-2, JRR-3M, JRR-4) and Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in JAERI was held from September 29th to 30th, 1997 at Sannomaru Hotel, Mito. The purpose of this symposium is to announce contribution to progress of scientific technology as well as to promote future utilization of the research reactors and JMTR. During the symposium, 16 reports were presented on nuclear fuel and material, neutron beam experiment, medical irradiation, radioisotope production and neutron activation analysis. The present status of the research reactors and JMTR were also reported. The special lecture titled `JRR-2 and Medical Irradiation` was given by Mr. Nakamura, former editorial writer of Yomiuri. Finally, panel discussion was carried on `The Role of Research Reactors and JMTR in Scientific Technology for the future` actively by the participants and experts in every field of research reactor utilization. 250 people participated in this symposium from universities, national research institutes, private corporations and JAERI. This proceedings briefly summarizes 16 reports, the content of panel discussion and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  10. A quick and simple route to form soft Janus colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Chris; Priestley, Rodney; Prud'Homme, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Janus colloids, i.e., particles with two chemically distinct compartments or ``faces,'' are of significant scientific interest as they could serve as the enabling material for self-organizing superstructures and functional nanodevices. The internally segregated structures present in Janus particles are not only beneficial for self-assembly applications, but are also attractive from a more fundamental scientific perspective for the insight they can provide on hybrid material interfaces. Here, we present a novel, one-step nano-precipitation process for the formation of soft Janus colloids composed of two compositionally distinct and surface-active polymer domains. In particular, this approach allows for the fabrication of Janus particles from both homopolymers and block co-polymers, generates phase-separated Janus structures on extremely fast timescales, and provides excellent scalability. Supported, in part, by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Graduate Fellowship Program (DOE SCGF).

  11. Design and installation of a hot water layer system at the Tehran research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmohammadi Sayedeh Leila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hot water layer system (HWLS is a novel system for reducing radioactivity under research reactor containment. This system is particularly useful in pool-type research reactors or other light water reactors with an open pool surface. The main purpose of a HWLS is to provide more protection for operators and reactor personnel against undesired doses due to the radio- activity of the primary loop. This radioactivity originates mainly from the induced radioactivity contained within the cooling water or probable minute leaks of fuel elements. More importantly, the bothersome radioactivity is progressively proportional to reactor power and, thus, the HWLS is a partial solution for mitigating such problems when power upgrading is planned. Following a series of tests and checks for different parameters, a HWLS has been built and put into operation at the Tehran research reactor in 2009. It underwent a series of comprehensive tests for a period of 6 months. Within this time-frame, it was realized that the HWLS could provide a better protection for reactor personnel against prevailing radiation under containment. The system is especially suitable in cases of abnormality, e. g. the spread of fission products due to fuel failure, because it prevents the mixing of pollutants developed deep in the pool with the upper layer and thus mitigates widespread leakage of radioactivity.

  12. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q., E-mail: xu@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T. [The Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shirai, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 10{sup 6}/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  13. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 106/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  14. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  15. Assembly, start and operation of an activated sludge reactor for the industrial effluents treatment: physico chemical and biological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Assalin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although of the immense available bibliography regarding the activated sludge process, little it is found in relation to the basic procedure to be adopted to implant, to activate and to monitor a reactor of activated sludge in laboratory scales. This article describes the assembly, departure and operation of an activated sludge system, operating in continuous process, at a laboratory scale, to study effluents treatments, using as example, Kraft E1 pulp mill effluent. Factors as biodegradability of the effluent to be treated, stationary state of the reactor, conventional operation parameters as physical chemistry and biological parameters are presented.

  16. Production and release rate of (37)Ar from the UT TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine; Biegalski, Steven R; Artnak, Edward J; Moll, Ethan; Haas, Derek A; Lowrey, Justin D; Aalseth, Craig E; Seifert, Allen; Mace, Emily K; Woods, Vincent T; Humble, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Air samples were taken at various locations around The University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor and analyzed to determine the concentrations of (37)Ar, (41)Ar, and (133)Xe present. The measured ratio of (37)Ar/(41)Ar and historical records of (41)Ar releases were then utilized to estimate an annual average release rate of (37)Ar from the reactor facility. Using the calculated release rate, atmospheric transport modeling was performed in order to determine the potential impact of research reactor operations on nearby treaty verification activities. Results suggest that small research reactors (∼1 MWt) do not release (37)Ar in concentrations measurable by currently proposed OSI detection equipment.

  17. ITHNA.SYS: An Integrated Thermal Hydraulic and Neutronic Analyzer SYStem for NUR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazidi, S., E-mail: samirmazidi@gmail.com [Division Physique et Applications Nucléaires, Centre de Recherche Nucléaire de Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala, Draria, Alger (Algeria); Meftah, B., E-mail: b_meftah@yahoo.com [Division Physique et Applications Nucléaires, Centre de Recherche Nucléaire de Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala, Draria, Alger (Algeria); Belgaid, M., E-mail: belgaidm@yahoo.com [Faculté de Physique, Université Houari Boumediene, USTHB, BP 31, Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Letaim, F., E-mail: fletaim@yahoo.fr [Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Université d’El-oued, PO Box 789, El-oued (Algeria); Halilou, A., E-mail: hal_rane@yahoo.fr [Division Réacteur NUR, Centre de Recherche Nucléaire de Draria, BP 43 Sebala, Draria, Alger (Algeria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a neutronic and thermal hydraulic MTR reactor analyzer. • The analyzer allows a rapid determination of the reactor core parameters. • Some NUR reactor parameters have been analyzed. - Abstract: This paper introduces the Integrated Thermal Hydraulic and Neutronic Analyzer SYStem (ITHNA.SYS) that has been developed for the Algerian research reactor NUR. It is used both as an operating aid tool and as a core physics engineering analysis tool. The system embeds three modules of the MTR-PC software package developed by INVAP SE: the cell calculation code WIMSD, the core calculation code CITVAP and the program TERMIC for thermal hydraulic analysis of a material testing reactor (MTR) core in forced convection. ITHNA.SYS operates both in on-line and off-line modes. In the on-line mode, the system is linked, via the computer parallel port, to the data acquisition console of the reactor control room and allows a real time monitoring of major physical and safety parameters of the NUR core. PC-based ITHNA.SYS provides a viable and convenient way of using an accumulated and often complex reactor physics stock of knowledge and frees the user from the intricacy of adequate reactor core modeling. This guaranties an accurate, though rapid, determination of a variety of neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters of importance for the operation and safety analysis of the NUR research reactor. Instead of the several hours usually required, the processing time for the determination of such parameters is now reduced to few seconds. Validation of the system was performed with respect to experimental measurements and to calculations using reference codes. ITHNA.SYS can be easily adapted to accommodate other kinds of MTR reactors.

  18. The present situations and perspectives on utilization of research reactors in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongkum, Somporn

    2002-01-01

    The Thai Research Reactor 1/Modification 1, a TRIGA Mark III reactor, went critical on November 7, 1977. It has been playing a central role in the development of both Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and nuclear application in Thailand. It has a maximum power of 2 MW (thermal) at steady state and a pulsing capacity of 2000 MW. The highest thermal neutron flux at a central thimber is 1×10 13 n/cm 2/s, which is extensively utilized for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis and neutron beam experiments, i.e. neutron scattering, prompt gamma analysis and neutron radiography. Following the nuclear technological development, the OAEP is in the process of establishing the Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC). The center is being built in Nakhon Nayok province, 60 km northeast of Bangkok. The centerpiece of the ONRC is a multipurpose 10 MW TRIGA research reactor. Facilities are included for the production of radioisotopes for medicine, industry and agriculture, neutron transmutation doping of silicon, and neutron capture therapy. The neutron beam facilities will also be utilized for applied research and technology development as well as training in reactor operations, performance of experiments and reactor physics. This paper describes a recent program of utilization as well as a new research reactor for enlarging the perspectives of its utilization in the future.

  19. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  20. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  1. New Research Strategies in Lactation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Ogorevc

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Different approaches have been used to study milk related traits in farm animals, reaching from statistical dissection of phenotypic variation to the search of candidate genes with major phenotypic effects. The aim of this study was to develop a new research tool devoted to in vitro studies of physiological pathways responsible for mammary gland development, lactation, remodeling and immune response, supported by a user friendly map based bioinformatics tool for integration of different types of data. We established goat mammary gland derived primary epithelial cell line with predominantly epithelial morphology, responsive to lactogenic hormones and exhibiting regeneration potential in heterologous mouse system. The response of primary epithelial cells to pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma agalactiae was studied using RNA sequencing approach and 1553 differentially expressed genes were detected 24h post infection. The majority of differentially expressed genes belonged to cell cycle regulating genes, pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and genes involved in lipid metabolism. Bioinformatic analysis of 359 putative target sites for mammary gland expressed miRNAs revealed polymorphic miRNA target sites for bta-miR-199b, -199a-5p, and -361 in the IL1B gene and for -miR-126 in the CYP11B1 gene. Graphical integration of different types of data to DairyVis platform allowed identification of genomic regions with higher number of potential functional elements that deserve further experimental analysis. The newly developed MEC line and integration of bioinformatics tools into DairyVis database represent a promising methodological support for further research in the field of lactation biology.

  2. [Progress in research on the biological reason of male homosexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Feng, Tie-jian

    2012-04-01

    Male homosexuality is a complex phenomenon which is universal and with unknown causes. Researchers believe that both biological and environmental factors have played a role in its pathogenesis. Researches focusing on genetics, neurobiology, development and endocrinology have made certain progress. In this paper, we have reviewed the biological causes of male homosexuality, which may provide clues for further research in this field.

  3. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals.

  4. Proposed design for the PGAA facility at the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Bruno T.; Jacimovic, Radojko; Menezes, Maria Angela BC; Leal,Alexandre S.

    2013-01-01

    Background This work presents an initial proposed design of a Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) facility to be installed at the TRIGA IPR-R1, a 60 years old research reactor of the Centre of Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN) in Brazil. The basic characteristics of the facility and the results of the neutron flux are presented and discussed. Findings The proposed design is based on a quasi vertical tube as a neutron guide from the reactor core, inside the reactor pool, 6 m below t...

  5. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)

  6. Reduction in toxicity of coking wastewater to aquatic organisms by vertical tubular biological reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyun; Watanabe, Haruna; Wei, Chang; Wang, Dongzhou; Zhou, Jiti; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Masunaga, Shigeki; Zhang, Ying

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a battery of toxicity tests using photo bacterium, algae, crustacean and fish to evaluate acute toxicity profile of coking wastewater, and to evaluate the performance of a novel wastewater treatment process, vertical tubular biological reactor (VTBR), in the removal of toxicity and certain chemical pollutants. A laboratory scale VTBR system was set up to treat industrial coking wastewater, and investigated both chemicals removal efficiency and acute bio-toxicity to aquatic organisms. The results showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol reductions by VTBR were approximately 93% and 100%, respectively. VTBR also reduced the acute toxicity of coking wastewater significantly: Toxicity Unit (TU) decreased from 21.2 to 0.4 for Photobacterium phosphoreum, from 9.5 to 0.6 for Isochrysis galbana, from 31.9 to 1.3 for Daphnia magna, and from 30.0 to nearly 0 for Danio rerio. VTBR is an efficient treatment method for the removal of chemical pollutants and acute bio-toxicity from coking wastewater.

  7. Biological phosphorus removal in sequencing batch reactor with single-stage oxic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Bo; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Liao, De-Xiang; Zhang, Jie

    2008-09-01

    The performance of biological phosphorus removal (BPR) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with single-stage oxic process was investigated using simulated municipal wastewater. The experimental results showed that BPR could be achieved in a SBR without anaerobic phase, which was conventionally considered as a key phase for BPR. Phosphorus (P) concentration 0.22-1.79 mg L(-1) in effluent can be obtained after 4h aeration when P concentration in influent was about 15-20 mg L(-1), the dissolved oxygen (DO) was controlled at 3+/-0.2 mg L(-1) during aerobic phase and pH was maintained 7+/-0.1, which indicated the efficiencies of P removal were achieved 90% above. Experimental results also showed that P was mainly stored in the form of intracellular storage of polyphosphate (poly-P), and about 207.235 mg phosphates have been removed by the discharge of rich-phosphorus sludge for each SBR cycle. However, the energy storage poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA) was almost kept constant at a low level (5-6 mg L(-1)) during the process. Those results showed that phosphate could be transformed to poly-P with single-stage oxic process without PHA accumulation, and BPR could be realized in net phosphate removal.

  8. Degradation of pharmaceuticals from membrane biological reactor sludge with Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens-Blanch, Guillem; Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Pennanen, Taina; Caminal, Gloria; Blánquez, Paqui

    2015-02-01

    Emerging contaminants are a wide group of chemical products that are found at low concentrations in the environment. These contaminants can be either natural, e.g., estrogens, or synthetics, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, which can enter the environment through the water and sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The growth of Trametes versicolor on membrane biological reactor (MBR) sludge in bioslurry systems at the Erlenmeyer scale was assessed and its capacity for removing pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) was evaluated. The ability of the fungus to remove hydrochlorothiazide (HZT) from liquid media cultures was initially assessed. Consequently, different bioslurry media (complete nutrient, glucose and no-nutrient addition) and conditions (sterile and non-sterile) were tested, and the removal of spiked HZT was monitored under each condition. The highest spiked HZT removal was assessed under non-sterile conditions without nutrient addition (93.2%). Finally, the removal assessment of a broad set of pharmaceuticals was performed in non-spiked bioslurry. Under non-sterile conditions, the fungus was able to completely degrade 12 out of the 28 drugs initially detected in the MBR sludge, achieving an overall degradation of 66.9%. Subsequent microbial analysis showed that the microbial diversity increased after 15 days of treatment, but there was still some T. versicolor in the bioslurry. Results showed that T. versicolor can be used to remove PPCPs in bioslurry systems under non-sterile conditions, without extra nutrients in the media, and in matrices as complex as an MBR sludge.

  9. Investigation of furfural biodegradation in a continuous inflow cyclic biological reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Leili, Mostafa; Nadafi, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a continuous inflow cyclic biological reactor (CBR) containing moving media was investigated for the degradation of high concentrations of furfural. The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and furfural initial concentrations (loading rate), as main operating parameters, on the bioreactor performance were studied. The results indicated that the CBR could remove over 98% of furfural and 71% of its chemical oxygen demand (COD) at inlet furfural concentrations up to 1,200 mg L(-1) (2.38 g L(-1) d(-1)), a 6-h cycle time and HRT of 12.1 h. The removal efficiency decreased slightly from 98 to 94% when HRT decreased from 12.1 to 10.5 h. The average removal efficiency of furfural and COD during the 345-day operational period under steady-state conditions were 97.7% and 82.1%, respectively. The efficiency also increased approximately 17.2% after addition of synthetic polyurethane cubes as moving media at a filling ratio of 10%.

  10. Fuel burnup calculation of a research reactor plate element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work consists in simulating the burnup of two different plate type fuel elements, where one is the benchmark MTR of the IAEA, which is made of an alloy of uranium and aluminum, while the other belonging to a typical multipurpose reactor is composed of an alloy of uranium and silicon. The simulation is performed using the WIMSD-5B computer code, which makes use of deterministic methods for solving neutron transport. In developing this task, fuel element equivalent cells were calculated representing each of the reactors to obtain the initial concentrations of each isotope constituent element of the fuel cell and the thicknesses corresponding to each region of the cell, since this information is part of the input data. The compared values of the k∞ showed a similar behavior for the case of the MTR calculated with the WIMSD-5B and EPRI-CELL codes. Relating the graphs of the concentrations in the burnup of both reactors, there are aspects very similar to each isotope selected. The application WIMSD-5B code to calculate isotopic concentrations and burnup of the fuel element, proved to be satisfactory for the fulfillment of the objective of this work. (author)

  11. Structural biology computing: Lessons for the biomedical research sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Andrew; Sliz, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    The field of structural biology, whose aim is to elucidate the molecular and atomic structures of biological macromolecules, has long been at the forefront of biomedical sciences in adopting and developing computational research methods. Operating at the intersection between biophysics, biochemistry, and molecular biology, structural biology's growth into a foundational framework on which many concepts and findings of molecular biology are interpreted1 has depended largely on parallel advancements in computational tools and techniques. Without these computing advances, modern structural biology would likely have remained an exclusive pursuit practiced by few, and not become the widely practiced, foundational field it is today. As other areas of biomedical research increasingly embrace research computing techniques, the successes, failures and lessons of structural biology computing can serve as a useful guide to progress in other biomedically related research fields.

  12. Event management in research reactors; Gestion de eventos en reactores de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, C.D. [Coordinador Reactores de Investigacion y Conjuntos Criticos, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (Argentina)]. e-mail: cperrin@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    In the Radiological and Nuclear Safety field, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina controls the activities of three investigation reactors and three critical groups, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to assure the execution of the requirements settled down in the Licenses of the facilities, in the regulatory standards and in the documentation of mandatory character in general. In this work one of the key strategies developed by the ARN to promote an appropriate level of radiological and nuclear safety, based on the control of the administration of the abnormal events that its could happen in the facilities is described. The established specific regulatory requirements in this respect and the activities developed in the entities operators are presented. (Author)

  13. Radiation protection tasks on the Kiev research reactor WWR-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobach Yuri N.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the description of and the operational experience with the radiation protection system at the research reactor WWR-M are presented. The list of the factors regarding the radiation hazards during the reactor routine operation is given and the main activities on the radiation safety provision are established. The statistical information for the staff exposure, the radioactive aerosol releases and the external radiation monitoring is shown. The preliminary considerations on the system upgrading for the decommissioning are presented.

  14. Status and future of the WWR-M research reactor in Kiev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazavov, D.A.; Gavrilyuk, V.I.; Kirischuk, V.I.; Kochetkov, V.V.; Lysenko, M.V.; Makarovskiy, V.N.; Scherbachenko, A.M.; Shevel, V.N.; Slisenko, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2001-07-01

    Kiev WWR-M Research Reactor, operated at maximum power of 10 MW, was put into operation in 1960 and during its 40-years history has been used to perform numerous studies in different areas of science and technology. Due to a number of technical problems the Research Reactor, the only one in Ukraine, was shut down in 1993 and then put into operation in 1999 again. Now there is an intention to reconstruct Kiev Research Reactor. The upgraded Research Reactor would allow solving such problems as the safe operation of Ukrainian NPPs, radioisotope production and, naturally, fundamental and applied research. The main problem for the successful operation of Kiev Research Reactor is the management and storage of spent fuel at the site, since after core unloading the spent fuel storage appears to be practically completed. So it is absolutely necessary to ship the most part of the spent fuel for reprocessing and as soon as possible. Besides, there is a need to build up the new spent fuel storage, because the tank of available storage requires careful inspection for corrosion. (author)

  15. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  16. Disposal of irradiated fuel elements from German research reactors. Status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamm, G. [Central Research Reactor and Nuclear Operations Division, Research Centre Juelich, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    There will be a quantity of highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel (snf) from German research reactors amounting to about 9.1 t by the end of the next decade, which has to be disposed of. About 4.1 t of this quantity are intended to be returned to the USA. The remaining approximately 5 t can be loaded into approximately 30 CASTOR-2 casks and will be stored in a central German dry interim store for about 30 to 50 years (first step of the domestic disposal concept). Of course, snf arising from the operation of research reactors beyond 2010 has to be disposed of in the same way (3 MTR-2 casks every two years for BER-II and FRM-II). It is expected that snf from the zero-power facilities probably will be recycled for reusing the uranium. Due to the amendment of the German Atomic Energy Act intended by the new Federal German Government, the interim dry storage of snf from power reactors in central storage facilities like Ahaus or Gorleben will be stopped and the power reactors have to store snf at their own sites. Although the amendment only concerns nuclear power reactors, it could not be excluded that snf from research reactors, too, cannot be stored at Ahaus or Gorleben at present. (author)

  17. 76 FR 8357 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy; Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. ] SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Biological and... Thomassen, Designated Federal Officer, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Biological and...

  18. Medicated Janus fibers fabricated using a Teflon-coated side-by-side spinneret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deng-Guang; Yang, Chen; Jin, Miao; Williams, Gareth R; Zou, Hua; Wang, Xia; Bligh, S W Annie

    2016-02-01

    A family of medicated Janus fibers that provides highly tunable biphasic drug release was fabricated using a side-by-side electrospinning process employing a Teflon-coated parallel spinneret. The coated spinneret facilitated the formation of a Janus Taylor cone and in turn high quality integrated Janus structures, which could not be reliably obtained without the Teflon coating. The fibers prepared had one side consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K60 and ketoprofen, and the other of ethyl cellulose (EC) and ketoprofen. To modulate and tune drug release, PVP K10 was doped into the EC side in some cases. The fibers were linear and had flat morphologies with an indent in the center. They provide biphasic drug release, with the PVP K60 side dissolving very rapidly to deliver a loading dose of the active ingredient, and the EC side resulting in sustained release of the remaining ketoprofen. The addition of PVP K10 to the EC side was able to accelerate the second stage of release; variation in the dopant amount permitted the release rate and extent this phase to be precisely tuned. These results offer the potential to rationally design systems with highly controllable drug release profiles, which can complement natural biological rhythms and deliver maximum therapeutic effects.

  19. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  20. Self-propelled Janus particles in a ratchet: Numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Marchesoni, Fabio; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Brownian transport of self-propelled overdamped microswimmers (like Janus particles) in a two-dimensional periodically compartmentalized channel is numerically investigated for different compartment geometries, boundary collisional dynamics, and particle rotational diffusion. The resulting time-correlated active Brownian motion is subject to rectification in the presence of spatial asymmetry. We prove that ratcheting of Janus particles can be orders of magnitude stronger than for ordinary thermal potential ratchets and thus experimentally accessible. In particular, autonomous pumping of a large mixture of passive particles can be induced by just adding a small fraction of Janus particles.

  1. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

  2. Activity report on the utilization of research reactors. Japanese Fiscal Year, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Masayuki [ed.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    This is the second issue of the activity report on the utilization of research reactors in the fields of neutron beam experiments, neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, etc., performed during Japanese Fiscal Year 1999 (April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000). All reports in this volume were described by users from JAERI and also users from the other organizations, i.e., universities, national research institutes and private companies, who have utilized our research reactor utilization facilities for the purpose of the above studies. (author)

  3. Activity report on the utilization of research reactors. Japanese Fiscal Year, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Masayuki; Koyama, Yoshimi [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    This is the second issue of the activity report on the utilization of research reactors in the fields of neutron beam experiments, neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, etc., performed during Japanese Fiscal Year 1998 (April 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999). All reports in this volume were described by users from JAERI and also users from the other organizations, i.e., universities, national research institutes and private companies, who have utilized our research reactor utilization facilities for the purpose of the above studies. (author)

  4. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CBER is the Center within FDA that regulates biological products for human use under applicable federal laws, including the Public Health Service Act and the Federal...

  5. RESEARCHES RELATED TO THE BIOLOGICAL STAGE FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C MOGA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a model for the oxygen concentration profiles in a mobile bed biofilm reactor (MBBR is proposed. By using a material with a large specific surface area (m2/m3 high biological activity can be maintained using a relatively small reactor volume. Small parts made of special materials with density close to the water density, are immersed in the bioreactors. The biofilm carriers are kept in suspension and even mixed with the help of air bubbles generated by the aeration system. Water oxygenation is a mass transfer process of oxygen from gas/air to the liquid mass. It can be used in wastewater treatment in order to remove the organic matter, in the biological stage. The functioning of aerobic processes depends on the availability of sufficient quantities of oxygen. In wastewater treatment plants, submerged bubbles aeration is most frequently accomplished by dispersing air bubbles in the liquid. The main purpose of this study is to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen using mathematical modeling and numerical simulations. The aim of the study is to find the optimum dimension and position of the aeration pipes for maintaining the oxygen concentration in the limits indicated in the literature. Experimental determinations (measurements of the DO concentration have also been realized. The oxygen profile concentration, in a MBBR reactor, was determined.

  6. Meta-Research: Broadening the Scope of PLOS Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousta, Stavroula; Ferguson, Christine; Ganley, Emma

    2016-01-01

    In growing recognition of the importance of how scientific research is designed, performed, communicated, and evaluated, PLOS Biology announces a broadening of its scope to cover meta-research articles.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of the accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Kyeong; Lee, Deok Jung [Nuclear Engineering Division, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Chul [VHTR Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Nuclear Engineering Science Division, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Shin, Ho Cheol [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan), a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium-tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  8. Progress in the decommissioning planning for the Kiev’s research reactor WWR-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobach Yuri N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kiev’s research reactor WWR-M has been in operation for more than 50 years and its further operation is planned for no less than 8-10 years. The acting nuclear legislation of Ukraine demands from the operator to perform the decommissioning planning during the reactor operation stage as early as possible. Recently, the Decommissioning Program has been approved by the regulatory body. The Program is based on the plans for the further use of the reactor site and foresees the strategy of immediate dismantling. The Program covers the whole de- commissioning process and represents the main guiding document during the whole decommissioning period, which determines and substantiates the principal technical and organizational activities on the preparation and implementation of the reactor decommissioning, the consequence of the decommissioning stages, the sequence of planned works and measures as well as the necessary conditions and infrastructure for the provision and safe implementation.

  9. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Accelerator-Driven System at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan, a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft–Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium–tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  10. Ageing management and refurbishment of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amponsahabu, Edward Oscar; Gbadago, Joseph Korbla; Addo, Moses Ankamah; Sogbadji, Robert Bright Mawuko; Odoi, Henry Cecil; Gyamfi, Kwame; Ampong, Atta Gyekye; Opate, Nicholas Sackitey [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Accra (Ghana)

    2013-07-01

    Ageing management is an essential component of the routine practices at the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) Facility. The reactor is Miniature Neutron Source Reactor with a rated power of 30 kW. GHARR-1 was installed and attained criticality on December 17, 1994 and commissioned on 8th March, 1995. It has since been in operation. The routine practices and operational procedures have been set out with clear emphasis on ageing policy at the facility. Some electronic components are changed regularly during maintenance sessions and keeping to regular purification of the reactor and pool water to mitigate against corrosion. This paper outlines the ageing management programme, mitigation practices, strategies for ageing management, periodic safety reviews, consideration of ageing during designing, design features for components and unit replacement, top beryllium shim addition, and succession planning. Information sharing with other operating organization is one of the means considered by GHARR-1 to attain excellence.

  11. Decommissioning of the Astra research reactor: Review and status on July 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes work on the decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf. Organizational, planning, and dismantling work done until July 2003 including radiation protection and waste management procedures as well as the current status of the project are presented. Completion of the decommissioning activities is planned for 2006.

  12. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  13. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the replacement of the Australian Research reactor has been released. An important objective of the EIS process is to ensure that all relevant information has been collected and assessed so that the Commonwealth Government can make an informed decision on the proposal. The environmental assessment of the proposal to construct and operate a replacement reactor described in the Draft EIS has shown that the scale of environmental impacts that would occur would be acceptable, provided that the management measures and commitments made by ANSTO are adopted. Furthermore, construction and operation of the proposed replacement reactor would result in a range of benefits in health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and industrial capability. It would also result in a range of benefits derived from increased employment and economic activity. None of the alternatives to the replacement research reactor considered in the Draft EIS can meet all of the objectives of the proposal. The risk from normal operations or accidents has been shown to be well within national and internationally accepted risk parameters. The dose due to reactor operations would continue to be small and within regulatory limits. For the replacement reactor, the principle of `As Low As Reasonably Achievable` would form an integral part of the design and licensing process to ensure that doses to operators are minimized. Costs associated with the proposal are $286 million (in 1997 dollars) for design and construction. The annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $12 million per year, of which a significant proportion will be covered by commercial activities. The costs include management of the spent fuel from the replacement reactor as well as the environmental management costs of waste management, safety and environmental monitoring. Decommissioning costs for the replacement reactor would arise at the end of its lifetime

  14. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  15. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor, 1996. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactor is responsible for the operation, maintenance, utilization and related R and D works of the research reactors including JRR-2, JRR-3M (new JRR-3) and JRR-4. This report describes the activities of our department in fiscal year of 1996 and it also includes some of the technical topics on the works mentioned above. As for the research reactors, we carried out the operation, maintenance, irradiation utilization, neutron beam experiments, technical management including fuels and water chemistry, radiation monitoring as related R and D works. The international cooperations between the developing countries and our department were also made concerning the operation, utilization and safety analysis for nuclear facilities. (author)

  16. Annual report of department of research reactor, 1995 (April 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Department of Research Reactor is responsible for the operation, maintenance, utilization and related R and D works of the research reactors including JRR-2, JRR-3M (new JRR-3) and JRR-4. This report describes the activities of our department in fiscal year of 1995 and it also includes some of the technical topics on the works mentioned above. As for the research reactors, we carried out the operation, maintenance, irradiation utilization, neutron beam experiments, technical management including fuels and water chemistry, radiation monitoring as related R and D works. The international cooperations between the developing countries and our department were also made concerning the operation, utilization and safety analysis for nuclear facilities. (author)

  17. Proceedings of the 1998 workshop on the utilization of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    The 1998 Workshop on the Utilization of Research Reactors, which is the seventh Workshop on the theme of research reactor utilization was held in Yogyakarta and Serpong, Indonesia from February 8 to 14. This Workshop was executed based on the agreement in the Ninth International Conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (ICNCA) held in Tokyo, March 1998. The whole Workshop consists of the Workshop on the theme of following three fields, 1) Neutron Scattering, 2) Neutron Activation analysis and 3) Safe Operation and Maintenance of Research Reactor, and the Sub-workshop carried out the experiment of Neutron Activation analysis. The total number of participants for the workshop was about 100 people from 8 countries, i.e. Australia, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. The 38 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. Annual report of department of research reactors, 2001. April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    The Department of Research Reactor is responsible for the operation, maintenance, utilization of the JRR-3 and the JRR-4 and for the related R and D. Besides RI production including its R and D are carried out. This report describes the activities of the department in fiscal year of 2001 and it also includes some of the technical topics on the works mentioned above. As for the research reactors, we carried out the operation, maintenance, the utilization of irradiation and neutron beam experiments, technical management including fuels and water chemistry, radiation monitoring as related R and D works. RI production and its R and D works were conducted as well. The international cooperations between the developing countries and the department were also made concerning the operation, utilization and safety analysis for research reactors. (author)

  19. Annual report of department of research reactor, 1999. April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactor is responsible for the operation, maintenance, utilization of the JRR-3M (new JRR-3) and the JRR-4 and for the related R and D. Besides the decommissioning of the JRR-2 and RI production including its R and D are carried out. This report describes the activities of the department in fiscal year of 1999 and it also includes some of the technical topics on the works mentioned above. As for the research reactors, we carried out the operation, maintenance, the utilization of irradiation and neutron beam experiments, technical management including fuels and water chemistry, radiation monitoring as related R and D works. RI production and its R and D works were conducted as well. The international cooperations between the developing countries and the department were also made concerning the operation, utilization and safety analysis for research reactors. (author)

  20. Fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles prepared via seed emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Bitar, Ahmad; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2014-06-15

    Anisotropic polymeric colloidal or Janus particles possessing simultaneous magnetic and fluorescent properties were successfully prepared via the swelling-diffusion or the in situ emulsion polymerization method. In the swelling-diffusion process, magnetic emulsions (an organic ferrofluid dispersed in aqueous medium) were synthesized and used for seeds of submicron magnetic Janus particles. After swelling the anisotropic particles obtained by 1-pyrene-carboxaldehyde fluorescent dye dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, well-defined fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles were produced. In the in situ emulsion polymerization, styrene monomer mixed with fluorescent dye monomers, i.e., 1-pyrenylmethyl methacrylate (PyMMA) or fluorescein dimethacrylate (FDMA), and an oil-soluble initiator (2,2'-azobis(2-isobutyronitrile)) were emulsified in the presence of magnetic seed emulsions. The confocal microscopic images showed the fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles with high fluorescent intensity when a fluorescent crosslinker monomer FDMA was employed.

  1. The Janus Head Article - On Quality in the Documentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Andersen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The god Janus in Greek mythology was a two-faced god; each face had its own view of the world. Our idea behind the Janus Head article is to give you two different and maybe even contradicting views on a certain topic. In this issue the topic is quality in the documentation process. In the first half of this issue’s Janus Head Article translators from the international company Grundfos give us their view of quality and how quality is managed in the documentation process at Grundfos. In the second half of the Janus Head Article scholars from the University of Southern Denmark describe and discuss quality in the documentation process at Grundfos from a researcher’s point of view.

  2. The Need for Cyber-Informed Engineering Expertise for Nuclear Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert Stephen [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-12-01

    Engineering disciplines may not currently understand or fully embrace cyber security aspects as they apply towards analysis, design, operation, and maintenance of nuclear research reactors. Research reactors include a wide range of diverse co-located facilities and designs necessary to meet specific operational research objectives. Because of the nature of research reactors (reduced thermal energy and fission product inventory), hazards and risks may not have received the same scrutiny as normally associated with power reactors. Similarly, security may not have been emphasized either. However, the lack of sound cybersecurity defenses may lead to both safety and security impacts. Risk management methodologies may not contain the foundational assumptions required to address the intelligent adversary’s capabilities in malevolent cyber attacks. Although most research reactors are old and may not have the same digital footprint as newer facilities, any digital instrument and control function must be considered as a potential attack platform that can lead to sabotage or theft of nuclear material, especially for some research reactors that store highly enriched uranium. This paper will provide a discussion about the need for cyber-informed engineering practices that include the entire engineering lifecycle. Cyber-informed engineering as referenced in this paper is the inclusion of cybersecurity aspects into the engineering process. A discussion will consider several attributes of this process evaluating the long-term goal of developing additional cyber safety basis analysis and trust principles. With a culture of free information sharing exchanges, and potentially a lack of security expertise, new risk analysis and design methodologies need to be developed to address this rapidly evolving (cyber) threatscape.

  3. Human reliability analysis of the Tehran research reactor using the SPAR-H method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barati Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to cover human reliability analysis of the Tehran research reactor using an appropriate method for the representation of human failure probabilities. In the present work, the technique for human error rate prediction and standardized plant analysis risk-human reliability methods have been utilized to quantify different categories of human errors, applied extensively to nuclear power plants. Human reliability analysis is, indeed, an integral and significant part of probabilistic safety analysis studies, without it probabilistic safety analysis would not be a systematic and complete representation of actual plant risks. In addition, possible human errors in research reactors constitute a significant part of the associated risk of such installations and including them in a probabilistic safety analysis for such facilities is a complicated issue. Standardized plant analysis risk-human can be used to address these concerns; it is a well-documented and systematic human reliability analysis system with tables for human performance choices prepared in consultation with experts in the domain. In this method, performance shaping factors are selected via tables, human action dependencies are accounted for, and the method is well designed for the intended use. In this study, in consultations with reactor operators, human errors are identified and adequate performance shaping factors are assigned to produce proper human failure probabilities. Our importance analysis has revealed that human action contained in the possibility of an external object falling on the reactor core are the most significant human errors concerning the Tehran research reactor to be considered in reactor emergency operating procedures and operator training programs aimed at improving reactor safety.

  4. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

  5. Electronic imaging system for neutron radiography at a low power research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O., E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68550, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, A.X.; Crispim, V.R. [PEN/COPPE-DNC/POLI CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes an electronic imaging system for producing real time neutron radiography from a low power research reactor, which will allow inspections of samples with high efficiency, in terms of measuring time and result analysis. This system has been implanted because of its potential use in various scientific and industrial areas where neutron radiography with photographic film could not be applied. This real time system is installed in neutron radiography facility of Argonauta nuclear research reactor, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, in Brazil. It is adequate to perform real time neutron radiography of static and dynamic events of samples.

  6. Research Projects for Interrogations of Biological Systems: Training for the Development of Novel Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisson, Silvia S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Lever, Susan Z. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Robertson, J. David [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-10-04

    This grant was situated at the University of Missouri to train Ph.D. scientists in radiochemistry and synthetic chemistry in conjunction with Faculty from the Interdisciplinary Plant Group, Division of Biological Sciences, the MU Research Reactor Center, Molecular Biology and the Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute. This project was collaborative with Brookhaven National Laboratory (Richard Ferrieri, PI). Projects for the Ph.D. candidates included novel probe development for peptides, nucleosides, small molecules or radiometals, the direct use of radiometals as probes, or nuclear techniques for analysis. The projects for the postdoctoral fellow involved synthetic chemistry for the preparation of precursors for novel tracers that will be radiolabeled with 18F or other appropriate radionuclides. The skill sets of our team members allowed us to prepare probes with positron or single photon emitters, as well as ones that are dual-labeled (fluorescent and radiolabeled). We focused our technical advances to those that will be broadly applicable to any research field.

  7. Radioisotope radiotherapy research and achievements at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, G. J.; Ketring, A. R.; Cutler, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) in collaboration with faculty in other departments at the University of Missouri has been involved in developing new means of internal radioisotopic therapy for cancer for many years. These efforts have centered on methods of targeting radioisotopes such as brachytherapy, embolisation of liver tumors with radioactive microspheres, small-molecule-labelled chelates for the treatment of bone cancer, and various means of radioimmunotherapy or labelled receptor agent targeting. This work has produced two radioactive agents, Sm-153 Quadramet™ and Y-90 TheraSphere™, which have U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the palliation of bone cancer pain and treatment of inoperable liver cancer, respectively. MURR has also pioneered development of other beta-emitting isotopes for internal radiotherapy such as Re-186, Re-188, Rh-105, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Pm-149, many of which are in research and clinical trials throughout the U.S. and the world. This important work has been made possible by the very high neutron flux available at MURR combined with MURR's outstanding reliability of operation and flexibility in meeting the needs of researchers and the radiopharmaceutical industry.

  8. Effect of redox conditions on pharmaceutical loss during biological wastewater treatment using sequencing batch reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, Lauren B.; Su, Lijuan; Moline, Christopher J.;

    2015-01-01

    We lack a clear understanding of how wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process parameters, such as redox environment, impact pharmaceutical fate. WWTPs increasingly install more advanced aeration control systems to save energy and achieve better nutrient removal performance. The impact of redox...... condition, and specifically the use of microaerobic (low dissolved oxygen) treatment, is poorly understood. In this study, the fate of a mixture of pharmaceuticals and several of their transformation products present in the primary effluent of a local WWTP was assessed in sequencing batch reactors operated...... and between redox environments. Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest in the aerobic reactor; sulfamethoxazole loss was highest in the microaerobic reactors; and phenytoin was recalcitrant in all reactors. Transformation products of sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine resulted in the reformation...

  9. Development of Selective Covalent Janus Kinase 3 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Akahane, Koshi; McNally, Randall; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ficarro, Scott B; Liu, Suhu; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Koyama, Shohei; Pattison, Michael J; Labella, Katherine; Johannessen, Liv; Akbay, Esra A; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Frank, David A; Marto, Jarrod A; Look, Thomas A; Arthur, J Simon C; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S

    2015-08-27

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) and their downstream effectors, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STATs), form a critical immune cell signaling circuit, which is of fundamental importance in innate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis, and dysregulation is frequently observed in immune disease and cancer. The high degree of structural conservation of the JAK ATP binding pockets has posed a considerable challenge to medicinal chemists seeking to develop highly selective inhibitors as pharmacological probes and as clinical drugs. Here we report the discovery and optimization of 2,4-substituted pyrimidines as covalent JAK3 inhibitors that exploit a unique cysteine (Cys909) residue in JAK3. Investigation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) utilizing biochemical and transformed Ba/F3 cellular assays resulted in identification of potent and selective inhibitors such as compounds 9 and 45. A 2.9 Å cocrystal structure of JAK3 in complex with 9 confirms the covalent interaction. Compound 9 exhibited decent pharmacokinetic properties and is suitable for use in vivo. These inhibitors provide a set of useful tools to pharmacologically interrogate JAK3-dependent biology.

  10. Initial verification and validation of RAZORBACK - A research reactor transient analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, Darren G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the work and results of the initial verification and validation (V&V) of the beta release of the Razorback code. Razorback is a computer code designed to simulate the operation of a research reactor (such as the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)) by a coupled numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations, the energy conservation equation for fuel element heat transfer, and the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for the water cooling of the fuel elements. This initial V&V effort was intended to confirm that the code work to-date shows good agreement between simulation and actual ACRR operations, indicating that the subsequent V&V effort for the official release of the code will be successful.

  11. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  12. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Krista; Chantel Nowlen, K.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  13. Decontamination and decommissioning project of the TRIGA Mark-2 and 3 research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K. J.; Baik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H

    2000-01-01

    During the review on the decommissioning plan and environmental impact assessment report by the KINS, the number of the inquired items were two hundred and fifty one, and the answers were made and sent until September 10, 1999, as the screened review results were reported to Ministry of Science and Technology(MOST) in December 14, 1999, all the reviews on the licence were over. Radioactive liquid wastes of 400 tons generated during the operation of the research reactors including reactor vessels are stored in the facility of the research reactor 1 and 2. Those liquid wastes have the low-level-radioactivity which can be discharged to the surroundings, but was wholly treated to be vaporized naturally by means of the increased numbers of the natural vaporization disposal facilities with the annual capacity of 200 tons for the purpose of the minimized environmental contamination.

  14. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  15. Proceedings of the 1999 workshop on the utilization of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    The 1999 workshop on the utilization of reactors, which is the eighth workshop on the theme of research reactor utilization was held at JAERI Tokai and Mito Plaza Hotel, in Japan from November 25 to December 2. This workshop was executed based on the agreement in the Tenth International conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (ICNCA) held in Tokyo, March 1999. The whole workshop consists of the workshop on the theme of following three fields, 1) neutron scattering, 2) radioisotope production and 3) safe operation and maintenance of research reactor, and the sub-workshop carried out the experiments of small angle neutron scattering. The total number of participants for the workshop was about 70 people from 9 countries, i.e. Australia, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, The Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. The 37 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. A reload and startup plan for conversion of the NIST research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology operates a 20 MW research reactor for neutron-based research. The heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) but a program to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is underway. Among other requirements, a reload and startup test plan must be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for their approval. The NRC provides guidance for what should be in the plan to ensure that the licensee has sufficient information to operate the reactor safely. Hence, a plan has been generated consisting of two parts. The reload portion of the plan specifies the fuel management whereby initially only two LEU fuel elements are in the core for eight fuel cycles. This is repeated until a point when the optimum approach is to place four fresh LEU elements into the reactor each cycle. This final transition is repeated and after eight cycles the reactor is completely fueled with LEU. By only adding two LEU fuel elements initially, the plan allows for the consumption of HEU fuel elements that are expected to be in storage at the time of conversion and provides additional qualification of production LEU fuel under actual operating conditions. Because the reload is to take place over many fuel cycles, startup tests will be done at different stages of the conversion. The tests, to be compared with calculations to show that the reactor will operate as planned, are the measurement of critical shim arm position and shim arm and regulating rod reactivity worths. An acceptance criterion for each test is specified based on technical specifications that relate to safe operation. Additional tests are being considered that have less safety significance but may be of interest to bolster the validation of analysis tools.

  17. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  18. Improvement of the reactivity computer for HANARO research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jin; Park, S. J.; Jung, H. S.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Seo, S. G

    2001-04-01

    The reactivity computer in HANARO has a dedicated neutron detection system for experiments and measurements of the reactor characteristics. This system consists of a personal computer and a multi-function I/O board, and collects the signals from the various neutron detectors. The existing hardware and software are developed under the DOS environment so that they are very inconvenient to use and have difficulties in finding replacement parts. Since the continuity of the signal is often lost when we process the wide rang signal, the need for its improvement has been an issue. The purpose of this project is to upgrade the hardware and software for data collection and processing in order for them to be compatible with Windows{sup TM} operating system and to solve the known issue. We have replaced the existing system with new multi-function I/O board and Pentium III class PC, and the application program for the wide range reactivity measurement and multi-function signal counter have been developed. The newly replaced multi-function I/O board has seven times fast A/D conversion rate and collects sufficient amount of data in a short time. The new application program is user-friendly and provides various useful information on its display screen so that the ability of data processing and storage has been very much enhanced.

  19. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in a simultaneous fermentation, denitrification and phosphate removal reactor using primary sludge as internal carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Shujun; Wang, Shuying; Wu, Chengcheng; Chen, Yinguang; Wang, Yayi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2013-04-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from primary sludge and the subsequent application to improve biological nutrient removal has drawn much attention. In this study, a novel approach of using primary sludge as an additional carbon source was conducted in batch tests. The nitritation effluent was directly injected into the sludge fermentation reactor to achieve nitrogen removal. Complete denitrification could be realized in the combined reactor. Moreover, injecting nitrite not only promoted the sludge stabilization process, but also reduced the release of phosphate and ammonium during sludge stabilization. The novel process was further evaluated in a continuous system by treating sludge dewatering liquors. Under optimum conditions, 85% removal of ammonium and 75% of total nitrogen could be obtained using primary sludge, resulting in the suitable effluent for recycling into the inlet of the wastewater treatment plant.

  20. Coupling of acrylic dyeing wastewater treatment by heterogeneous Fenton oxidation in a continuous stirred tank reactor with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Bruno M; Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Boaventura, Rui A R; Maldonado-Hódar, F J; Madeira, Luís M

    2016-01-15

    This work deals with the treatment of a recalcitrant effluent, from the dyeing stage of acrylic fibres, by combination of the heterogeneous Fenton's process in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor (SBR). Three different catalysts (a commercial Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite and two distinct Fe-containing activated carbons - ACs - prepared by wet impregnation of iron acetate and iron nitrate) were employed on the Fenton's process, and afterwards a parametric study was carried out to determine the effect of the main operating conditions, namely the hydrogen peroxide feed concentration, temperature and contact time. Under the best operating conditions found, using the activated carbon impregnated with iron nitrate, 62.7% of discolouration and 39.9% of total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were achieved, at steady-state. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the effluent's biodegradability was attained (BOD5:COD ratio increased from <0.001 to 0.27 and SOUR - specific oxygen uptake rate - from <0.2 to 11.1 mg O2/(gVSS·h)), alongside a major decrease in its toxicity (from 92.1 to 94.0% of Vibrio fischeri inhibition down to 6.9-9.9%). This allowed the application of the subsequent biological degradation stage. The combination of the two processes provided a treated effluent that clearly complies with the legislated discharge limits. It was also found that the iron leaching from the three catalysts tested was very small in all runs, a crucial factor for the stability and long-term use of such materials.

  1. Effect of Geometric and Chemical Anisotropy of Janus Ellipsoids on Janus Boundary Mismatch at the Fluid–Fluid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Woo Kang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the geometric and chemical factors of nonspherical Janus particles (i.e., Janus ellipsoids with regard to the pinning and unpinning behaviors of the Janus boundary at the oil–water interface using attachment energy numerical calculations. The geometric factors were characterized by aspect ratio (AR and location of the Janus boundary (α separating the polar and apolar regions of the particle. The chemical factor indicated the supplementary wettability (β of the two sides of the particle with identical deviations of apolarity and polarity from neutral wetting. These two factors competed with each other to determine particle configurations at the interface. In general, the critical value of β (βc required to preserve the pinned configuration was inversely proportional to the values of α and AR. From the numerical calculations, the empirical relationship of the parameter values of Janus ellipsoids was found; that is, λ = Δ β c / Δ α ≈ 0.61 A R − 1.61 . Particularly for the Janus ellipsoids with AR > 1, the βc value is consistent with the boundary between the tilted only and the tilted equilibrium/upright metastable region in their configuration phase diagram. We believe that this work performed at the single particle level offers a fundamental understanding of the manipulation of interparticle interactions and control of the rheological properties of particle-laden interfaces when particles are used as solid surfactants.

  2. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  3. 75 FR 62892 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Correction In notice document 2010-24809 beginning on page 61220 in the issue of...

  4. Neutron fluence depth profiles in water phantom on epithermal beam of LVR-15 research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L; Klupak, V; Lahodova, Z; Marek, M; Burian, J

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal channel with epithermal neutron beam at the LVR-15 research reactor is used mainly for boron neutron capture therapy. Neutron fluence depth profiles in a water phantom characterise beam properties. The neutron fluence (approximated by reaction rates) depth profiles were measured with six different types of activation detectors. The profiles were determined for thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons.

  5. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, J G; Sousa, M; Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C

    2011-08-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  6. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  7. Experience of IEA-R1 research reactor spent fuel transportation back to United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frajndlich, Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Operacao do Reator IEAR-R1m]. E-mail: frajndli@net.ipen.br; Perrotta, Jose A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div.de Engenharia do Nucleo]. E-mail: perrotta@net.ipen.br; Maiorino, Jose Rubens [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Reatores]. E-mail: maiorino@net.ipen.br; Soares, Adalberto Jose [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Reatores]. E-mail: ajsoares@net.ipen.br

    1998-07-01

    IPEN/CNEN-SP is sending the IEA-R1 Research Reactor spent fuels from USA origin back to this country. This paper describes the experience in organizing the negotiations, documents and activities to perform the transport. Subjects as cask licensing, transport licensing and fuel failure criteria for transportation are presented. (author)

  8. Experimental computer-controlled instrumentation system for the research reactor DR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodstein, L.P.

    1969-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for one of the Danish Atomic Energy Commission's research reactors as part of an experiment on the advantages to be gained by the use of digital computers in a process plant application. Problem areas to be investigated include (a) reliability and safety...

  9. 77 FR 26321 - Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... COMMISSION Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112 AGENCY... License No. R- 112, held by Reed College (the licensee), which authorizes continued operation of the Reed... renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112 will expire 20 years from its date of issuance. The...

  10. A Study on Comparison of HANARO and KIJANG Research Reactor in Nuclear Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Juang; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As one of major national projects for nuclear science and engineering in Korea, the KIJANG Research Reactor(KJRR) project was commenced in order to develop the core research reactor(RR) technologies for strengthening the competitiveness of the RR export and also to stabilize the supply of key radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. This paper is about applying IAEA safeguards at new nuclear facility (KJRR). The beginning of this project is comparing of HANARO and KIJANG research reactor in nuclear safeguards for nuclear material accountancy method. As mentioned before, research reactor is basically item counting facility. In Fig 1, first two processes are belonging to item counting. But last two processes are for bulk handling. So KIJANG RR would be treated item counting facility as well as bulk handling facility by fission moly production facility. For this reason, nuclear material accountancy method for KJRR is not easy compared to existing one. This paper accounted for solution of KJRR nuclear material accountancy briefly. Future study on the suitable nuclear material accountancy method for mixed facility between item counting facility and bulk handling facility will be conducted more specifically.

  11. Status of DOE efforts to renew acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, C.R.

    1997-08-01

    This presentation summarizes the efforts being made by the Department of Energy to renew acceptance of spent nuclear fuel shipments from foreign research reactors. The author reviews the actions undertaken in this process in a fairly chronological manner, through the present time, as well as the development of an environmental impact statement to support the proposed actions.

  12. 77 FR 13376 - Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52 The... No. R-52, for the University of Arizona Research Reactor (UARR). The NRC has terminated the license... released for unrestricted use. Therefore, Facility Operating License No. R-52 is terminated. For...

  13. 77 FR 7613 - Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... COMMISSION Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108... renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-108 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Dow Chemical Company (the licensee) to operate the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor (DTRR) at a...

  14. 77 FR 4807 - Revised Fee Policy for Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel From High-Income...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... National Nuclear Security Administration Revised Fee Policy for Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor... Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel'' (61 FR 25092, May..., Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of a change in the fee policy. SUMMARY: This notice announces a...

  15. [New concepts in molecular biology applied to traslational research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengual, Lourdes

    2013-06-01

    This chapter intends to introduce the new concepts that have been established in molecular biology over the last years and are being applied in translational research. The chapter is divided in four big blocks, which treat the molecular biology concepts and techniques in relation to DNA, RNA, proteins and metabolites, respectively. Moreover, we give examples of translational application of these new methodologies described.

  16. Kinetics of organic removal in fixed-bed aerobic biological reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei, S M; Sharbatmaleki, M; Pourrezaie, P; Borghei, G

    2008-03-01

    The process kinetics of a lab-scale upflow aerobic immobilized biomass (UAIB) reactor using simulated sugar-manufacturing wastewater as feed was investigated. The experimental unit consisted of a 22l reactor filled with high porosity pumice stone. The UAIB reactor was tested under different organic loads and different hydraulic retention times (HRT) and the substrate loading removal rate was compared with prediction of Stover-Kincannon model, second-order model and the first order substrate removal model. After obtaining steady-state conditions, organic loading rate was increased from 750 to 4500 g COD/m(3) day to resemble wastewater from sugar production lines, and hydraulic retention time was decreased from 1 to 0.5 days, stepwise. Nine different operational conditions were applied changing these two parameters in a certain program. As a result of the calculations, Stover-Kincannon model and second-order model known as "Grau" model were found to be the most appropriate models for this reactor. Stover-Kincannon model and Grau second-order model gave high correlation coefficients, which were 99.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Therefore, these models could be used in predicting the behavior or design of the UAIB reactors.

  17. Recent expansion of research for light water reactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kiichi (Japan Electric Power Information Center, Tokyo (Japan)); Nemoto, Kazuyasu; Aoki, Norichika; Kusanagi, Hideo

    1990-09-01

    It is needless to say that for simultaneously coping with the increase of energy consumption and the prevention of the worsening of environment in the world, and for maintaining the standard of living in Japan where energy resources are scarce, the development of atomic energy is necessary. Though the technology of LWRs has been already established, the efforts of aiming at the further high safety and reliability of LWRs must be exerted. In this report, the recent technical development is described, centering around the research and technical development promoted by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry. The energy consumption in the world recorded the yearly growth of about 3%, and in 1987, it was 9.65 billion tons in terms of coal (7000 kcal/kg). The problems of earth environment will relax by promoting atomic energy. As for the recent development of LWR technology, the research on existing LWRs, the research on the LWRs of next generation, the research on the new technology for locating nuclear facilities and the research on radiation are carried out. As the research aiming at the LWRs of next generation, the design and evaluation of statically safe LWRs, the evaluation of fuel behavior at high burnup and the development of new location technology are carried out. (K.I.).

  18. Radioactive liquid waste treatment for decontamination and decommissioning of TRIGA research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kook; Chung, K.H

    1999-04-01

    All of operated radioactive liquid waste will be stored by using existing collection tank and temporally transfer piping system before dismantle the TRIGA research reactors. In this paper, there are presented and discussed as follows; 1.The status of operated radioactive liquid waste. 2. The radioactive liquid waste during dismantle the reactor. 3. Radiological status of radioactive liquid waste. 4. The classification criteria and method radioactive liquid waste. 6. The collection and transportation of radioactive liquid waste. (Author). 13 refs., 13 tabs., 8 figs.

  19. Stable isotopes: essential tools in biological and medical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P. D.; Hachey, D. L.; Kreek, M. J.; Schoeller, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of the stable isotopes, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O, as tracers in research studies in the fields of biology, medicine, pharmacology, and agriculture are briefly reviewed. (CH)

  20. Research on Precaution and Detection Technology for Flow Blockage of Plate-type Fuel Element in Research Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Li; QIAO; Ya-xin; ZHANG; Nian-peng; LUO; Bei-bei; HUA; Xiao; JIA; Shu-jie; YAN; Hui-yang

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to offer the technical support for safety operation and management of research reactors using plate-type fuel assemblies in China,which is performed from analysis of precaution measures for flow blockage and detection methods of accidents.Study shows that most accidents were induced by in-core foreign objects and the swelling of fuel

  1. Comparative performance of fixed-film biological filters: Application of reactor theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification is classified as a two-step consecutive reaction where R1 represents the rate of formation of the intermediate product NO2-N and R2 represents the rate of formation of the final product NO3-N. The relative rates of R1 and R2 are influenced by reactor type characterized hydraulically as plug-flow, plug-flow with dispersion and mixed-flow. We develop substrate conversion models for fixed-film biofilters operating in the first-order kinetic regime based on application of chemical reactor theory. Reactor type, inlet conditions and the biofilm kinetic constants Ki (h-1) are used to predict changes in NH4-N, NO2-N, NO3-N and BOD5. The inhibiting effects of the latter on R1 and R2 were established based on the ?? relation, e.g.:{A formula is presented}where BOD5,max is the concentration that causes nitrification to cease and N is a variable relating Ki to increasing BOD5. Conversion models were incorporated in spreadsheet programs that provided steady-state concentrations of nitrogen and BOD5 at several points in a recirculating aquaculture system operating with input values for fish feed rate, reactor volume, microscreen performance, make-up and recirculating flow rates. When rate constants are standardized, spreadsheet use demonstrates plug-flow reactors provide higher rates of R1 and R2 than mixed-flow reactors thereby reducing volume requirements for target concentrations of NH4-N and NO2-N. The benefit provided by the plug-flow reactor varies with hydraulic residence time t as well as the effective vessel dispersion number, D/??L. Both reactor types are capable of providing net increases in NO2-N during treatment but the rate of decrease in the mixed-flow case falls well behind that predicted for plug-flow operation. We show the potential for a positive net change in NO2-N increases with decreases in the dimensionless ratios K2, (R2 )/K1,( R1 ) and [NO2-N]/[NH4-N] and when the product K1, (R1) t provides low to moderate NH4-N conversions. Maintaining

  2. Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) - Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters - LED (BRIC-LED) is a biological research system that is being designed to complement the capabilities of the existing BRIC-Petri Dish Fixation Unit (PDFU) for the Space Life and Physical Sciences (SLPS) Program. A diverse range of organisms can be supported, including plant seedlings, callus cultures, Caenorhabditis elegans, microbes, and others. In the event of a launch scrub, the entire assembly can be replaced with an identical back-up unit containing freshly loaded specimens.

  3. Bright Flash Neutron Radiography at the McClellan Nuclear Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, M.; Tremsin, A. S.; Schillinger, B.

    The University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Research Center (MNRC) operates a 2 MW TRIGATM reactor, which is currently the highest power TRIGATM reactor in the United States. The Center was originally build by the US Air Force to detect hidden defects in aircraft structures using neutron radiography; the Center can accommodate samples as large as 10.00 m long, 3.65 m high, and weighing up to 2,270 kg. The MNRC reactor can be pulsed to 350 MW for about 30 ms (FWHM). The combination of a short neutron pulse with a fast microchannel plate based neutron detector enables high-resolution flash neutron radiography to complement conventional neutron radiography

  4. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Disposal of beryllium and cadmium from research reactors; Entsorgung von Beryllium und Cadmium aus Forschungsreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lierse von Gostomski, C.; Remmert, A.; Stoewer, W. [Inst. fuer Radiochemie, Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Bach, F.W.; Wilk, P.; Kutlu, I. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde, Univ. Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Blenski, H.J.; Berthold, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Nerlich, K.D.; Plank, W. [TUeV Sueddeutschland Bau und Betrieb GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Beryllium and cadmium mostly occur in metal form as radioactive special materials during the deconstruction of research reactors. Beryllium is usually used in these reactors as a neutron reflector and moderator, while cadmium is used above all as a neutron absorber. Both metals together have a high chemotoxicity as well as an inventory of radionuclides which has not been more closely characterised up to now. A high tritium content is to be expected, particularly in the case of beryllium; this tritium is due to the reaction of the metal with thermal reactor neutrons in particular. However, other nuclides which may be formed by neutron capture from impurities also contribute to the activity inventory. Up to now there is no qualified process for proper treatment, conditioning and intermediate and final repository in Germany. (orig.)

  6. Verification of HELIOS/MASTER Nuclear Analysis System for SMART Research Reactor, Rev. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Kang Seog; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Sung Quun

    2005-12-15

    Nuclear design for the SMART reactor is performed by using the transport lattice code HELIOS and the core analysis code MASTER. HELIOS code developed by Studsvik Scandpower in Norway is a transport lattice code for the neutron and gamma behavior, and is used to generate few group constants. MASTER code is a nodal diffusion code developed by KAERI, and is used to analyze reactor physics. This nuclear design code package requires verification. Since the SMART reactor is unique, it is impossible to verify this code system through the comparison of the calculation results with the measured ones. Therefore, the uncertainties for the nuclear physics parameters calculated by HELIOS/MASTER have been evaluated indirectly. Since Monte Carlo calculation includes least approximations an assumptions to simulate a neutron behavior, HELIOS/MASTER has been verified by this one. Monte Carlo code has been verified by the Kurchatov critical experiments similar to SMART reactor, and HELIOS/MASTER code package has been verified by Monte Carlo calculations for the SMART research reactor.

  7. Verification of HELIOS/MASTER Nuclear Analysis System for SMART Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Sung Quun

    2005-07-15

    Nuclear design for the SMART reactor is performed by using the transport lattice code HELIOS and the core analysis code MASTER. HELIOS code developed by Studsvik Scandpower in Norway is a transport lattice code for the neutron and gamma behavior, and is used to generate few group constants. MASTER code is a nodal diffusion code developed by KAERI, and is used to analyze reactor physics. This nuclear design code package requires verification. Since the SMART reactor is unique, it is impossible to verify this code system through the comparison of the calculation results with the measured ones. Therefore, the uncertainties for the nuclear physics parameters calculated by HELIOS/MASTER have been evaluated indirectly. Since Monte Carlo calculation includes least approximations an assumptions to simulate a neutron behavior, HELIOS/MASTER has been verified by this one. Monte Carlo code has been verified by the Kurchatov critical experiments similar to SMART reactor, and HELIOS/MASTER code package has been verified by Monte Carlo calculations for the SMART research reactor.

  8. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic parameter uncertainties in a TRIGA research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Costa, Antonio C.L.; Ladeira, Luiz C.D.; Rezende, Hugo C., E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: aclc@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcdl@cdtn.br, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Experimental studies had been performed in the TRIGA Research Nuclear Reactor of CDTN/CNEN to find out the its thermal hydraulic parameters. Fuel to coolant heat transfer patterns must be evaluated as function of the reactor power in order to assess the thermal hydraulic performance of the core. The heat generated by nuclear fission in the reactor core is transferred from fuel elements to the cooling system through the fuel-cladding (gap) and the cladding to coolant interfaces. As the reactor core power increases the heat transfer regime from the fuel cladding to the coolant changes from single-phase natural convection to subcooled nucleate boiling. This paper presents the uncertainty analysis in the results of the thermal hydraulics experiments performed. The methodology used to evaluate the propagation of uncertainty in the results was done based on the pioneering article of Kline and McClintock, with the propagation of uncertainties based on the specification of uncertainties in various primary measurements. The uncertainty analysis on thermal hydraulics parameters of the CDTN TRIGA fuel element is determined, basically, by the uncertainty of the reactor's thermal power. (author)

  9. Preliminary conceptual design for electrical and I and C system of a new research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, H. K.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-01-01

    The core type and the process system design will be varied according to the reactor's application and capacity. A New research reactor is being designed by KAERI since 2002 and the process systems are not fixed yet. But control and instrument systems are similar to each other even though the application and the size are not same. So the C and I system that encompasses reactor protection system, reactor control system, and computer system was designed conceptually according to the requirements based on new digital technology and HANARO's proven design. The plant electrical system consists of off-site system that delivers bulk electrical power to the reactor site and on-site system that distributes and controls electrical power at the facility. The electrical system includes building service system that consist of lighting, communication, fire detection, grounding, cathodic protection, etc. also. This report describes the design requirements of on-site and off-site electric power system that set up from the codes and standards and the conceptual design based on the design requirements.

  10. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  11. Heterogeneous catalysis in a microscale reactor fabricated from a biologically active polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Bill B.; Besser, Ronald S.; Lu, Zonghuan; Forrest, Andrea; Jiang, Rui; Jones, Francis

    2001-09-01

    Micro-scale biochemical reactors have been developed from a polydimethylsiloxane/enzyme (PDMS-E)biopolymer. Micro-reactor channels 125 micrometers in depth, 500 micrometers wide by 50 centimeters long contain fixed triangular features for enhanced fluid mixing. All channel features are composed of the same PDMS-E material. Conversions of urea by urease enzyme of up to 70% have been obtained at an overall flowrate of 0.4 mL/min. Additional PDMS-E biopolymer systems containing amyloglucosidase (for converting starch to glucose) have demonstrated enzymatic activity.

  12. RETU. The Finnish research programme on reactor safety. Interim report 1995 - May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanttola, T.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy] [eds.

    1997-08-01

    The Finnish national research programme on Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) concentrates on the search of safe limits of nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of the operation of nuclear power plants. The annual volume of the programme has been about 26 person years and the annual funding FIM 15 million. This report summarises the structure and objectives of the programme, research fields included and the main results obtained during the period 1995 - May 1997. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel is studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes are developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients and accidents. Research on accident management aims at development and validation of calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Other goals are to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. In the field of risk management probabilistic methods are developed for safety related decision making and for complex phenomena and event sequences. Effects of maintenance on nuclear power plant safety are studied and more effective methods for the assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations are searched. 135 refs.

  13. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  14. Janus spectra in two-dimensional flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    In theory, large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows and other two-dimensional flows may host two distinct types of turbulent energy spectra---in one, $\\alpha$, the spectral exponent of velocity fluctuations, equals $3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the small scales, and in the other, $\\alpha=5/3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the large scales---but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed $\\alpha = 3$. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which $\\alpha$ has transitioned from $3$ to $5/3$ for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to $3$ for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows...

  15. A dupla face de Janus da China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Rattner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Na mitologia romana, Janus é o rei mais antigo do Latium. Por ter acolhido a Saturno, expulso do Olimpo, este lhe brindou com uma visão em que tanto o futuro quanto o passado estivessem presentes, ficando assim conhecido como dono de duas faces. Essa duplicidade de personagem aplica-se perfeitamente ao papel da política chinesa, neste início de século XXI.

  16. Major update of Safety Analysis Report for Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip [Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR-1/M1) was converted from a Material Testing Reactor in 1975 and it had been operated by Office of Atom for Peace (OAP) since 1977 until 2007. During the period, Office of Atom for Peace had two duties for the reactor, that is, to operate and to regulate the reactor. However, in 2007, there was governmental office reformation which resulted in the separation of the reactor operating organization from the regulatory body in order to comply with international standard. The new organization is called Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) which has the mission to promote peaceful utilization of nuclear technology while OAP remains essentially the regulatory body. After the separation, a new ministerial regulation was enforced reflecting a new licensing scheme in which TINT has to apply for a license to operate the reactor. The safety analysis report (SAR) shall be submitted as part of the license application. The ministerial regulation stipulates the outlines of the SAR almost equivalent to IAEA standard 35-G1. Comparing to the IAEA 35-G1 standard, there were several incomplete and missing chapters in the original SAR of TRR1/M1. The major update of the SAR was therefore conducted and took approximately one year. The update work included detail safety evaluation of core configuration which used two fuel element types, the classification of systems, structures and components (SSC), the compilation of detail descriptions of all SSCs and the review and evaluation of radiation protection program, emergency plan and emergency procedure. Additionally, the code of conduct and operating limits and conditions were revised and finalized in this work. A lot of new information was added to the SAR as well, for example, the description of commissioning program, information on environmental impact assessment, decommissioning program, quality assurance program and etc. Due to the complexity of this work, extensive knowledge was

  17. Synthesis on biological soil crust research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Belnap, Jayne; Buedel, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In this closing chapter, we summarize the advances in biocrust research made during the last 1.5 decades. In the first part of the chapter, we discuss how in some research fields, such as the microbial diversity of fungi, bacteria, and microfauna; the interaction between biocrusts and vascular plants; and in the rehabilitation of biocrusts; particularly large achievements have been made. In other fields, previously established knowledge of overall patterns has been corroborated and refined by additional studies, e.g., in the fields of soil stabilization and disturbance effects. In the second part of the chapter, we outline the research gaps and challenges foreseen by us. We identify multiple knowledge gaps, including many understudied geographic regions, the largely missing link between genetic and morphological species identification data, and the answers to some mechanistic questions, such as the overall role of biocrusts in hydrology and nutrient cycles. With some ideas on promising new research questions and approaches we close this chapter and the overall book.

  18. Studies for a multipurpose research reactor for the CRCN/CNEN-PE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso, Antonio C.O. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maiorino, Jose R.; Bastos, Jose L.; Silva, Jose E.R. da; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo; Umbehaum, Pedro E.; Ferreira, Carlos R.; Maprelian, E.; Silva, Graciete S. de A.; Yoryiaz, H.; Terremoto, Luiz A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maiorino@net.ipen.br; mitsuo@net.ipen.br; emaprel@net.ipen.br; gsasilva@net.ipen.br; Moreira, Joao M.L. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R. de A.; Lyra, Carlos A.B.O. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Azevedo, Carlos V.G. de; Filho, Jose A.B. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Santos, Rubens S. dos [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual proposal for the design and construction of an irradiation research facility at the CRCN (Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences) site, in cooperation with an international partner. The planned irradiation facility is based on a multipurpose research reactor with an innovative design feature, which is a core with two sub-critical parts coupled by a heavy water tank for enhancing and flatten the thermal fluxes, improving safety, and improving beam applications. (author)

  19. Management of research reactor; dynamic characteristics analysis for reactor structures related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chang Kee; Shim, Joo Sup [Shinwa Technology Information, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study is to deduce the dynamic correlation between the fuel assembly and the reactor structure. Dynamic characteristics analyses for reactor structure related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly have been performed For the dynamic characteristic analysis, the in-air models of the round and hexagonal flow tubes, 18-element and 36-element fuel assemblies, and reactor structure were developed. By calculating the hydrodynamic mass and distributing it on the in-air models, the in-water models of the flow tubes, the fuel assemblies, and the reactor structure were developed. Then, modal analyses for developed in-air and in-water models have been performed. Especially, two 18-element fuel assemblies and three 36-element fuel assemblies were included in the in-water reactor models. For the verification of the modal analysis results, the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the fuel assembly were compared with those obtained from the experiment. Finally the analysis results of the reactor structure were compared with them performed by AECL Based on the reactor model without PCS piping, the in-water reactor model including the fuel assemblies was developed, and its modal analysis was performed. The analysis results demonstrate that there are no resonance between the fuel assembly and the reactor structures. 26 refs., 419 figs., 85 tabs. (Author)

  20. The Systems Biology Research Tool: evolvable open-source software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Jeremiah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in the field of systems biology requires software for a variety of purposes. Software must be used to store, retrieve, analyze, and sometimes even to collect the data obtained from system-level (often high-throughput experiments. Software must also be used to implement mathematical models and algorithms required for simulation and theoretical predictions on the system-level. Results We introduce a free, easy-to-use, open-source, integrated software platform called the Systems Biology Research Tool (SBRT to facilitate the computational aspects of systems biology. The SBRT currently performs 35 methods for analyzing stoichiometric networks and 16 methods from fields such as graph theory, geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. New computational techniques can be added to the SBRT via process plug-ins, providing a high degree of evolvability and a unifying framework for software development in systems biology. Conclusion The Systems Biology Research Tool represents a technological advance for systems biology. This software can be used to make sophisticated computational techniques accessible to everyone (including those with no programming ability, to facilitate cooperation among researchers, and to expedite progress in the field of systems biology.

  1. Perspectives in Biological Nitrogen Fixation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, along with photosynthesis is the basis of all life on earth. Current understanding suggests that no plant fixes its own nitrogen. Some plants (mainly legumes) fix nitrogen via symbiotic anaerobic microorganisms (mainly rhizobia). The nature of biological nitrogen fixation is that the dinitrogenase catalyzes the reaction-splitting triple-bond inert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into organic ammonia molecule (NH3). All known nitrogenases are found to be prokaryotic,multi.complex and normally oxygen liable. Not surprisingly, the engineering of autonomous nitrogen-fixing plants would be a long-term effort because it requires the assembly of a complex enzyme and provision of anaerobic conditions. However,in the light of evolving protein catalysts, the anaerobic enzyme has almost certainly been replaced in many reactions by the more efficient and irreversible aerobic version that uses O2. On the other hand, nature has shown numerous examples of evolutionary convergence where an enzyme catalyzing a highly specific, O2-requiring reaction has an oxygen-independent counterpart, able to carry out the same reaction under anoxic conditions. In this review, I attempt to take the reader on a simplified journey from conventional nitrogenase complex to a possible simplified version of a yet to be discovered Ilght-utilizing nitrogenase.

  2. Effect of redox conditions on pharmaceutical loss during biological wastewater treatment using sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Lauren B., E-mail: lstadler@umich.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Su, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuansu@buffalo.edu [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Moline, Christopher J., E-mail: christopher.moline@hdrinc.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ernstoff, Alexi S., E-mail: alexer@dtu.dk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Aga, Diana S., E-mail: dianaaga@buffalo.edu [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Love, Nancy G., E-mail: nglove@umich.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • Pharmaceutical fate was studied in SBRs operated at different redox conditions. • Stable carbon oxidation and nitrification occurred under microaerobic conditions. • Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest under fully aerobic conditions. • Loss of sulfamethoxazole was highest under microaerobic conditions. • Deconjugation occurred during treatment to form sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine. - Abstract: We lack a clear understanding of how wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process parameters, such as redox environment, impact pharmaceutical fate. WWTPs increasingly install more advanced aeration control systems to save energy and achieve better nutrient removal performance. The impact of redox condition, and specifically the use of microaerobic (low dissolved oxygen) treatment, is poorly understood. In this study, the fate of a mixture of pharmaceuticals and several of their transformation products present in the primary effluent of a local WWTP was assessed in sequencing batch reactors operated under different redox conditions: fully aerobic, anoxic/aerobic, and microaerobic (DO concentration ≈0.3 mg/L). Among the pharmaceuticals that were tracked during this study (atenolol, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, desvenlafaxine, venlafaxine, and phenytoin), overall loss varied between them and between redox environments. Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest in the aerobic reactor; sulfamethoxazole loss was highest in the microaerobic reactors; and phenytoin was recalcitrant in all reactors. Transformation products of sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine resulted in the reformation of their parent compounds during treatment. The results suggest that transformation products must be accounted for when assessing removal efficiencies and that redox environment influences the degree of pharmaceutical loss.

  3. A development of SDLC for MMIS of SMART research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Suk; Park, Jae Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Koo, In Soo; Kim, Jong Myung; Park, Dong Cheol [Control Tech. Research Inst., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Soo [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Software development concept for Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) of SMART has been researched in KAERI since 2000. As a result of it, we developed Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) based on IEEE Std 1074(1997) and submitted it to Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) as a part of Pre-SAR. We verify that the SDLC meets IEEE Std 1074(1997) by making mapping table between them in this paper.

  4. Status of research and development on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    To improve uranium utilization, a design study of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been carried out intensively since 1998 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this reactor, the nuclear fission reaction is designed to be realized mainly by high energy neutrons. To achieve this, the volume of water used to cool the fuel rods is decreased by reducing the gap width between the fuel rods. Conversion ratio greater than 1.0 is expected whether the core i-s cooled by boiling water or pressurized water and whether the core size is small or large. Status of the RMWR design is reviewed and planning of R and D for future deployment of this reactor after 20-20 is presented. To improve economics of this reactor, development of fuel cans for high burnup and low-cost reprocessing technology of mixed oxide spect fuels are highly needed. R and D has been conducted under the cooperation with utilities, industry, research organization and academia. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Nodalization effects on RELAP5 results related to MTR research reactor transient scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the anal y sis of RELAP5 results obtained from the evaluation study of the total loss of flow transient with the deficiency of the heat removal system in a research reactor using two different nodalizations. It focuses on the effect of nodalization on the thermal-hydraulic evaluation of the re search reactor. The analysis of RELAP5 results has shown that nodalization has a big effect on the predicted scenario of the postulated transient. There fore, great care should be taken during the nodalization of the reactor, especially when the avail able experimental or measured data are insufficient for making a complete qualification of the nodalization. Our analysis also shows that the research reactor pool simulation has a great effect on the evaluation of natural circulation flow and on other thermal-hydraulic parameters during the loss of flow transient. For example, the on set time of core boiling changes from less than 2000 s to 15000 s, starting from the beginning of the transient. This occurs if the pool is simulated by two vertical volumes in stead of one vertical volume.

  6. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Novara, Oscar E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  7. Photocatalytic degradation of bezacryl yellow in batch reactors--feasibility of the combination of photocatalysis and a biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenniche, Lamia; Favier, Lidia; Bouzaza, Abdelkrim; Fourcade, Florence; Aissani, Farida; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2015-01-01

    A combined process coupling photocatalysis and a biological treatment was investigated for the removal of Bezacryl yellow (BZY), an industrial-use textile dye. Photocatalytic degradation experiments of BZY were carried out in two stirred reactors, operating in batch mode with internal or external irradiation. Two photocatalysts (TiO2P25 and TiO2PC500) were tested and the dye degradation was studied for different initial pollutant concentrations (10-117 mg L(-1)). A comparative study showed that the photocatalytic degradation led to the highest degradation and mineralization yields in a stirred reactor with internal irradiation in the presence of the P25 catalyst. Regardless of the photocatalyst, discoloration yields up to 99% were obtained for 10 and 20 mg L(-1) dye concentrations in the reactor with internal irradiation. Moreover, the first-order kinetic and Langmuir-Hinshelwood models were examined by using the nonlinear method for different initial concentrations and showed that the two models lead to completely different predicted kinetics suggesting that they were completely different.According to the BOD5/ Chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratio, the non-treated solution (20 mg L(-1) of BZY) was estimated as non-biodegradable. After photocatalytic pretreatment of bezacryl solution containing 20 mg/L of initial dye, the biodegradability test showed a BOD5/COD ratio of 0.5, which is above the limit of biodegradability (0.4). These results were promising regarding the feasibility of combining photocatalysis and biological mineralization for the removal of BZY.

  8. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  9. Quarterly report of Biological and Medical Research Division, April 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brues, A.M.

    1955-04-01

    This report is a compilation of 48 investigator prepared summaries of recent progress in individual research programs of the Biology and Medical Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for the quarterly period ending April,1955. Individual reports are about 3-6 pages in length and often contain research data.

  10. Recent upgrades and new scientific infrastructure of MARIA research reactor, Otwock-Swierk, Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The MARIA reactor is open-pool type, water and beryllium moderated. It has two independent primary cooling systems: fuel and pool cooling system. Each fuel assembly is cooled down separately in pressurized channels with individual performances characterization. The fuel assemblies consist of five layers of bent plates or six concentric tubes. Currently it is one of the most powerful research reactors in Europe with operation availability at least up to 2030. Its nominal thermal power is 30 MW. It is characterized by high neutron flux density: up to 3x10{sup 14} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in case of thermal neutrons, and up to 2x10{sup 13} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in case of fast neutrons. The reactor is operated for ca. 4000 h per year. The reactor facility is equipped with fully equipped three hot cells with shielding up to 10{sup 15} Bq. Adjacent to the reactor facility, the radio-pharmaceutics plant (POLATOM) and Material Research Laboratory are located. They are equipped with a number of hot cells with instrumentation. The transport system of radioactive materials from reactor facility to Material Research Laboratory is available. During 2014 the MARIA reactor has been operated with three different types of fuel the same time: previous 36% enriched fuel, and two types of new LEU fuels. In the meantime, molybdenum irradiation programme has been developed. Maria is a multifunctional research tool, with a notable application in production of radioisotopes, radio-pharmaceutics manufacturing (ca. 600 TBq/y), {sup 99}Mo for medical scintigraphy (ca. 6000 TBq/y), neutron transmutation doping of silicon single crystals, wide scientific research based on neutron beams utilization. From the beginning MARIA reactor was intended for loop and fuel testing research activities. Currently it is used mostly as material testing and irradiation facility and for that reason it has wide experimental capabilities. There are eight horizontal irradiation channels from among whom six of them

  11. Safety Re-evaluation of Kyoto University Research Reactor by reflecting the Accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at rated thermal power of 5MW. After the accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we have settled a 40-ton water tank near the reactor room, and prepared a mobile fire pump and a mobile power generator as additional safety measures for beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). We also have conducted the safety re-evaluation of KUR, and confirmed that the integrity of KUR fuels could be kept against the BDBA with the use of the additional safety measures when the several restrictions were imposed on the reactor operation.

  12. Biological treatment of phenolic wastewater in an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firozjaee Taghizade Tahere

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (ACSTR with consortium of mixed culture was operated continuously for a period of 110 days. The experiments were performed with three different hydraulic retention times and by varying initial phenol concentrations between 100 to 1000 mg/L. A maximum phenol removal was observed at a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 4 days, with an organic loading rate (OLR of 170.86 mg/L.d. At this condition, phenol removal rate of 89% was achieved. In addition, the chemical oxygen demand (COD removal corresponds to phenol removal. Additional operating parameters such as pH, MLSS and biogas production rate of the effluents were also measured. The present study provides valuable information to design an anaerobic ACSTR reactor for the biodegradation of phenolic wastewater.

  13. Evaluation of Gamma Fluence Rate Predictions for 41-argon Releases to the Atmosphere at a Nuclear Research Reactor Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Palma, Carlos; Aage, Helle Karina; Astrup, Poul

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere has been conducted at the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Artificially generated aerosols ('white smoke') were mixed with the routine releases of Ar-41 in the reactor's 60-m tall venting stack. The detailed plume geometry...

  14. Design and implementation progress of multi-purpose simulator for nuclear research reactor using LabVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, Amany Abdel Aziz; Saleh, Hassan Ibrahim [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Engineering Dept.; Ashoub, Nagieb [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2015-11-15

    This paper illustrates the neutronic and thermal hydraulic models that were implemented in the nuclear research reactor simulator based on LabVIEW. It also describes the system and transient analysis of the simulator that takes into consideration the temperature effects and poisoning. This simulator is designed to be a multi-purpose in which the operator could understand the effects of the input parameters on the reactor. A designer can study different solutions for virtual reactor accident scenarios. The main features of the simulator are the flexibility to design and maintain the interface and the ability to redesign and remodel the reactor core engine. The developed reactor simulator permits to acquire hands-on the experience of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors including reactivity control, thermodynamics, technology design and safety system design. This simulator can be easily customizable and upgradable and new opportunities for collaboration between academic groups could be conducted.

  15. SoLid: Search for Oscillation with a 6Li Detector at the BR2 research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Michiels, Ianthe

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, various nuclear reactor neutrino experiments have measured a deficit in the flux of antineutrinos coming from the reactor at short reactor-detector distances, when compared to theoretical calculations. One of the experiments designed to investigate this reactor antineutrino anomaly is the SoLid experiment. It uses the compact BR2 research reactor from the SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium, to perform reactor antineutrino flux measurements at very short baseline. These proceedings discuss the general detection concepts of the SoLid experiment and its novel detector technology. The performance of the SoLid design is demonstrated with some results of the analysis of the data gathered with the experiment's first large scale test module, SM1.

  16. Corrosion Surveillance for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in Wet Basin Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.P.

    1998-10-16

    Foreign and domestic test and research reactor fuel is currently being shipped from locations over the world for storage in water filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The fuel was provided to many of the foreign countries as a part of the "Atoms for Peace" program in the early 1950's. In support of the wet storage of this fuel at the research reactor sites and at SRS, corrosion surveillance programs have been initiated. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) in 1996 on "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" and scientists from ten countries worldwide were invited to participate. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the IAEA sponsored CRP and provides the updated results from corrosion surveillance activities at SRS. In May 1998, a number of news articles around the world reported stories that microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was active on the aluminum-clad spent fuel stored in the RBOF basin at SRS. This assessment was found to be in error with details presented in this paper. A biofilm was found on aluminum coupons, but resulted in no corrosion. Cracks seen on the surface were not caused by corrosion, but by stresses from the volume expansion of the oxide formed during pre-conditioning autoclaving. There has been no pitting caused by MIC or any other corrosion mechanism seen in the RBOF basin since initiation of the SRS Corrosion Surveillance Program in 1993.

  17. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Research and Development in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stainsby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR research is directed towards fulfilling the ambitious goals of Generation IV (Gen IV, that is, to develop a safe, sustainable, reliable, proliferation-resistant and economic nuclear energy system. The research is directed towards developing the GFR as an economic electricity generator, with good safety and sustainability characteristics. Fast reactors maximise the usefulness of uranium resources by breeding plutonium and can contribute to minimising both the quantity and radiotoxicity nuclear waste by actinide transmutation in a closed fuel cycle. Transmutation is particularly effective in the GFR core owing to its inherently hard neutron spectrum. Further, GFR is suitable for hydrogen production and process heat applications through its high core outlet temperature. As such GFR can inherit the non-electricity applications that will be developed for thermal high temperature reactors in a sustainable manner. The Euratom organisation provides a route by which researchers in all European states, and other non-European affiliates, can contribute to the Gen IV GFR system. This paper summarises the achievements of Euratom's research into the GFR system, starting with the 5th Framework programme (FP5 GCFR project in 2000, through FP6 (2005 to 2009 and looking ahead to the proposed activities within the 7th Framework Programme (FP7.

  18. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissani, M; O' Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to

  19. Biologic treatment of wastewater from cassava flour production using vertical anaerobic baffled reactor (VABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyce T Correia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The estimate cassava production in Brazil in 2007 was of 25 million tons (= 15% of the world production and most of it is used in the production of flour. During its processing, waste that can cause environmental inequality is generated, if discharged inappropriately. One of the liquid waste generated, manipueira, is characterized by its high level of organic matter. The anaerobic treatment that uses a vertical anaerobic baffled reactor (VABR inoculated with granulated sludge, is one of the ways of treating this effluent. The anaerobic biodigestion phases are separated in this kind of reactor, allowing greater stability and resistance to load shocks. The VABR was built with a width/height rate of 1:2. The pH, acidity, alkalinity, turbidity and COD removal were analyzed in 6 different regions of the reactor, which was operated with an increasing feeding from ? 2000 to ? 10000 mg COD L?¹ and HRT between 6.0 and 2.5 days. The VABR showed decreasing acidity and turbidity, an increase in alkalinity and pH, and 96% efficiency in COD removal with 3-day HRT and feeding of 3800 mg COD L?¹.

  20. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  1. Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

  2. Heat Transfer Calculation on Plate-Type Fuel Assembly of High Flux Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxin Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer characteristics of fuel assemblies for a high flux research reactor with a neutron trap are numerically investigated in this study. Single-phase turbulence flow is calculated by a commercial code, FLUENT, where the computational objective covers standard and control fuel assemblies. The simulation is carried out with an inlet coolant velocity varying from 4.5 m/s to 7.5 m/s in hot assemblies. The results indicate that the cladding temperature is always lower than the saturation temperature in the calculated ranges. The temperature rise in the control fuel assembly is smaller than that of the standard fuel assembly. Additionally, the assembly with a hot spot is specially studied, and the safety of the research reactor is also approved.

  3. Source term derivation and radiological safety analysis for the TRICO II research reactor in Kinshasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muswema, J.L., E-mail: jeremie.muswem@unikin.ac.cd [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Ekoko, G.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lukanda, V.M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Democratic Republic of the Congo' s General Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box AE1 (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lobo, J.K.-K. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Darko, E.O. [Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Boafo, E.K. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe St. North, Oshawa, ONL1 H7K4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric dispersion modeling for two credible accidents of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Kinshasa (TRICO II) was performed. • Radiological safety analysis after the postulated initiating events (PIE) was also carried out. • The Karlsruhe KORIGEN and the HotSpot Health Physics codes were used to achieve the objectives of this study. • All the values of effective dose obtained following the accident scenarios were below the regulatory limits for reactor staff members and the public, respectively. - Abstract: The source term from the 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor core of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was derived in this study. An atmospheric dispersion modeling followed by radiation dose calculation were performed based on two possible postulated accident scenarios. This derivation was made from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released in the core by using the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation code KORIGEN. The atmospheric dispersion modeling was performed with HotSpot code, and its application yielded to radiation dose profile around the site using meteorological parameters specific to the area under study. The two accident scenarios were picked from possible accident analyses for TRIGA and TRIGA-fueled reactors, involving the case of destruction of the fuel element with highest activity release and a plane crash on the reactor building as the worst case scenario. Deterministic effects of these scenarios are used to update the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor, and for its current version, these scenarios are not yet incorporated. Site-specific meteorological conditions were collected from two meteorological stations: one installed within the Atomic Energy Commission and another at the National Meteorological Agency (METTELSAT), which is not far from the site. Results show that in both accident scenarios, radiation doses remain within the limits, far below the recommended maximum effective

  4. Material characteristics and construction methods for a typical research reactor concrete containment in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimia, Mahsa; Suha, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eghbalic, Rahman; Jahan, Farzaneh Asadi malek [School of Architecture and Urbanism, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally selecting an appropriate material and also construction style for a concrete containment due to its function and special geometry play an important role in applicability and also construction cost and duration decrease in a research reactor (RR) project. The reactor containment enclosing the reactor vessel comprises physical barriers reflecting the safety design and construction codes, regulations and standards so as to prevent the community and the environment from uncontrolled release of radioactive materials. It is the third and the last barrier against radioactivity release. It protects the reactor vessel from such external events as earthquake and aircraft crash as well. Thus, it should be designed and constructed in such a manner as to withstand dead and live loads, ground and seismic loads, missiles and aircraft loads, and thermal and shrinkage loads. This study aims to present a construction method for concrete containment of a typical RR in Iran. The work also presents an acceptable characteristic for concrete and reinforcing re bar of a typical concrete containment. The current study has evaluated the various types of the RR containments. The most proper type was selected in accordance with the current knowledge and technology of Iran.

  5. Dosimetry at the Portuguese research reactor using thermoluminescence measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Santos, J; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Ferro Carvalho, A; Marques, J G; Kling, A; Ramalho, A J G; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    This work presents an extensive study on Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation and thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry for characterising mixed radiation fields (neutrons and photons) occurring in nuclear reactors. The feasibility of these methods is investigated for radiation fields at various locations of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The performance of the approaches developed in this work is compared with dosimetric techniques already existing at RPI. The Monte Carlo MCNP-4C code was used for a detailed modelling of the reactor core, the fast neutron beam and the thermal column of RPI. Simulations using these models allow to reproduce the energy and spatial distributions of the neutron field very well (agreement better than 80%). In the case of the photon field, the agreement improves with decreasing intensity of the component related to fission and activation products. (7)LiF:Mg,Ti, (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y TL detectors (TLDs) with low neutron sensitivity are able to determine photon dose and dose profiles with high spatial resolution. On the other hand, (nat)LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs with increased neutron sensitivity show a remarkable loss of sensitivity and a high supralinearity in high-intensity fields hampering their application at nuclear reactors.

  6. Dismantling design for a reference research reactor of the WWR type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobach, Yu.N., E-mail: lobach@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pr. Nauki, 47, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Cross, M.T., E-mail: Martin.Cross@nuvia.co.uk [Nuvia Ltd., Robinson House, Crow Park Way, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HY (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Design features of WWRs relevant to decommissioning have been analysed. • The technical basis for the preparation and implementation of dismantling has been established for a reference WWR. • The applicability of existing proven dismantling technologies has been established. -- Abstract: A decommissioning study has been carried out for a reference research reactor of the WWR type. Many such reactors were constructed more than 50 years ago and most of them are still in operation. Decommissioning has now become an important consideration. This paper summarizes the main decommissioning steps and, on the basis of the reactor design features, technical aspects of the dismantling and removal of the contaminated/activated components have been analysed. The advisability of the removal of large components, such as the reactor vessel and the heat-exchangers, as one piece items has also been demonstrated. Additionally, a work schedule and an estimation of the collective dose for the preparation and implementation of dismantling have been established. The applicability of existing proven dismantling technologies has been identified together with some additional features for the dismantling.

  7. Thermal hydraulic analysis of reactivity accidents in MTR research reactors using RELAP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sahlamy, N.; Khedr, A. [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt); D' Auria, F.D. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Facolta di Ingegneria

    2015-12-15

    The present paper comes in the line with the international approach which use the best estimate codes, instead of conservative codes, to get more realistic prediction of system behavior under off-normal reactor conditions. The aim of the current work is to apply this approach using the thermal-hydraulic system code RELAP5/Mod3.3 in a reassessment of safety of the IAEA benchmark 10 MW Research Reactor. The assessment is performed for both slow and fast reactivity insertion transients at initial power of 1.0 W. The reactor power is calculated using the RELA5 point kinetic model. The reactivity feedback terms are considered in two steps. In the first step the feedback from changes in water density and fuel temperature (Doppler effects) are considered. In the second step the feedback from the water temperature changes is added. The results from the first step are compared with that published in IAEA-TECDOC-643 benchmarks. The comparison shows that RELAP5 over predicts the peak power and consequently the fuel, clad and coolant temperatures in case of fast reactivity insertion. The results from the second step show unjustified values for reactor power. Therefore, the model of reactivity feedback from water temperature changes in the RELAP5 code may have to be reviewed.

  8. Non-destructive control of cladding thickness of fuel elements for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, Y.; Zhukov, Y.; Chashchin, S

    1997-07-01

    The control method of fuel elements for research reactors by means of measuring beta particles back scattering made it possible to perform complete automatic non-destructive control of internal and external claddings at our plant. This control gives high guarantees of the fuel element correspondence to the requirements. The method can be used to control the three-layer items of different geometry, including plates. (author)

  9. NCTPlan application for neutron capture therapy dosimetric planning at MEPhI nuclear research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyutina, A S; Kiger, W S; Portnov, A A

    2011-12-01

    The results of modeling of two therapeutic beams HEC-1 and HEC-4 at the NRNU "MEPhI" research nuclear reactor exploitable for preclinical treatments are reported. The exact models of the beams are constructed as an input to the NCTPlan code used for planning Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) procedure. The computations are purposed to improve the accuracy of prediction of a dose absorbed in tissue with the account of all components of radiation.

  10. A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, M A Stanojev; Pugliesi, R

    2012-01-01

    A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

  11. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  12. NASA Space Biology Plant Research for 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Tomko, D. L.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) recently published "Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era" (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record id=13048), and NASA completed a Space Biology Science Plan to develop a strategy for implementing its recommendations ( http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/library/esmd documents.html). The most important recommendations of the NRC report on plant biology in space were that NASA should: (1) investigate the roles of microbial-plant systems in long-term bioregenerative life support systems, and (2) establish a robust spaceflight program of research analyzing plant growth and physiological responses to the multiple stimuli encountered in spaceflight environments. These efforts should take advantage of recently emerged analytical technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and apply modern cellular and molecular approaches in the development of a vigorous flight-based and ground-based research program. This talk will describe NASA's strategy and plans for implementing these NRC Plant Space Biology recommendations. New research capabilities for Plant Biology, optimized by providing state-of-the-art automated technology and analytical techniques to maximize scientific return, will be described. Flight experiments will use the most appropriate platform to achieve science results (e.g., ISS, free flyers, sub-orbital flights) and NASA will work closely with its international partners and other U.S. agencies to achieve its objectives. One of NASA's highest priorities in Space Biology is the development research capabilities for use on the International Space Station and other flight platforms for studying multiple generations of large plants. NASA will issue recurring NASA Research Announcements (NRAs) that include a rapid turn-around model to more fully engage the biology community in designing experiments to respond to the NRC recommendations. In doing so, NASA

  13. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater using a novel anoxic moving bed biofilm reactor (ANMBBR)-biological aerated filter (BAF) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian; Hou, Baolin

    2014-04-01

    A novel system integrating anoxic moving bed biofilm reactor (ANMBBR) and biological aerated filter (BAF) with short-cut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) process was investigated as advanced treatment of real biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The results showed the system had efficient capacity of degradation of pollutants especially nitrogen removal. The best performance was obtained at hydraulic residence times of 12h and nitrite recycling ratios of 200%. The removal efficiencies of COD, total organic carbon, NH4(+)-N, total phenols and total nitrogen (TN) were 74.6%, 70.0%, 85.0%, 92.7% and 72.3%, the corresponding effluent concentrations were 35.1, 18.0, 4.8, 2.2 and 13.6mg/L, respectively. Compared with traditional A(2)/O process, the system had high performance of NH4(+)-N and TN removal, especially under the high toxic loading. Moreover, ANMBBR played a key role in eliminating toxicity and degrading refractory compounds, which was beneficial to improve biodegradability of raw wastewater for SBNR process.

  14. Computational simulation of fuel burnup estimation for research reactors plate type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the spatial fuel burnup, through computational simulation, in two research reactors plate type, loaded with dispersion fuel: the benchmark Material Test Research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR-IAEA) and a typical multipurpose reactor (MR). The first composed of plates with uranium oxide dispersed in aluminum (UAlx-Al) and a second composed with uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. To develop this work we used the deterministic code, WIMSD-5B, which performs the cell calculation solving the neutron transport equation, and the DF3DQ code, written in FORTRAN, which solves the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation using the finite difference method. The methodology used was adequate to estimate the spatial fuel burnup , as the results was in accordance with chosen benchmark, given satisfactorily to the proposal presented in this work, even showing the possibility to be applied to other research reactors. For future work are suggested simulations with other WIMS libraries, other settings core and fuel types. Comparisons the WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in fuel burnup calculations and also others commercial programs, are suggested too. Another proposal is to estimate the fuel burnup, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the Xenon production. (author)

  15. Thermal-hydraulic Fortran program for steady-state calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety assessment of research and power reactors is a continuous process covering their lifespan and requiring verified and validated codes. Power reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume a lot of running time. On the other hand, most research reactor codes still require much more data for validation and qualification. It is, therefore, of benefit to any regulatory body to develop its own codes for the review and assessment of research reactors. The present paper introduces a simple, one-dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors. Besides calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distributions and pressure gradients in an average and hot channel, the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in research reactors, such as the onset of nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and flow instability. Well known thermal-hydraulic correlations for calculating the safety parameters and several formulas for the heat transfer coefficient have been used. The THDSN program was verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with those published in IAEA publications and a good agreement was found. Also, the results of the program are compared with those published for other programs, such as the PARET and TERMIC.

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

    2011-11-01

    This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

  18. Applying the community partnership approach to human biology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Julia; Schell, Lawrence M; Cole, Tewentahawih'tha'

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary human biology research employs a unique skillset for biocultural analysis. This skillset is highly appropriate for the study of health disparities because disparities result from the interaction of social and biological factors over one or more generations. Health disparities research almost always involves disadvantaged communities owing to the relationship between social position and health in stratified societies. Successful research with disadvantaged communities involves a specific approach, the community partnership model, which creates a relationship beneficial for researcher and community. Paramount is the need for trust between partners. With trust established, partners share research goals, agree on research methods and produce results of interest and importance to all partners. Results are shared with the community as they are developed; community partners also provide input on analyses and interpretation of findings. This article describes a partnership-based, 20 year relationship between community members of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation and researchers at the University at Albany. As with many communities facing health disparity issues, research with Native Americans and indigenous peoples generally is inherently politicized. For Akwesasne, the contamination of their lands and waters is an environmental justice issue in which the community has faced unequal exposure to, and harm by environmental toxicants. As human biologists engage in more partnership-type research, it is important to understand the long term goals of the community and what is at stake so the research circle can be closed and 'helicopter' style research avoided.

  19. Microfluidic generation and selective degradation of biopolymer-based Janus microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Mélanie; Renard, Denis; Cathala, Bernard

    2012-04-09

    We describe a microfluidic approach for generating Janus microbeads from biopolymer hydrogels. A flow-focusing device was used to emulsify the coflow of aqueous solutions of one or two different biopolymers in an organic phase to synthesize homo or hetero Janus microbeads. Biopolymer gelation was initiated, in the chip, by diffusion-controlled ionic cross-linking of the biopolymers. Pectin-pectin (homo Janus) and, for the first time, pectin-alginate (hetero Janus) microbeads were produced. The efficiency of separation of the two hemispheres, which reflected mixing and convection phenomena, was investigated by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) of previously labeled biopolymers. The interface of the hetero Janus structure was clearly defined, whereas that of the homo Janus microbeads was poorly defined. The Janus structure was confirmed by subjecting each microbead hemisphere to specific enzymatic degradation. These new and original microbeads from renewable resources will open up opportunities for studying relationships between combined enzymatic hydrolysis and active compound release.

  20. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  1. Biological sulfate removal from acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater using a two-stage UASB reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Li; Jun Wang; Zhaokun Luan; Zhongguang Ji; Lian Yu

    2012-01-01

    A two-stage UASB reactor was employed to remove sulfate from acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater.Mesophilic operation (35±0.5℃) was performed with hydraulic retention time (HRT) varied between 28 and 40 hr.Mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS)in the reactor was maintained about 8000 mg/L.The results indicated that sulfate removal was enhanced with increasing the ratio of COD/SO42-.At low COD/SO42-,the growth of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was carbon-limited.The optimal sulfate removal efficiencies were 75% when the HRT was no less than 38 hr.Sulfidogenesis mainly happened in the sulfate-reducing stage,while methanogenesis in the methane-producing stage.Microbes in sulfate-reducing stage performed granulation better than that in methaneproducing stage.Higher extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content in sulfate-reducing stage helped to adhere and connect the flocculent sludge particles together.SRB accounted for about 31% both in sulfate-reducing stage and methane-producing stage at COD/SO42- ratio of 0.5,while it dropped dramatically from 34% in sulfate-reducing stage to 10% in methane-producing stage corresponding to the COD/SO42- ratio of 4.7.SRB and MPA were predominant in sulfate-reducing stage and methane-producing stage respectively.

  2. Radiation distribution through ilmenite-limonite concrete and its application as a reactor biological shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Kansouh, W.A.; Bashter, I.I.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the penetration of primary ..gamma.. rays, secondary ..gamma.. rays and slow neutrons through an ilmenite-limonite concrete shield (heat resistant concrete) and through both ordinary and ilmenite concrete shields has been carried out. A shielding assembly with dimensions of 120 x 120 x 120cm/sup 3/ for each concrete type has been used. Direct, cadmium filtered and B/sub 4/C-filtered reactor beams emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor were used. The ..gamma..-ray doses were measured using LiF-7 Teflon disc TLD dosimeters and the slow neutron doses were measured using LiF-6 Teflon disc TLD dosimeters. Ratios of the total ..gamma.. doses, secondary ..gamma.. doses and slow neutron doses for an ilmenite-limonite concrete shield, and for both ordinary and ilmenite concrete, have been obtained. The results show that ilmenite concrete is better than both ordinary and ilmenite-limonite concrete for ..gamma.. ray attenuation, especially at deep penetration. Also it was concluded that ilmenite concrete with a density p = 4.6 g/cm/sup 3/ is better than both ordinary and ilmenite-limonite concrete for slow neutron attenuation.

  3. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S.D. [LSRE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Madeira, Luis M. [LEPAE - Laboratory for Process, Environmental and Energy Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Boaventura, Rui A.R., E-mail: bventura@fe.up.pt [LSRE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-12-30

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5 h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD{sub 5} and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  4. Biological removal of phenol from saline wastewater using a moving bed biofilm reactor containing acclimated mixed consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhli, Seyyed Ali Akbar; Ahmadizadeh, Kimia; Fereshtehnejad, Mahmood; Rostami, Mohammad Hossein; Safari, Mojtaba; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the performance of an aerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was assessed for the removal of phenol as the sole substrate from saline wastewater. The effect of several parameters namely inlet phenol concentration (200-1200 mg/L), hydraulic retention time (8-24 h), inlet salt content (10-70 g/L), phenol shock loading, hydraulic shock loading and salt shock loading on the performance of the 10 L MBBR inoculated with a mixed culture of active biomass gradually acclimated to phenol and salt were evaluated in terms of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies. The results indicated that phenol and COD removal efficiencies are affected by HRT, phenol and salt concentration in the bioreactor saline feed. The MBBR could remove up to 99% of phenol and COD from the feed saline wastewater at inlet phenol concentrations up to 800 mg/L, HRT of 18 h and inlet salt contents up to 40 g/L. The reactor could also resist strong shock loads. Furthermore, measuring biological quantitative parameters indicated that the biofilm plays a main role in phenol removal. Overall, the results of this investigation revealed that the developed MBBR system with high concentration of the active mixed biomass can play a prominent role in order to treat saline wastewaters containing phenol in industrial applications as a very efficient and flexible technology.

  5. IGORR-1: Proceedings of the first meeting of the international group on research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D. (comp.)

    1990-05-01

    Many organizations, in several countries, are planning or implementing new or upgraded research reactor projects, but there has been no organized forum devoted entirely to discussion and exchange of information in this field. Over the past year or so, informal discussions resulted in widespread agreement that such a forum would serve a useful purpose. Accordingly, a proposal to form a group was submitted to the leading organizations known to be involved in projects to build or upgrade reactor facilities. Essentially all agreed to join in the formation of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) and nominated a senior staff member to serve on its international organizing committee. The first IGORR meeting took place on February 28--March 2, 1990. It was very successful and well attended; some 52 scientists and engineers from 25 organizations in 10 countries participated in 2-1/2 days of open and informative presentations and discussions. Two workshop sessions offered opportunities for more detailed interaction among participants and resulted in identification of common R D needs, sources of data, and planned new facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  6. BURNUR.SYS: A 2-D code system for NUR research reactor burn up analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meftah, B. [Division Reacteur NUR, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria, BP 43 Sebala, Alger (Algeria)], E-mail: b_meftah@yahoo.com; Halilou, A. [Division Reacteur NUR, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria, BP 43 Sebala, Alger (Algeria); Letaim, F.; Mazidi, S. [Faculte de Physique, Universite Haouri Boumediene, USTHB, BP 31 Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Mokeddem, M.Y. [Division Physique et Applications Nucleaires, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria, BP 43 Sebala, Alger (Algeria); Zeggar, F. [Division Surete Nucleaire et Radioprotection, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria, BP 43 Sebala, Alger (Algeria)

    2008-04-15

    Adequate knowledge of burn up levels of fuel elements within a research reactor is of great importance for its optimum operation. Such knowledge is required for the monitoring of reactivity parameters and flux and power distributions throughout the reactor core, the estimation of the radioactive source term needed in accidental situations analysis, the evaluation of the amount of fissile materials present at any moment within the fuel for safeguards purposes and the estimation of cooling and shielding requirements for interim storage or transport of spent fuel elements. This paper presents the approach of fuel burn up evaluation used at the NUR research reactor. The approach is essentially based upon the utilization of BURNUR.SYS code, an in-house developed software. BURNUR.SYS is an object oriented program under DELPHI 7 that integrates the cell calculation code WIMSD-4 and the core calculation code CITVAP. BURNUR.SYS calculates the evolution in time of pertinent quantities such as: the concentrations of U235 and others actinides, the concentrations of major poisons (Xe135 and Sm149), the distributions of power densities and burn up levels within fuel elements, the effective multiplication factor and core reactivity. The results are displayed in user friendly graphical and numerical formats.

  7. OVERVIEW OF CRITERIA FOR INTERIM WET & DRY STORAGE OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.; Vinson, D.; Iyer, N.; Fisher, D.

    2010-11-03

    Following discharge from research reactors, spent nuclear fuel may be stored 'wet' in water pools or basins, or it may be stored 'dry' in various configurations including non-sealed or sealed containers until retrieved for ultimate disposition. Interim safe storage practices are based on avoiding degradation to the fuel that would impact functions related to safety. Recommended practices including environmental controls with technical bases, are outlined for wet storage and dry storage of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based research reactor fuel. For wet storage, water quality must be maintained to minimize corrosion degradation of aluminum fuel. For dry storage, vented canister storage of aluminum fuel readily provides a safe storage configuration. For sealed dry storage, drying must be performed so as to minimize water that would cause additional corrosion and hydrogen generation. Consideration must also be given to the potential for radiolytically-generated hydrogen from the bound water in the attendant oxyhydroxides on aluminum fuel from reactor operation for dry storage systems.

  8. Bibliographical review on the teaching of Biology and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Luz Rodríguez Palmero

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This review complements another one done by the same author, in 1997, regarding the role of comprehending the concept of cell in the learning of Biology. In addition, some general papers on science education that provide a better understanding of research approaches used in the investigation of this topic have been included. The reviewed papers have been organized into categories according to the object of study, the relevance assigned to the cell concept, and the framework of analysis. The review shows that the concept of cell is very important in the biological conceptualization, however, it also shows the need of additional research on this matter, from theoretical frameworks that pay more attention to the psychological level, in order to provide some guidance to improve the teaching and learning processes of the biological content that presupose the comprehension of living beings.

  9. Validation of deterministic and Monte Carlo codes for neutronics calculation of the IRT-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchurovskaya, M. V.; Alferov, V. P.; Geraskin, N. I.; Radaev, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the validation of a research reactor calculation using Monte Carlo and deterministic codes against experimental data and based on code-to-code comparison are presented. The continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCU-PTR and the nodal diffusion-based deterministic code TIGRIS were used for full 3-D calculation of the IRT MEPhI research reactor. The validation included the investigations for the reactor with existing high enriched uranium (HEU, 90 w/o) fuel and low enriched uranium (LEU, 19.7 w/o, U-9%Mo) fuel.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  11. A Janus Mucoadhesive and Omniphobic Device for Gastrointestinal Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhang, Shiyi; Lin, Jiaqi; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    A novel Janus device with omniphobic and mucoadhesive sides that exhibit the unique capacity for antifouling and extended gastrointestinal retention is fabricated. This system enables repulsion of the food and fluid stream by the luminal-facing omniphobic side and allows attachment to the gastrointestinal mucosa by the mucoadhesive side.

  12. Shear-induced interfacial assembly of Janus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvantalab, Hossein; Connington, Kevin W.; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of spherical Janus particles at the interface between two immiscible fluids using a multicomponent lattice-Boltzmann method. The Cahn-Hilliard model is used to evolve the composition for this binary system of incompressible fluids, while the particle-fluid interactions are taken into account by adding a supplemental force to recover the appropriate wettability at solid boundaries. We evaluate the capillary-induced interactions between multiple Janus particles at a sheared interface and demonstrate the possibility of directing their assembly. In response to the flow, all particles approach a steady orientation resulting from the balance between shear-induced torque and the resistance due to preferred wetting. At sufficiently large shear rates leading to strong capillary dipoles, the particles rearrange and form chains normal to the shear direction. For the particle sizes considered, an intermediate window of surface coverage between 32% and 65% is found to give effective alignment with order parameters in the range of 0.7-1.0. An interesting feature of this directed assembly method is that the structure is preserved after removing the flow field: Janus particles only rotate to upright orientation without disintegrating the chains. This approach can enable directing a randomly oriented or distributed cluster of Janus particles into an ordered structure with controllable rheological properties.

  13. Fuel-free locomotion of Janus motors: magnetically induced thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraban, Larysa; Streubel, Robert; Makarov, Denys; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy; Schmidt, Oliver G; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-02-26

    We present fuel-free locomotion of magnetic spherical Janus motors driven by magnetically induced thermophoresis--a self-diffusive propulsion of an object in any liquid media due to a local temperature gradient. Within this approach an ac magnetic field is applied to induce thermophoretic motion of the objects via heating a magnetic cap of the particles, while an additional dc magnetic field is used to orient Janus motors and guide their motion on a long time scale. Full control over the motion is achieved due to specific properties of ultrathin 100-nm-thick Permalloy (Py, Fe₁₉Ni₈₁ alloys) magnetic films resulting in a topologically stable magnetic vortex state in the cap structure of Janus motors. Realized here magnetically induced thermophoretic locomotion does not require catalytic chemical reactions that imply toxic reagents. In this respect, we addressed and successfully solved one of the main shortcomings in the field of artificial motors, namely being fully controlled and remain biocompatible. Therefore, our approach is attractive for biotechnological in vitro assays and even in vivo operations, since the functioning of Janus motors offers low toxicity; it is not dependent on the presence of the fuel molecules in solution. Furthermore, the suggested magnetic ac excitation is superior compared to the previously proposed optically induced heating using lasers as it does not require transparent packaging.

  14. Janus Kinase 2: An Epigenetic 'Writer' that Activates Leukemogenic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin He; Yi Zhang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) plays a critical role in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. Dawson et al. (2009; JAK2 phosphorylates histone H3Y41 and excludes Hplalpha from chromatin. Nature 461, 819-822) report that JAK2 performs this function by displacing the heterochromatin protein HP1α from chromatin through phosphorylation of histone H3.

  15. Janus fluid with fixed patch orientations: theory and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Miguel Ángel G; Fantoni, Riccardo; Giacometti, Achille; Santos, Andrés

    2013-03-07

    We study thermophysical properties of a Janus fluid with constrained orientations, using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. The Janus character is modeled by means of a Kern-Frenkel potential where each sphere has one hemisphere of square-well and the other of hard-sphere character. The orientational constraint is enforced by assuming that each hemisphere can only point either North or South with equal probability. The analytical approach hinges on a mapping of the above Janus fluid onto a binary mixture interacting via a "quasi" isotropic potential. The anisotropic nature of the original Kern-Frenkel potential is reflected by the asymmetry in the interactions occurring between the unlike components of the mixture. A rational-function approximation extending the corresponding symmetric case is obtained in the sticky limit, where the square-well becomes infinitely narrow and deep, and allows a fully analytical approach. Notwithstanding the rather drastic approximations in the analytical theory, this is shown to provide a rather precise estimate of the structural and thermodynamical properties of the original Janus fluid.

  16. Bioaugmentation of biological contact oxidation reactor (BCOR) with phenol-degrading bacteria for coal gasification wastewater (CGW) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Han, Hongjun; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Chunyan; Zhang, Linghan

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the biological contact oxidation reactor (BCOR) treating coal gasification wastewater (CGW) after augmented with phenol degrading bacteria (PDB). The PDB were isolated with phenol, 4-methyl phenol, 3,5-dimethyl phenol and resorcinol as carbon resources. Much of the refractory phenolic compounds were converted into easily-biodegradable compounds in spite of low TOC removal. The bioaugmentation with PDB significantly enhanced the removal of COD, total phenols (TP) and NH3-N, with efficiencies from 58% to 78%, 66% to 80%, and 5% to 25%, respectively. In addition, the augmented BCOR exhibited strong recovery capability in TP and COD removal while recovery of NH3-N removal needed longer time. Microbial community analysis revealed that the PDB presented as dominant populations in the bacteria consortia, which in turn determined the overall performance of the system.

  17. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Planning, executing and summarizing the project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Centres Seibersdorf was described within three technical papers already released in Nuclear Technology & Radiation Protection throughout the years 2003, 2006, and 2008. Following a suggestion from IAEA the project was investigated well after the files were closed regarding rather administrative than technical matters starting with the project mission, explaining the project structure and identifying the key factors and the key performance indicators. The continuous documentary and reporting system as implemented to fulfil the informational needs of stake-holders, management, and project staff alike is described. Finally the project is summarized in relationship to the performance indicators.

  18. Shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis of spent fuel transportation cask in research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Hassanzadeh, M; Gharib, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study, shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis were carried out for general material testing reactor (MTR) research reactors interim storage and relevant transportation cask. During these processes, three major terms were considered: source term, shielding, and criticality calculations. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5 was used for shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis and ORIGEN2.1 code for source term calculation. According to the results obtained, a cylindrical cask with body, top, and bottom thicknesses of 18, 13, and 13 cm, respectively, was accepted as the dual-purpose cask. Furthermore, it is shown that the total dose rates are below the normal transport criteria that meet the standards specified.

  19. Development of a steady thermal-hydraulic analysis code for the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wenxi; QIU Suizheng; GUO Yun; SU Guanghui; JIA Dounan; LIU Tiancai; ZHANG Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    A multi-channel model steady-state thermalhydraulic analysis code was developed for the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). By simulating the whole reactor core, the detailed mass flow distribution in the core was obtained. The result shows that structure size plays the most important role in mass flow distribution, and the influence of core power could be neglected under singlephase flow. The temperature field of the fuel element under unsymmetrical cooling condition was also obtained, which is necessary for further study such as stress analysis, etc. Of the fuel element. At the same time, considering the hot channel effect including engineering factor and nuclear factor, calculation of the mean and hot channel was carried out and it is proved that all thermal-hydraulic parameters satisfy the "Safety design regulation of CARR".

  20. Design of the cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, P.; Zhang, Hongxia; Bao, W. [Department of Physics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Functional Materials & Micro-nano Devices, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Schneidewind, A. [Jülich Center for Neutron Science (JCNS), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz MaierCLeibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), D-85747 Garching (Germany); Link, P. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grünwald, A.T.D. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Georgii, R. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hao, L.J.; Liu, Y.T. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, PO Box-275-30, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2016-06-11

    The design of the first cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations using neutron ray-tracing program McStas, the parameters of major neutron optics in this instrument are optimized. The neutron flux at sample position is estimated to be 5.6 ×10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s at neutron incident energy E{sub i}=5 meV when the reactor operates normally at the designed 60 MW power. The performances of several neutron supermirror polarizing devices are compared and their critical parameters are optimized for this spectrometer. The polarization analysis will be realized with a flexible switch from the unpolarized experimental mode.

  1. Design of the cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P.; Zhang, Hongxia; Bao, W.; Schneidewind, A.; Link, P.; Grünwald, A. T. D.; Georgii, R.; Hao, L. J.; Liu, Y. T.

    2016-06-01

    The design of the first cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations using neutron ray-tracing program McStas, the parameters of major neutron optics in this instrument are optimized. The neutron flux at sample position is estimated to be 5.6 ×107 n/cm2/s at neutron incident energy Ei=5 meV when the reactor operates normally at the designed 60 MW power. The performances of several neutron supermirror polarizing devices are compared and their critical parameters are optimized for this spectrometer. The polarization analysis will be realized with a flexible switch from the unpolarized experimental mode.

  2. Research on pressure control of pressurizer in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ling; Yang, Xuhong; Liu, Gang; Ye, Jianhua; Qian, Hong; Xue, Yang

    2010-07-01

    Pressurizer is one of the most important components in the nuclear reactor system. Its function is to keep the pressure of the primary circuit. It can prevent shutdown of the system from the reactor accident under the normal transient state while keeping the setting value in the normal run-time. This paper is mainly research on the pressure system which is running in the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. A conventional PID controller and a fuzzy controller are designed through analyzing the dynamic characteristics and calculating the transfer function. Then a fuzzy PID controller is designed by analyzing the results of two controllers. The fuzzy PID controller achieves the optimal control system finally.

  3. Collaborative Core Research Program for Chemical-Biological Warfare Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-04

    Research Center (UC-DDRC, part of UC-MDI). Using an EvoTec robot , single point (10 μM final solution test chemical concentration) 2 measurements...assay on neuroblastoma cell lines. We performed this method, as well as incorporated a novel method developed at US Army Medical Research Institute of...formulations chemists to determine the optimal dose methods. These new CWA countermeasures will be transitioned to the Chemical Biological Medical Systems for

  4. In focus: molecular and cell biology research in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xuebiao; Li, Dangsheng; Pei, Gang

    2013-09-01

    An interactive, intellectual environment with good funding opportunities is essential for the development and success of basic research. The fast-growing economy and investment in science, together with a visionary plan, have attracted foreign scholars to work in China, motivated world-class Chinese scientists to return and strengthened the country's international collaborations. As a result, molecular and cell biology research in China has evolved rapidly over the past decade.

  5. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olli Yli-Harja; Antti Ylip(a)(a); Matti Nykter; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  6. The Research Proposal in Biomechanical and Biological Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roger G.; Nollert, Matthias U.; Schmidtke, David W.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.

    2006-01-01

    Students in four biochemical and biological engineering courses for upper-­level undergraduates and graduate students were required to write a research proposal. Breaking the requirements down into segments (such as a summary with specific aims, rough draft, and final draft) due on different dates helped make the assignment more manageable for the…

  7. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Harja, Olli; Ylipää, Antti; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  8. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2008-03-21

    Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Danio rerio: the Janus of the bone from embryo to scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Massimo; Carnovali, Marta; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Summary Danio rerio (zebrafish), like the Roman god Janus, is an old animal model which is recently emerged and looks to the future with an increasing scientific success. Unlike other traditional animal models, zebrafish represents a versatile way to approach the study of the skeleton. Transparency of the larval stage, genetic manipulability and unique anatomical structures (scales) makes zebrafish a powerful and versatile instrument to investigate the bone tissue in terms of structure and function. Like Janus, zebrafish offers two different faces, or better, two models in one animal: larval and adult stage. The embryo can be used to isolate new genes involved in osteogenesis by large-scale mutagenesis screenings. The behavior of bone cells and genes in osteogenesis can be investigate by using transgenic lines, vital dyes, mutants and traditional molecular biology techniques. The adult zebrafish represents an important resource to study the pathways related to the bone metabolism and turnover. In particular, the properties of the caudal fin allow to study mechanisms of bone regeneration and reparation whereas the elasmoid scale represents an unique tool to investigate the bone metabolism under physiological or pathological conditions. PMID:26604948

  10. Design and calculation for the main shielding layer of researching reactor%反应堆主屏蔽的设计与计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟文发; 胡永明; 钟兆鹏

    2001-01-01

    为使反应堆处于运行状态时,对辐射源的屏蔽满足辐射安全的要求,以及对堆的各部件和材料满足辐射限制的要求,必须设计堆的主屏蔽层。介绍了主屏蔽的设计与计算方法,以研究堆为设计实例,给出了主屏蔽的主要计算结果表明,以池水和重混凝土作生物屏蔽能满足辐射安全限值的要求,设计的主屏蔽层是适宜的。%To satisfy the national safety criteria of the radiationshielding when the reactor is in operation, We must complete the design of shielding for the main body of reactor. This paper introduces the design and computing methods of the shielding for the main body of reactor, using the researching reactor as an example, and gives the results of the computing for the radiation shielding. The results show that it can satisfy the safety criteria of radiation to use water and heavy concrete as biological layer for radiation, so the design of the main layer for radiation shielding is reliable.

  11. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh [South African Young Nuclear Professional Society, PO Box 9396, Centurion, 0157 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  12. Biological removal of selenate and ammonium by activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, J; Nancharaiah, Y V; van Hullebusch, E D; Lens, P N L

    2017-04-01

    Wastewaters contaminated by both selenium and ammonium need to be treated prior to discharge into natural water bodies, but there are no studies on the simultaneous removal of selenium and ammonium. A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was inoculated with activated sludge and operated for 90days. The highest ammonium removal efficiency achieved was 98%, while the total nitrogen removal was 75%. Nearly a complete chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was attained after 16days of operation, whereas complete selenate removal was achieved only after 66days. The highest total Se removal efficiency was 97%. Batch experiments showed that the total Se in the aqueous phase decreased by 21% with increasing initial ammonium concentration from 50 to 100mgL(-1). This study showed that SBR can remove both selenate and ammonium via, respectively, bioreduction and partial nitrification-denitrification and thus offer possibilities for treating selenium and ammonium contaminated effluents.

  13. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Catherine Y; Park, Jin G; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743-D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease.

  14. Severe Accidents and New Reactors. Twenty Years of Research; Accidents severos y nuevos reactores. Veinte anos de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    2008-07-01

    A review was done on the main activities performed by the Programme for Nuclear Safety of CIEMAT in the field of nuclear reactor safety from 1985 to 2005. It covers the areas of severe accident and source term, advanced and passive reactors, containments analyses and plant applications. It is emphasized CIEMATs participation in national and international projects mainly in those supported by CSN, OECD and the EU. At the same time, experimental and analytical capabilities set up at CIEMAT, as PECA, RECA and GIRS for simulating aerosol pool scrubbing phenomena, hydrogen catalytic recombiner and sprays are been presented, together with an Annex on Generation IV. Two chapters were added, one on the nuclear power reactors in the world and another about the safety systems and principles. (Author)

  15. Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology: A New Epoch for Toxicology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T. Mc Auley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology and synthetic biology are emerging disciplines which are becoming increasingly utilised in several areas of bioscience. Toxicology is beginning to benefit from systems biology and we suggest in the future that is will also benefit from synthetic biology. Thus, a new era is on the horizon. This review illustrates how a suite of innovative techniques and tools can be applied to understanding complex health and toxicology issues. We review limitations confronted by the traditional computational approaches to toxicology and epidemiology research, using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and their effects on adverse birth outcomes as an illustrative example. We introduce how systems toxicology (and their subdisciplines, genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic toxicology will help to overcome such limitations. In particular, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of mathematical frameworks that computationally represent biological systems. Finally, we discuss the nascent discipline of synthetic biology and highlight relevant toxicological centred applications of this technique, including improvements in personalised medicine. We conclude this review by presenting a number of opportunities and challenges that could shape the future of these rapidly evolving disciplines.

  16. Application Method of Anthropometric Data for Operator Console of Exportable Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Goo Hyun; Lee, Jun Hun; Jeng, Ja Won; Lee, Youn Sang; Kim, Min Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper studied the method to apply the anthropometric data to operator console and large display that used to control room of the exportable research reactor. It is difficult to provide an appropriate operation environment personally to all operators. Therefore, this paper studied method to provide comfortable operation space common to most operators. In the future, it will be possible to enhance the completeness through conformity assessment of the design based on this paper. Therefore, the results of this paper will be an important basic data to design suitable for body size of the user for exportable products such as large display and operator console. Nuclear-related domestic technology has been exported overseas, starting with the JRTR (Jordan Research and Training Reactor) which is currently on its development scheduled to operate in March 2015. It means that Korean nuclear technology has reached the global level already. Therefore, design standards of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) are needed for good products to make more comfortable and suitable for export products. In addition, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reported that the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident in 1979 has been caused by inappropriate design of control panel, human errors, and incorrect procedures. Accordingly, the importance of HFE was raised. In this paper, we studied the application of anthropometric data for operator console and large display of exportable research reactor. Research for nuclear power has been active around the world with environment friendly image. Therefore, it is also very important to study the HFE as a big part in the field of nuclear safety.

  17. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options.

  18. The solar system: Importance of research to the biological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to describe the scope of scientific areas that comprise the current field of exobiology in the United States. From investigations of astrophysical phenomena that deal with the birth of stars and planetary systems to questions of molecular biology involving phylogenetic relationships among organisms, from attempts to simulate the synthesis of biological precursor molecules in the chemistry laboratory to making measurements of the organic constituents of Titan's atmosphere, these researches all converge toward a common objective--answering the question of how life came about in the universe.

  19. The opportunities for space biology research on the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1987-01-01

    The life sciences research facilities for the Space Station are being designed to accommodate both animal and plant specimens for long durations studies. This will enable research on how living systems adapt to microgravity, how gravity has shaped and affected life on earth, and further the understanding of basic biological phenomena. This would include multigeneration experiments on the effects of microgravity on the reproduction, development, growth, physiology, behavior, and aging of organisms. To achieve these research goals, a modular habitat system and on-board variable gravity centrifuges, capable of holding various animal, plant, cells and tissues, is proposed for the science laboratory.

  20. Finding an optimization of the plate element of Egyptian research reactor using genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAHED Mohamed; IBRAHIM Wesam; EFFAT Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    The second Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-2 went critical on the 27th of November 1997. The National Center of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC) has the responsibility of the evaluation and assessment of the safety of this reactor. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach to optimization of the fuel element plate.For an efficient search through the solution space we use a multi objective genetic algorithm which allows us to identify a set of Pareto optimal solutions providing the decision maker with the complete spectrum of optimal solutions with respect to the various targets. The aim of this paper is to propose a new approach for optimizing the fuel element plate in the reactor. The fuel element plate is designed with a view to improve reliability and lifetime and it is one of the most important elements during the shut down. In this present paper, we present a conceptual design approach for fuel element plate, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a fuel plate that maximizes a fitness value to optimize the safety design of the fuel plate.

  1. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor of Bangladesh Considering Different Cycles of Burnup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Altaf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnup dependent steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of TRIGA Mark-II research reactor has been carried out utilizing coupled point kinetics, neutronics and thermal hydraulics code EUREKA-2/RR. From the previous calculations of neutronics parameters including percentage burnup of individual fuel elements performed so far for 700 MWD burnt core of TRIGA reactor showed that the fuel rod predicted as hottest at the beginning of cycle (fresh core was found to remain as the hottest until 200 MWD of burn, but, with the progress of core burn, the hottest rod was found to be shifted and another rod in the core became the hottest. The present study intends to evaluate the thermal hydraulic parameters of these hottest fuel rods at different cycles of burnup, from beginning to 700 MWD core burnt considering reactor operates under steady state condition. Peak fuel centerline temperature, maximum cladding and coolant temperatures of the hottest channels were calculated. It revealed that maximum temperature reported for fuel clad and fuel centerline found to lie below their melting points which indicate that there is no chance of burnout on the fuel cladding surface and no blister in the fuel meat throughout the considered cycles of core burnt.

  2. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Teruo [Energis, Co., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Tokunaga, Sango [Japan Deep Sea Technology Association, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  4. Power up-grading study for the first Egyptian research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sawy Temraz, H.; Ashoub, N. E-mail: nageeb@pcn.aea.sci.eg; Fathallah, A

    2001-09-01

    In the present work, power up-grading study is performed, for the first Egyptian Research Reactor (ET-RR-1), using the present fuel basket with 4x4 fuel rods, (17.5 mm pitch), and a proposed fuel basket with 5x5 fuel rods, (14.0 mm pitch), without violating the thermal hydraulic safety criteria. These safety criteria are; fuel centerline temperature (fuel melting), clad surface temperature (surface boiling), outlet coolant temperature, and maximum heat flux (critical heat flux ratio). Different thermal reactor powers (2-10 MW) and different core coolant flow rates (450, 900, 1350 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}) are considered. The thermal hydraulic analysis was performed using the subchannel code COBRA-IIIC for the estimation of temperatures, coolant velocities and critical heat flux. The neutronic calculations were performed using WIMS-D4 code with 5-group neutron cross section library. These cross sections were adapted to use in the two-dimensional (2-D) diffusion code DIXY for core calculations. The study concluded that ET-RR-1 power can be upgraded safely up to 4 MW with the present 4x4-fuel basket and with the proposed 5x5-fuel basket up to 5 MW with the present coolant flow rate (900 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}). With the two fuel arrays, the reactor power can be upgraded to 6 MW with coolant flow rate of 1350 m{sup 3} h{sup -1} without violating the safety criterion. It is also concluded that, loading the ET-RR-1 core with the proposed fuel basket (5x5) increases the excess reactivity of the reactor core than the present 4x4 fuel matrix with equal U-235 mass load and gave better fuel economy of fuel utilization.

  5. Report of the work of the Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services Divisions for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1953-10-01

    The monthly progress report from the Argonne National Laboratory includes material from one-third of the Laboratory. The three divisions into which the work has been divided are: (l) Reactor Engineering, Physics, Instrument Research and Development, and Electronics, (2) Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services, and (3) Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Metallurgy, and Remote Control Engineering. The present monthly progress report covers the work in Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1953.

  6. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2014-10-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  7. Invited review article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J; Jones, David B; van Loon, Jack J W A; Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-10-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  8. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the facility license for the research reactor at the Dow Chemical Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This safety evaluation report for the application filed by the Dow Chemical Company for renewal of facility Operating License R-108 to continue to operate its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the grounds of the Michigan Division of the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan. The staff concludes that the Dow Chemical Company can continue to operate its reactor without endangering the health and safety of the public.

  10. The Colorado Plateau: cultural, biological, and physical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Stretching from the four corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, the Colorado Plateau is a natural laboratory for a wide range of studies. This volume presents 23 original articles drawn from more than 100 research projects presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. This scientific gathering revolved around research, inventory, and monitoring of lands in the region. The book's contents cover management techniques for cultural, biological, and physical resources, representing collaborative efforts among federal, university, and private sector scientists and land managers. Chapters on cultural concerns cover benchmarks of modern southwestern anthropological knowledge, models of past human activity and impact of modern visitation at newly established national monuments, challenges in implementing the 1964 Wilderness Act, and opportunities for increased federal research on Native American lands. The section on biological resources comprises sixteen chapters, with coverage that ranges from mammalian biogeography to responses of elk at the urban-wildland interface. Additional biological studies include the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation; research on bald eagles at Grand Canyon and tracking wild turkeys using radio collars; and management of palentological resources. Two final chapters on physical resources consider a proposed rerouting of the Rio de Flag River in urban Flagstaff, Arizona, and an examination of past climate patterns over the Plateau, using stream flow records and tree ring data. In light of similarities in habitat and climate across the Colorado Plateau, techniques useful to particular management units have been found to be applicable in many locations. This volume highlights an abundance of research that will prove useful for all of those working in the region, as well as for others seeking comparative studies that integrate research into land management actions.

  11. 2003 Biology and Biotechnology Research Program Overview and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prange, C

    2003-03-01

    LLNL conducts multidisciplinary bioscience to fill national needs. Our primary roles are to: develop knowledge and tools which enhance national security, including biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities, and energy and environmental security; develop understanding of genetic and biochemical processes to enhance disease prevention, detection and treatment; develop unique biochemical measurement and computational modeling capabilities which enable understanding of biological processes; and develop technology and tools which enhance healthcare. We execute our roles through integrated multidisciplinary programs that apply our competencies in: microbial and mammalian genomics--the characterization of DNA, the genes it encodes, their regulation and function and their role in living systems; protein function and biochemistry - the structure, function, and interaction of proteins and other molecules involved in the integrated biochemical function of the processes of life; computational modeling and understanding of biochemical systems--the application of high-speed computing technology to simulate and visualize complex, integrated biological processes; bioinformatics--databasing, networking, and analysis of biological data; and bioinstrumentation--the application of physical and engineering technologies to novel biological and biochemical measurements, laboratory automation, medical device development, and healthcare technologies. We leverage the Laboratory's exceptional capabilities in the physical, computational, chemical, environmental and engineering sciences. We partner with industry and universities to utilize their state-of-the art technology and science and to make our capabilities and discoveries available to the broader research community.

  12. Investigation of the properties of aluminium alloys used in the construction of nuclear research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajewska, E. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1993-11-01

    In the paper there are described the results of the studies of the properties of aluminium alloys using in the construction of research reactors, especially of the Polish alloy PAR-1 which belongs to the group of Al-Mg-Si alloys. The influence of the heat treatment on structure of the alloy as well as on the mechanical and corrosion properties was studying. In the paper the results of some properties of PAR-1 alloy after irradiation were done. (author). 27 refs, 43 figs, 9 tabs.

  13. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  14. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The appendices contains additional relevant information on: Environment Australia EIS Guidelines, composition of the Study Team, Consultation Activities and Resuits, Relevant Legislation and Regulatory Requirements, Exampies of Multi-Purpose Research Reactors, Impacts of Radioactive Emissions and Wastes Generated at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, Technical Analysis of the Reference Accident, Flora and Fauna Species Lists, Summary of Environmental Commitments and an Outline of the Construction Environmental Management Plan Construction Environmental Management Plan figs., ills., refs. Prepared for Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

  15. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning project of the TRIGA mark - 2 and 3 research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K. J.; Baik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Lee, B. J.; Yang, S. H.

    2001-01-15

    The decommissioning license for KRR (Korea Research Reactor) 1 and 2 was issued Nov. 23, 2000. The atmospheric stability on the KRR site was evaluated using the meteorological data measured at the site. From the results of this evaluation, the population dose was evaluated for the public who lives at the periphery of the site. The Radiation Safety Management Guideline was developed and it will be used as a base line making Radiation Safety Management Procedure. The container was specially designed and manufactured for the storing of low level radioactive solid waste arising from the D and D activities. Firstly, the 50 containers were completely manufactured.

  17. A Management Strategy for the Heavy Water Reflector Cooling System of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. S.; Park, Y. C.; Lim, S. P. (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Heavy water is used as the reflector and the moderator of the HANARO research reactor. After over 10 years operation since first criticality in 1995 there arose some operational issues related with the tritium. A task force team(TFT) has been operated for 1 year since September 2006 to study and deduce resolutions of the issues concerning the tritium and the degradation of heavy water in the HANARO reflector system. The TFT drew many recommendations on the hardware upgrade, tritium containing air control, heavy water quality management, waste management, and tritium measurement system upgrade.

  18. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, M S; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Habib, N; Adib, M

    2015-03-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-133keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named "QMNB" was developed in the "MATLAB" programming language to perform the required calculations.

  19. Research Applications of Proteolytic Enzymes in Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Tőzsér

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes (also termed peptidases, proteases and proteinases are capable of hydrolyzing peptide bonds in proteins. They can be found in all living organisms, from viruses to animals and humans. Proteolytic enzymes have great medical and pharmaceutical importance due to their key role in biological processes and in the life-cycle of many pathogens. Proteases are extensively applied enzymes in several sectors of industry and biotechnology, furthermore, numerous research applications require their use, including production of Klenow fragments, peptide synthesis, digestion of unwanted proteins during nucleic acid purification, cell culturing and tissue dissociation, preparation of recombinant antibody fragments for research, diagnostics and therapy, exploration of the structure-function relationships by structural studies, removal of affinity tags from fusion proteins in recombinant protein techniques, peptide sequencing and proteolytic digestion of proteins in proteomics. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular biological aspects of proteolytic enzymes and summarize their applications in the life sciences.

  20. A sequencing batch reactor system for high-level biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal from abattoir wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Romain; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bernet, Nicolas; Marcos, Marcelino; Yilmaz, Gulsum; Keller, Jürg

    2009-06-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system is demonstrated to biologically remove nitrogen, phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand (COD) to very low levels from abattoir wastewater. Each 6 h cycle contained three anoxic/anaerobic and aerobic sub-cycles with wastewater fed at the beginning of each anoxic/anaerobic period. The step-feed strategy was applied to avoid high-level build-up of nitrate or nitrite during nitrification, and therefore to facilitate the creation of anaerobic conditions required for biological phosphorus removal. A high degree removal of total phosphorus (>98%), total nitrogen (>97%) and total COD (>95%) was consistently and reliably achieved after a 3-month start-up period. The concentrations of total phosphate and inorganic nitrogen in the effluent were consistently lower than 0.2 mg P l(-1) and 8 mg N l(-1), respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the sludge was enriched in Accumulibacter spp. (20-40%), a known polyphosphate accumulating organism, whereas the known glycogen accumulating organisms were almost absent. The SBR received two streams of abattoir wastewater, namely the effluent from a full-scale anaerobic pond (75%) and the effluent from a lab-scale high-rate pre-fermentor (25%), both receiving raw abattoir wastewater as feed. The pond effluent contained approximately 250 mg N l(-1) total nitrogen and 40 mg P l(-1) of total phosphorus, but relatively low levels of soluble COD (around 500 mg l(-1)). The high-rate lab-scale pre-fermentor, operated at 37 degrees C and with a sludge retention time of 1 day, proved to be a cheap and effective method for providing supplementary volatile fatty acids allowing for high-degree of biological nutrient removal from abattoir wastewater.

  1. Production of sorption functional media (SFM) from clinoptilolite tailings and its performance investigation in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yan [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Qi, Jingyao, E-mail: qjy_hit@yahoo.cn [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chi, Liying [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Wang, Dong [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Ke; Li, Xin [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Sorption functional media (SFM) were prepared using zeolite tailings. ► Two upflow BAFs were applied to treat municipal wastewater. ► SFM BAF brought a relative superiority to haydite reactor. ► SFM BAF has a stronger adaptability to low temperature (6–11°C) for NH{sub 3}-N removal. ► The application provided a promising way in zeolite tailings utilization. -- Abstract: The few reuse and large stockpile of zeolite tailings led to a series of social and environmental problems. This study investigated the possibility of using the zeolite tailings as one of principal raw materials to prepare sorption functional media (SFM) by a high temperature sintering process. The SFM was used to serve as a biomedium in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor for domestic wastewater treatment, and its purification performance was examined. The physical, chemical and sorption properties of SFM were also determined. The microstructure of the SFM was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results revealed that: (1) zeolite tailings could be used to produce the SFM under the optimal sintering parameters; (2) the sorption and desorption isotherm of ammonia nitrogen on SFM could be well described by the Langmuir formula; (3) in terms of removing organic matter, ammonia nitrogen, turbidity and colourity, the performance of the biofilter with SFM was superior to that with haydite; and (4) SFM BAF has a stronger adaptability to low temperature (6–11 °C) for NH{sub 3}-N removal compared to haydite BAF. Therefore, the SFM produced from the zeolite tailings was suitable to serve as the biomedium in the domestic wastewater treatment.

  2. Microfauna communities as performance indicators for an A/O Shortcut Biological Nitrogen Removal moving-bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, O; Salvadó, H; Auset, M; Hernández, C; Malfeito, J J

    2013-06-01

    The microfauna communities present in the mixed liquor and biofilm of an Anoxic/Oxic Shortcut Biofilm Nitrogen Removal moving-bed biofilm process were characterised in order to optimise process control through the use of bioindicators. The system operated at high ammonium concentrations, with an average of 588 ± 220 mg N-NH4(+) L(-1) in the influent, 161 ± 80 mg L(-1) in the anoxic reactor and 74 ± 71.2 mg L(-1) in the aerobic reactor. Up to 20 different taxa were identified, including ciliates (4), flagellates (11), amoebae (4) and nematodes (1). Compared to conventional wastewater treatment processes (WWTPs), this process can be defined as a flagellates-predominant system with a low diversity of ciliates. Flagellates were mainly dominant in the mixed liquor, demonstrating high tolerance to ammonium and the capacity for survival over a long time under anoxic conditions. The data obtained provide interesting values of maximum and minimum tolerance ranges to ammonium, nitrates and nitrites for the ciliate species Cyclidium glaucoma, Colpoda ecaudata, Vorticella microstoma-complex and Epistylis cf. rotans. The last of these was the only ciliate species that presented a constant and abundant population, almost exclusively in the aerobic biofilm. Epistylis cf. rotans dynamics showed a high negative correlation with ammonium variations and a positive correlation with ammonium removal efficiency. Hence, the results indicate that Epistylis cf. rotans is a good bioindicator of the nitrification process in this system. The study of protozoan communities in unexplored WWTPs sheds light on species ecology and their role under conditions that have been little studied in WWTPs, and could offer new biological management tools.

  3. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  4. Improving the performance of the Egyptian second testing nuclear research reactor using interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller tuned by modified biogeography-based optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, M.M., E-mail: M.M.Sayed@ieee.org; Saad, M.S.; Emara, H.M.; Abou El-Zahab, E.E.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A modified version of the BBO was proposed. • A novel method for interval type-2 FLC design tuned by MBBO was proposed. • The performance of the ETRR-2 was improved by using IT2FLC tuned by MBBO. -- Abstract: Power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. The conventional proportional derivative (PD) controller is currently used in the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). In this paper, we propose a modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) algorithm to design the interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller (IT2FLC) to improve the performance of the Egyptian second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). Biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a novel evolutionary algorithm that is based on the mathematical models of biogeography. Biogeography is the study of the geographical distribution of biological organisms. In the BBO model, problem solutions are represented as islands, and the sharing of features between solutions is represented as immigration and emigration between the islands. A modified version of the BBO is applied to design the IT2FLC to get the optimal parameters of the membership functions of the controller. We test the optimal IT2FLC obtained by modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) using the integral square error (ISE) and is compared with the currently used PD controller.

  5. Biological phenol degradation in a gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecarver, K D; Fan, L S

    1989-03-01

    Biological phenol degradation was performed experimentally in a gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed bioreactor using a mixed culture of living cells immobilized on activated carbon particles. A comprehensive model was developed for this system utilizing double-substrate limiting kinetics. The model was used to simulate the effects of changing inlet phenol concentration and biofilm thickness on the rate of biodegradation for two different types of support particles. The model shows that gas-liquid mass transfer is the limiting step in the rate of phenol biodegradation when the phenol loading is high.

  6. Antibiotic abatement in different advanced oxidation processes coupled with a biological sequencing batch biofilm reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esplugas, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Benito, J.; Sans, C.

    2009-07-01

    During the last decade, the lack of fresh water is becoming a major concern. Recently, the present of recalcitrant products such as pharmaceuticals has caused a special interest due to their undefined environmental impact. Among these antibiotics are one of the numerous recalcitrant pollutants present in surface waters that might not be completely removed in the biological stage of sewage treatment plants because of their antibacterial nature. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have proved to be highly efficient for the degradation of most organic pollutants in wastewaters. (Author)

  7. Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment.

  8. Irradiation of electronic components and circuits at the Portuguese Research Reactor: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, J.G.; Ramos, A.R.; Fernandes, A.C.; Santos, J.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The behavior of electronic components and circuits under radiation is a concern shared by the nuclear industry, the space community and the high-energy physics community. Standard commercial components are used as much as possible instead of radiation hard components, since they are easier to obtain and allow a significant reduction of costs. However, these standard components need to be tested in order to determine their radiation tolerance. The Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) is a 1 MW pool-type reactor, operating since 1961. The irradiation of electronic components and circuits is one area where a 1 MW reactor can be competitive, since the fast neutron fluences required for testing are in most cases well below 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}. A program was started in 1999 to test electronics components and circuits for the LHC facility at CERN, initially using a dedicated in-pool irradiation device and later a beam line with tailored neutron and gamma filters. Neutron filters are essential to reduce the intensity of the thermal neutron flux, which does not produce significant defects in electronic components but produces unwanted radiation from activation of contacts and packages of integrated circuits and also of the printed circuit boards. In irradiations performed within the line-of-sight of the core of a fission reactor there is simultaneous gamma radiation which complicates testing in some cases. Filters can be used to reduce its importance and separate testing with a pure gamma radiation source can contribute to clarify some irradiation results. Practice has shown the need to introduce several improvements to the procedures and facilities over the years. We will review improvements done in the following areas: - Optimization of neutron and gamma filters; - Dosimetry procedures in mixed neutron / gamma fields; - Determination of hardness parameter and 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence; - Temperature measurement and control during irradiation; - Follow-up of reactor

  9. Assessment of the reliability of neutronic parameters of Ghana Research Reactor-1 control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amponsah-Abu, E.O., E-mail: edwardabu2002@yahoo.com [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG. 80, Legon-Accra (Ghana); Gbadago, J.K. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG. 80, Legon-Accra (Ghana); Akaho, E.H.K.; Akoto-Bamford, S. [School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, University of Ghana (Ghana); Gyamfi, K.; Asamoah, M.; Baidoo, I.K. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG. 80, Legon-Accra (Ghana)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The reliability of neutronics parameters of GHARR-I was assessed. • The reactor was operated at different power levels of 5–30 kW. • The pre-set flux was compared with the flux in the inner irradiation site. • Decrease in the core reactivity caused difference in flux on the meters and site. • Neutronic parameters become reliable when operation is done at reactivity of 4 mk. - Abstract: The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) has been in operation for the past 19 years using a Micro-Computer Closed Loop System (MCCLS) and Control Console (CC) as the control systems. The two control systems were each coupled separately with a micro-fission chamber to measure the current pulses of the neutron fluxes in the core at excess reactivity of 4 mk. The MCCLS and CC meter readings at a pre-set flux of 5.0 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} s were 6.42 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} s and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} s respectively. Due to ageing and obsolescence, the MCCLS and some components that control the sensitivity and the reading mechanism of the meters were replaced. One of the fission chambers was also removed and the two control systems were coupled to one fission chamber. The reliability of the neutronic parameters of the control systems was assessed after the replacement. The results showed that when the reactor is operated at different power levels of 5–30 kW using one micro-fission chamber, the pre-set neutron fluxes at the control systems is 1.6 times the neutron fluxes obtained using a flux monitor at the inner irradiation site two of the reactor. The average percentage deviations of the obtained fluxes from the pre-set values of 1.67 × 10{sup 11}–1.0 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} s were 36.5%. This compares very well with the decrease in core excess reactivity of 36.3% of the nominal value of 4 mk, after operating the reactor at critical neutron flux of 1.0 × 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s.

  10. Investigation of Classification and Design Requirements for Digital Software for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gee Young; Jung, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Park, C

    2005-06-15

    As the digital technology is being developed drastically, it is being applied to various industrial instrumentation and control (I and C) fields. In the nuclear power plants, I and C systems are also being installed by digital systems replacing their corresponding analog systems installed previously. There had been I and C systems constructed by analog technology especially for the reactor protection system in the research reactor HANARO. Parallel to the pace of the current trend for digital technology, it is desirable that all I and C systems including the safety critical and non-safety systems in an advanced research reactor is to be installed based on the computer based system. There are many attractable features in using digital systems against existing analog systems in that the digital system has a superior performance for a function and it is more flexible than the analog system. And any fruit gained from the newly developed digital technology can be easily incorporated into the existing digital system and hence, the performance improvement of a computer based system can be implemented conveniently and promptly. Moreover, the capability of high integrity in electronic circuits reduces the electronic components needed to construct the processing device and makes the electronic board simple, and this fact reveals that the hardware failure itself are unlikely to occur in the electronic device other than some electric problems. Balanced the fact mentioned above are the roles and related issues of the software loaded on the digital integrated hardware. Some defects in the course of software development might induce a severe damage on the computer system and plant systems and therefore it is obvious that comprehensive and deep considerations are to be placed on the development of the software in the design of I and C system for use in an advanced research reactor. The work investigates the domestic and international standards on the classifications of digital

  11. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  13. Combination of ion exchange system and biological reactors for simultaneous removal of ammonia and organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wooshin; Jang, Eunhee; Lee, Myun-Joo; Yu, Seungho; Kim, Tak-Hyun

    2011-04-01

    A novel process for a simultaneous removal of ammonia and organics was developed on the basis of ion exchange and biological reactions. From batch experiments, it was found out that NH(4)(+) could be removed effectively by combining cation exchange and biological nitrification showing 0.98 mg N/m(2) ∙ s of a maximum flux. On the other hand, the removal of NO(3)(-) was 3.5 times faster than NH(4)(+) and the maximum flux was calculated to be 3.4 mg N/m(2) ∙ s. The systems for NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) removal were combined for establishing the IEBR process. When the process was operated in a continuous mode, approximately 95.8% of NH(4)(+) was removed showing an average flux of 0.22 mg N/m(2) · s. The removal efficiency of total nitrogen was calculated as 94.5% whereas that of organics was 99.5%. It was concluded that the IEBR process would be effectively used for a simultaneous removal of NH(4)(+) and organics.

  14. Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

    2008-06-23

    This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics

  15. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  16. Self-assembly of Janus particles under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Bianchi, Emanuela; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2015-05-21

    We investigate the self-assembly of colloidal Janus particles under shear flow by employing hybrid molecular dynamics simulations that explicitly take into account hydrodynamic interactions. Under quiescent conditions, the amphiphilic colloids form spherical micellar aggregates of different sizes, where the solvophobic hemispheres are directed towards the core and the solvophilic caps are exposed to the solvent. When sufficiently strong shear is applied, the micelles disaggregate with a consequent decay of the average cluster size. Nonetheless, we find an intermediate shear rate regime where the balance between rearrangement and dissociation favors the growth of the aggregates. Additionally, our simulations show that clusters composed of either 6 or 13 particles are the most stable towards the shear flow due to their high geometric symmetry. Our findings open up a new range of applications for Janus particles, ranging from biotechnology to sensor systems.

  17. Bidirectional microfluidic pumping using an array of magnetic Janus microspheres rotating around magnetic disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, Wesley T E; Cadena, Natalia L; Bomer, Johan; de Weerd, Eddy L; Abelmann, Leon; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-07-07

    We demonstrate a novel, flexible and programmable method to pump liquid through microchannels in lab-on-a-chip systems without the use of an external pump. The pumping principle is based on the rotation of ferromagnetic Janus microspheres around permalloy disks, driven by an external rotating magnetic field. By placing the disks close to the edge of the microchannel, a pumping rate of at least 0.3 nL min(-1) was measured using tracking microspheres. Geometric programming of the pumping direction is possible by positioning the magnetic disk close to the side wall. A second degree of freedom in the pumping direction is offered by the rotational direction of the external magnetic field. This method is especially suited for flow-controlled recirculation of chemical and biological species in microchannels - for example, medium recirculation in culture chambers - opening the way towards novel, portable, on-chip applications without the need for external fluidic or electrical connections.

  18. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  19. The final status of the decommissioning of research reactors in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Hong, S. B.; Park, J. H.; Chung, U. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A decommissioning project for the Korean Research Reactors (KRR-1 and 2) was started in 1997 and had been carried out with the goal of completion being by the end of 2008. All the facilities were dismantled and the building surfaces decontaminated. The radioactive waste was packed into 200 liter drums and 4 m{sup 3} containers and temporarily stored on site until their final disposal at the national repository facility. Some of the releasable waste was freely released and utilized for the non-nuclear industries. The assessment of the residual radioactivity was carried out according to Multi Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual guidance, and accordingly, the safety of the site release was verified. The site and the buildings will be cleared for a reuse for non nuclear purposes after a review of the assessment. In this paper, the final status of the decommissioning of research reactors in Korea including dismantlement processes, waste management and a final assessment for unrestricted use of the site and buildings for the final goal of the decommissioning project that will be described. (Author)

  20. The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [and others

    1997-08-01

    During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.