WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological reactive intermediates

  1. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  2. Nitrous oxide production from reactive nitrification intermediates: a concerted action of biological and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Nicolas; Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Wei, Jing; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    This contribution tries to open up a new perspective on biogeochemical N2O production processes, taking the term bio-geo-chemistry literally. What if a major part of N2O is produced from reactive intermediates of microbiological N turnover processes ("bio…") leaking out of the involved microorganisms into the soil ("…geo…") and then reacting chemically ("…chemistry") with the surrounding matrix? There are at least two major reactive N intermediates that might play a significant role in these coupled biological-chemical reactions, i.e. hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitrite (NO2-), both of which are produced during nitrification under oxic conditions, while NO2- is also produced during denitrification under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, NH2OH is assumed to be also a potential intermediate of DNRA and/or anammox. First, this contribution will summarize information about several chemical reactions involving NH2OH and NO2- leading to the formation of N2O. These abiotic reactions are: reactions of NO2- with reduced metal cations, nitrosation reactions of NO2- and soil organic matter (SOM), the reaction between NO2- and NH2OH, and the oxidation of NH2OH by oxidized metal ions. While these reactions can occur over a broad range of soil characteristics, they are ignored in most current N trace gas studies in favor of biological processes only. Disentangling microbiological from purely chemical N2O production is further complicated by the fact that the chemically formed N2O is either undiscernible from N2O produced during nitrification, or shows an intermediate 15N site preference between that of N2O from nitrification and denitrification, respectively. Results from experiments with live and sterilized soil samples, with artificial soil mixtures and with phenolic lignin decomposition model compounds will be presented that demonstrate the potential contribution of these abiotic processes to soil N trace gas emissions, given a substantial leakage rate of these reactive

  3. Sulfur-centered reactive intermediates derived from the oxidation of sulfur compounds of biological interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedinzadeh, Z. [Lab. de Chimie Physique, UMR, Univ. Rene Descartes, Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    Sulphur compounds play a central role in the structure and activity of many vital systems. In the living cell, sulfur constitutes an essential part of the defense against oxidative damage and is transformed into a variety of sulfur free radical species. Many studies of the chemistry of sulfur-centered radicals using pulse radiolysis and photolysis techniques to detect and measure the kinetics of these radicals have been published and reviewed. This paper discusses the present state of research on the formation and reactivity of certain sulfur-centered radicals [RS{sup .}, RSS{sup .}, RS{sup .+}, (RSSR){sup .+}] and their implications for biological systems. (author)

  4. Covalent functionalization of graphene with reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyeung; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-01-15

    Graphene, a material made exclusively of sp(2) carbon atoms with its π electrons delocalized over the entire 2D network, is somewhat chemically inert. Covalent functionalization can enhance graphene's properties including opening its band gap, tuning conductivity, and improving solubility and stability. Covalent functionalization of pristine graphene typically requires reactive species that can form covalent adducts with the sp(2) carbon structures in graphene. In this Account, we describe graphene functionalization reactions using reactive intermediates of radicals, nitrenes, carbenes, and arynes. These reactive species covalently modify graphene through free radical addition, CH insertion, or cycloaddition reactions. Free radical additions are among the most common reaction, and these radicals can be generated from diazonium salts and benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer from graphene to aryl diazonium ion or photoactivation of benzoyl peroxide yields aryl radicals that subsequently add to graphene to form covalent adducts. Nitrenes, electron-deficient species generated by thermal or photochemical activation of organic azides, can functionalize graphene very efficiently. Because perfluorophenyl nitrenes show enhanced bimolecular reactions compared with alkyl or phenyl nitrenes, perfluorophenyl azides are especially effective. Carbenes are used less frequently than nitrenes, but they undergo CH insertion and C═C cycloaddition reactions with graphene. In addition, arynes can serve as a dienophile in a Diels-Alder type reaction with graphene. Further study is needed to understand and exploit the chemistry of graphene. The generation of highly reactive intermediates in these reactions leads to side products that complicate the product composition and analysis. Fundamental questions remain about the reactivity and regioselectivity of graphene. The differences in the basal plane and the undercoordinated edges of graphene and the zigzag versus arm-chair configurations

  5. On the reactivity and selectivity of donor glycosides in glycochemistry and glycobiology : trapped covalent intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Codee, Jeroen D. C.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of sugar donors and the stability of covalent intermediates formed in both chemical and biological systems is an active subject of study in both glycochemistry and glycobiology. Knowledge of the structure of these intermediates is vital for understanding reactivity and stereoselectivi

  6. On the reactivity and selectivity of donor glycosides in glycochemistry and glycobiology : trapped covalent intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Codee, Jeroen D. C.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of sugar donors and the stability of covalent intermediates formed in both chemical and biological systems is an active subject of study in both glycochemistry and glycobiology. Knowledge of the structure of these intermediates is vital for understanding reactivity and

  7. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  8. Reactive nitrogen intermediates suppress the primary immunologic response to Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, S H; Wing, E J; Hoffman, R A; Simmons, R L

    1993-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), e.g., nitric oxide derived from a terminal guanido nitrogen atom of L-arginine, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. The function of these intermediates in host defenses in vivo, however, is presently unclear. Experiments were undertaken to determine the role of RNI in the resolution of primary listerial infections of the liver. Serum RNI levels were elevated significantly in mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, a marked increase in RNI production was found in cultures of the parenchymal, as well as the nonparenchymal, liver cells obtained from Listeria-infected mice. RNI did not kill Listeria treated directly, however, nor were they a factor in the listericidal activity exhibited by hepatic cells. Rather, the elevated production of RNI during primary infection appeared to promote the replication of Listeria in vivo. Mice administered NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of RNI production, exhibited a 10- and a 100-fold reduction in the number of Listeria in their lives on days 3 and 7 postinfection, respectively. In vitro, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine stimulated the Ag-specific proliferation of T lymphocytes derived from Listeria-infected mice at concentrations that inhibited RNI production. These latter findings suggest that the elevated production of RNI during primary listerial infections suppresses host defenses by diminishing the proliferation and, consequently, the biologic response of immune cell populations.

  9. Receptor- and reactive intermediate-mediated mechanisms of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter G; Lee, Crystal J J; McCallum, Gordon P; Perstin, Julia; Harper, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely alter the development of the fetus at critical periods during pregnancy, resulting in death, or in structural and functional birth defects in the surviving offspring. This process of teratogenesis may not be evident until a decade or more after birth. Postnatal functional abnormalities include deficits in brain function, a variety of metabolic diseases, and cancer. Due to the high degree of fetal cellular division and differentiation, and to differences from the adult in many biochemical pathways, the fetus is highly susceptible to teratogens, typically at low exposure levels that do not harm the mother. Insights into the mechanisms of teratogenesis come primarily from animal models and in vitro systems, and involve either receptor-mediated or reactive intermediate-mediated processes. Receptor-mediated mechanisms involving the reversible binding of xenobiotic substrates to a specific receptor are exemplified herein by the interaction of the environmental chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or "dioxin") with the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which translocates to the nucleus and, in association with other proteins, binds to AH-responsive elements (AHREs) in numerous genes, initiating changes in gene transcription that can perturb development. Alternatively, many xenobiotics are bioactivated by fetal enzymes like the cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) to highly unstable electrophilic or free radical reactive intermediates. Electrophilic reactive intermediates can covalently (irreversibly) bind to and alter the function of essential cellular macromolecules (proteins, DNA), causing developmental anomalies. Free radical reactive intermediates can enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and/or altered signal transduction. The teratogenicity of reactive intermediates is determined to a large extent

  10. Nitrenes, carbenes, diradicals, and ylides. Interconversions of reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentrup, Curt

    2011-06-21

    Rearrangements of aromatic and heteroaromatic nitrenes and carbenes can be initiated with either heat or light. The thermal reaction is typically induced by flash vacuum thermolysis, with isolation of the products at low temperatures. Photochemical experiments are conducted either under matrix isolation conditions or in solution at ambient temperature. These rearrangements are usually initiated by ring expansion of the nitrene or carbene to a seven-membered ring ketenimine, carbodiimide, or allene (that is, a cycloheptatetraene or an azacycloheptatetraene when a nitrogen is involved). Over the last few years, we have found that two types of ring opening take place as well. Type I is an ylidic ring opening that yields nitrile ylides or diazo compounds as transient intermediates. Type II ring opening produces either dienylnitrenes (for example, from 2-pyridylnitrenes) or 1,7-(1,5)-diradicals (such as those formed from 2-quinoxalinylnitrenes), depending on which of these species is better stabilized by resonance. In this Account, we describe our achievements in elucidating the nature of the ring-opened species and unraveling the connections between the various reactive intermediates. Both of these ring-opening reactions are found, at least in some cases, to dominate the subsequent chemistry. Examples include the formation of ring-opened ketenimines and carbodiimides, as well as the ring contraction reactions that form five-membered ring nitriles (such as 2- and 3-cyanopyrroles from pyridylnitrenes, N-cyanoimidazoles from 2-pyrazinyl and 4-pyrimidinylnitrenes, N-cyanopyrazoles from 2-pyrimidinylnitrenes and 3-pyridazinylnitrenes, and so forth). The mechanisms of formation of the open-chain and ring-contraction products were unknown at the onset of this study. In the course of our investigation, several reactions with three or more consecutive reactive intermediates have been unraveled, such as nitrene, seven-membered cyclic carbodiimide, and open-chain nitrile ylide

  11. Intermediate Depth Earthquakes in Middle America: Fault Reactivation or Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, M. A.; Warren, L. M.; Silver, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes are often attributed to dehydration embrittlement reactivating pre-existing weak zones. The orientations of pre-subduction faults are particularly well known offshore of Middle America, where seismic reflection profiles show outer-rise faults dipping towards the trench and extending >20~km into the lithosphere. If water is transported along these faults and incorporated into hydrous minerals, the faults may be reactivated later when the minerals dehydrate. In this case, the fault orientations should be the same in the outer rise and at depth, after accounting for the angle of subduction. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the directivity of 54 large (M_W > 5.7) earthquakes between 40--220~km depth in the Middle America Trench. For 15 of these earthquakes, the directivity vector allows us to confidently distinguish the fault plane of the earthquake. Between 40--85~km depth, we observe both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes. The subvertical fault planes are consistent with the reactivation of outer rise faults, whereas the subhorizontal fault planes suggest the formation of new faults. Deeper than 85~km, we only observe subhorizontal faults, indicating that the outer rise faults are no longer reactivated. The occurrence of only subhorizontal faults may be due to unbending stresses preferentially creating horizontal faults, or an isobaric rupture process.

  12. Role of MGST1 in reactive intermediate-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtney S Schaffert

    2011-01-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1, EC 2.5.1.18) is a membrane bound glutathione transferase extensively studied for its ability to detoxify reactive intermediates, including metabolic electrophile intermediates and lipophilic hydroperoxides through its glutathione dependent transferase and peroxidase activities. It is expressed in high amounts in the liver, located both in the endoplasmic reticulum and the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. This enzyme is activated by oxidative stress. Binding of GSH and modification of cysteine 49 (the oxidative stress sensor) has been shown to increase activation and induce conformational changes in the enzyme. These changes have either been shown to enhance the protective effect ascribed to this enzyme or have been shown to contribute to cell death through mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation. The purpose of this review is to elucidate how one enzyme found in two places in the cell subjected to the same conditions of oxidative stress could both help protect against and contribute to reactive oxygen species-induced liver injury.

  13. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we...... indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first...

  14. Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbie, Russell K

    2007-01-01

    Intended for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in biophysics, physiology, medical physics, cell biology, and biomedical engineering, this wide-ranging text bridges the gap between introductory physics and its application to the life and biomedical sciences. This extensively revised and updated fourth edition reflects new developments at the burgeoning interface between physics and biomedicine. Among the many topics treated are: forces in the skeletal system; fluid flow, with examples from the circulatory system; the logistic equation; scaling; transport of neutral particles by diffusion and by solvent drag; membranes and osmosis; equipartition of energy in statistical mechanics; the chemical potential and free energy; biological magnetic fields; membranes and gated channels in membranes; linear and nonlinear feedback systems; nonlinear phenomena, including biological clocks and chaotic behavior; signal analysis, noise and stochastic resonance detection of weak signals; image formation and...

  15. Visualizing biological reaction intermediates with DNA curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yiling; Jiang, Yanzhou; Qi, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    Single-molecule approaches have tremendous potential analyzing dynamic biological reaction with heterogeneity that cannot be effectively accessed via traditional ensemble-level biochemical approaches. The approach of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) curtains developed by Dr Eric Greene and his research team at Columbia University is a high-throughput single-molecule technique that utilizes fluorescent imaging to visualize protein–DNA interactions directly and allows the acquisition of statistically relevant information from hundreds or even thousands of individual reactions. This review aims to summarize the past, present, and future of DNA curtains, with an emphasis on its applications to solve important biological questions.

  16. Reactive intermediates revealed in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Jason D.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Chan, ManNin; Loza, Christine L.; Kwan, Alan J.; Hersey, Scott P.; Flagan, Richard C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Isoprene is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosol; however, the oxidation pathways that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have remained elusive. Here, we identify the role of two key reactive intermediates, epoxydiols of isoprene (IEPOX = β-IEPOX + δ-IEPOX) and methacryloylperoxynitrate (MPAN), which are formed during isoprene oxidation under low- and high-NOx conditions, respectively. Isoprene low-NOx SOA is enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol (mass yield 28.6%) over that in the presence of neutral aerosol (mass yield 1.3%). Increased uptake of IEPOX by acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions is shown to explain this enhancement. Under high-NOx conditions, isoprene SOA formation occurs through oxidation of its second-generation product, MPAN. The similarity of the composition of SOA formed from the photooxidation of MPAN to that formed from isoprene and methacrolein demonstrates the role of MPAN in the formation of isoprene high-NOx SOA. Reactions of IEPOX and MPAN in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants (i.e., acidic aerosol produced from the oxidation of SO2 and NO2, respectively) could be a substantial source of “missing urban SOA” not included in current atmospheric models. PMID:20080572

  17. Intermediate physics for medicine and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbie, Russell K

    2015-01-01

    This classic text has been used in over 20 countries by advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in biophysics, physiology, medical physics, neuroscience, and biomedical engineering. It bridges the gap between an introductory physics course and the application of physics to the life and biomedical sciences. Extensively revised and updated, the fifth edition incorporates new developments at the interface between physics and biomedicine. New coverage includes cyclotrons, photodynamic therapy, color vision, x-ray crystallography, the electron microscope, cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation, nanomedicine, and other topics highlighted in the National Research Council report BIO2010. As with the previous edition, the first half of the text is primarily biological physics, emphasizing the use of ideas from physics to understand biology and physiology, and the second half is primarily medical physics, describing the use of physics in medicine for diagnosis (mainly imaging) and therapy. Among the m...

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  19. Modulation of defensive reactivity by GLRB allelic variation: converging evidence from an intermediate phenotype approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, U; Kuhn, M; Yang, Y; Straube, B; Kircher, T; Wittchen, H-U; Pfleiderer, B; Arolt, V; Wittmann, A; Ströhle, A; Weber, H; Reif, A; Domschke, K; Deckert, J; Lonsdorf, T B

    2017-09-05

    Representing a phylogenetically old and very basic mechanism of inhibitory neurotransmission, glycine receptors have been implicated in the modulation of behavioral components underlying defensive responding toward threat. As one of the first findings being confirmed by genome-wide association studies for the phenotype of panic disorder and agoraphobia, allelic variation in a gene coding for the glycine receptor beta subunit (GLRB) has recently been associated with increased neural fear network activation and enhanced acoustic startle reflexes. On the basis of two independent healthy control samples, we here aimed to further explore the functional significance of the GLRB genotype (rs7688285) by employing an intermediate phenotype approach. We focused on the phenotype of defensive system reactivity across the levels of brain function, structure, and physiology. Converging evidence across both samples was found for increased neurofunctional activation in the (anterior) insular cortex in GLRB risk allele carriers and altered fear conditioning as a function of genotype. The robustness of GLRB effects is demonstrated by consistent findings across different experimental fear conditioning paradigms and recording sites. Altogether, findings provide translational evidence for glycine neurotransmission as a modulator of the brain's evolutionary old dynamic defensive system and provide further support for a strong, biologically plausible candidate intermediate phenotype of defensive reactivity. As such, glycine-dependent neurotransmission may open up new avenues for mechanistic research on the etiopathogenesis of fear and anxiety disorders.

  20. Thermolysis of Semicarbazones to the Corresponding Azines Through Reactive N-Substituted Isocyanate Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Chudgar

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermolysis of semicarbazones (I to azines (II occurs through reactive N-substituted isocyanate intermediates (Ia which can be converted in situ to carbamates and Nsubstituted ureas.

  1. POLYSTYRYLSULFONYL CHLORIDE:A USEFUL,REACTIVE INTERMEDIATE FOR PREPARATION OF FUNCTIONALIZED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGWenqiang; HEBinglin

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation of polystyrylsulfonyl chloride, a reactive intermediate,and its application in syntheses of functionalized polymers which can be used in organic chemistry as polymeric reagents, supports and in controlled release systems.

  2. Trapping Reactive Intermediates by Mechanochemistry: Elusive Aryl N-Thiocarbamoylbenzotriazoles as Bench-Stable Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Gracin, Davor; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-07-13

    Monitoring of mechanochemical thiocarbamoylation by in situ Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of aryl N-thiocarbamoylbenzotriazoles, reactive intermediates deemed unisolable in solution. The first-time isolation and structural characterization of these elusive molecules demonstrates the ability of mechanochemistry to access otherwise unobtainable intermediates and offers a new range of masked isothiocyanate reagents.

  3. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The national laboratory consortium has undertaken an R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute (MBI) to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources. The projects near-term goal is to demonstrate an economically competetive process for producing 1,4-butanediol and other derivatives from biologically produced succinic acid without generating a major salt waste. The competitiveness to the petrochemical process must be demonstrated.

  4. A novel reactive resin for embedding biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Liu, Xiuli; Gang, Yadong; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-02-01

    We developed a novel reactive embedding resin that crosslinking with the biological tissue via the reaction of epoxy group and amino group, which improves its compatibility with biological tissue and can be good to preserve endogenous fluorescent protein and dyes.

  5. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  6. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes. PMID:28660882

  7. Iron(III) porphyrin-catalysed oxidation reactions by -chloroperbenzoic acid: Nature of reactive intermediates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Agarwala; V Bagchi; D Bandyopadhyay

    2005-03-01

    The reaction of -chloroperbenzoic (-CPBA) acid with meso-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) porphynatoiron(III) chloride (F20TPPFe(III)Cl) has been studied in dichloromethane and acetonitrile medium at 25 ± 1° C. The reactive intermediates formed in this reaction have been quantitatively trapped by 2,4,6-tri -butylphenol (TTBP) in both the solvents. It has been observed that the kinetic plots of the formation of TTBP$^{\\bullet}$ radical in dichloromethane are all multiexponential, supporting the formation of more than one reactive intermediate in this solvent. In acetonitrile solvent the formation of TTBP$^{\\bullet}$ radical was however observed to be distinctly single exponential. Different kinds of reactive intermediates are proposed in these two solvents.

  8. Radiolysis studies on reactive intermediates. Final report, February 1, 1970-August 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L.

    1980-08-01

    Research highlights are briefly reviewed concerning studies of excess and solvated electrons, development of new electron spin resonance methods for maximizing the geometrical information about the surroundings of paramagnetic species in disordered systems, atom and ion solvation, and studies on other reactive intermediates. Titles of 155 research publications and 182 scientific talks presented on these areas are given.

  9. Biological false reactive VDRL tests: when to re-test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2002-01-01

    Syphilis serology is a basic screening test for the workers who want to go abroad. Many countries reject migrant workers who have reactive syphilis serology. Biological false reactives warrant repeated syphilis serology. We prospectively studied 30 patients (25 males and 5 females) who had biological false reactive VDRL tests (VDRL reactive, confirmatory TPHA negative). Affirmative tests for syphilis serology for all cases were performed every two weeks. On follow-up, the expected range (95% CI) for seroconversion was between 9.25 and 10.49 weeks. Most cases (25 cases) completely returned to the VDRL non-reactive stage within 10 weeks; three cases completely returned within 6 weeks; 2 cases completely returned within 14 weeks. It is recommended that repeat syphilis serology be conducted 10 weeks after an initial biological false reactive VDRL test.

  10. Gilbert Gottlieb: intermediator between psychology and evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Jay S

    2007-12-01

    This article describes and evaluates Gilbert Gottlieb's role as an intermediator between psychology and evolutionary biology. He proposed that altered developmental conditions gave rise to new behavioral phenotypes (behavioral neophenotypes) that could provide the basis for initiating speciation. As an example, Gottlieb cited sympatric speciation of two species of fruit flies (Rhageletis pomella), which he believed was based on an ontogenetic shift in pupal feeding on apples or hawthorn fruit which determined their adult selection of apple or hawthorn trees for ovipositing. Recent evidence has provided additional links in the process of speciation of these fruit flies. Unlike other efforts to incorporate evolution in psychology, Gottlieb's theoretical contribution was based on actual evolutionary processes including recent developments in the field of evo-devo.

  11. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lianghai Hu; John Paul Fawcett; Jingkai Gu

    2012-01-01

    Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein funct...

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  13. Visible Light Photocatalysis for the Generation and Use of Reactive Azolyl and Polyfluoroaryl Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amandeep; Weaver, Jimmie D

    2016-10-18

    Photocatalysis offers several mechanistically unique pathways that are not rivaled by mainstream catalysis. Primarily, the ability to convert photochemical energy into single electron oxidation and reduction events provides a new dimension for chemists to consider when choosing how to activate a molecule or approach a complex synthesis. Since most organic molecules do not absorb light in the visible region, they are impervious to direct visible light photochemistry, which provides an opportunity for photocatalysis in which a visible light absorbing compound can serve as a mediator. In this Account, we discuss the consequences of catalyst mediated, photoinduced electron transfer to several classes of reducible arenes. While the bulk of the work discussed within this Account utilizes iridium-based photocatalysts, in principle the chemistry is not limited to this class of photocatalyst, and the principles should be more general. Instead, this Account focuses largely on the consequences of single electron transfer to poly- and perfluorinated arenes and 2-halo azoles. Electron transfer converts these stable molecules into reactive intermediates whose behavior often depends entirely on the identity of the halogen that undergoes substitution. The result is both diverse chemistry and an alternative way of thinking about the chemical reactivity of these motifs. Specifically, we discuss our efforts and those of others to develop strategies for the generation of radicals or radical anions from perfluoroarenes and azoles and the behavior of these intermediates as implied by reactions in which they participate. The divergent pathway is illustrated by 2-bromoazoles, which yield azolyl radicals and can be utilized for addition to π-bonds, while use of the 2-chloroazole substrate leads to an entirely different reaction profile. Under the appropriate reaction conditions, the reactive and transient intermediates are useful coupling partners and often provide unrivaled access to new

  14. Reactivation of latent viruses after treatment with biological therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asthana AK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Anil Kumar Asthana,1 John Samuel Lubel2,31Department of Gastroenterology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, 2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Eastern Health, 3Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaAbstract: Biological therapies are used extensively for malignant (eg, lymphoma and autoimmune (eg, rheumatoid arthritis conditions. These agents include anti-tumor necrosis factor antagonists, such as infliximab, and B-cell-depleting therapies, such as rituximab. In the past decade, there has been an explosion in the types and numbers of agents being used. One of the known risks with these agents is infection. In particular, there is increasing awareness regarding latent virus reactivation. This occurs when a latent virus is reactivated into its active replicative phase as a result of an internal or external trigger, such as immunosuppression. It is challenging, however, to quantitatively attribute the risk of reactivation to biological therapy alone because the underlying malignant or autoimmune condition could also be a contributing factor. There is well documented evidence regarding the reactivation of viruses such as hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus with drugs such as rituximab. Long-term data are lacking; such data are essential to guide risk stratification and chemoprophylaxis. Universally accepted viral screening guidelines prior to commencement of immunosuppression are lacking. As an example, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have published recommendations regarding hepatitis B virus screening prior to commencing immunosuppression, but this action has not translated into universally accepted guidelines. Some of the other relevant viruses involved include cytomegalovirus, hepatitis C virus, varicella zoster virus, Epstein–Barr virus, and other members of the herpes family. This article reviews the current literature on the risk of latent viral reactivation with biological

  15. Radiolysis studies on reactive intermediates. Technical progress report, November 1, 1975--November 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L.

    1976-11-01

    During the past year we have focused on the development of new experimental electron magnetic resonance methods and new theoretical models to study reactive reaction intermediates and on the application of these and other methods to study radical and ionic intermediates produced by high energy radiation. We have continued development of electron spin echo spectrometry for studying molecular orientation around trapped radicals, have suggested a new electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanism applicable to glasses, have shown a correlation between electron spin-lattice relaxation times and trapped radical decay and have shown how electron-electron double resonance measurements of cross relaxation can be analyzed to give radical-radical correlation distances. A new model of electron localization in alkanes has been developed, electron solvation in alcohol-alkane mixtures has been studied theoretically and an improved model of electron solvation times has been formulated. Radical reaction intermediates have been detected and identified by spin trapping in methanol, cyanoalkyl and fluoroalcohol liquids, and by X and Q band ESR in methyltetrahydrofuran glass. In aqueous glasses the electronic structure of O/sup -/ and the first solvation shell geometry of e/sup -//sub t/ have been deduced by /sup 17/O substitution. Electron tunneling as a function of the e/sup -//sub t/ energy state and the photoionization mechanism of indole in solution have been investigated.

  16. Tuning the Relative Stability and Reactivity of Manganese Dioxygen and Peroxo Intermediates via Systematic Ligand Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Julie A

    2015-10-20

    Many fundamental processes of life depend on the chemical energy stored in the O–O bond of dioxygen (O2), the majority of which is derived from photosynthetic H2O oxidation. Key steps in these processes involve Mn-, Fe-, or Cu-promoted formation or cleavage of O–O and O–H bonds, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood, especially with Mn. Metal–peroxo and high-valent metal–oxo species are proposed to be involved as intermediates. The metal ion properties that favor O–O and O–H bond formation versus cleavage have yet to be systematically explored. Herein we examine the O2 reactivity of a series of structurally related Mn(II) complexes and show that several metastable intermediates are observed, the relative stabilities of which depend on subtle differences in ligand architecture. We show that in contrast to Fe and Cu complexes, O2 binds irreversibly to Mn(II). By crystallizing an entire series of the first reported examples of Mn(III)–OOR peroxos as well as an O2-derived binuclear trans-μ-1,2-bridged Mn(III)–peroxo with varying degrees of O–O bond activation, we demonstrate that there are distinct correlations between spectroscopic, structural, and reactivity properties. Rate-limiting O–O bond cleavage is shown to afford a reactive species capable of abstracting H atoms from 2,4-tBu2-PhOH or 1,4-cyclohexadiene, depending on the ligand substituents. The weakly coordinated N-heterocycle Mn···Npy,quino distance is shown to correlate with the peroxo O–O bond length and modulate the π overlap between the filled πv*(O–O) and Mn dxz orbitals. We also show that there is a strong correlation between the peroxo → Mn charge transfer (CT) band and the peroxo O–O bond length. The energy difference between the CT bands associated with the peroxos possessing the shortest and longest O–O bonds shows that these distances are spectroscopically distinguishable. We show that we can use this spectroscopic parameter to estimate the O

  17. Phthalides: Distribution in Nature, Chemical Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandra; Del-Ángel, Mayela; Ávila, José Luis; Delgado, Guillermo

    oxidation, reduction, addition, elimination, and cycloaddition reactions, and treatments with Lewis acids of (Z)-ligustilide have afforded linear dimers. Some intramolecular condensations and differentiated cyclizations of the dimeric phthalides have been carried out, providing evidences for the particular chemical reactivity of these compounds.Several structural modifications of phthalides have been carried out subjecting them to microbial transformations by different species of bacteria, fungi and algae, and these included resolutions of racemic mixtures and oxidations, among others.The [π4s + π2s] and [π2s + π2s] cycloadditions of (Z)-ligustilide for the synthesis of dimeric phthalides have been reported, and different approaches involving cyclizations, Alder-Rickert reactions, Sharpless asymmetric hydroxylations, or Grignard additions have been used for the synthesis of monomeric phthalides. The use of phthalides as building blocks for divergent oriented synthesis has been proven.Many of the naturally occurring phthalides display different biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory effects, among many others, with a considerable recent research on the topic. In the case of compounds isolated from the Apiaceae, the bioactivities correlate with the traditional medicinal uses of the natural sources. Some monomeric phthalides have shown their ability to attenuate certain neurological diseases, including stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.The present contribution covers the distribution of phthalides in nature and the findings in the structural diversity, chemical reactivity, biotransformations, syntheses, and bioactivity of natural and semisynthetic phthalides.

  18. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The national laboratory consortium has undertaken a joint R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources.

  19. Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (SCMC-LYS) is a selective scavenger of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandolini, Laura; Allegretti, Marcello; Berdini, Valerio; Cervellera, Maria Neve; Mascagni, Patrizia; Rinaldi, Matteo; Melillo, Gabriella; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mengozzi, Manuela; Bertini, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (SCMC-Lys) is a well-known mucoactive drug whose therapeutic efficacy is commonly related to the ability of SCMC-Lys to replace fucomucins by sialomucins. The aim of this study was to determine if SCMC-Lys could exert an anti-oxidant action by scavenging reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs). Our results show that SCMC-Lys proved effective as a selective scavenger of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hydroxyl radical (OH.), this effect being related to the reactivity of the SCMC tioether group. The scavenger activity of SCMC-Lys was observed in free cellular system as well as in activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). SCMC-Lys scavenger activity on HOCl was paralleled by a powerful protection from HOCl-mediated inactivation of alpha1-antitripsin (alpha1-AT) inhibitor, the main serum protease inhibitor. Production of interleukin-(IL-)8, a major mediator of PMN recruitment in inflammatory diseases, is known to be mediated by intracellular OH. SCMC-Lys significantly reduced IL-8 production on stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the same range of concentrations affecting OH. activity. It is concluded that SCMC-Lys could exert, in addition to its mucoactive capacity, an anti-oxidant action, thus contributing to the therapeutic efficacy of SCMC-Lys.

  20. "Involvement of metabolic reactive intermediate Cr (IV in Chromium (VI cytotoxic effects "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourahmad J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Addition of Cr VI (dichromate to isolated rat hepatocytes results in rapid glutathione oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and lysosomal membrane rupture before hepatocyte lysis occurred. Cytotoxicity was prevented by ROS scavengers, antioxidants, and glutamine (ATP generator. Hepatocyte dichlorofluorescin oxidation to dichlorofluorescein (DCF to determine ROS formation was inhibited by mannitol (a hydroxyl radical scavenger or butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene (antioxidants. The Cr VI reductive mechanism required for toxicity is not known. Cytochrome P450 inhibitors, Particularly CYP 2E1 inhibitors, but not inhibitors of DT diaphorase or glutathione reductase also prevented cytotoxicity. This suggests that P450 reductase and/or reduced cytochrome P450 contributes to Cr VI reduction to Cr IV. Glutathione depleted hepatocytes were resistant to Cr (VI toxicity and much less dichlorofluorescin oxidation occurred. Reduction of dichromate by glutathione or cysteine in vitro was also accompanied by oxygen uptake and was inhibited by Mn II (a Cr IV reductant. Cr VI induced cytotoxicity and ROS formation was also inhibited by Mn II, which suggests that, Cr IV and Cr IV GSH mediate "ROS" formation in isolated hepatocytes. In conclusion Cr VI cytotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial/lysosomal toxicity by the metabolic reactive intermediate Cr IV and “ROS”.

  1. Interaction between leucocytes and human spermatozoa influencing reactive oxygen intermediates release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Monika; Sanocka, Dorota; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between the presence of white blood cells (WBCs) and the fertilizing potential of human semen is still an open question. It is well known that the presence of leucocytes in human semen can be related to the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Semen samples were obtained from 15 normozoospermic men and leucocytes were isolated from heparinized blood drawn from 15 volunteers. Lucigenin and luminol-mediated chemiluminescence assays were used to determine reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by non-activated or activated leucocytes through 12-myristate-13-acetate or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyalanine (FMLP) before the addition of spermatozoa isolated by swim-up or Percoll procedures. All spermatozoal fractions used in this study were characterized by defining their motility, morphology and viability. The levels of ROS formation by non-activated as well as stimulated leucocytes were significantly decreased after addition of swim-up separated spermatozoa (p levels changed depending on the type of inducing factor used for oxidative burst. Then, spermatozoa selected by swim-up procedure although with only slightly higher viability and morphology than sperm obtained from 90% Percoll fraction clearly exhibited much higher capacity to inhibit ROI secretion by receptor-stimulated leucocytes (FMLP-activation) than Percoll fractionated sperm. Such results may indicate that within normal semen may exist sperm subpopulations with different biochemical mechanisms controlling the interaction between spermatozoa and contaminating leucocytes. When ROI levels contained in normozoospermic semen are dependent on the WBCs activation, it seems that spermatozoa with preserved normal functional competence are able to defend themselves against leucocytes-derived ROI. Also for normozoospermic ejaculates, swim-up sperm may improve semen antioxidant characteristics when comparing with Percoll (90%) separated sperm. It may help for optimal sperm preparation

  2. Assessment of solid reactive mixtures for the development of biological permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnanelli, Francesca; Viggi, Carolina Cruz; Mainelli, Sara; Toro, Luigi

    2009-10-30

    Solid reactive mixtures were tested as filling material for the development of biological permeable reactive barriers for the treatment of heavy metals contaminated waters. Mixture selection was performed by taking into account the different mechanisms operating in sulphate and cadmium removal with particular attention to bioprecipitation and sorption onto the organic matrices in the mixtures. Suspensions of eight reactive mixtures were tested for sulphate removal (initial concentration 3 g L(-1)). Each mixture was made up of four main functional components: a mix of organic sources for bacterial growth, a neutralizing agent, a porous medium and zero-valent iron. The best mixture among the tested ones (M8: 6% leaves, 9% compost, 3% zero-valent iron, 30% silica sand, 30% perlite, 22% limestone) presented optimal conditions for SRB growth (pH 7.8 +/- 0.1; E(h)= -410 +/- 5 mV) and 83% sulphate removal in 22 days (25% due to bioreduction, 32% due to sorption onto compost and 20% onto leaves). M8 mixture allowed the complete abatement of cadmium with a significant contribution of sorption over bioprecipitation (6% Cd removal due to SRB activity). Sorption properties, characterised by potentiometric titrations and related modelling, were mainly due to carboxylic sites of organic components used in reactive mixtures.

  3. Transformation and products of captopril with humic constituents during laccase-catalyzed oxidation: Role of reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Penghui; Zhao, He; Liu, Chenming; Huang, Qingguo; Cao, Hongbin

    2016-12-01

    The transformation of captopril (CAP), a widely-used thiol drug, was studied with the presence of dissolved model humic constituents (HCs) in a laccase-catalyzed system. Reaction products were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry and condensed fukui function computation. CAP reacted with different model HCs in the enzymatic system for 1 h, ranging from 75% (syringic acid) to 96% (p-coumaric acid). In the absence of HCs, only 15% of CAP was removed through self-coupling. The presence of HCs apparently changed the transformation of CAP in aqueous environment, and the HC reactive intermediates played an important role. First, during laccase catalysis, HCs with different structures were oxidized to produce reactive intermediates, including phenoxyl radical cation, ortho-, and para-quinone intermediates. Second, these intermediates were readily attacked by CAP via nucleophilic reactions, forming C-S-C covalent conjugates. More importantly, the standard reduction potential of these intermediates is a critical parameter, as PCA showed the highest reactivity to the nucleophilic addition reaction with CAP by forming phenoxy radical cations. While SYR showed the least reactivity due to the formation of para-quinone intermediates. Therefore, the functional groups on HCs could greatly influence the cross-coupling with CAP, as well as the type and stability of the coupling products. This work clearly demonstrated the transformation of CAP and other thiol drugs with the presence of HCs in aqueous environment, which is similar to the natural humification process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HOCCO versus OCCO: Comparative spectroscopy of the radical and diradical reactive intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew R.; Xue, Tian; Sanov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    We present a photoelectron imaging study of three glyoxal derivatives: the ethylenedione anion (OCCO-), ethynediolide (HOCCO-), and glyoxalide (OHCCO-). These anions provide access to the corresponding neutral reactive intermediates: the OCCO diradical and the HOCCO and OHCCO radicals. Contrasting the straightforward deprotonation pathway in the reaction of O- with glyoxal (OHCCHO), which is expected to yield glyoxalide (OHCCO-), OHCCO- is shown to be a minor product, with HOCCO- being the dominant observed isomer of the m/z = 57 anion. In the HOCCO/OHCCO anion photoelectron spectrum, we identify several electronic states of this radical system and determine the adiabatic electron affinity of HOCCO as 1.763(6) eV. This result is compared to the corresponding 1.936(8) eV value for ethylenedione (OCCO), reported in our recent study of this transient diradical [A. R. Dixon, T. Xue, and A. Sanov, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 54, 8764-8767 (2015)]. Based on the comparison of the HOCCO-/OHCCO- and OCCO- photoelectron spectra, we discuss the contrasting effects of the hydrogen connected to the carbon framework or the terminal oxygen in OCCO.

  5. The origin of the reactivity of the Criegee intermediate: implications for atmospheric particle growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2016-01-18

    The electronic structure of the simplest Criegee intermediate (H₂COO) is practically that of a closed shell. On the biradical scale (β) from 0 (pure closed shell) to 1 (pure biradical) it registers a mere β=0.10, suggesting that a Lewis structure of a H₂C=Oδ+-Oδ- zwitterion best describes its ground electronic state. However, this picture of a nearly inert closed shell contradicts its rich atmospheric reactivity. It is the mixing of its ground with the first triplet excited state, which is a pure biradical state of the type H₂C•-O-O•, that is responsible for the formation of strongly bound products during reactions inducing atmospheric particle growth. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research also used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. The metabolism of pentachlorobenzene by rat liver microsomes: The nature of the reactive intermediates formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    den Besten, C.; Peters, M.M.; van Bladeren, P.J. (Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1989-09-29

    Metabolism of (14C)-pentachlorobenzene by liver microsomes from dexamethasone-induced rats results in the formation of pentachlorophenol and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol as major primary metabolites in a ratio of 4:1, with 2,3,4,5- and 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenols as minor metabolites. The unsubstituted carbon atom is thus the favourite site of oxidative attack, but the chlorine substituted positions still play a sizable role. As secondary metabolites both para- and ortho-tetrachlorohydroquinone are formed (1.4 and 0.9% of total metabolites respectively). During this cytochrome P450-dependent conversion of pentachlorobenzene, 5-15% of the total amount of metabolites becomes covalently bound to microsomal protein. Ascorbic acid inhibits this binding to a considerable extent, indicating that quinone metabolites play an important role in the binding. However, complete inhibition was never reached by ascorbic acid, nor by glutathione, suggesting that other reactive intermediates, presumably epoxides, are also responsible for covalent binding.

  7. Reactive oxygen intermediates in plant-microbe interactions: who is who in powdery mildew resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hückelhoven, Ralph; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2003-04-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the superoxide anion radical (O*(2)(-)) accumulate in many plants during attack by microbial pathogens. Despite a huge number of studies, the complete picture of the role of ROIs in the host-pathogen interaction is not yet fully understood. This situation is reflected by the controversially discussed question as to whether ROIs are key factors in the establishment and maintenance of either host cell inaccessibility or accessibility for fungal pathogens. On the one hand, ROIs have been implicated in signal transduction as well as in the execution of defence reactions such as cell wall strengthening and a rapid host cell death (hypersensitive reaction). On the other hand, ROIs accumulate in compatible interactions, and there are reports suggesting a function of ROIs in restricting the spread of leaf lesions and thus in suppressing cell death. Moreover, in situ analyses have demonstrated that different ROIs may trigger opposite effects in plants depending on their spatiotemporal distribution and subcellular concentrations. This demonstrates the need to determine the particular role of individual ROIs in distinct stages of pathogen development. The well-studied interaction of cereals with fungi from the genus Blumeria is an excellent model system in which signal transduction and defence reactions can be further elucidated in planta. This review article gives a synopsis of the role of ROI accumulation, with particular emphasis on the pathosystem Hordeum vulgare L.- Blumeria graminis.

  8. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Jo A Brion; Evans, David M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G.; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological inte...

  9. Involvement of sphingoid bases in mediating reactive oxygen intermediate production and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Shi; Yusuf A Hannun; Jianru Zuo; Jacek Bielawski; Jinye Mu; Haili Dong; Chong Teng; Jian Zhang; Xiaohui Yang; Nario Tomishige; Kentaro Hanada

    2007-01-01

    Sphingolipids have been suggested to act as second messengers for an array of cellular signaling activities in plant cells, including stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD). However, the mechanisms underpinning these processes are not well understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis mutant, fumonisin Bl resistant11-1 (fbr11-1), which fails to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), is incapable of initiating PCD when the mutant is challenged by fumonisin B1 (FB1), a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase. Molecular analysis indicated that FBR11 encodes a long-chain basel (LCB1) subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first rate-limiting step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Mass spectrometric analysis of the sphingolipid concentrations revealed that whereas the fbrll-1 mutation did not affect basal levels of sphingoid bases, the mutant showed attenuated formation of sphingoid bases in response to FB1 By a direct feeding experiment, we show that the free sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine and sphingosine efficiently induce ROI generation followed by cell death. Conversely, ROI generation and cell death induced by dihydrosphingosine were specifically blocked by its phosphorylated form dihydrosphingosine-1 -phosphate in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the maintenance of homeostasis between a free sphingoid base and its phosphorylated derivative is critical to determining the cell fate. Because alterations of the sphingolipid level occur prior to the ROI production, we propose that the free sphingoid bases are involved in the control of PCD in Arabidopsis, presumably through the regulation of the ROI level upon receiving different developmental or environmental cues.

  10. Reactive Carbonyl Species In Vivo: Generation and Dual Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna M. Semchyshyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyls are widespread species in living organisms and mainly known for their damaging effects. The most abundant reactive carbonyl species (RCS are derived from oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Chemical modification of proteins, nucleic acids, and aminophospholipids by RCS results in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. In addition to their direct toxicity, modification of biomolecules by RCS gives rise to a multitude of adducts and cross links that are increasingly implicated in aging and pathology of a wide range of human diseases. Understanding of the relationship between metabolism of RCS and the development of pathological disorders and diseases may help to develop effective approaches to prevent a number of disorders and diseases. On the other hand, constant persistence of RCS in cells suggests that they perform some useful role in living organisms. The most beneficial effects of RCS are their establishment as regulators of cell signal transduction and gene expression. Since RCS can modulate different biological processes, new tools are required to decipher the precise mechanisms underlying dual effects of RCS.

  11. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates in human monocytes by tumour cells and their role in spontaneous monocyte cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytar, B; Siedlar, M; Woloszyn, M; Ruggiero, I; Pryjma, J; Zembala, M

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the ability of human monocytes to produce reactive oxygen intermediates after a contact with tumour cells. Monocytes generated oxygen radicals, as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and superoxide anion production, after stimulation with the tumour, but not with untransformed, cells. The use of specific oxygen radical scavengers and inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase, dimethyl sulphoxide and deferoxamine as well as the myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, indicated that chemiluminescence was dependent on the production of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical and the presence of myeloperoxidase. The tumour cell-induced chemiluminescent response of monocytes showed different kinetics from that seen after activation of monocytes with phorbol ester. These results indicate that human monocytes can be directly stimulated by tumour cells for reactive oxygen intermediate production. Spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity towards cancer cells was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, deferoxamine and hydrazide, implicating the role of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and hypohalite. We wish to suggest that so-called ‘spontaneous’ tumoricidal capacity of freshly isolated human monocytes may in fact be an inducible event associated with generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and perhaps other toxic mediators, resulting from a contact of monocytes with tumour cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070862

  12. Reactive oxygen species and vascular biology: implications in human hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyz, Rhian M; Briones, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    Increased vascular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; termed oxidative stress) has been implicated in various chronic diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress is both a cause and a consequence of hypertension. Although oxidative injury may not be the sole etiology, it amplifies blood pressure elevation in the presence of other pro-hypertensive factors. Oxidative stress is a multisystem phenomenon in hypertension and involves the heart, kidneys, nervous system, vessels and possibly the immune system. Compelling experimental and clinical evidence indicates the importance of the vasculature in the pathophysiology of hypertension and as such much emphasis has been placed on the (patho)biology of ROS in the vascular system. A major source for cardiovascular, renal and neural ROS is a family of non-phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (Nox), including the prototypic Nox2 homolog-based NADPH oxidase, as well as other Noxes, such as Nox1 and Nox4. Nox-derived ROS is important in regulating endothelial function and vascular tone. Oxidative stress is implicated in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis and rarefaction, important processes involved in vascular remodeling in hypertension. Despite a plethora of data implicating oxidative stress as a causative factor in experimental hypertension, findings in human hypertension are less conclusive. This review highlights the importance of ROS in vascular biology and focuses on the potential role of oxidative stress in human hypertension.

  13. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  14. Conserved YjgF protein family deaminates reactive enamine/imine intermediates of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrecht, Jennifer A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Downs, Diana M

    2012-01-01

    .... Our data support the conclusion that YjgF proteins have enamine/imine deaminase activity and accelerate the release of ammonia from reactive enamine/imine intermediates of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate...

  15. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Kenta; Uematsu, Takumi; Korenaga, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Ryuya; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Murata, Kyohei; Zhang, Jian; Gai, Xiaoqing; Sakamoto, Kazuichi; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Takumi

    2017-03-16

    Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs) are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs-used at 1 mM-protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate-another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM), they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Krebs cycle intermediates modulate thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntel, Robson L; Nogueira, Cristina W; Rocha, João B T

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Krebs cycle intermediates on basal and quinolinic acid (QA)- or iron-induced TBARS production in brain membranes. Oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate and malate reduced significantly the basal and QA-induced TBARS production. The potency for basal TBARS inhibition was in the order (IC50 is given in parenthesis as mM) citrate (0.37) > oxaloacetate (1.33) = succinate (1.91) > > malate (12.74). alpha-Ketoglutarate caused an increase in TBARS production without modifying the QA-induced TBARS production. Cyanide (CN-) did not modify the basal or QA-induced TBARS production; however, CN- abolished the antioxidant effects of succinate. QA-induced TBARS production was enhanced by iron ions, and abolished by desferrioxamine (DFO). The intermediates used in this study, except for alpha-ketoglutarate, prevented iron-induced TBARS production. Oxaloacetate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate, but no succinate and QA, exhibited significantly iron-chelating properties. Only alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced deoxyribose degradation, while succinate and malate showed a modest effect against Fe2+/H2O2-induced deoxyribose degradation. Using heat-treated preparations citrate, malate and oxaloacetate protected against basal or QA-induced TBARS production, whereas alpha-ketoglutarate induced TBARS production. Succinate did not offer protection against basal or QA-induced TBARS production. These results suggest that oxaloacetate, malate, succinate, and citrate are effective antioxidants against basal and iron or QA-induced TBARS production, while alpha-ketoglutarate stimulates TBARS production. The mechanism through which Krebs cycle intermediates offer protection against TBARS production is distinct depending on the intermediate used. Thus, under pathological conditions such as ischemia, where citrate concentrations vary it can assume an important role as a modulator of oxidative

  18. Biologically-Plausible Reactive Control of Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Rene, Zapata; Pascal, Lepinay

    2006-01-01

    This chapter addressed the problem of controlling the reactive behaviours of a mobile robot evolving in unstructured and dynamic environments. We have carried out successful experiments for determining the distance field of a mobile robot using two

  19. Short-, Intermediate-, and Long-Term Changes in Basophil Reactivity Induced by Venom Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Trabado, Ana; Cámara Hijón, Carmen; Ramos Cantariño, Alfonso; Romero-Chala, Silvia; García-Trujillo, José Antonio; Fernández Pereira, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The basophil activation test (BAT) has been used to monitor venom immunotherapy (VIT) due to its high specificity. A previous study has reported a good correlation between a significant decrease in basophil activation during 5 years of VIT and clinical protection assessed by sting challenge. The following prospective study was performed to examine changes in basophil reactivity over a complete VIT period of 5 years. Methods BAT in a dose-response curve was studied prospectively in 10 ...

  20. Theoretical evaluation of zeolite confinement effects on the reactivity of bulky intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesthaeghe, David; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel

    2009-07-14

    Zeolites provide a unique setting for heterogeneous Brønsted acid catalysis, because the effects of the surrounding framework on fundamental reaction kinetics go well beyond what would be expected for a mere reaction flask. This aspect becomes very pronounced when bulky molecules form key intermediates for the reaction under study, which is exactly when the interaction between the framework and the intermediate is maximal. We will use the example of methanol-to-olefin conversion (MTO), and, more specifically, the constant interplay between the inorganic host framework and the organic hydrocarbon pool co-catalyst, to illustrate how zeolite confinement directly influences catalytic reaction rates. Theoretical calculations are used to isolate and quantify these specific effects, with the main focus on methylbenzenes in ZSM-5, as the archetypical MTO catalyst. This review intends to give an overview of recent theoretical insights, which have proven to provide an ideal complementary tool to experimental investigations. In addition, we will also introduce the role of zeolite breathing in activating a catalytic cycle.

  1. Imino [4+4] cycloaddition products as exclusive and biologically relevant acrolein-amine conjugates are intermediates of 3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidine (FDP), an acrolein biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Masayuki; Fukase, Koichi; Kurbangalieva, Almira; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrated synthetically that the eight-membered heterocycles 2,6,9-triazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes and 1,5-diazacyclooctanes are the initial and exclusive products of the reaction, through an imino [4+4] cycloaddition, of biologically relevant amines with acrolein. The stabilities of the aminoacetals within the eight-membered heterocycles determined whether the product was subsequently transformed gradually into the 3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidine (FDP), which is widely used as an oxidative stress marker. The reactivity profiles discovered in this study suggested that some of the imino [4+4] cycloaddition products are reactive intermediates of FDP and contribute to the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress response to acrolein.

  2. Fluoranthene fumigation and exogenous scavenging of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in evergreen Japanese red pine seedlings (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et. Zucc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntimehin, Ilemobayo; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) such as O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), and *OH is known to be a major mechanism of damage in biological systems. This study investigated and compared effectiveness of scavenging ROI generated in fluoranthene (FLU) pre-fumigated Japanese red pine seedlings. Three kinds of eco-physiological assessments were used to express the impact of the different fumigants used inside the green house. Gas exchange measurements showed negative changes induced by 10 microM FLU on Japanese pine seedlings during a 10 d exposure period whilst no negative change was found during a 5 d exposure period. Moreover, during a 14 d FLU exposure incorporating ROI scavengers, results revealed that chlorophyll fluorescence, needle chemical contents and needle dry mass per unit area of the seedlings were affected. The negative effects of FLU on the conifer were dependent on both the dose and period of FLU fumigation. Peroxidase (PERO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and mannitol (MANN) were all effective scavengers of ROI. MANN scavenged *OH, the most lethal of the ROI. For practicable use, MANN is more economical, and may be the best ROI scavenger among the three considered. It can be concluded that efficient scavenging of ROI in biological systems is important to mitigate the negative effects of FLU on Japanese red pine trees.

  3. Role of Reactive Intermediates in Manganese Oxide Formation By Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Anderton, C.; Wu, S.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment, and their high reactivity can profoundly impact the fate of contaminants and cycling of carbon and nutrients. In contrast to bacteria, the pathways utilized by fungi to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III,IV) oxides remain largely unknown. Here, we explore the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation by a phylogenetically diverse group of filamentous Ascomycete fungi using a combination of chemical assays and bulk and spatially-resolved mass spectrometry. We show that the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation vary with fungal species, over time during secretome compositional changes, and in the presence of other fungi. Specifically, our work implicates a dynamic transition in Mn(II) oxidation pathways that varies between species. In particular, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via transmembrane NADPH oxidases are involved in initial oxidation, over time, secreted enzymes become important Mn(II) oxidation mediators for some species. In addition, the overall secretome oxidation capacity varies with time and fungal species. Secretome analysis reveals a surprising absence of enzymes currently considered to be Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes in these organisms, and instead highlights a wide variety of redox-active enzymes. Furthermore, we implicate fungal cell defense mechanisms in the formation of distinct Mn oxide patterns when fungi are grown in head-to-head competition. The identification and regulation of these secreted enzymes are under current investigation within the bulk secretome and within the interaction zone of structured fungal communities. Overall, our findings illustrate that Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms are highly variable and are dictated by complex environmental and ecological interactions. Future work will explore the connection between Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation and the ability to degrade cellulose, a key carbon reservoir for biofuel production.

  4. Studies on the metabolism of chlorotrianisene to a reactive intermediate and subsequent covalent binding to microsomal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juedes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on chlorotrianisene were conducted to determine whether metabolism of chlorotrianisene occurs via the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system and whether a reactive intermediate is being formed that is capable of binding covalently to microsomal proteins. ({sup 3}H)-chlorotrianisene was incubated with liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH. At the termination of the incubation, the protein was trapped on a glass filter and the unbound chlorotrianisene was removed by extensive washing of the protein with organic solvent. A dramatic stimulation of covalent binding was demonstrated in microsomes from rats treated with methylcholanthrene (60 fold increase) versus control or phenobarbital treatment. Verification of covalent binding was achieved by localization of radiolabeled bands following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the macromolecules in the incubation mixture. Further analysis of the radiolabeled macromolecules separated on SDS-PAGE revealed that these macromolecules were degraded by protease degradation indicating that the macromolecules were proteins. Further investigations were done to determine the cause of the dramatic stimulation of covalent binding detected in microsomes from methylcholanthrene treated rats versus control or phenobarbital treated rats. Further evidence for the participation of P-450c was obtained with a reconstituted cytochrome P-450 system. Incubations of chlorotrianisene with reconstituted P-450c and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase exhibited covalent binding characteristics comparable to those seen in microsomal incubations. Investigations into the nature of the binding site and the reactive intermediate are currently being conducted. By analyzing the BSA adduct, the author intends to isolate the specific amino acid binding site(s).

  5. Current trends in management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in the biologic therapy era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudio M Mastroianni; Miriam Lichtner; Rita Citton; Cosmo Del Borgo; Angela Rago; Helene Martini; Giuseppe Cimino; Vincenzo Vullo

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation represents an emerging cause of liver disease in patients undergoing treatment with biologic agents. In particular, the risk of HBV reactivation is heightened by the use monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab (anti-CD20) and alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) that cause profound and long-lasting immunosuppression. Emerging data indicate that HBV reactivation could also develop following the use of other biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. When HBV reactivation is diagnosed, it is mandatory to suspend biologic treatment and start antiviral agents immediately. However, pre-emptive antiviral therapy prior to monoclonal antibody administration is crucial in preventing HBV reactivation and its clinical consequences. Several lines of evidence have shown that risk of HBV reactivation is greatly reduced by the identification of high-risk patients and the use of prophylactic antiviral therapy. In this article, we discuss current trends in the management of HBV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients receiving biologic therapy, such as rituximab, alemtuzumab and TNF-α antagonists.

  6. Reactive oxygen intermediates from eosinophils in mice infected with Hymenolepis nana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-06-01

    A large number of eosinophils were recruited to the intestinal villi after infection with Hymenolepis nana. Eosinophil numbers were increased more rapidly in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Local intestinal eosinophils from challenged mice showed more extracellular oxygen radical release, as assessed by histochemical methods using nitro blue tetrazolium, accompanied with tissue injury and larval degradation. Intestinal eosinophils isolated from the lamina propria induced specific oxygen radical generation in response to H. nana oncosphere extract as measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. This response was stronger in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Radical generation from uninfected mice was negligible. Lipid peroxidation in the small intestine, as measured by formation of malondialdehyde, was increased during H. nana challenge infection, the peak activity coinciding with the elimination of challenge larvae. Continuous administration of a NADPH oxidase inhibitor to sensitized mice interfered with the degeneration of challenge larvae. These results suggest that intestinal eosinophils may be the major contributor to oxygen radical production in response to H. nana and that reactive oxygen species may play a part of effector molecule in the resistance to reinfection with H. nana.

  7. Study of Uranium Transport Utilizing Reactive Numerical Modeling and Experimental Data from Heterogeneous Intermediate-Scale Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.; Miller, A.; Honeyman, B.

    2007-12-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in groundwater is critical in order to mitigate risks to downstream receptors from sites where past releases of these contaminants has resulted in the degradation of the water quality of the underlying aquifer. In most cases, the fate and transport of these contaminants occurs in a chemically and physically heterogeneous environment; thereby making the prediction of the ultimate fate of these contaminants difficult. In order to better understand the fundamental processes that have the greatest effect on the transport of these contaminants, careful laboratory study must be completed in a controlled environment. Once the experimental data has been generated, the validation of numerical models may then be achieved. Questions on the management of contaminated sites may center on the long-term release (e.g., desorption, dissolution) behavior of contaminated geomedia. Data on the release of contaminants is often derived from bench-scale experiments or, in rare cases, through field-scale experiments. A central question, however, is how molecular-scale processes (e.g., bond breaking) are expressed at the macroscale. This presentation describes part of a collaborative study between the Colorado School of Mines, the USGS and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab on upscaling pore-scale processes to understanding field-scale observations. In the work described here, two experiments were conducted in two intermediate-scale tanks (2.44 m x 1.22 m x 7.6 cm and 2.44 m x 0.61 m x 7.6 cm) to generate data to quantify the processes of uranium dissolution and transport in fully saturated conditions, and to evaluate the ability of two reactive transport models to capture the relevant processes and predict U behavior at the intermediate scale. Each tank was designed so that spatial samples could be collected from the side of the tank, as well as samples from the effluent end of the tank. The larger tank was packed with a less than 2mm fraction of a

  8. Reactive oxygen intermediates and glutathione regulate the expression of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase during iron-mediated oxidative stress in bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, Irena; Tel-Or, Elisha; Mittler, Ron

    2002-07-01

    Excess of free iron is thought to harm plant cells by enhancing the intracellular production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cAPX) is an iron-containing, ROI-detoxifying enzyme induced in response to iron overload or oxidative stress. We studied the expression of cAPX in leaves of de-rooted bean plants in response to iron overload. cAPX expression, i.e., mRNA and protein, was rapidly induced in response to iron overload. This induction correlated with the increase in iron content in leaves and occurred in the light as well as in the dark. Reduced glutathione (GSH), which plays an important role in activating the ROI signal transduction pathway as well as in ROI detoxification, was found to enhance the induction of APX mRNA by iron. To determine whether cAPX induction during iron overload was due to an increase in the amount of free iron, which serves as a co-factor for cAPX synthesis, or due to iron-mediated increase in ROI production, we tested the expression of APX in leaves under low oxygen pressure. This treatment, which suppresses the formation of ROI, completely abolished the induction of cAPX mRNA during iron overload, without affecting the rate of iron uptake by plants. Taken together, our results suggest that high intracellular levels of free iron in plants lead to the enhanced production of ROI, which in turn induces the expression of cAPX, possibly using GSH as an intermediate signal. We further show, using cAPX-antisense transgenic plants, that cAPX expression is essential to prevent iron-mediated tissue damage in tobacco.

  9. The chemical biology of hydropersulfides (RSSH): Chemical stability, reactivity and redox roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saund, Simran S; Sosa, Victor; Henriquez, Stephanie; Nguyen, Q Nhu N; Bianco, Christopher L; Soeda, Shuhei; Millikin, Robert; White, Corey; Le, Henry; Ono, Katsuhiko; Tantillo, Dean J; Kumagai, Yoshito; Akaike, Takaaki; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M

    2015-12-15

    Recent reports indicate the ubiquitous prevalence of hydropersulfides (RSSH) in mammalian systems. The biological utility of these and related species is currently a matter of significant speculation. The function, lifetime and fate of hydropersulfides will be assuredly based on their chemical properties and reactivity. Thus, to serve as the basis for further mechanistic studies regarding hydropersulfide biology, some of the basic chemical properties/reactivity of hydropersulfides was studied. The nucleophilicity, electrophilicity and redox properties of hydropersulfides were examined under biological conditions. These studies indicate that hydropersulfides can be nucleophilic or electrophilic, depending on the pH (i.e. the protonation state) and can act as good one- and two-electron reductants. These diverse chemical properties in a single species make hydropersulfides chemically distinct from other, well-known sulfur containing biological species, giving them unique and potentially important biological function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Determining Chemical Reactivity Driving Biological Activity from SMILES Transformations: The Bonding Mechanism of Anti-HIV Pyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC and the Branching SMILES (BraS, respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  11. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  12. Chemistry and biology of reactive oxygen species in signaling or stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J

    2011-07-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of molecules that are continuously generated, transformed and consumed in all living organisms as a consequence of aerobic life. The traditional view of these reactive oxygen metabolites is one of oxidative stress and damage that leads to decline of tissue and organ systems in aging and disease. However, emerging data show that ROS produced in certain situations can also contribute to physiology and increased fitness. This Perspective provides a focused discussion on what factors lead ROS molecules to become signal and/or stress agents, highlighting how increasing knowledge of the underlying chemistry of ROS can lead to advances in understanding their disparate contributions to biology. An important facet of this emerging area at the chemistry-biology interface is the development of new tools to study these small molecules and their reactivity in complex biological systems.

  13. Insight into the messenger role of reactive oxygen intermediates in immunostimulated hemocytes from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanedel, Daniel; Gonzalez, Roxana; Brokordt, Katherina; Schmitt, Paulina; Mercado, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are metabolites produced by aerobic cells which have been linked to oxidative stress. Evidence reported in vertebrates indicates that ROI can also act as messengers in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, including those involved in innate immunity. In a recent study, an inhibitor of NF-kB transcription factors was identified in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, and its functional characterization suggested that it may regulate the expression of the big defensin antimicrobial peptide ApBD1. In order to give new insights into the messenger role of ROI in the immune response of bivalve mollusks, the effect of ROI production on gene transcription of ApBD1 was assessed in A. purpuratus. The results showed that 48 h-cultured hemocytes were able to display phagocytic activity and ROI production in response to the β-glucan zymosan. The immune stimulation also induced the transcription of ApBD1, which was upregulated in cultured hemocytes. After neutralizing the ROI produced by the stimulated hemocytes with the antioxidant trolox, the transcription of ApBD1 was reduced near to base levels. The results suggest a potential messenger role of intracellular ROI on the regulation of ApBD1 transcription during the immune response of scallops.

  14. Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates Production by Macrophages of Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Goats and Supplemented with Dyhidroxyvitamin D3 in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Martinez-Romero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Tuberculosis (TB remains one of the world's major health problems. To evaluate in vivo indices of cellular sensitization, antigen-induced Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates (RNI responses by blood mononuclear cells from Mycobacterium bovis BCG-infected goats supplemented with 1, 25 dyhidroxyvitamin D3 [1, 25-(OH2D3]. Approach: An experimental, longitudinal and comparative study was planned. Twelve animals of goat cattle 20-to 24-month-old sannen selected themselves. Five samplings were made, previous to the inoculation (zero d, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after applying the treatments. The mononuclear cells by the Ficoll-hypaque method were obtained. The RNI, nitrites and nitrates (NO2- and NO3-­ were quantified by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Results: The treatment with the 1, 25(OH2D3 stimulated the NO3- synthesis indicating, that by itself it is a good modulador of the micobacterial replication and in the treatment with M. bovis-BCG vaccine increased as a result to the treatment with 1,25(OH2D3. The exhibition to M. bovis-BCG vaccine with the treatment with 1, 25(OH2D3 was able to increase answer NO3-­ in exposed animals. Conclusion: The 1, 25(OH2D3 stimulated in vivo the production of RNI in goats exposed to M. bovis BCG vaccine.

  15. Novel type 1 photosensitizers: viability of leukemia cells exposed to reactive intermediates generated in situ by in vitro photofragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Karwa, Amol; Lusiak, Przemyslaw M.; Srivastava, Kripa; Poreddy, Amruta R.; Pandurangi, Raghootama S.; Galen, Karen P.; Neumann, William L.; Cantrell, Gary E.; Dorshow, Richard B.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy of tumors involving Type 2 photosenstizers has been conspicuously successful, but the Type 1 process, in contrast, has not received much attention despite its considerable potential. Accordingly, several classes of molecules containing fragile bonds such as azido (-N=N=N), azo (-N=N-), sulfenato (-S-O-) and oxaza (-N-O-) functional groups that produce reactive intermediates such as radicals and nitrenes upon photoexcitation were prepared and tested for cell viability using U397 leukemia cell line. The azido photosensitizer was conjugated to leukemia cell binding peptide, SFFWRLS, for targeted cell viability study. The cells were incubated with the photosensitizer at various concentrations, and were illuminated for 5, 10, and 20 minutes. The results show that all the photosensitizers caused cell death compared to the controls when exposed to both the photosensitizers and light. Most importantly, selective cell death was observed with the azido peptide conjugate 6, which clearly demonstrates that these Type 1 sensitizers are useful for phototherapeutic applications.

  16. In situ mid-infrared analyses of reactive gas-phase intermediates in TEOS/Ozone SAPCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Thomas K.; Doiron, Sarah

    1998-11-01

    In this report, we present in situ characterizations of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactors used in silicon dioxide thin film depositions. The characterizations are based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption data are interpreted within the context of process and thin film properties and the bearing of the spectroscopic data upon the chemical mechanisms extant in the deposition reaction. The relevance of the interpretations to real-time process control is discussed. The process under study in this work is TEOS/ozone-based deposition of silicon dioxide thin films at subatmospheric pressures. This process exhibits many desirable properties but has fundamental problems that may be solvable by reaction control based on in situ analyses and the real-time manipulation of reagent concentrations and process conditions. Herein we discuss our preliminary data on characterizations of TEOS/ozone chemistries in commercial reactor configurations. Reaction products and reactive intermediate species are detected and identified. Quantitative in situ measurements of the reagent materials are demonstrated. Preliminary correlations of these data with process and thin film properties are discussed.

  17. Structure, reactivity, and biological properties of hidantoines; Estrutura, reatividade e propriedades biologicas de hidantoinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Silvania Maria de; Silva, Joao Bosco Paraiso da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental]. E-mail: paraiso@ufpe.br; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves de; Galdino, Suely Lins; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Antibioticos

    2008-07-01

    Hydantoin (imidazolidine-2,4-dione) is a 2,4-diketotetrahydroimidazole discovered by Baeyer in 1861. Thiohydantoins and derivatives were prepared, having chemical properties similar to the corresponding carbonyl compounds. Some biological activities (antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, schistosomicidal) are attributed to the chemical reactivity and consequent affinity of hydantoinic rings towards biomacromolecules. Therefore, knowledge about the chemistry of hydantoins has increased enormously. In this review, we present important aspects such as reactivity of hydantoins, acidity of hydantoins, spectroscopy and crystallographic properties, and biological activities of hydantoin and its derivatives. (author)

  18. Biological detection and tagging using tailorable, reactive, highly fluorescent chemosensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Zifer, Thomas; McElhanon, James Ross; Rahn, Larry A.

    2006-11-01

    This program was focused on the development of a fluorogenic chemosensor family that could tuned for reaction with electrophilic (e.g. chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (e.g. proteins and other biological molecules) species. Our chemosensor approach utilized the fluorescent properties of well-known berberine-type alkaloids. In situ chemosensor reaction with a target species transformed two out-of-plane, weakly conjugated, short-wavelength chromophores into one rigid, planar, conjugated, chromophore with strong long wavelength fluorescence (530-560 nm,) and large Stokes shift (100-180 nm). The chemosensor was activated with an isourea group which allowed for reaction with carboxylic acid moieties found in amino acids.

  19. Principles for integrating reactive species into in vivo biological processes: Examples from exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritelis, Nikos V; Cobley, James N; Paschalis, Vassilis; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-04-01

    The equivocal role of reactive species and redox signaling in exercise responses and adaptations is an example clearly showing the inadequacy of current redox biology research to shed light on fundamental biological processes in vivo. Part of the answer probably relies on the extreme complexity of the in vivo redox biology and the limitations of the currently applied methodological and experimental tools. We propose six fundamental principles that should be considered in future studies to mechanistically link reactive species production to exercise responses or adaptations: 1) identify and quantify the reactive species, 2) determine the potential signaling properties of the reactive species, 3) detect the sources of reactive species, 4) locate the domain modified and verify the (ir)reversibility of post-translational modifications, 5) establish causality between redox and physiological measurements, 6) use selective and targeted antioxidants. Fulfilling these principles requires an idealized human experimental setting, which is certainly a utopia. Thus, researchers should choose to satisfy those principles, which, based on scientific evidence, are most critical for their specific research question.

  20. Prostaglandin synthase-mediated metabolism of carcinogens and a potential role for peroxyl radicals as reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnett, L.J. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Prostaglandin-H synthase is unique among enzymes of the plant and animal kingdom in its ability to biosynthesize and metabolize hydroperoxides. Higher oxidation states of the peroxidase oxidize reducing substrates to electron-deficient derivatives that react with macromolecular nucleophiles. In the case of aromatic amines, the electron-deficient derivatives are mutagenic to bacterial and mammalian cells. {beta}-Dicarbonyl compounds and retinoic acid are oxidized to carbon-centered radicals that react with O{sub 2} to form peroxyl free radicals. Peroxyl radicals are the most stable oxy radicals and are able to diffuse some distance from the site of their generation. Peroxyl radicals are also formed during lipid peroxidation and in the reaction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides with metal complexes and metalloproteins. Peroxyl radicals epoxidize isolated doubled bonds of compounds such as 7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (BP-7,8-diol); 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrobenzo(a)anthracene; and aflatoxin B{sub 1}. The epoxide products represent the ultimate carcinogenic forms of the respective compounds. Techniques for quantitating the extent of peroxidase dependent or peroxyl radical-dependent metabolism in vivo make use of differences in the structure or stereochemistry of reactive intermediates formed by peroxidases relative to cytochromes P-450. Differences in the relative amounts of hydrolysis products and DNA adducts derived from anti- and syn-dihydrodiolepoxides following application of BP-7,8-diol to mouse skin in vivo indicate peroxyl radicals play a significant role in metabolism of BP-7,8-diol in uninduced animals.

  1. Bioactivation of minocycline to reactive intermediates by myeloperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and hepatic microsomes: implications for minocycline-induced lupus and hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannargudi, Baskar; McNally, David; Reynolds, William; Uetrecht, Jack

    2009-09-01

    Of the tetracyclines, minocycline is unique in causing a significant incidence of a lupus-like syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis. It is also unique among the tetracyclines in having a para-N,N-dimethylaminophenol ring. Many drugs that cause autoimmune reactions are oxidized to reactive metabolites by the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system of macrophages. In this study, we showed that minocycline is oxidized to reactive intermediates by MPO/H(2)O(2)/Cl(-), HOCl, horseradish peroxidase/H(2)O(2), or hepatic microsomes. When trapped with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), two adducts with protonated molecular ions at m/z 619 were isolated and analyzed by NMR. One represents attack of the aromatic D ring by NAC meta to the N,N-dimethylamino group, which implies that the reactive intermediate was a quinone iminium ion. The NMR of the other adduct, which was not observed when minocycline was oxidized by hepatic microsomes, indicates that the NAC is attached at the junction of the B and C rings. In the oxidation by HOCl, we found an intermediate with a protonated molecular ion of m/z 510 that represents the addition of HOCl to minocycline. The HOCl presumably adds across the double bond of the B ring, and reaction of this intermediate with NAC led to the second NAC adduct. We were surprised to find that the same NAC adduct was not observed after oxidation of tetracycline with HOCl, even though this part of the tetracycline structure is the same as for minocycline. We propose that one or more of these reactive metabolites are responsible for the idiosyncratic drug reactions that are specific to this tetracycline.

  2. Conserved YjgF Protein Family Deaminates Reactive Enamine/Imine Intermediates of Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate (PLP)-dependent Enzyme Reactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Jennifer A.; Flynn, Jeffrey M.; Downs, Diana M.

    2012-01-01

    The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is conserved in all domains of life, suggesting that the role of these proteins arose early and was maintained throughout evolution. Metabolic consequences of lacking this protein in Salmonella enterica and other organisms have been described, but the biochemical function of YjgF remained unknown. This work provides the first description of a conserved biochemical activity for the YjgF protein family. Our data support the conclusion that YjgF proteins have enamine/imine deaminase activity and accelerate the release of ammonia from reactive enamine/imine intermediates of the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent threonine dehydratase (IlvA). Results from structure-guided mutagenesis experiments suggest that YjgF lacks a catalytic residue and that it facilitates ammonia release by positioning a critical water molecule in the active site. YjgF is renamed RidA (reactive intermediate/imine deaminase A) to reflect the conserved activity of the protein family described here. This study, combined with previous physiological studies on yjgF mutants, suggests that intermediates of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-mediated reactions may have metabolic consequences in vivo that were previously unappreciated. The conservation of the RidA/YjgF family suggests that reactive enamine/imine metabolites are of concern to all organisms. PMID:22094463

  3. Ozone uptake and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols (Abbatt, Lee and Thornton, 2012). The effects of particle phase state on the reaction kinetics are still not fully elucidated and cannot be described by classical models assuming a homogeneous condensed phase (Berkemeier et al., 2013). We apply a kinetic multi-layer model, explicitly resolving gas adsorption, condensed phase diffusion and condensed phase chemistry (Shiraiwa et al., 2010), to systematic measurements of ozone uptake onto proxies for secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our findings show how moisture-induced phase changes affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter through change in the physicochemical properties of the substrate: the diffusion coefficients are found to be low under dry conditions, but increase by several orders of magnitude toward higher relative humidity (RH). The solubility of ozone in the dry organic matrix is found to be one order of magnitude higher than in the dilute aqueous solution. The model simulations reveal that at high RH, ozone uptake is mainly controlled by reaction throughout the particle bulk, whereas at low RH, bulk diffusion is retarded severely and reaction at the surface becomes the dominant pathway, with ozone uptake being limited by replenishment of unreacted organic molecules from the bulk phase. The experimental results can only be reconciled including a pathway for ozone self-reaction, which becomes especially important under dry and polluted conditions. Ozone self-reaction can be interpreted as formation and recombination of long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates at the aerosol surface, which could also explain several kinetic parameters and has implications for the health effects of organic aerosol particles. This study hence outlines how kinetic modelling can be used to gain mechanistic insight into the coupling of mass transport, phase changes, and chemical

  4. Chemical reactivity and biological activity of chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydt, Daniela; De Spirt, Silke; Muschelknautz, Christian; Stahl, Wilhelm; Müller, Thomas J J

    2013-08-01

    Abstract 1. Chalcones are structural analogues of benzalacetophenone (BAP). Several derivatives have been identified in plants and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties were attributed to the compounds, probably related to their direct antioxidant activity or stimulatory effects on the expression of endogenous defence enzymes like hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 expression is triggered by the Nrf2-Keap1 signalling pathway, initiated by the addition of chalcones to thiol groups of Keap1 via Michael-type reaction. 2. The present study used a model system estimating the reactivity of different synthetic chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with thiols and compared the chemical reactivity with the biological activity, measured by HO-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts. 3. Chemical reactivity with the thiol group of N-acetylcysteine was determined with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and followed chemical principles of structure-reactivity relationship. Most reactive were sulforaphane, dimethylfumarate, chalcone 3 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-pyrimidin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7 (1,3-diphenylprop-2-yn-1-one). This result demonstrates that α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives react with thiols differently. All compounds were also biologically active; however, expression of HO-1 was not only related to the chemical reactivity but also to the lipophilicity of the molecules which likely affected transmembrane uptake. Most efficient inducers of HO-1 expression were BAP, 4-hydroxynonenal and chalcone 1 (4-[(1E)-3-oxo-3-phenylprop-1-en-1-yl]benzonitrile), chalcone 5 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7.

  5. Be alert to the alterations in the biological characteristics in heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of reduced vancomycin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus in many cases appears to be associated with characteristic changes. These changes may have pitfall of identifying S. aureus by automated testing methods like Vitek 32. In this study, we retested 24 heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus haemolyticus (h-VISH collected in 2008-2010 at the Department of Clinical Microbiology by conventional biochemical tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA reversion test and electron microscopic examination were also used. Six isolates of 24 h-VISH possessed nuc, coa, and 16S rRNA genes, and could be reversed into S. aureus. It suggested that biochemical and morphological changes in hVISA and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA should be considered, and the detection of S. aureus, especially reduced vancomycin susceptibility isolates, requires more attention and different techniques.

  6. The Quantum Biology of Reactive Oxygen Species Partitioning Impacts Cellular Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Castello, Pablo R; Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten; Dratz, Edward A; Singel, David J; Martino, Carlos F

    2016-12-20

    Quantum biology is the study of quantum effects on biochemical mechanisms and biological function. We show that the biological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells can be influenced by coherent electron spin dynamics, providing a new example of quantum biology in cellular regulation. ROS partitioning appears to be mediated during the activation of molecular oxygen (O2) by reduced flavoenzymes, forming spin-correlated radical pairs (RPs). We find that oscillating magnetic fields at Zeeman resonance alter relative yields of cellular superoxide (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ROS products, indicating coherent singlet-triplet mixing at the point of ROS formation. Furthermore, the orientation-dependence of magnetic stimulation, which leads to specific changes in ROS levels, increases either mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis rates. Our results reveal quantum effects in live cell cultures that bridge atomic and cellular levels by connecting ROS partitioning to cellular bioenergetics.

  7. The Quantum Biology of Reactive Oxygen Species Partitioning Impacts Cellular Bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Castello, Pablo R.; Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten; Dratz, Edward A.; Singel, David J.; Martino, Carlos F.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum biology is the study of quantum effects on biochemical mechanisms and biological function. We show that the biological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells can be influenced by coherent electron spin dynamics, providing a new example of quantum biology in cellular regulation. ROS partitioning appears to be mediated during the activation of molecular oxygen (O2) by reduced flavoenzymes, forming spin-correlated radical pairs (RPs). We find that oscillating magnetic fields at Zeeman resonance alter relative yields of cellular superoxide (O2•-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ROS products, indicating coherent singlet-triplet mixing at the point of ROS formation. Furthermore, the orientation-dependence of magnetic stimulation, which leads to specific changes in ROS levels, increases either mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis rates. Our results reveal quantum effects in live cell cultures that bridge atomic and cellular levels by connecting ROS partitioning to cellular bioenergetics.

  8. Bioactivation of coumarin in rat olfactory mucosal microsomes: Detection of protein covalent binding and identification of reactive intermediates through analysis of glutathione adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Weiping; Zheng, Joanna; Humphreys, W Griffith; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Zhu, Mingshe

    2009-10-07

    The presence of high levels, as well as tissue-specific forms, of cytochrome P450 enzymes in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM) has important implications in the bioactivation and toxicity of xenobiotics entering the tissue. Previous studies have shown that coumarin, a known olfactory toxicant in rats, is bioactivated by OM microsomal P450s to a number of products, presumably via coumarin-3,4-epoxide and other epoxide intermediates. The aim of the current study was to obtain direct evidence for the formation of such reactive intermediates in rat OM through the detection of protein covalent binding and glutathione (GSH) adduct formation. Protein covalent binding experiments with [(14)C]coumarin (10microM) displayed a 7-9-fold higher NADPH-dependent radioactivity binding in rat OM microsomes (2.5nmol/mg/30min) compared to those in rat and human liver microsomes; the binding value in rat OM microsomes was substantially but not completely reduced by the addition of GSH (5mM). LC/MS analyses detected a number of GSH adducts in GSH-supplemented coumarin metabolism reaction in rat OM microsomes; 3-glutathionyl coumarin was found to be the major one, indicating 3,4-epoxidation as the main bioactivation pathway. Additional GSH adducts were identified, presumably forming via the same pathway or epoxidation on the benzene moiety. Our findings provide direct evidence for the formation of multiple coumarin reactive intermediates in rat OM, leading to protein covalent binding and GSH conjugation.

  9. Evaluation of Fenton Oxidation Process Coupled with Biological Treatment for the Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Bahmani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of azo dyes is difficult due to their complex structures and low BOD to COD ratios. In the present study, the efficiency of using Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + Fe2+ as a pretreatment process to enhance microbial transformation of reactive black 5 (RB5 in an aqueous system was evaluated. The RB5 with an initial concentration of 250 mg/L was decolorized up to 90% in 60 h by using a bacterial consortium. Fenton’s reagent at a Fe2+ concentration of 0.5 mM and H2O2 concentration of 2.9 mM (molar ratio, 1:5.8 was most effective for decolorization at pH = 3.0. The extent of RB5 removal by the combined Fenton–biotreatment was about 2 times higher than that of biotreatment alone. The production of some aromatic amines intermediates implied partial mineralization of the RB5 in Fenton treatment alone; in addition, decreasing of GC-MS peaks suggested that dearomatization occurred in Fenton-biological process. Fenton pretreatment seems to be a cost–effective option for the biotreatment of azo dyes, due mainly to the lower doses of chemicals, lower sludge generation, and saving of time. Our results demonstrated positive effects of inoculating bacterial consortium which was capable of dye biodegradation with a Fenton’s pretreatment step as well as the benefits of low time required for the biological process. In addition, the potential of field performance of Fenton-biological process because of using bacterial consortium is an other positive effect of it.

  10. Biology and Control of Snail Intermediate Host of Schistosoma japonicum in The People's Republic of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Z.J.; Ge, J; Dai, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum is a severe parasitic disease in The People's Republic of China and imposed considerable burden on human and domestic animal health and socioeconomic development. The significant achievement in schistosomiasis control has been made in last 60years. ....... Oncomelania hupensis as the only intermediate host of S. japonicum plays a key role in disease transmission. The habitat complexity of the snails challenges to effective control. In this review we share the experiences in control and research of O. hupensis....

  11. Biological decolorization of reactive anthraquinone and phthalocyanine dyes under various oxidation-reduction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young H; Matthews, Rosalyn D; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2006-02-01

    The decolorization of two anthraquinone dyes (Reactive Blue 4 [RB4] and Reactive Blue 19 [RB19]) and two phthalocyanine dyes (Reactive Blue 7 [RB7] and Reactive Blue 21 [RB21]) was investigated at an initial dye concentration of 300 mg/L using an unacclimated, enrichment culture. The culture was fed a mixture of organic compounds and maintained initially under aerobic conditions, and then progressively developed anoxic/ anaerobic conditions. Biotransformation-related decolorization of the dyes did not take place under aerobic conditions, but use of the feed organic mixture and biomass production by the enrichment culture were not affected. Complete ammonia removal occurred in the control and all dye-amended cultures. The development and extent of nitrification were much lower in the latter cultures, in which ammonia removal via air stripping was the dominant mechanism. Prolonged incubation of the culture under anoxic/anaerobic conditions with multiple carbon source additions resulted in a high decolorization extent of anthraquinone dyes (over 84%) and only partial decolorization of phthalocyanine dyes (49 to 66%). Development of significant methanogenic activity took place in the control and, to a lesser extent, in the two phthalocyanine dye-amended cultures, but the anthraquinone dyes severely inhibited the development of methanogenic activity. The RB4 and RB19 decolorization was attributed to nonreversible, microbially mediated dye transformation(s), demonstrated by the accumulation of decolorization products with absorbance maxima in the 420- to 460-nm region. The decolorization of RB4 and RB19 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At an initial dye concentration of 300 mg/L, the observed maximum decolorization rate per unit biomass was 9.1 and 37.5 mg dye/mg volatile suspended solids x day for the RB4 and RB19, respectively. Thus, partial decolorization of reactive phthalocyanine dyes and extensive biological decolorization of reactive anthraquinone dyes is

  12. Biochar and hydrochar reactivity assessed by chemical, physical and biological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naisse, Christophe; Alexis, Marie; Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; pozzi, Alessandro; Carcaillet, Christopher; Criscuoli, Irene; Miglietta, Franco; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    Field application of biochar is intended to increase soil carbon (C) storage. The assessment of C storage potential of biochars lacks methods and standard materials. In this study, we compared the chemical reactivity of biochars and hydrochars and their potential mineralisation before and after physical weathering as one possibility to evaluate their environmental stability. We used biochars produced by gasification (GSs) and hydrochars produced by hydrothermal carbonisation (HTCs) produced from three different feedstocks as well as Holocene charcoals (150 and 2000 yr old). Their chemical reactivity was analysed after acid dichromate oxidation and their mineralisation potential after laboratory incubations before and after physical weathering. Our results showed that use of acid dichromate oxidation may allow for differentiation of the reactivity of modern biochars but that chemical reactivity of biochars is poorly suited to assess their environmental residence time because it may change with exposure time in soil. Physical weathering induced a carbon loss and increased biological stability of biochar, while reducing its positive priming effect on native soil organic matter. Model extrapolations based on our data showed that decadal C sequestration potential of GS and HTC is globally equivalent when all losses including those due to priming and physical weathering were taken into account. However, at century scale only GS may have the potential to increase soil C storage.

  13. Biological and physiological role of reactive oxygen species--the good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, L; Zhou, T; Pannell, B K; Ziegler, A C; Best, T M

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules that are naturally produced within biological systems. Research has focused extensively on revealing the multi-faceted and complex roles that ROS play in living tissues. In regard to the good side of ROS, this article explores the effects of ROS on signalling, immune response and other physiological responses. To review the potentially bad side of ROS, we explain the consequences of high concentrations of molecules that lead to the disruption of redox homeostasis, which induces oxidative stress damaging intracellular components. The ugly effects of ROS can be observed in devastating cardiac, pulmonary, neurodegenerative and other disorders. Furthermore, this article covers the regulatory enzymes that mitigate the effects of ROS. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase are discussed in particular detail. The current understanding of ROS is incomplete, and it is imperative that future research be performed to understand the implications of ROS in various therapeutic interventions.

  14. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  15. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Naidis, G.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Laroussi, M. [Plasma Engineering & Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Reuter, S. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Graves, D.B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); School of Physics, Chemistry, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O.Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-05-04

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors’ vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  16. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the Biological Activities of Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them appropriate for various applications. The structural alteration of metallic NPs leads to different biological functions, specifically resulting in different potentials for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The amount of ROS produced by metallic NPs correlates with particle size, shape, surface area, and chemistry. ROS possess multiple functions in cellular biology, with ROS generation a key factor in metallic NP-induced toxicity, as well as modulation of cellular signaling involved in cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review, we briefly explained NP classes and their biomedical applications and describe the sources and roles of ROS in NP-related biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we also described the roles of metal NP-induced ROS generation in stem cell biology. Although the roles of ROS in metallic NP-related biological functions requires further investigation, modulation and characterization of metallic NP-induced ROS production are promising in the application of metallic NPs in the areas of regenerative medicine and medical devices.

  17. Identification of the Main Intermediate Precursor of l-Ergothioneine Biosynthesis in Human Biological Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sotgia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A capillary electrophoresis coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (CE–MS/MS has been used to make a qualitative determination of hercynine—the main precursor of l-ergothioneine biosynthesis—in some key human biological specimens, such as urine, whole blood, plasma, and saliva. From semiquantitative analysis results, the highest concentrations of hercynine were detected in saliva and whole blood, whereas much lower concentrations were measured in urine and plasma. Whole blood was the biological matrix with the highest concentration of l-ergothioneine followed by plasma, saliva, and urine. The antioxidant effects attributed to l-ergothioneine, along with its peculiar antioxidant mechanism, offer a possible explanation for the presence of the hercynine, as well as its concentration, in the considered biological matrices.

  18. Biological false reactive VDRL test among the HIV-infected patients: A note on its prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Presently, the screening of syphilis is dependent mainly on serological tests. In the sexually transmitted disease clinic, syphilis serology is a basic screening test. The results VDRL test among of 150 HIV (82 males, 68 females infected, regardless to immune status (CD4+ count, were studied. It was found that in 2 cases, the VDRL was biologically false reactive (VDRL positive, TPHA negative, who had CD4+ count >200 /mL, giving the incidence rate equal to 1.3 % (1.2 % for male and 1.5 % for female.

  19. Versatile micropipette technology based on deep reactive ion etching and anodic bonding for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Martinez, M. J.; Campo, E. M.; Caballero, D.; Fernandez, E.; Errachid, A.; Esteve, J.; Plaza, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    A novel, versatile and robust technology to manufacture transparent micropipettes, suitable for biological applications, is presented here. Up to three deep reactive ion etchings have been included in the manufacturing process, providing highly controlled geometry of reservoirs, connection cavities and inlet ports. Etching processes have been used for the definition of chip and reservoir and for nozzle release. Additionally, special design considerations have been developed to facilitate micro-to-macro fluidic connections. Implementation of anodic bonding to seal a glass substrate to the fluidic structure etched on Si, allowed observation of the flow inside the reservoir. Flow tests have been conducted by filling channels with different fluids. Flow was observed under an optical microscope, both during capillary filling and also during pumping. Dispensing has been demonstrated by functionalizing the surface of an AFM cantilever. Mechanical tests performed by piercing live mouse cells with FIB-sharpened micropipettes suggest the design is sturdy for biological piercing applications.

  20. Electrochemical generation and reactivity of free radical redox intermediates from ortho- and meta-nitro substituted 1,4-dihydropyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Vergara, L J; Ortiz, M E; Bollo, S; Squella, J A

    1997-08-29

    This paper reports a comprehensive study by cyclic voltammetry on the electrochemical characteristics and the reactivity of the one-electron reduction product from a series of nitro aryl 1,4-dihydropyridines in mixed and aprotic media. In addition, the effects of 1,4-DHP on the oxygen consumption of T. cruzi epimastigotes are reported. One-electron reduction products from 1,4-DHP derivatives significantly reacted with both thiol compounds and the nuclei acid bases, adenine and uracil. This reactivity was significantly higher than the natural decay of the radicals in mixed media. Based on these results the following tentative order of reactivity towards the xeno/endobiotics is as follows: cysteamine > glutathione > adenineuracil. Both the stability and the reactivity of the nitro radical anions electrochemically generated from 1,4-DHP showed a linear dependence with pH. The sensitivity to pH of the radicals derived from o-nitro substituted derivatives was significantly higher than m-nitro substituted derivatives. On the other hand, in all cases an increase of pH produced a significant decrease in the interaction rate constant. Interaction studies carried out in aprotic media did not show any reactivity of the radicals towards both thiol compounds and the nuclei acid bases, adenine and uracil. Therefore, we concluded that the interaction process requires certain proton activity in the media. All the tested 1,4-dihydropyridines inhibited the oxygen consumption by T. cruzi epimastigotes, Tulahuén strain. The drugs with higher electron-affinity produced greater inhibition than those with lower electron-affinity (i.e. nicardipine vs nifedipine).

  1. Ability of Curcuminoid from Curcuma domestica Val. in Reducing the Secretion of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates by Synovial Fluid Monocytes in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Kertia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIncreasing the secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI by monocytes in the synovial fluid is anindicator to determine the severity of joint inflammation. Previous studies have shown that curcumin inhibitthe osteoarthritis progression with its ability to inhibite the activity of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS enzymefrom macrophages. In this prospective randomized open end blinded evaluations = PROBE study, 80 patientswith knee osteoarthritis were eligable. The subject were devided in to two group: group who received 3 x 30mg of curcuminoid from Curcuma domestica Val. extract (curcuminoid group and group who received 3 x 25mg of diclofenac sodium (diclofenac group as comparison. The treatment was for 4 weeks time. The secretionof ROI by sinovial fluid monocytes was calculated by scoring the amount of formazan formation after neutralred staining in nitrobleu tetrazolium reduction assay. The result of this study showed that the secretion of ROIby synovial fluid monocytes was significantly decreased in both groups (p <0.001 respectively. There wasno significant difference in decreasing of ROI secretion of synovial fluid monocytes between both treatmentgroups (p = 0.92.Keywords : curcuminoid, diclofenac sodium, reactive oxygen intermediates, monocyte, osteoarthritis

  2. Effect of human glutathione S-transferases on glutathione-dependent inactivation of cytochrome P450-dependent reactive intermediates of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragovic, Sanja; Boerma, Jan Simon; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2013-11-18

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions due to the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac have been proposed to be caused by the generation of reactive acyl glucuronides and oxidative metabolites. For the oxidative metabolism of diclofenac by cytochromes P450 at least five different reactive intermediates have been proposed previously based on structural identification of their corresponding GSH-conjugates. In the present study, the ability of four human glutathione S-transferases (hGSTs) to catalyze the GSH-conjugation of the different reactive intermediates formed by P450s was investigated. Addition of pooled human liver cytosol and recombinant hGSTA1-1, hGSTM1-1, and hGSTP1-1 to incubations of diclofenac with human liver microsomes or purified CYP102A1M11 L437N as a model system significantly increased total GSH-conjugation. The strongest increase of total GSH-conjugation was observed by adding hGSTP1-1, whereas hGSTM1-1 and hGSTA1-1 showed lower activity. Addition of hGSTT1-1 only showed a minor effect. When considering the effects of hGSTs on GSH-conjugation of the different quinoneimines of diclofenac, it was found that hGSTP1-1 showed the highest activity in GSH-conjugation of the quinoneimine derived from 5-hydroxydiclofenac (5-OH-DF). hGSTM1-1 showed the highest activity in inactivation of the quinoneimine derived from 4'-hydroxydiclofenac (4'-OH-DF). Separate incubations with 5-OH-DF and 4'-OH-DF as substrates confirmed these results. hGSTs also catalyzed GSH-conjugation of the o-iminemethide formed by oxidative decarboxylation of diclofenac as well as the substitution of one of the chlorine atoms of DF by GSH. hGSTP1-1 showed the highest activity for the formation of these minor GSH-conjugates. These results suggest that hGSTs may play an important role in the inactivation of DF quinoneimines and its minor reactive intermediates especially in stress conditions when tissue levels of GSH are decreased.

  3. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Reactive species and DNA damage in chronic inflammation: reconciling chemical mechanisms and biological fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Dedon, Peter C

    2011-05-01

    Chronic inflammation has long been recognized as a risk factor for many human cancers. One mechanistic link between inflammation and cancer involves the generation of nitric oxide, superoxide and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by macrophages and neutrophils that infiltrate sites of inflammation. Although pathologically high levels of these reactive species cause damage to biological molecules, including DNA, nitric oxide at lower levels plays important physiological roles in cell signaling and apoptosis. This raises the question of inflammation-induced imbalances in physiological and pathological pathways mediated by chemical mediators of inflammation. At pathological levels, the damage sustained by nucleic acids represents the full spectrum of chemistries and likely plays an important role in carcinogenesis. This suggests that DNA damage products could serve as biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in clinically accessible compartments such as blood and urine. However, recent studies of the biotransformation of DNA damage products before excretion point to a weakness in our understanding of the biological fates of the DNA lesions and thus to a limitation in the use of DNA lesions as biomarkers. This review will address these and other issues surrounding inflammation-mediated DNA damage on the road to cancer.

  5. Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Intermediate Species Mediate Asbestos-Induced Genotoxicity and Oxidative Stress–Responsive Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sarah X.L.; Partridge, Michael A.; Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Davidson, Mercy M.; Sally A Amundson; Hei, Tom K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of asbestos-induced human cancers is increasing worldwide, and considerable evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of these diseases. Our previous studies suggested that mitochondria might be involved in the initiation of oxidative stress in asbestos-exposed mammalian cells. Objective: We investigated whether mitochondria are a potential cytoplasmic target of asbestos using a mitochondrial DNA–depleted (ρ0) human small airway epi...

  6. Evaluation of biological effects of intermediate frequency magnetic field on differentiation of embryonic stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yoshie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryotoxic effect of intermediate frequency (IF magnetic field (MF was evaluated using murine embryonic stem (ES cells and fibroblast cells based on the embryonic stem cell test (EST. The cells were exposed to 21 kHz IF–MF up to magnetic flux density of 3.9 mT during the cell proliferation process (7 days or the cell differentiation process (10 days during which an embryonic body differentiated into myocardial cells. As a result, there was no significant difference in the cell proliferation between sham- and IF–MF-exposed cells for both ES and fibroblast cells. Similarly, the ratio of the number of ES-derived cell aggregates differentiated to myocardial cells to total number of cell aggregates was not changed by IF–MF exposure. In addition, the expressions of a cardiomyocytes-specific gene, Myl2, and an early developmental gene, Hba-x, in the exposed cell aggregate were not altered. Since the magnetic flux density adopted in this study is much higher than that generated by an inverter of the electrical railway, an induction heating (IH cooktop, etc. in our daily lives, these results suggested that IF–MF in which the public is exposed to in general living environment would not have embryotoxic effect.

  7. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heidi; Johnson, David K.

    2015-03-22

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. The high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.

  8. Biological and chemical reactivity and phosphorus forms of buffalo manure compost, vermicompost and their mixture with biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Phuong-Thi; Rumpel, Cornelia; Ngo, Quoc-Anh; Alexis, Marie; Velásquez Vargas, Gabriela; Mora Gil, Maria de la Luz; Dang, Dinh-Kim; Jouquet, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    This study characterized the carbon and phosphorus composition of buffalo manure, its compost and vermicompost and investigated if presence of bamboo biochar has an effect on their chemical and biological reactivity. The four substrates were characterized for chemical and biochemical composition and P forms. The biological stability of the four substrates and their mixtures were determined during an incubation experiment. Their chemical reactivity was analyzed after acid dichromate oxidation. Biological reactivity of these substrates was related to their soluble organic matter content, which decreased in the order buffalo manure>compost>vermicompost. Phosphorus was labile in all organic substrates and composting transformed organic P into plant available P. The presence of biochar led to a protection of organic matter against chemical oxidation and changed their susceptibility to biological degradation, suggesting that biochar could increase the carbon sequestration potential of compost, vermicompost and manure, when applied in mixture.

  9. Biological consequences of potential repair intermediates of clustered base damage site in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikazono, Naoya, E-mail: shikazono.naoya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Research Science Center, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); O' Neill, Peter [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-02

    Clustered DNA damage induced by a single radiation track is a unique feature of ionizing radiation. Using a plasmid-based assay in Escherichia coli, we previously found significantly higher mutation frequencies for bistranded clusters containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) than for either a single 8-oxoG or a single DHT in wild type and in glycosylase-deficient strains of E. coli. This indicates that the removal of an 8-oxoG from a clustered damage site is most likely retarded compared to the removal of a single 8-oxoG. To gain further insights into the processing of bistranded base lesions, several potential repair intermediates following 8-oxoG removal were assessed. Clusters, such as DHT + apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and DHT + GAP have relatively low mutation frequencies, whereas clusters, such as AP + AP or GAP + AP, significantly reduce the number of transformed colonies, most probably through formation of a lethal double strand break (DSB). Bistranded AP sites placed 3' to each other with various interlesion distances also blocked replication. These results suggest that bistranded base lesions, i.e., single base lesions on each strand, but not clusters containing only AP sites and strand breaks, are repaired in a coordinated manner so that the formation of DSBs is avoided. We propose that, when either base lesion is initially excised from a bistranded base damage site, the remaining base lesion will only rarely be converted into an AP site or a single strand break in vivo.

  10. Manganese-Substituted Myoglobin: Characterization and Reactivity of an Oxidizing Intermediate towards a Weak C-H Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari L. Stone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-substituted hemoproteins have been examined by biochemists for decades, but their potential for diverse functionalities has not been thoroughly investigated. By replacing hemoproteins with non-native metals, heme-containing proteins could be capable of performing a range of chemistries not allowed for in the native protein. The metal within the heme of the oxygen-carrying hemoprotein, myoglobin, can readily be replaced with other first row transition metals such as cobalt, chromium and manganese. Upon oxidation with two-electron oxidants (ex. meta-chloroperbenzoic acid, an oxidizing intermediate is produced in manganese-substituted myoglobin. Electron paramagnetic resonance analyses confirm the oxidation of Mn(III to Mn(IV. With the addition of weak C-H bonds of 1,4 cyclohexadiene, hydrogen atom abstraction is exhibited by the oxidizing intermediate that displays a second-order rate constant of 2.79 +/− 0.22 M−1 s−1 by the metal-oxo species. The replacement of the iron ion with a manganese ion at the active site of myoglobin displays oxidative capabilities that are not shown in native myoglobin.

  11. An intermediate-depth tensional earthquake (MW 5.7) and its aftershocks within the Nazca slab, central Chile: A reactivated outer rise fault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, Marianne; Monfret, Tony; Pardo, Mario; Ranalli, Giorgio; Nolet, Guust

    2012-04-01

    An intermediate-depth earthquake (7 January 2003, Mw 5.7) occurred within the subducting Nazca plate at longitude 70.3°W, latitude 33.8°S and depth 113 km. Its focal mechanism shows normal faulting with a slight strike-slip component. We detected 50 aftershocks within January 2003 using a temporary seismic network installed in the zone. Their local magnitudes Ml range between 1.9 and 3.5, with the strongest events occurring around the mainshock. Their spatial distribution, including the mainshock, defines an area of ~ (35 ± 5) × (10 ± 2) km2, cutting through almost half of the slab's total thickness at an angle of ~ 60° to the slab's surface. This area agrees well with one of the mainshock nodal planes. However, the total seismic area, as defined by the aftershock distribution, is larger than the rupture area normally expected for an earthquake of moderate magnitude. We compare the orientation of the seismic plane with the outer rise fault pattern offshore central Chile and find a correlation with the strike of the seafloor spreading fabric. The seismic sequence shows similarities with other intermediate-depth cases, notably the 13 June 2005 Tarapacá earthquake in northern Chile and similar cases in the Pacific slab beneath Japan. In all these cases, the inferred reactivated fault planes probably originate from the outer rise region, in agreement with the hypothesis that intermediate-depth seismicity is linked to inherited faults. Consequently, even moderate-sized earthquakes can reactivate large areas of inherited faults within slabs at depths > 100 km. Furthermore, the occurrence of multiple other local events (Mw > 5), with similar focal mechanism and depth to the January 2003 event, appear to indicate that the slab becomes mechanically weak ~ 100 km depth. The depth extent in the slab of the reactivated pre-existing faults is likely governed by the slab's bending/unbending stress regime, i.e. the depth to the neutral plane. Dehydration embrittlement is a

  12. Effects of UV-C irradiation on phosphoinositide turnover in plant cells: similarities with those occurring via the formation of reactive oxygen intermediates in animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, M P; Ricci, D; Fraternale, D; Piatti, E; Manunta, A; Accorsi, A

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of examining the response of plant cells to UV-C irradiation, we investigated the behaviour of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PtdIns 4,5-P2) molecule (the precursor of the phosphoinositide signal transduction cascade) by exposing callus cells from Peucedanum verticillare to UV-C (130 J m-2) and by examining the level and the fatty acid composition of PtdIns 4,5-P2 at different times after irradiation. We show that a pathway for the UV-C response includes transient PtdIns 4,5-P2 breakdown. The effect of ultraviolet rays is mimicked by H2O2 suggesting that in this plant it may be brought about by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), as already underlined in experimental animal models.

  13. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  14. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  15. Two Reaction Mechanisms via Iminium Ion Intermediates: The Different Reactivities of Diphenylprolinol Silyl Ether and Trifluoromethyl-Substituted Diarylprolinol Silyl Ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Hiroaki; Uchimaru, Tadafumi; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2015-08-24

    The reactions of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with cyclopentadiene in the presence of diarylprolinol silyl ethers as catalyst proceed via iminium cations as intermediates, and can be divided into two types; one involving a Michael-type reaction (type A) and one involving a cycloaddition (type B). Diphenylprolinol silyl ethers and trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ethers, which are widely used proline-type organocatalysts, have been investigated in this study. As the LUMO of the iminium ion derived from trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether is lower in energy than that derived from diphenylprolinol silyl ether, as supported by ab initio calculations, the trifluoromethyl-substituted catalyst is more reactive in a type B reaction. The iminium ion from an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde is generated more quickly with diphenylprolinol silyl ether than with the trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether. When the generation of the iminium ion is the rate-determining step, the diphenylprolinol silyl ether catalyst is the more reactive. Because acid accelerates the generation of iminium ions and reduces the generation of anionic nucleophiles in the Michael-type reaction (type A), it is necessary to select the appropriate acid for specific reactions. In general, diphenylprolinol silyl ether is a superior catalyst for type A reactions, whereas the trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether catalyst is preferred for type B reactions.

  16. Biological decolorization of the reactive dyes Reactive Black 5 by a novel isolated bacterial strain Enterobacter sp. EC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Su, Jian-Qiang; Tian, Yun; Xiong, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Tian-Ling

    2009-11-15

    Studies were carried out on the decolorization of the reactive dye Reactive Black 5 by a newly isolated bacterium, EC3. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence comparisons indicate that this strain belonged to the genus Enterobacter. The optimal conditions for the decolorizing activity of Enterobacter sp. EC3 were anaerobic conditions with glucose supplementation, at pH 7.0, and 37 degrees C. The maximum decolorization efficiency against Reactive Black 5 achieved in this study was 92.56%. Ultra-violet and visible (UV-vis) analyses before and after decolorization and the colorless bacterial biomass after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation, rather than inactive surface adsorption. The bacterial strain also showed a strong ability to decolorize various reactive textile dyes, including both azo and anthraquinone dyes. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a bacterial strain of Enterobacter sp. has been reported with decolorizing ability against both azo and anthraquinone dyes.

  17. How covalent heme to protein bonds influence the formation and reactivity of redox intermediates of a bacterial peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Markus; Nicolussi, Andrea; Schütz, Georg; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-11-07

    The most striking feature of mammalian peroxidases, including myeloperoxidase and lactoperoxidase (LPO) is the existence of covalent bonds between the prosthetic group and the protein, which has a strong impact on their (electronic) structure and biophysical and chemical properties. Recently, a novel bacterial heme peroxidase with high structural and functional similarities to LPO was described. Being released from Escherichia coli, it contains mainly heme b, which can be autocatalytically modified and covalently bound to the protein by incubation with hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, we investigated the reactivity of these two forms in their ferric, compound I and compound II state in a multi-mixing stopped-flow study. Upon heme modification, the reactions between the ferric proteins with cyanide or H2O2 were accelerated. Moreover, apparent bimolecular rate constants of the reaction of compound I with iodide, thiocyanate, bromide, and tyrosine increased significantly and became similar to LPO. Kinetic data are discussed and compared with known structure-function relationships of the mammalian peroxidases LPO and myeloperoxidase.

  18. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom toxins: Evaluation of biological conservation by immune cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Daniela Regina; Souza, Fernanda Nunes; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Morgon, Adriano Marcelo; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Boia-Ferreira, Mariana; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Gremski, Waldemiro; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    Loxosceles spiders are responsible for serious human envenomations worldwide. The collection of symptoms found in victims after accidents is called loxoscelism and is characterized by two clinical conditions: cutaneous loxoscelism and systemic loxocelism. The only specific treatment is serum therapy, in which an antiserum produced with Loxosceles venom is administered to the victims after spider accidents. Our aim was to improve our knowledge, regarding the immunological relationship among toxins from the most epidemiologic important species in Brazil (Loxosceles intermedia, Loxosceles gaucho and Loxosceles laeta). Immunoassays using spider venoms and L. intermedia recombinant toxins were performed and their cross-reactivity assessed. The biological conservation of the main Loxosceles toxins (Phospholipases-D, Astacin-like metalloproteases, Hyaluronidase, ICK-insecticide peptide and TCTP-histamine releasing factor) were investigated. An in silico analysis of the putative epitopes was performed and is discussed on the basis of the experimental results. Our data is an immunological investigation in light of biological conservation throughout the Loxosceles genus. The results bring out new insights on brown spider venom toxins for study, diagnosis and treatment of loxoscelism and putative biotechnological applications concerning immune conserved features in the toxins.

  19. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems.

  20. Biological substrates of emotional reactivity and regulation in adolescence during an emotional go-nogo task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Todd A; Tottenham, Nim; Galvan, Adriana; Voss, Henning U; Glover, Gary H; Casey, B J

    2008-05-15

    Adolescence is a transition period from childhood to adulthood that is often characterized by emotional instability. This period is also a time of increased incidence of anxiety and depression, underscoring the importance of understanding biological substrates of behavioral and emotion regulation during adolescence. Developmental changes in the brain in concert with individual predispositions for anxiety might underlie the increased risk for poor outcomes reported during adolescence. We tested the hypothesis that difficulties in regulating behavior in emotional contexts in adolescents might be due to competition between heightened activity in subcortical emotional processing systems and immature top-down prefrontal systems. Individual differences in emotional reactivity might put some teens at greater risk during this sensitive transition in development. We examined the association between emotion regulation and frontoamygdala circuitry in 60 children, adolescents, and adults with an emotional go-nogo paradigm. We went beyond examining the magnitude of neural activity and focused on neural adaptation within this circuitry across time with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Adolescents showed exaggerated amygdala activity relative to children and adults. This age-related difference decreased with repeated exposures to the stimuli, and individual differences in self-ratings of anxiety predicted the extent of adaptation or habituation in amygdala. Individuals with higher trait anxiety showed less habituation over repeated exposures. This failure to habituate was associated with less functional connectivity between ventral prefrontal cortex and amygdala. These findings suggest that exaggerated emotional reactivity during adolescence might increase the need for top-down control and put individuals with less control at greater risk for poor outcomes.

  1. "Reactive" optical sensor for Hg(2+) and its application in environmental aqueous media and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jiayun; Pan, Dong; Li, Hongwei; Yao, Yunhui; Lyu, Zu; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun

    2017-03-01

    A new rhodamine B-based "reactive" optical sensor (1) for Hg(2+) was synthesized. Sensor 1 shows a unique colorimetric and fluorescent "turn-on" selectivity to Hg(2+) over 14 other metal ions with a hypersensitivity (detection limits are 27.6 nM (5.5 ppb) and 6.9 nM (1.4 ppb), respectively) in neutral buffer solution. To test its applicability in the environment, sensor 1 was applied to quantify and visualize low levels of Hg(2+) in tap water and river water samples. The results indicate sensor 1 is a highly sensitive fluorescent sensor for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 1.7 ppb in tap water and river water. Moreover, sensor 1 is a convenient visualizing sensor for low levels of Hg(2+) (0.1 ppm) in water environment (from colorless to light pink). In addition, sensor 1 shows good potential as a fluorescent visualizing sensor for Hg(2+) in fetal bovine serum and living 293T cells. The results indicate that sensor 1 shows good potential as a highly sensitive sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) in environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract A new rhodamine B-based "reactive" optical sensor (1) for Hg(2+) was synthesized. 1 shows a unique colorimetric and fluorescent "turn-on" selectivity to Hg(2+) over 14 other metal ions with a hypersensitivity in water environment. And it is a convenient visualizing probe for low levels of Hg(2+) in environment aqueous media, fetal bovine serum and living 293T cells.

  2. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  3. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  4. DECOLORIZATION AND BIOLOGICAL DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE REACTIVE RED2 BY ANAEROBIC/AEROBIC SEQUENTIAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Naimabadi ، H. Movahedian Attar ، A. Shahsavani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anaerobic treatability of reactive Red2 in an anaerobic/aerobic sequential process. Laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor and fixed activated sludge reactor were operated at different organic loadings and hydraulic retention times. The effects of shock dye concentration on the chemical oxygen demand and color removal efficiencies were investigated in the anaerobic baffled reactor. The effect of hydraulic retention time on the color and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were also investigated in the aerobic reactor. The studies were carried out in continuous mode and the effluent of the anaerobic baffled reactor was used as feed for the fixed activated sludge reactor. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 54.5% was obtained at HRT =1 day in the anaerobic reactor. The average color removal was 89.5%. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 69% was obtained at HRT =7 h in the aerobic fixed activated sludge reactor. A slight decrease of the color was also observed in the aerobic reactor. This investigation has shown that successful treatment of a highly colored wastewater is possible in the anaerobic baffled reactor. Also the results showed that, anaerobic biological system has higher efficiency in dye removal than fixed activated sludge system, while aerobic system has higher efficiency in chemical oxygen demand removal comparing with the anaerobic baffled reactor.

  5. Biological stress reactivity as an index of the two polarities of the experience model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jaime R; Vivanco-Carlevari, Anastassia; Barrientos, Mauricio; Martínez, Claudio; Salazar, Luis A; Krause, Mariane

    2017-10-01

    The two-polarities model of personality argues that experience is organized around two axes: interpersonal relatedness and self-definition. Differential emphasis on one of these poles defines adaptive and pathological experiences, generating anaclitic or introjective tendencies. The anaclitic pattern, on one hand, has been conceptually related with an exaggerated emphasis on interpersonal relatedness. On the other hand, the introjective pattern has been connected to high levels of self-criticism. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychophysiological basis for this relationship. Specifically, we hypothesized that the anaclitic individual should have a higher biological reactivity to stress (BRS), measured by the cortisol concentration in saliva, in an interpersonal stress induction protocol (Trier Social Stress Test). Contrary to what was expected, the results indicated that introjective participants presented a higher BSR than the anaclitic group. Interestingly, in contrast to their higher BSR, the introjective group reported a diminished subjective stress in relation to the average. In the anaclitic group, a tendency that goes in the opposite direction was found. Theoretical implications of these findings were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of integrated chemical-biological degradation of a reactive azo dye using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarjanto, Gatut [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller-Lehmann, Beatrice [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller, Jurg [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: j.keller@awmc.uq.edu.au

    2006-11-02

    The integrated chemical-biological degradation combining advanced oxidation by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by aerobic biodegradation was used to degrade C.I. Reactive Azo Red 195A, commonly used in the textile industry in Australia. An experimental design based on the response surface method was applied to evaluate the interactive effects of influencing factors (UV irradiation time, initial hydrogen peroxide dosage and recirculation ratio of the system) on decolourisation efficiency and optimizing the operating conditions of the treatment process. The effects were determined by the measurement of dye concentration and soluble chemical oxygen demand (S-COD). The results showed that the dye and S-COD removal were affected by all factors individually and interactively. Maximal colour degradation performance was predicted, and experimentally validated, with no recirculation, 30 min UV irradiation and 500 mg H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/L. The model predictions for colour removal, based on a three-factor/five-level Box-Wilson central composite design and the response surface method analysis, were found to be very close to additional experimental results obtained under near optimal conditions. This demonstrates the benefits of this approach in achieving good predictions while minimising the number of experiments required.

  7. Porphyrin Cobalt(III) "Nitrene Radical" Reactivity; Hydrogen Atom Transfer from Ortho-YH Substituents to the Nitrene Moiety of Cobalt-Bound Aryl Nitrene Intermediates (Y = O, NH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Monalisa; Rebreyend, Christophe; de Bruin, Bas

    2016-02-20

    In the field of cobalt(II) porphyrin-catalyzed metallo-radical reactions, organic azides have emerged as successful nitrene transfer reagents. In the pursuit of employing ortho-YH substituted (Y = O, NH) aryl azides in Co(II) porphyrin-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions, unexpected hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the OH or NH₂ group in the ortho-position to the nitrene moiety of the key radical-intermediate was observed. This leads to formation of reactive ortho-iminoquinonoid (Y = O) and phenylene diimine (Y = NH) species. These intermediates convert to subsequent products in non-catalyzed reactions, as is typical for these free organic compounds. As such, the observed reactions prevent the anticipated cobalt-mediated catalytic radical-type coupling of the nitrene radical intermediates to alkynes or alkenes. Nonetheless, the observed reactions provide valuable insights into the reactivity of transition metal nitrene-radical intermediates, and give access to ortho-iminoquinonoid and phenylene diimine intermediates from ortho-YH substituted aryl azides in a catalytic manner. The latter can be employed as intermediates in one-pot catalytic transformations. From the ortho-hydroxy aryl azide substrates both phenoxizinones and benzoxazines could be synthesized in high yields. From the ortho-amino aryl azide substrates azabenzene compounds were obtained as the main products. Computational studies support these observations, and reveal that HAT from the neighboring OH and NH₂ moiety to the nitrene radical moiety has a low energy barrier.

  8. Release of reactive oxygen intermediates (superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals) and peroxidase in germinating radish seeds controlled by light, gibberellin, and abscisic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopfer, P; Plachy, C; Frahry, G

    2001-04-01

    Germination of radish (Raphanus sativus cv Eterna) seeds can be inhibited by far-red light (high-irradiance reaction of phytochrome) or abscisic acid (ABA). Gibberellic acid (GA3) restores full germination under far-red light. This experimental system was used to investigate the release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by seed coats and embryos during germination, utilizing the apoplastic oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to fluorescent 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein as an in vivo assay. Germination in darkness is accompanied by a steep rise in ROI release originating from the seed coat (living aleurone layer) as well as the embryo. At the same time as the inhibition of germination, far-red light and ABA inhibit ROI release in both seed parts and GA3 reverses this inhibition when initiating germination under far-red light. During the later stage of germination the seed coat also releases peroxidase with a time course affected by far-red light, ABA, and GA3. The participation of superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in ROI metabolism was demonstrated with specific in vivo assays. ROI production by germinating seeds represents an active, developmentally controlled physiological function, presumably for protecting the emerging seedling against attack by pathogens.

  9. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  10. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP levelseptic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRPkingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRPseptic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRParthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP10 mg/L during septic arthritis in children, it could be negative in up to 20% of patients in different studies. However, a mild inflammatory syndrome or even a CRPseptic arthritis. Therefore, a first episode of monoarthritis in children has to be considered as septic arthritis and treatment should not be delayed.

  11. Use of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) in biological control of intermediate host snails of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in nursery ponds in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Nguyen M.; Duc, Nguyen V.; Stauffer, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    the first intermediate host (i.e., freshwater gastropods), would be an attractive approach, if feasible. The black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus, is a well-known predator of freshwater snails and is already used successfully for biological control of snails in various parts of the world including Vietnam....... Here we report the first trials using it for biological control of intermediate host snails in nursery ponds stocked with 1-week old fry (10-12 mm in length) of Indian carp, Labeo rohita. Methods. Semi-field and field experiments were set up to test the effect of black carp on snail populations....... In the semi-field experiment a known quantity of snails was initially introduced into a pond which was subsequently stocked with black carp. In the field trial in nursery ponds, density of snails was estimated prior to a nursing cycle and at the end of the cycle (after 9 weeks). Results: The results showed...

  12. Heme versus non-heme iron-nitroxyl {FeN(H)O}⁸ complexes: electronic structure and biologically relevant reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Amy L; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2014-04-15

    Researchers have completed extensive studies on heme and non-heme iron-nitrosyl complexes, which are labeled {FeNO}(7) in the Enemark-Feltham notation, but they have had very limited success in producing corresponding, one-electron reduced, {FeNO}(8) complexes where a nitroxyl anion (NO(-)) is formally bound to an iron(II) center. These complexes, and their protonated iron(II)-NHO analogues, are proposed key intermediates in nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) reducing enzymes in bacteria and fungi. In addition, HNO is known to have a variety of physiological effects, most notably in the cardiovascular system. HNO may also serve as a signaling molecule in mammals. For these functions, iron-containing proteins may mediate the production of HNO and serve as receptors for HNO in vivo. In this Account, we highlight recent key advances in the preparation, spectroscopic characterization, and reactivity of ferrous heme and non-heme nitroxyl (NO(-)/HNO) complexes that have greatly enhanced our understanding of the potential biological roles of these species. Low-spin (ls) heme {FeNO}(7) complexes (S = 1/2) can be reversibly reduced to the corresponding {FeNO}(8) species, which are stable, diamagnetic compounds. Because the reduction is ligand (NO) centered in these cases, it occurs at extremely negative redox potentials that are at the edge of the biologically feasible range. Interestingly, the electronic structures of ls-{FeNO}(7) and ls-{FeNO}(8) species are strongly correlated with very similar frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and thermodynamically strong Fe-NO bonds. In contrast, high-spin (hs) non-heme {FeNO}(7) complexes (S = 3/2) can be reduced at relatively mild redox potentials. Here, the reduction is metal-centered and leads to a paramagnetic (S = 1) {FeNO}(8) complex. The increased electron density at the iron center in these species significantly decreases the covalency of the Fe-NO bond, making the reduced complexes highly reactive. In the absence of

  13. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates-dependent programmed cell death in human malignant ex vivo glioma cells and inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor production by taurolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Roksana; Kubota, Hisashi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Könü, Dilek; Möhler, Hanns; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Frei, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Taurolidine, a derivative of the amino acid taurin, was recently found to display a potent antineoplastic effect both in vitro and in vivo. The authors therefore initiated studies to assess the potential antineoplastic activity of taurolidine in human glioma cell lines and in ex vivo malignant cell cultures. They also studied the mechanisms that induce cell death and the impact of taurolidine on tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. Cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays were performed using crystal violet staining. In the cytotoxicity assay 100% of glioma cell lines (eight of eight) and 74% of ex vivo glioma cultures (14 of 19) demonstrated sensitivity to taurolidine, with a mean median effective concentration (EC50) of 51 +/- 28 microg/ml and 56 +/- 23 microg/ml, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited by taurolidine, with a mean EC50 of 7 +/- 3 microg/ml for the cell lines and a mean EC50 of 3.5 +/- 1.7 microg/ml for the ex vivo glioma cultures. On observing this high activity of taurolidine in both assays, the authors decided to evaluate its cell death mechanisms. Fragmentation of DNA, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential followed by a release of apoptosis-inducing factor, and typical apoptotic features were found after taurolidine treatment. Cell death was preceded by the generation of reactive O2 intermediates, which was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine but not by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Moreover, taurolidine also induced suppression of VEGF production on the protein and messenger RNA level, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Given all these findings, taurolidine may be a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant gliomas; it displays a combination of antineoplastic and antiangiogenic activities, inducing tumor cell

  14. Use of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry and circulating biological markers to predict outcomes in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Vandack; Ataíde, Thiago Bragança; Brant, Luisa Caldeira; Oliveira, Clara Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Lucas Vieira; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Lopes, Fernanda Barbosa; Saraiva, Ivan Euclides; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness and prognostic value of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in patients with sepsis. Moreover, we investigated the association of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry results with serum levels of certain inflammatory molecules. Methods Prospective study, conducted in an 18-bed mixed intensive care unit for adults. The exclusion criteria included severe immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy initiated more than 48 hours before assessment. We measured the reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry on inclusion (day 1) and on day 3. Interleukin-6, interleukin-10, high-mobility group box 1 protein and soluble ST2 levels were measured in the blood obtained upon inclusion. Results Seventeen of the 79 patients (21.6%) enrolled were determined to have reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry signals considered technically unreliable and were excluded from the study. Thus, 62 patients were included in the final analysis, and they underwent a total of 95 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry exams within the first 48 hours after inclusion. The mean age was 51.5 (SD: 18.9), and 49 (62%) of the patients were male. Reactive hyperemia indexes from days 1 and 3 were not associated with vasopressor need, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, or 28-day mortality. Among the patients who died, compared with survivors, there was a significant increase in the day 3 reactive hyperemia index compared with day 1 (p = 0.045). There was a weak negative correlation between the day 1 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry index and the levels of high-mobility group box 1 protein (r = -0.287). Conclusion Technical difficulties and the lack of clear associations between the exam results and clinical severity or outcomes strongly limits the utility of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in septic patients

  15. In Situ Denitrification and Biological Nitrogen Fixation Under Enhanced Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen Deposition in UK Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sami; Saiz Val, Ernesto; Sgouridis, Fotis; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats

    2017-04-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) losses due to denitrification and biological N2 fixation (BNF) are the most uncertain components of the nitrogen (N) cycle in peatlands under enhanced atmospheric reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition. This uncertainty hampers our ability to assess the contribution of denitrification to the removal of biologically fixed and/or atmospherically deposited Nr in peatlands. This uncertainty emanates from the difficulty in measuring in situ soil N2 and N2O production and consumption in peatlands. In situ denitrification and its contribution to total N2O flux was measured monthly between April 2013 and October 2014 in peatlands in two UK catchments. An adapted 15N-Gas Flux method1 with low level addition of 15N tracer (0.03 ± 0.005 kg 15N ha-1) was used to measure denitrification and its contribution to net N2O production (DN2O/TN2O). BNF was measured in situ through incubation of selected sphagnum species under 15N2 gas tracer. Denitrification2 varied temporally and averaged 8 kg N-N2 ha-1 y-1. The contribution of denitrification was about 48% to total N2O flux3 of 0.05 kg N ha-1 y-1. Soil moisture, temperature, ecosystem respiration, pH and mineral N content mainly regulated the flux of N2 and N2O. Preliminary results showed suppression of BNF, which was 1.8 to 7 times lower in peatland mosses exposed to ˜15 to 20 kg N ha-1 y-1 Nr deposition in the UK than in peatland mosses in northern Sweden with background Nr deposition. Overall, the contribution of denitrification to Nr removal in the selected peatlands was ˜50% of the annual Nr deposition rates, making these ecosystems vulnerable to chronic N saturation. These results point to a need for a more comprehensive annual BNF measurement to more accurately account for total Nr input into peatlands and its atmospheric loss due to denitrification. References Sgouridis F, Stott A & Ullah S, 2016. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to

  16. Reactivity of the one-electron reduction product from nifedipine with relevant biological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Vergara, L J; Navarrete-Encina, P A; Ortiz, M E; Bollo, S; Squella, J A

    1996-08-14

    The reactivity of the electrochemically generated nitro radical anion from nifedipine, a nitro aryl 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative, with relevant endobiotics and thiol-containing xenobiotics, was quantitatively assessed by cyclic voltammetry. The method was based on the decrease in the return-to-forward peak current ratio after the addition of compounds. A quantitative procedure to calculate the respective interaction constants between the radicals and the xeno/endobiotics is also provided. In the optimal selected conditions, i.e. mixed media (0.015 M aqueous citrate/DMF: 40/60, 0.3 M KCl, 0.1 TBAI) at pH 9.0 the following order of reactivity was obtained: glutathione > uracil > adenine and cysteamine > N-acetylcysteine > captopril > penicillamine. In all cases, the interaction rate constants for these derivatives were greater than the natural decay constant of the radical. Studies on the reactivity at pH 7.4 were also conducted. Results from these experiments indicate a significant reactivity between the radical and the endo/xenobiotics. The increase in the stability of the radical anion by increasing the pH of the mixed media resulted in a decreased reaction with the endo/xenobiotics tested. Computerized simulation with DIGISIM 2.0 of the proposed mechanisms fitted very well with the experimental results for both the natural decay of the radical and its reaction with the tested compounds.

  17. A modular neurocontroller for a sensor-driven reactive behavior of biologically inspired walking machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Pasemann, Frank; Roth, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a modular neurocontroller is presented. It has the capability to generate a reactive behavior of walking machines. The neurocontroller is formed on the basis of a modular structure. It consists of the three different functionality modules: neural preprocessing, a neural oscillato...

  18. Biological upgrading of volatile fatty acids, key intermediates for the valorization of biowaste through dark anaerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhania, Reeta Rani; Patel, Anil Kumar; Christophe, Gwendoline; Fontanille, Pierre; Larroche, Christian

    2013-10-01

    VFAs can be obtained from lignocellulosic agro-industrial wastes, sludge, and various biodegradable organic wastes as key intermediates through dark fermentation processes and synthesized through chemical route also. They are building blocks of several organic compounds viz. alcohol, aldehyde, ketones, esters and olefins. These can serve as alternate carbon source for microbial biolipid, biohydrogen, microbial fuel cells productions, methanisation, and for denitrification. Organic wastes are the substrate for VFA platform that is of zero or even negative cost, giving VFA as intermediate product but their separation from the fermentation broth is still a challenge; however, several separation technologies have been developed, membrane separation being the most suitable one. These aspects will be reviewed and results obtained during anaerobic treatment of slaughterhouse wastes with further utilisation of volatile fatty acids for yeast cultivation have been discussed.

  19. Cross-reactivity virtual profiling of the human kinome by X-react(KIN): a chemical systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2010-12-06

    Many drug candidates fail in clinical development due to their insufficient selectivity that may cause undesired side effects. Therefore, modern drug discovery is routinely supported by computational techniques, which can identify alternate molecular targets with a significant potential for cross-reactivity. In particular, the development of highly selective kinase inhibitors is complicated by the strong conservation of the ATP-binding site across the kinase family. In this paper, we describe X-React(KIN), a new machine learning approach that extends the modeling and virtual screening of individual protein kinases to a system level in order to construct a cross-reactivity virtual profile for the human kinome. To maximize the coverage of the kinome, X-React(KIN) relies solely on the predicted target structures and employs state-of-the-art modeling techniques. Benchmark tests carried out against available selectivity data from high-throughput kinase profiling experiments demonstrate that, for almost 70% of the inhibitors, their alternate molecular targets can be effectively identified in the human kinome with a high (>0.5) sensitivity at the expense of a relatively low false positive rate (cross-reactivity profiles for the human kinome are freely available to the academic community at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/kinomelhm/ .

  20. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  1. Biological substrates of emotional reactivity and regulation in adolescence during an emotional go-nogo task

    OpenAIRE

    Hare, Todd A.; Tottenham, N; Galvan, A.; Voss, H. U.; Glover, G. H.; Casey, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescence is a transition period from childhood to adulthood that is often characterized by emotional instability. This period is also a time of increased incidence of anxiety and depression, underscoring the importance of understanding biological substrates of behavioral and emotion regulation during adolescence. Developmental changes in the brain in concert with individual predispositions for anxiety might underlie the increased risk for poor outcomes reported during adolescen...

  2. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  3. The stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests on stored horse blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, P; Sullivan, M; Evans, D

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in the role of oxidative stress (OS) in equine medicine has highlighted the need to develop reliable methods to quantify it. In this study we describe the effect of refrigeration (at 4 degrees C) on the stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests carried out on 15 healthy horses. Blood samples, collected from the jugular vein, were immediately placed on ice and analysed using both the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Samples were also refrigerated at 4 degrees C and tested after 3, 7 and 24 h. The average results were similar for up to 24 h and minimal variations were found for each horse. The findings suggest that refrigeration is suitable for preserving equine blood samples for these assays and this approach will provide veterinarians with a technically simple, reliable test to measure OS under field conditions.

  4. [Impact of biologically important anions on reactive oxygen species formation in water under the effect of non-ionizing physical agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, S V; Ivanov, V E; Karp, O É; Chernikov, A V; Belosludtsev, K N; Bobylev, A G; Astashev, M E; Gapeev, A B; Bruskov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of biologically relevant anions (succinate, acetate, citrate, chloride, bicarbonate, hydroorthophosphate, dihydroorthophosphate, nitrite, nitrate) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in water was studied under the effect of non-ionizing radiation: heat, laser light with a wavelength of 632.8 nm, corresponding to the maximum absorption of molecular oxygen, and electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequencies. It has been established that various anions may both inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase it. Bicarbonate and sulfate anions included in the biological fluids' and medicinal mineral waters have significant, but opposite effects on reactive oxygen species production. Different molecular mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation are considered under the action of the investigated physical factors involving these anions, which may influence the biological processes by signal-regulatory manner and provide a healing effect in physical therapy.

  5. Previous exposure to biologics and C-reactive protein are associated with the response to tacrolimus in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iago Rodríguez-Lago

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Tacrolimus is a calcineurin inhibitor used in the prophylaxis of rejection after a solid organ transplant. There is some evidence for its use in inflammatory bowel disease, although there is a lack of information about the patients who will benefit the most with this drug and the prognostic factors for a favorable response. Material and Methods: We performed a multicentric retrospective study evaluating all the patients who have received tacrolimus in the last 10 years as a treatment for IBD in our area. Results: A total of 20 patients, 12 with Crohn's disease and 8 with ulcerative colitis, were included in four hospitals. The two most common indications were steroid-dependency and fistulizing Crohn's disease. The median time receiving tacrolimus was 11 months. In 12 patients the treatment was stopped. The main reasons for drug withdrawal were absence or loss of response. The median clinical follow-up was 35.5 months. Overall, a 25% achieved clinical remission and 40% were in partial response. Biologic-naïve patients demonstrated a significantly better remission rate as compared with those that were not (80 vs. 7%. Patients who achieved remission were more likely to have a significant reduction in C-reactive protein values 1 month after starting the drug. Seven patients required surgery during the follow- up period. Conclusions: Patients naïve to biologics showed a significantly better response to tacrolimus. A reduction in C-reactive protein one month after starting this drug was associated with clinical remission.

  6. Pyrylium Salts as Reactive Matrices for MALDI-MS Imaging of Biologically Active Primary Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Karlsson, Oskar; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Svenningsson, Per; Andren, Per E.

    2015-06-01

    Many neuroactive substances, including endogenous biomolecules, environmental compounds, and pharmaceuticals possess primary amine functional groups. Among these are catecholamine neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine), many substituted phenethylamines (e.g., amphetamine), as well as amino acids and neuropeptides. In most cases, mass spectrometric (ESI and MALDI) analyses of trace amounts of such compounds are challenging because of their poor ionization properties. We present a method for chemical derivatization of primary amines by reaction with pyrylium salts that facilitates their detection by MALDI-MS and enables the imaging of primary amines in brain tissue sections. A screen of pyrylium salts revealed that the 2,4-diphenyl-pyranylium ion efficiently derivatizes primary amines and can be used as a reactive MALDI-MS matrix that induces both derivatization and desorption. MALDI-MS imaging with such matrix was used to map the localization of dopamine and amphetamine in brain tissue sections and to quantitatively map the distribution of the neurotoxin β- N-methylamino-L-alanine.

  7. Mitochondrial Flash: Integrative Reactive Oxygen Species and pH Signals in Cell and Organelle Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guohua; Wang, Xianhua; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Recent breakthroughs in mitochondrial research have advanced, reshaped, and revolutionized our view of the role of mitochondria in health and disease. These discoveries include the development of novel tools to probe mitochondrial biology, the molecular identification of mitochondrial functional proteins, and the emergence of new concepts and mechanisms in mitochondrial function regulation. The discovery of “mitochondrial flash” activity has provided unique insights not only into real-time visualization of individual mitochondrial redox and pH dynamics in live cells but has also advanced understanding of the excitability, autonomy, and integration of mitochondrial function in vivo. Recent Advances: The mitochondrial flash is a transient and stochastic event confined within an individual mitochondrion and is observed in a wide range of organisms from plants to Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. As flash events involve multiple transient concurrent changes within the mitochondrion (e.g., superoxide, pH, and membrane potential), a number of different mitochondrial targeted fluorescent indicators can detect flash activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that flash events reflect integrated snapshots of an intermittent mitochondrial process arising from mitochondrial respiration chain activity associated with the transient opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Critical Issues: We review the history of flash discovery, summarize current understanding of flash biology, highlight controversies regarding the relative roles of superoxide and pH signals during a flash event, and bring forth the integration of both signals in flash genesis. Future Directions: Investigations using flash as a biomarker and establishing its role in cell signaling pathway will move the field forward. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 534–549. PMID:27245241

  8. Mitochondrial Flash: Integrative Reactive Oxygen Species and pH Signals in Cell and Organelle Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang; Gong, Guohua; Wang, Xianhua; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2016-09-20

    Recent breakthroughs in mitochondrial research have advanced, reshaped, and revolutionized our view of the role of mitochondria in health and disease. These discoveries include the development of novel tools to probe mitochondrial biology, the molecular identification of mitochondrial functional proteins, and the emergence of new concepts and mechanisms in mitochondrial function regulation. The discovery of "mitochondrial flash" activity has provided unique insights not only into real-time visualization of individual mitochondrial redox and pH dynamics in live cells but has also advanced understanding of the excitability, autonomy, and integration of mitochondrial function in vivo. The mitochondrial flash is a transient and stochastic event confined within an individual mitochondrion and is observed in a wide range of organisms from plants to Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. As flash events involve multiple transient concurrent changes within the mitochondrion (e.g., superoxide, pH, and membrane potential), a number of different mitochondrial targeted fluorescent indicators can detect flash activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that flash events reflect integrated snapshots of an intermittent mitochondrial process arising from mitochondrial respiration chain activity associated with the transient opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. We review the history of flash discovery, summarize current understanding of flash biology, highlight controversies regarding the relative roles of superoxide and pH signals during a flash event, and bring forth the integration of both signals in flash genesis. Investigations using flash as a biomarker and establishing its role in cell signaling pathway will move the field forward. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 534-549.

  9. Enzymatic Hydrolysis Does Not Reduce the Biological Reactivity of Soybean Proteins for All Allergic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rakhi; Tetteh, Afua O; Pramod, Siddanakoppalu N; Goodman, Richard E

    2015-11-04

    Many soybean protein products are processed by enzymatic hydrolysis to attain desirable functional food properties or in some cases to reduce allergenicity. However, few studies have investigated the effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on the allergenicity of soybean products. In this study the allergenicity of soybean protein isolates (SPI) hydrolyzed by Alcalase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, bromelain, or papain was evaluated by IgE immunoblots using eight soybean-allergic patient sera. The biological relevance of IgE binding was evaluated by a functional assay using a humanized rat basophilic leukemia (hRBL) cell line and serum from one subject. Results indicated that hydrolysis of SPI by the enzymes did not reduce the allergenicity, and hydrolysis by chymotrypsin or bromelain has the potential to increase the allergenicity of SPI. Two-dimensional (2D) immunoblot and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the chymotrypsin-hydrolyzed samples indicated fragments of β-conglycinin protein are responsible for the apparent higher allergenic potential of digested SPI.

  10. Suicide inactivation of cytochrome P-450 by methoxsalen. Evidence for the covalent binding of a reactive intermediate to the protein moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, G.; Descatoire, V.; Beaune, P.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. (Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France))

    1989-09-01

    Incubation of rat liver microsomes with (3H)methoxsalen and NADPH resulted in the covalent binding of a methoxsalen intermediate to proteins comigrating with cytochromes P-450 UT-A, PB-B/D, ISF-G and PCN-E. Binding was increased by pretreatments with phenobarbital, beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF) and dexamethasone. Such pretreatments also increased the loss of CO-binding capacity either after administration of methoxsalen, or after incubation of hepatic microsomes with methoxsalen and NADPH. Immunoprecipitation of the methoxsalen metabolite-protein adducts in phenobarbital-induced microsomes was moderate with anti-UT-A antibodies, but marked with anti-PB-B/D and anti-PCN-E antibodies. Immunoprecipitation was observed also with anti-ISF-G (anti-beta NF-B) antibodies in beta NF-induced microsomes. Methoxsalen (0.25 mM) inhibited markedly the benzphetamine demethylase activity of phenobarbital-induced microsomes and the erythromycin demethylase activity of dexamethasone-induced microsomes. Whereas methoxsalen itself did not produce any binding spectrum, in contrast either in vivo administration of methoxsalen or incubation in vitro with methoxsalen and NADPH resulted in a low-to-high spin conversion of cytochrome P-450 as suggested by the appearance of a spectrum analogous to a type I binding spectrum. This low-to-high spin conversion was apparently due to a methoxsalen intermediate (probably, covalently bound to the protein and preventing partial sixth ligation of the iron). We conclude that suicide inactivation of cytochrome P-450 by methoxsalen is related to the covalent binding of a methoxsalen intermediate to the protein moiety of several cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes (including UT-A, PB-B/D, PCN-E as well as ISF-G and/or beta NF-B).

  11. Synthesis and Reactivity of Metal Complexes in Trigonal N,O,O,O-Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Adelhardt, Mario Erwin

    2016-01-01

    High-valent iron complexes, for instance stabilized by multiple bonded oxo, nitrido, or imido ligands, have been identified as reactive intermediates in biological as well as technical systems. Although numerous synthetic model complexes have been synthesized and characterized in the past four decades, they often lack the high reactivity of their parental compounds. One strategy to enhance the reactivity of, for example, Fe(IV) oxo complexes is to enforce a trigonal coordination geometry ar...

  12. Modeling of S-Nitrosothiol-Thiol Reactions of Biological Significance: HNO Production by S-Thiolation Requires a Proton Shuttle and Stabilization of Polar Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Lena V; Cibich, Daniel; Deye, Gregory; Talipov, Marat R; Timerghazin, Qadir K

    2017-02-07

    Nitroxyl (HNO), a reduced form of the important gasotransmitter nitric oxide, exhibits its own unique biological activity. A possible biological pathway of HNO formation is the S-thiolation reaction between thiols and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs). Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggested that S-thiolation proceeds through a proton transfer from the thiol to the RSNO nitrogen atom, which increases electrophilicity of the RSNO sulfur, followed by nucleophilic attack by thiol, yielding a charge-separated zwitterionic intermediate structure RSS(+) (R)N(H)O(-) (Zi), which decomposes to yield HNO and disulfide RSSR. In the gas phase, the proton transfer and the S-S bond formation are asynchronous, resulting in a high activation barrier (>40 kcal mol(-1) ), making the reaction infeasible. However, the barrier can decrease below the S-N bond dissociation energy in RSNOs (≈30 kcal mol(-1) ) upon transition into an aqueous environment that stabilizes Zi and provides a proton shuttle to synchronize the proton transfer and the S-S bond formation. These mechanistic features suggest that S-thiolation can easily lend itself to enzymatic catalysis and thus can be a possible route of endogenous HNO production.

  13. Taming reactive phenol tautomers and o-quinone methides with transition metals: a structure-reactivity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouri, Hani; Le Bras, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Quinone methides act as important intermediates in organic syntheses, as well as in chemical and biological processes; however, examples of such isolated species are scarce as a result of their high reactivity. Phenol tautomers (keto form of phenol) are also important intermediates in several organic and organometallic reactions; nevertheless, isolated complexes are rare. This Account reviews the recent progress on the synthesis and reactivity of iridium and rhodium o-quinone methide complexes as well as on iridium-mediated ortho functionalization of phenols. This reaction was at the origin of the discovery of a general synthetic procedure to prepare the first metal-stabilized o-quinone methide.

  14. Maternal and neonatal evaluation of derivated reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgorbini, M; Bonelli, F; Marmorini, P; Biagi, G; Corazza, M; Pasquini, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate derivated reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) in mares and foals to study perinatal oxidative status. A total of 60 animals were included in the present study. Maternal and foal venous blood samples were collected immediately after delivery along with a sample drawn from one of the umbilical arteries, and plasma samples were evaluated for lactatemia, d-ROMs, and BAP. The t test for unpaired data was applied between mares versus umbilical artery blood versus foals, both for d-ROMs and BAP. The Pearson test with two-tailed P value and a confidence interval of 95% was performed between d-ROMs and BAP and between d-ROMs and lactatemia, both for mares and foals. Finally, the t test for unpaired data was performed between fillies and colts. The t test showed differences between mares versus their own foals versus umbilical artery blood but not foals versus. umbilical artery blood, both for d-ROMs and BAP. A positive correlation was found both in mares and foals between BAP and d-ROMs and in mares between lactatemia and d-ROM. No differences in gender were found in BAP concentration. Our data are in line to previous studies performed in women and cattle.

  15. A new class of radiation-activating antitumor prodrugs releasing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine: synthesis, reactivity and biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, S.; Zhou, L.; Mori, M.; Hatta, H.; Nishimoto, S. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ., Institute for Frontier Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A number of 3-substituted 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FdUrd) derivatives (1-6) were synthesized to evaluate their radiation reactivity and biological activity as a new class of prodrugs that can be radiation-activated to release 5-FdUrd. The compounds 2-6 bearing substituents with a 2-oxo group underwent radiolytic reduction to release 5-FdUrd in considerably high yields under anoxic conditions, while the compound 1 without 2-oxo substituent was inactive in releasing 5-FdUrd. The cytotoxicities of 2-6 toward P388 T cells of mouse leukemia were less than 5-FdUrd, as indicated by an MTT assay. The apparent cytotoxicities were significantly enhanced by X-irradiation under hypoxic conditions. A conclusion was that 2-6 have no antitumor effect in contrast to 5-FdUrd, but can potentiate the effect of cancer radiotherapy by releasing a cell-killing component 5-FdUrd. (author)

  16. Cytochrome P450-catalysed arene-epoxidation of the bioactive tea tree oil ingredient p-cymene: indication for the formation of a reactive allergenic intermediate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, R J W; Duisken, M; Hollender, J

    2009-09-01

    1. The cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of the tea tree oil ingredient p-cymene (p-isopropyltoluene) was studied by the application of in vitro enzymatic assays using different recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes. 2. In total, four enzymatic products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The enzymatic products identified were: thymol (2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol), p-isopropylbenzyl alcohol, p,alpha,alpha-trimethylbenzyl alcohol, and p-isopropylbenzaldehyde. 3. The enzymatic products of p-cymene resulted from catalysed enzymatic arene-epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions by the studied cytochrome P450 enzymes. 4. An in vivo study could only confirm the formation of one enzymatic product, namely thymol. Thymol was identified after enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in collected blood and urine samples. 5. The obtained results may help to increase the understanding of cases where skin sensitization and irritation by tea tree oil-containing products that are involved with allergic reactions of users of these products. The results also indicate that skin sensitization and irritation reactions not only can be explained by the frequently in literature reported auto-oxidation of tea tree resulting in bioactive oxidized products, but also now by the formation of epoxide intermediates resulting from catalysed arene-epoxidation reactions by selected human cytochrome P450 enzymes which are also located in different organs in humans.

  17. A Western blot-based investigation of the yeast secretory pathway designed for an intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Degrenier, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in two distinct steps of protein secretion were differentiated using a genetic reporter designed specifically to identify defects in the first step of the pathway, the insertion of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (Vallen, 2002). We have developed two versions of a Western blotting assay that serves as a second way of distinguishing the two secretory mutants, which we pair with the genetic assay in a 3-wk laboratory module. A quiz administered before and after students participated in the lab activities revealed significant postlab gains in their understanding of the secretory pathway and experimental techniques used to study it. A second survey administered at the end of the lab module assessed student perceptions of the efficacy of the lab activities; the results of this survey indicated that the experiments were successful in meeting a set of educational goals defined by the instructor.

  18. Identification of the reactive intermediates produced upon photolysis of p-azidoacetophenone and its tetrafluoro analogue in aqueous and organic solvents: implications for photoaffinity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Meredith R; Mandel, Sarah M; Platz, Matthew S

    2007-02-20

    Photolysis of p-azidoacetophenone (1a) or 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-p-azidoacetophenone (1b) releases the corresponding singlet nitrenes 2a and 2b. In aqueous solutions singlet nitrenes relax (1.1 ps and 43 ns, respectively) to the lower energy triplet nitrenes 3a and 3b, intermediates which do not react to form cross-links or adducts with typical amino acids and nucleic acids. In a hydrophobic environment singlet nitrene 2a partitions between forming triplet nitrene 3a and an acyl-substituted didehydroazepine 4a, which can be detected by LFP and time-resolved IR spectroscopy. The absolute rate constant of reaction of didehydroazepine 4a with water, in acetonitrile, was determined (3.5 x 10(4) M-1 s-1) by laser flash photolysis (LFP) techniques with IR detection at ambient temperature. Photolysis of tetrafluoro azide 1b releases singlet nitrene 2b, which has a lifetime of 172 ns in benzene and can readily be intercepted by pyridine to form ylide 10b (lambdamax = 415 nm). Singlet nitrene 2b reacts with the unactivated CH bonds of cyclohexane to form adduct 8b in 46% yield. Absolute rate constants of reaction of 1b with N-methylimidazole, phenol, dibutyl sulfide, indole, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide were determined using the pyridine ylide probe method. It is concluded that photolysis of p-azidoacetophenone (1a) will not lead to cross-link formation but that tetrafluorinated azide 1b can form useful singlet nitrene derived adducts upon photolysis.

  19. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  20. Synthesis, chemical reactivity as Michael acceptors, and biological potency of monocyclic cyanoenones, novel and highly potent anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Suqing; Santosh Laxmi, Y R; David, Emilie; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shiavoni, Katherine H; Ren, Yanqing; Zheng, Ying; Trevino, Isaac; Bumeister, Ronald; Ojima, Iwao; Wigley, W Christian; Bliska, James B; Mierke, Dale F; Honda, Tadashi

    2012-05-24

    Novel monocyclic cyanoenones examined to date display unique features regarding chemical reactivity as Michael acceptors and biological potency. Remarkably, in some biological assays, the simple structure is more potent than pentacyclic triterpenoids (e.g., CDDO and bardoxolone methyl) and tricycles (e.g., TBE-31). Among monocyclic cyanoenones, 1 is a highly reactive Michael acceptor with thiol nucleophiles. Furthermore, an important feature of 1 is that its Michael addition is reversible. For the inhibition of NO production, 1 shows the highest potency. Notably, its potency is about three times higher than CDDO, whose methyl ester (bardoxolone methyl) is presently in phase III clinical trials. For the induction of NQO1, 1 also demonstrated the highest potency. These results suggest that the reactivity of these Michael acceptors is closely related to their biological potency. Interestingly, in LPS-stimulated macrophages, 1 causes apoptosis and inhibits secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β with potencies that are higher than those of bardoxolone methyl and TBE-31.

  1. Automatic flow injection based methodologies for determination of scavenging capacity against biologically relevant reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Luís M; Lúcio, Marlene; Segundo, Marcela A; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C

    2009-06-15

    Redox reactions are the heart of numerous biochemical pathways found in cellular chemistry, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), that includes superoxide anion radical (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (HO), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), hypochlorite anion (OCl-), peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) and nitric oxide radical (NO). The measurement of scavenging capacity against these reactive species presents new challenges, which can be met by flow injection analysis (FIA). In the present review several methods based on FIA and also on its predecessors computer-controlled techniques (sequential injection analysis, multisyringe flow injection analysis, multicommutated and multipumping flow systems) are critically discussed. The selectivity and applicability of the methodology, the generation and detection of the target reactive species, the benefits and limitations of automation when compared to batch methods are some of the issues addressed.

  2. Evaluation of structure-reactivity descriptors and biological activity spectra of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone using spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Megha; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Prabhu, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    The structure and several spectroscopic features along with reactivity parameters of the compound 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone (Nabumetone) have been studied using experimental techniques and tools derived from quantum chemical calculations. Structure optimization is followed by force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The vibrational spectra have been interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis. UV-visible spectrum and the effect of solvent have been discussed. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies have been determined by TD-DFT approach. In order to understand various aspects of pharmacological sciences several new chemical reactivity descriptors - chemical potential, global hardness and electrophilicity have been evaluated. Local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions and local softnesses have also been calculated to find out the reactive sites within molecule. Aqueous solubility and lipophilicity have been calculated which are crucial for estimating transport properties of organic molecules in drug development. Estimation of biological effects, toxic/side effects has been made on the basis of prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction results and their analysis by Pharma Expert software. Using the THz-TDS technique, the frequency-dependent absorptions of NBM have been measured in the frequency range up to 3 THz.

  3. The physiological substrates of fructosamine-3-kinase-related-protein (FN3KRP) are intermediates of nonenzymatic reactions between biological amines and ketose sugars (fructation products).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwergold, Benjamin S; Bunker, Richard D; Loomes, Kerry M

    2011-11-01

    The physiological function of fructosamine-3-kinase (FN3K) is relatively well understood. As shown in several studies, most conclusively by data on the FN3K-KO mouse, this enzyme breaks down compounds produced by the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins by D-glucose. In contrast with FN3K, very little is known about the function of the fructosamine-3-kinase-related-protein (FN3KRP) even though it has a 65% amino-acid sequence identity with FN3K. We do know that this enzyme is a kinase as evidenced by its ability to phosphorylate non-physiological compounds such a psicosamines, ribulosamines, erythrulosamines, and glucitolamines. However, FN3KRP does not phosphorylate any of the numerous Amadori products that are the physiological substrates of FN3K. The fact that FN3KRP is highly conserved in all vertebrates and present throughout nature suggests that it plays an important role in cellular metabolism and makes identification of its physiological substrates an important objective. In this paper, we propose that FN3KRP phosphorylates products resulting from a non-enzymatic glycation of amines by ketoses (fructation) that involves a 2,3-enolization and produces the stable Amadori intermediate, 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-ribo-hex-3-ulose (ADRH). This ketosamine is then phosphorylated to 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-ribo-hex-3-ulose-4-phosphate (ADRH-4-P). Since phosphates are much better leaving groups than hydroxyls, this destabilizes the C-2 amine bond and results in a spontaneous β-elimination of the phosphate to regenerate an unmodified amine with the concomitant production of 4-deoxy-2,3-diulose. Consequently, we postulate that the principal physiological function of FN3KRP is the breakdown of nonenzymatic fructation products. If confirmed in future studies, this hypothesis opens up new perspectives for an improved understanding of biological Maillard reactions and mechanisms for their control and/or reversal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. International Symposiun on Biological Reactive Intermediates: Molecular and Cellular Effects and Their Impact on Human Health (4th) Held in Tucson, Arizona on 14-17 January 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-03

    McConkey, and Pierluigi Nicotera Molecular Mechanisms of y- Diketone Neuropathy ................... 427 Doyle G. Graham, Mary Beth Genter St. Clair, V...717 R. Fisher, S. McCarthy, I.G. Sipes, R.P. Hanzlik, and K. Brendel Inhibition of Protein Synthesis and Secretion by

  5. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen intermediate on endothelial cells culture (HUVECs treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and tumour necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeki E. Fitri

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes on endothelial cells is a key factor in development of severe malaria. This process may associated with the activation of local immune that was enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. This study was conducted to see the influence of P.falciparum infected erythrocytes cytoadherence and TNF-α treatment in inducing endothelial cells activation in vitro. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and caspase-3 expression, also reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI production were used as parameters. An Experimental laboratory study had been done to observe endothelial cells activation (HUVECs after treatment with TNF-α for 20 hours or P. falciparum infected erythrocytes for 1 hour or both of them. Normal endothelial cells culture had been used as a control. Using immunocytochemistry local immune activation of endothelial cells was determined by iNOS and caspase-3 expression. Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction-assay was conducted to see the ROI production semi quantitatively. inducible nitric oxide synthase expression only found on endothelial cells culture treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or both P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α. Caspase-3 expression found slightly on normal endothelial cells culture. This expression increased significantly on endothelial cells culture treated with both P.falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α (p=0.000. The normal endothelial cells release low level of ROI in the presence of non-specific trigger, PMA. In the presence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or TNF-α or both of them, some cells showed medium to high levels of ROI. Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF α treatment on endothelial cells can induce activation of local immune marked by increase inducible nitric oxide synthase and release of free radicals that cause cell damage. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:151-6 Keywords: P.falciparum ,HUVECs, TNF-α, i

  6. End-on and side-on peroxo derivatives of non-heme iron complexes with pentadentate ligands : Models for putative intermediates in biological iron/dioxygen chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, G; Vrajmasu, [No Value; Ho, RYN; Rohde, JU; Zondervan, C; la Crois, RM; Schudde, EP; Lutz, M; Spek, AL; Hage, R; Feringa, BL; Munck, E; Que, L; Vrajmasu, Vladislav; Ho, Raymond Y.N.; Rohde, Jan-Uwe; Crois, Rene M. la; Spek, Anthony L.; Que, Jr.; Feringa, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Mononuclear iron(III) species with end-on and side-on peroxide have been proposed or identified in the catalytic cycles of the antitumor drug bleomycin and a variety of enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 and Rieske dioxygenases, Only recently have biomimetic analogues of such reactive species been, ge

  7. Preparation methods, reactivity and biological importance of 4-thiazolidinones; Metodos de obtencao, reatividade e importancia biologica de 4-tiazolidinonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liesen, Andre P.; Aquino, Thiago M. de; Goes, Alexandre J.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE)e, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Antibioticos]. E-mail: ajsg@ufpe.br; Lima, Jose G. de; Faria, Antonio R. de; Alves, Antonio J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE)e, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2008-07-01

    Molecules containing the 4-thiazolidinone ring are known to possess a wide range of biological properties including antimicrobial and antiinflammatory activities among others. These compounds can be synthesized by cyclization reactions involving alpha-haloacetic acid or alpha-mercaptoacetic acid and employed in several chemoselective reactions. Comprehensive reviews have been written on 4-thiazolidinones in 1961 by Brown and in 1980 by Singh et al. In the recent literature, some new synthesis methods for 4-thiazolidinone derivatives and several reactions have been reported. These advances warrant to review the chemical and biological properties of compounds with this important heterocycle employed in synthetic organic chemistry and medicinal chemistry (author)

  8. Process Simulation of Complex Biological Pathways in Physical Reactive Space and Reformulated for Massively Parallel Computing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Narayan; Li, Jie; Sharma, Vishakha; Jiang, Hanyu; Compagnoni, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems encompass complexity that far surpasses many artificial systems. Modeling and simulation of large and complex biochemical pathways is a computationally intensive challenge. Traditional tools, such as ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, stochastic master equations, and Gillespie type methods, are all limited either by their modeling fidelity or computational efficiency or both. In this work, we present a scalable computational framework based on modeling biochemical reactions in explicit 3D space, that is suitable for studying the behavior of large and complex biological pathways. The framework is designed to exploit parallelism and scalability offered by commodity massively parallel processors such as the graphics processing units (GPUs) and other parallel computing platforms. The reaction modeling in 3D space is aimed at enhancing the realism of the model compared to traditional modeling tools and framework. We introduce the Parallel Select algorithm that is key to breaking the sequential bottleneck limiting the performance of most other tools designed to study biochemical interactions. The algorithm is designed to be computationally tractable, handle hundreds of interacting chemical species and millions of independent agents by considering all-particle interactions within the system. We also present an implementation of the framework on the popular graphics processing units and apply it to the simulation study of JAK-STAT Signal Transduction Pathway. The computational framework will offer a deeper insight into various biological processes within the cell and help us observe key events as they unfold in space and time. This will advance the current state-of-the-art in simulation study of large scale biological systems and also enable the realistic simulation study of macro-biological cultures, where inter-cellular interactions are prevalent.

  9. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Jafari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes.Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation ofthe aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand wasnot detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However,photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 hillumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely,biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60 % COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  10. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Narjes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes. Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation of the aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand was not detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However, photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 h illumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely, biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60% COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  11. Approaches to systems biology. Four methods to study single-cell gene expression, cell motility, antibody reactivity, and respiratory metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, Peter

    : Transcript profiling of one cell type extracted from a complex tissue containing several cell types; observation and recording of cell motility; measurement of antibody reactivities using microarrays; and invivo measurement of free and bound NADH in mitochondria. Detailed statistical analysis of the data......To understand how complex systems, such as cells, function, comprehensive Measurements of their constituent parts must be made. This can be achieved by combining methods that are each optimized to measure specific parts of the system. Four such methods,each covering a different area, are presented...... from such measurements allows models of the system to be developed and tested. For each of the methods, such analysis and modelling approaches have beenapplied and are presented: Differentially regulated genes are identified and classified according to function; cell-specfic motility models...

  12. Mycobacterium kansasii Infection in a Patient Receiving Biologic Therapy-Not All Reactive Interferon Gamma Release Assays Are Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Nasir; Saba, Raya; Maddika, Srikanth; Weinstein, Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii, a nontuberculous mycobacterium, can lead to lung disease similar to tuberculosis. Immunotherapeutic biologic agents predispose to infections with mycobacteria, including M kansasii. T-cell-mediated interferon gamma release assays like QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test (QFT) are widely used by clinicians for the diagnosis of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, QFT may also show positive result with certain nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of M kansasii pulmonary infection, with a positive QFT, in an immunocompromised patient receiving prednisone, leflunomide and tocilizumab, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody. This case highlights the risk of mycobacterial infections with the use of various biologic agents and the need for caution when interpreting the results of interferon gamma release assays.

  13. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  14. Quantitative redox biology: an approach to understand the role of reactive species in defining the cellular redox environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Garry R; Wagner, Brett A; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2013-11-01

    Systems biology is now recognized as a needed approach to understand the dynamics of inter- and intra-cellular processes. Redox processes are at the foundation of nearly all aspects of biology. Free radicals, related oxidants, and antioxidants are central to the basic functioning of cells and tissues. They set the cellular redox environment and, therefore, are the key to regulation of biochemical pathways and networks, thereby influencing organism health. To understand how short-lived, quasi-stable species, such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, connect to the metabolome, proteome, lipidome, and genome we need absolute quantitative information on all redox active compounds as well as thermodynamic and kinetic information on their reactions, i.e., knowledge of the complete redoxome. Central to the state of the redoxome are the interactive details of the superoxide/peroxide formation and removal systems. Quantitative information is essential to establish the dynamic mathematical models needed to reveal the temporal evolution of biochemical pathways and networks. This new field of Quantitative Redox Biology will allow researchers to identify new targets for intervention to advance our efforts to achieve optimal human health.

  15. Reactivity of selenium-containing compounds with myeloperoxidase-derived chlorinating oxidants: Second-order rate constants and implications for biological damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Luke; Pattison, David I; Fu, Shanlin; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and N-chloramines are produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) as part of the immune response to destroy invading pathogens. However, MPO also plays a detrimental role in inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis, as inappropriate production of oxidants, including HOCl and N-chloramines, causes damage to host tissue. Low molecular mass thiol compounds, including glutathione (GSH) and methionine (Met), have demonstrated efficacy in scavenging MPO-derived oxidants, which prevents oxidative damage in vitro and ex vivo. Selenium species typically have greater reactivity toward oxidants compared to the analogous sulfur compounds, and are known to be efficient scavengers of HOCl and other hypohalous acids produced by MPO. In this study, we examined the efficacy of a number of sulfur and selenium compounds to scavenge a range of biologically relevant N-chloramines and oxidants produced by both isolated MPO and activated neutrophils and characterized the resulting selenium-derived oxidation products in each case. A dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of each N-chloramine was observed on addition of the sulfur compounds (cysteine, methionine) and selenium compounds (selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine, 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol, 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol) studied. In general, selenomethionine was the most reactive with N-chloramines (k2 0.8-3.4×10(3)M(-1) s(-1)) with 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol and 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol (k2 1.1-6.8×10(2)M(-1) s(-1)) showing lower reactivity. This resulted in the formation of the respective selenoxides as the primary oxidation products. The selenium compounds demonstrated greater ability to remove protein N-chloramines compared to the analogous sulfur compounds. These reactions may have implications for preventing cellular damage in vivo, particularly under chronic inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  17. Rationally Designed Vaccines Targeting the V2 Region of HIV-1 gp120 Induce a Focused, Cross-Clade-Reactive, Biologically Functional Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Powell, Rebecca; Yahyaei, Sara; Williams, Constance; Jiang, Xunqing; Li, Wei; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia; Upadhyay, Chitra; Hioe, Catarina E; Totrov, Max; Kong, Xiangpeng

    2016-12-15

    Strong antibody (Ab) responses against V1V2 epitopes of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope (Env) correlated with reduced infection rates in studies of HIV, simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In order to focus the Ab response on V1V2, we used six V1V2 sequences and nine scaffold proteins to construct immunogens which were tested using various immunization regimens for their ability to induce cross-reactive and biologically active V2 Abs in rabbits. A prime/boost immunization strategy was employed using gp120 DNA and various V1V2-scaffold proteins. The rabbit polyclonal Ab responses (i) were successfully focused on the V1V2 region, with weak or only transient responses to other Env epitopes, (ii) displayed broad cross-reactive binding activity with gp120s and the V1V2 regions of diverse strains from clades B, C, and E, (iii) included V2 Abs with specificities similar to those found in HIV-infected individuals, and (iv) remained detectable ≥1 year after the last boosting dose. Importantly, sera from rabbits receiving V1V2-scaffold immunogens displayed Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis whereas sera from rabbits receiving only gp120 did not. The results represent the first fully successful example of reverse vaccinology in the HIV vaccine field with rationally designed epitope scaffold immunogens inducing Abs that recapitulate the epitope specificity and biologic activity of the human monoclonal Abs from which the immunogens were designed. Moreover, this is the first immunogenicity study using epitope-targeting, rationally designed vaccine constructs that induced an Fc-mediated activity associated with protection from infection with HIV, SIV, and SHIV. Novel immunogens were designed to focus the antibody response of rabbits on the V1V2 epitopes of HIV-1 gp120 since such antibodies were associated with reduced infection rates of HIV, SIV, and SHIV. The vaccine-induced antibodies were broadly

  18. Reactive calcium-phosphate-containing poly(ester-co-ether) methacrylate bone adhesives: chemical, mechanical and biological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Olsen, Irwin; Li, Haoying; Gellynck, Kris; Buxton, Paul G; Knowles, Jonathan C; Salih, Vehid; Young, Anne M

    2010-03-01

    A poly(propylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate adhesive with monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) fillers in various levels has been investigated. Water sorption by the photo-polymerized materials catalyzed varying filler conversion to dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Polymer modulus was found to be enhanced upon raising total calcium phosphate content. With greater DCP levels, faster release of phosphate and calcium ions and improved buffering of polymer degradation products were observed. This could reduce the likelihood of pH-catalyzed bulk degradation and localized acid production and thereby may prevent adverse biological responses. Bone-like MG-63 cells were found to attach, spread and have normal morphology on both the polymer and composite surfaces. Moreover, composites implanted into chick embryo femurs became closely apposed to the host tissue and did not appear to induce adverse immunological reaction. The above results suggest that the new composite materials hold promise as clinical effective bone adhesives.

  19. Integration of pharmacokinetic and NRF2 system biology models to describe reactive oxygen species production and subsequent glutathione depletion in liver microfluidic biochips after flutamide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Eric; Hamon, Jeremy; Legendre, Audrey; Bois, Frederic Y

    2014-10-01

    We present a systems biology analysis of rat primary hepatocytes response after exposure to 10 μM and 100 μM flutamide in liver microfluidic biochips. We coupled an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK) model of flutamide to a system biology model of its reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging by the Nrf2 regulated glutathione production. The PK model was calibrated using data on flutamide kinetics, hydroxyflutamide and glutathione conjugates formation in microfluidic conditions. The parameters of Nrf2-related gene activities and the subsequent glutathione depletion were calibrated using microarray data from our microfluidic experiments and literature information. Following a 10 μM flutamide exposure, the model predicted a recovery time to baseline levels of glutathione (GSH) and ROS in agreement with our experimental observations. At 100 μM, the model predicted that metabolism saturation led to an important accumulation of flutamide in cells, a high ROS production and complete GSH depletion. The high levels of ROS predicted were consistent with the necrotic switch observed by transcriptomics, and the high cell mortality we had experimentally observed. The model predicted a transition between recoverable GSH depletion and deep GSH depletion at about 12.5 μM of flutamide (single perfusion exposure). Our work shows that in vitro biochip experiments can provide supporting information for complex in silico modeling including data from extra cellular and intra cellular levels. We believe that this approach can be an efficient strategy for a global integrated methodology in predictive toxicology.

  20. Using natural radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in GEOTRACES data from the North Atlantic to estimate particulate and biologically reactive trace element scavenging and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Sylvain; Church, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Central to understanding the coupling of oceanic carbon and nutrient cycles are trace elements that can limit ocean production and ultimately climate change. These include elements that are both lithogenic (particle reactive) and biogenic (biologically reactive) central to particle scavenging, exchange and bioavailability. The natural 210Po and 210Pb radionuclide (granddaughter/parent) pair provides the radiometric means to model particle scavenging and exchange in the ocean on monthly to annual time scales. Data on dissolved (0.2 μm, >53μm) 210Po (t1/2= 138.4 d) and 210Pb (T1/2 = 22.3 y) are available from seven complete water profiles during two U.S. GEOTRACES cruises that transited the North Atlantic during fall 2010 and 2011. The transects correspond to a wide range of marine environments: coastal slopes at the western and eutrophic up-welling at the eastern margins, Saharan dust sources from the east, hydro-thermal vents in the TAG plume on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and oligotrophic gyres in both the western and eastern basins. Steady state box modeling at each depth interval was employed to estimate radionuclide exchange rates at the fine-large particle and fine particulate-dissolved interface, in terms of biological uptake, and net of radioactive support or decay. By proxy, the results should predict the rates of biological (210Po) and particle reactive (210Pb) trace element adsorption and resorption, vertical particulate and carbon export, and respective residence times. The model results show the contrasting chemical behaviour of the two nuclides over the large range of oceanic conditions encountered in the North Atlantic. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particles in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb, which could in part be attributed to in

  1. Biological studies on the snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis with a special emphasis on using larval echinostomes as biocontrol agent against larval schistosomes and snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, A A

    2002-12-01

    The present investigation deals with the infectivity of the two snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis, Biomphalaria alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus collected from nine drains in Sharkia Governorate, Egypt. The rate of infection among the snails was general low being 0% in many drains. Regarding B. alexandrina, the rate of infection ranged from 4-16%, and in B. truncatus ranged from 4-8%. Infection with larval echinostomes was dominant over larval schistosomes in the two snail vectors. The distribution of larval schistosomes was restricted to the hepatopancreas of the two snail vectors, while larval echinostomes were distributed in head, foot, kidney, haemocoelic cavity, hepatopancreas...etc. The predation of larval schistosomes by larval echinostomes and the severe histopathological effects induced by larval ecbinostomes strongly enhances using them as biocontrol agent. The physico-chemical parameters and pollution condition in the drains seem to have no effect on the process of snails infectivity. It is concluded that larval echinostomes can resist the polluting conditions in the drain. The two snail vectors exhibit very minimal or rare host response against larval echinostomes. Probably, the toxicants and pollutants in the drain may act as stressor that makes the snails much more susceptible to infection by larval trematodes.

  2. Elucidation of the Fe(IV)=O intermediate in the catalytic cycle of the halogenase SyrB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shaun D; Srnec, Martin; Matthews, Megan L; Liu, Lei V; Kwak, Yeonju; Park, Kiyoung; Bell, Caleb B; Alp, E Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Kitao, Shinji; Seto, Makoto; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin; Solomon, Edward I

    2013-07-18

    Mononuclear non-haem iron (NHFe) enzymes catalyse a broad range of oxidative reactions, including halogenation, hydroxylation, ring closure, desaturation and aromatic ring cleavage reactions. They are involved in a number of biological processes, including phenylalanine metabolism, the production of neurotransmitters, the hypoxic response and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The reactive intermediate in the catalytic cycles of these enzymes is a high-spin S = 2 Fe(IV)=O species, which has been trapped for a number of NHFe enzymes, including the halogenase SyrB2 (syringomycin biosynthesis enzyme 2). Computational studies aimed at understanding the reactivity of this Fe(IV)=O intermediate are limited in applicability owing to the paucity of experimental knowledge about its geometric and electronic structure. Synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is a sensitive and effective method that defines the dependence of the vibrational modes involving Fe on the nature of the Fe(IV)=O active site. Here we present NRVS structural characterization of the reactive Fe(IV)=O intermediate of a NHFe enzyme, namely the halogenase SyrB2 from the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. This intermediate reacts via an initial hydrogen-atom abstraction step, performing subsequent halogenation of the native substrate or hydroxylation of non-native substrates. A correlation of the experimental NRVS data to electronic structure calculations indicates that the substrate directs the orientation of the Fe(IV)=O intermediate, presenting specific frontier molecular orbitals that can activate either selective halogenation or hydroxylation.

  3. Withaferin A Targets Intermediate Filaments Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Vimentin in a Model of Retinal Gliosis*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Gliosis is a biological process that occurs during injury repair in the central nervous system and is characterized by the overexpression of the intermediate filaments (IFs) glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. A common thread in many retinal diseases is reactive Müller cell gliosis, an untreatable condition that leads to tissue scarring and even blindness. Here, we demonstrate that the vimentin-targeting small molecule withaferin A (WFA) is a novel chemical probe of GFAP. Usi...

  4. Evaluating the Biological and Ecological Factors Influencing Transmission of Larval Digenetic Trematodes: A Test of Second Intermediate Host Specificity of Two North American Halipegus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigge, Heather A; Bolek, Matthew G

    2016-12-01

    Host specificity of parasites is a basic principle in parasitology; however, it is not easily measured. Previously, host specificity was calculated as the number of species that a parasite infected, but this is not an accurate description of host usage because some species are capable of being infected but do not contribute to the completion of the life cycle. Instead, measures of host specificity should take into consideration interactions between a parasite and a potential host species as well as interactions between current and subsequent hosts in the life cycle. The objectives of this study were to track the development of 2 trematode species, Halipegus eccentricus and Halipegus occidualis , in 3 phylogenetically and ecologically distinct microcrustacean second intermediate hosts, and then evaluate the extent to which each of these hosts contributed to transmission of each Halipegus species to the next odonate host in the life cycle. All 3 microcrustacean species exposed became infected with both species of Halipegus. The patterns of growth of H. eccentricus and H. occidualis were similar, but there were consistent differences in the rates of growth among the microcrustacean species in both Halipegus species. Regardless of host species infected, all individuals of both species were considered to be developmentally infective to the next host in the life cycle by 19 days postexposure (DPE) when they lost their excretory bladder. Worms of varying sizes were capable of surviving without this structure, suggesting that there is not a strong relationship between the rate of growth of the metacercariae and the development of their osmoregulatory system. Although Halipegus species were capable of living without an excretory bladder at 19 DPE, there were differences in their size and rates at which the 3 microcrustaceans contributed to transmission of the parasites to subsequent odonate hosts. Collectively, under controlled laboratory conditions, there was an

  5. Activation of biologically relevant levels of reactive oxygen species by Au/g-C3N4 hybrid nanozyme for bacteria killing and wound disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Dong, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhaowei; Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    As common reactive oxygen species, H2O2 is widely used for bacterial inactivation and wound disinfection. However, the concentrations used are always higher than physiological levels, which frequently result in potential toxicity to healthy tissue and even delay wound healing. Here we report highly efficient nanozyme hybrids that are capable of activating biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 for defending bacterial infections. The integration of AuNPs with ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) provides excellent peroxidase-activity, which can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 to OH radicals much more efficiently, allowing the use of bio-safety levels of H2O2 for the first time. Furthermore, our system not only exhibits striking bactericidal performance against both DR Gram-negative and DR Gram-positive bacteria, but also shows high efficiency in breaking down the existing DR-biofilms and prevented formation of new biofilms in vitro. More importantly, in vivo experiments indicate that our system could significantly prevent bacterial infections and accelerate the healing rate of wounds.

  6. Stability of Commercial Small-Sized Cerium Oxide in the Presence of Biological Material: Dilucidating Relationships between Reactivity and Toxicity of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, J.; Gilbert, B.; Fernandez-Lomelin, P.; Guzman-Mendoza, J.; Chavira, E.

    2007-05-01

    the transformation of biomolecules (as % carbon) with decreasing CeO2 particle diameter (13 < d < 84 Å), which substantiates an intimate relation between CeO2 unit cell expansion and reactivity towards organics susceptible to undergo redox transformations. As shown by C and Ce spectroscopy, organic polymers that form because of oxidation are distributed next to the mineral surface and its occurrence is coupled to Ce reduction-oxidation. As evidenced by DSL and UV experiments conducted for the pH 2 to 8 range, the aggregation behavior of nanoCeO2 is susceptible to pH variations imposed because the presence of biological moieties itself over solid concentration.

  7. Temperament and reproductive biology: emotional reactivity and reproduction in sheep Biologia temperamental e reprodutiva: reatividade emocional e reprodução em ovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Blache

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive capacity is controlled by a large number of factors such as season, social interactions and metabolic status. However, the influence of emotional reactivity on reproductive success has not been intensively investigated in farm animals. In this review, we define emotion reactivity and the expression of its inter individual variability named temperament. We briefly describe our protocol to measure temperament in sheep and discuss the heritability of temperament traits. Using the results obtained from our flock of sheep selected for calm or nervous temperament, we illustrate how this selection affects the reproductive biology from changing the inexperienced ewe's response to the male effect to improving lamb survival and ovulation rate. We conclude that the mechanisms by which selection for temperament affects the different steps of the reproductive cycle are not yet understood but nevertheless this type of selection could have a great impact on reproduction efficiency of sheep and other domestic ruminants.A capacidade reprodutiva é controlada por fatores como estação do ano, interações sociais e estado metabólico. Entretanto, a influência da reatividade emocional no sucesso reprodutivo ainda não foi intensivamente investigada nos rebanhos. Nesta revisão, definimos reatividade emocional e a sua expressão da variabilidade individual denominada temperamento. Descrevemos de forma reduzida um protocolo para mensurar o temperamento em ovinos e discutir a herdabilidade das características do temperamento. Utilizando resultados obtidos de nossos rebanhos de ovinos selecionados para temperamento calmo ou nervoso, apresentamos como esta seleção afeta a biologia reprodutiva pela mudança na resposta da ovelha para o efeito do macho para melhorar a sobrevivência do cordeiro e a taxa de ovulação. Nós concluímos que os mecanismos pelos quais a seleção para temperamento afeta os diferentes passos do ciclo reprodutivo ainda não s

  8. Photochemistry in a 3D metal-organic framework (MOF): monitoring intermediates and reactivity of the fac-to-mer photoisomerization of Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl incorporated in a MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easun, Timothy L; Jia, Junhua; Calladine, James A; Blackmore, Danielle L; Stapleton, Christopher S; Vuong, Khuong Q; Champness, Neil R; George, Michael W

    2014-03-03

    The mechanism and intermediates in the UV-light-initiated ligand rearrangement of fac-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl to form the mer isomer, when incorporated into a 3D metal-organic framework (MOF), have been investigated. The structure hosting the rhenium diimine complex is a 3D network with the formula {Mn(DMF)2[LRe(CO)3Cl]}∞ (ReMn; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), where the diimine ligand L, 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylate, acts as a strut of the MOF. The incorporation of ReMn into a KBr disk allows spatial distribution of the mer-isomer photoproduct in the disk to be mapped and spectroscopically characterized by both Fourier transform infrared and Raman microscopy. Photoisomerization has been monitored by IR spectroscopy and proceeds via dissociation of a CO to form more than one dicarbonyl intermediate. The dicarbonyl species are stable in the solid state at 200 K. The photodissociated CO ligand appears to be trapped within the crystal lattice and, upon warming above 200 K, readily recombines with the dicarbonyl intermediates to form both the fac-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl starting material and the mer-Re(diimine)(CO)3Cl photoproduct. Experiments over a range of temperatures (265-285 K) allow estimates of the activation enthalpy of recombination for each process of ca. 16 (±6) kJ mol(-1) (mer formation) and 23 (±4) kJ mol(-1) (fac formation) within the MOF. We have compared the photochemistry of the ReMn MOF with a related alkane-soluble Re(dnb)(CO)3Cl complex (dnb = 4,4'-dinonyl-2,2'-bipyridine). Time-resolved IR measurements clearly show that, in an alkane solution, the photoinduced dicarbonyl species again recombines with CO to both re-form the fac-isomer starting material and form the mer-isomer photoproduct. Density functional theory calculations of the possible dicarbonyl species aids the assignment of the experimental data in that the ν(CO) IR bands of the CO loss intermediate are, as expected, shifted to lower energy when the metal is bound to DMF rather than to an

  9. Effect of startup circuit exercise on derivatives reactive oxygen metabolites, biological antioxidant potential levels and physical fitness of adolescents boys with intellectual disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gyun; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of starup circuit exercise program on derivatives reactive oxygen metabolite (d-ROM) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) levels and physical fitness of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and to sugesst exercise programs to promote the health and physical development of such adolescents. Twelve students with intellectual disabilities were divided into two groups; circuit exercise group (CE group: n=6; age, 14.83±0.98 years; height, 163.83±5.78 cm; body mass, 67.08±3.32 kg; %Fat, 25.68±2.42), control group (CON group: n=6; age: 15.00±0.63 years; height, 162.33±4.41 cm; body mass, 67.50±3.62 kg; %Fat, 26.96±2.06). The CE group performed the CE program 4 times a week over a 12-week period. The CON group maintained their activities of daily living. The following were measured before and after intervention: physical fitness by before and after the completion of the training programm, and were measured and blood samples were assessed. The results of the study indicate that the 12-week CE program increased significantly physical fitness (P<0.05). Furthermore, This study proved that the CE program improved physical fitness, and reduced the d-ROM levels, and increased the BAP levels of the adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, it may enhance the health and physical development of adolescents boys with intellectual disabilities. PMID:27807529

  10. Characterization and reactivity of the weakly bound complexes of the [H, N, S]{sup −} anionic system with astrophysical and biological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabelsi, T.; Ajili, Y.; Ben Yaghlane, S.; Jaidane, N.-E. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications–LSAMA, Université de Tunis El Manar, Tunis (Tunisia); Mogren Al-Mogren, M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Francisco, J. S. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, Université Paris-Est, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Blvd. Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the lowest electronic states of doublet and quartet spin multiplicity states of HNS{sup −} and HSN{sup −} together with their parent neutral triatomic molecules. Computations were performed using highly accurate ab initio methods with a large basis set. One-dimensional cuts of the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) along the interatomic distances and bending angle are presented for each isomer. Results show that the ground anionic states are stable with respect to the electron detachment process and that the long range parts of the PESs correlating to the SH{sup −} + N, SN{sup −} + H, SN + H{sup −}, NH + S{sup −}, and NH{sup −} + S are bound. In addition, we predict the existence of long-lived weakly bound anionic complexes that can be formed after cold collisions between SN{sup −} and H or SH{sup −} and N. The implications for the reactivity of these species are discussed; specifically, it is shown that the reactions involving SH{sup −}, SN{sup −}, and NH{sup −} lead either to the formation of HNS{sup −} or HSN{sup −} in their electronic ground states or to autodetachment processes. Thus, providing an explanation for why the anions, SH{sup −}, SN{sup −}, and NH{sup −}, have limiting detectability in astrophysical media despite the observation of their corresponding neutral species. In a biological context, we suggest that HSN{sup −} and HNS{sup −} should be incorporated into H{sub 2}S-assisted heme-catalyzed reduction mechanism of nitrites in vivo.

  11. Endothelin-2/Vasoactive Intestinal Contractor: Regulation of Expression via Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by CoCl22, and Biological Activities Including Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Kotake-Nara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the local hormone endothelin-2 (ET-2, or vasoactive intestinal contractor (VIC, a member of the vasoconstrictor ET peptide family, where ET-2 is the human orthologous peptide of the murine VIC. While ET-2/VIC gene expression has been observed in some normal tissues, ET-2 recently has been reported to act as a tumor marker and as a hypoxia-induced autocrine survival factor in tumor cells. A recently published study reported that the hypoxic mimetic agent CoCl2 at 200 µM increased expression of the ET-2/VIC gene, decreased expression of the ET-1 gene, and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS increase and neurite outgrowth in neuronal model PC12 cells. The ROS was generated by addition of CoCl2 to the culture medium, and the CoCl2-induced effects were completely inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. Furthermore, interleukin-6 (IL-6 gene expression was up-regulated upon the differentiation induced by CoCl2. These results suggest that expression of ET-2/VIC and ET-1 mediated by CoCl2-induced ROS may be associated with neuronal differentiation through the regulation of IL-6 expression. CoCl2 acts as a pro-oxidant, as do Fe(II, III and Cu(II. However, some biological activities have been reported for CoCl2 that have not been observed for other metal salts such as FeCl3, CuSO4, and NiCl2. The characteristic actions of CoCl2 may be associated with the differentiation of PC12 cells. Further elucidation of the mechanism of neurite outgrowth and regulation of ET-2/VIC expression by CoCl2 may lead to the development of treatments for neuronal disorders.

  12. Establishing the Intermediate Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg.

    The State of Pennsylvania Act 102 establishes a system of 29 intermediate units, creates intermediate unit boards of directors, spells out their duties and functions, and provides a system of financing their operations. This handbook has been prepared by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to provide intermediate unit boards of directors,…

  13. "Pump-probe" atom-centered density matrix propagation studies to gauge anharmonicity and energy repartitioning in atmospheric reactive adducts: case study of the OH + isoprene and OH + butadiene reaction intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Dietrick, Scott M; Stevens, Philip S; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2012-04-26

    Time-resolved "pump-probe" ab initio molecular dynamics studies are constructed to probe the stability of reaction intermediates, the mechanism of energy transfer, and energy repartitioning, for moieties involved during the interaction of volatile organic compunds with hydroxyl radical. These systems are of prime importance in the atmosphere. Specifically, the stability of reaction intermediates of hydroxyl radical adducts to isoprene and butadiene molecules is used as a case study to develop novel computational techniques involving "pump-probe" ab initio molecular dynamics. Starting with the various possible hydroxyl radical adducts to isoprene and butadiene, select vibrational modes of each of the adducts are populated with excess energy to mimic the initial conditions of an experiment. The flow of energy into the remaining modes is then probed by subjecting the excited adducts to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the stability of the adducts arises directly due to the anhormonically driven coupling of the modes to facilitate repartitioning of the excess vibrational energy. This kind of vibrational repartitioning has a critical influence on the energy density.

  14. Direct visualization of a Fe(IV)-OH intermediate in a heme enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hanna; Basran, Jaswir; Casadei, Cecilia M.; Fielding, Alistair J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Devos, Juliette M.; Aller, Pierre; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Moody, Peter C. E.; Raven, Emma L.

    2016-11-01

    Catalytic heme enzymes carry out a wide range of oxidations in biology. They have in common a mechanism that requires formation of highly oxidized ferryl intermediates. It is these ferryl intermediates that provide the catalytic engine to drive the biological activity. Unravelling the nature of the ferryl species is of fundamental and widespread importance. The essential question is whether the ferryl is best described as a Fe(IV)=O or a Fe(IV)-OH species, but previous spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies have not been able to unambiguously differentiate between the two species. Here we use a different approach. We report a neutron crystal structure of the ferryl intermediate in Compound II of a heme peroxidase; the structure allows the protonation states of the ferryl heme to be directly observed. This, together with pre-steady state kinetic analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray fluorescence, identifies a Fe(IV)-OH species as the reactive intermediate. The structure establishes a precedent for the formation of Fe(IV)-OH in a peroxidase.

  15. Experimental and computational study on the reactivity of 2,3-bis[(3-pyridylmethyl)amino]-2(Z)-butene-1,4-dinitrile, a key intermediate for the synthesis of tribenzoporphyrazine bearing peripheral methyl(3-pyridylmethyl)amino substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslinski, Tomasz; Dutkiewicz, Zbigniew; Kryjewski, Michal; Tykarska, Ewa; Sobotta, Lukasz; Szczolko, Wojciech; Gdaniec, Maria; Mielcarek, Jadwiga

    An earlier developed alkylating path leading to tetraalkylated diaminomaleonitrile derivatives was explored. Attempts to explain the reactivity of the representative dialkylated diaminomaleonitrile 2,3-bis[(3-pyridylmethyl)amino]-2(Z)-butene-1,4-dinitrile during the alkylation reaction were performed using X-ray and density functional theory (DFT) studies. The condensed Fukui functions accompanied by softness indices were found to be useful in explaining its reactivity observed during the reaction. The values of the Fukui functions and condensed softness for electrophilic attack calculated from Mulliken, Löwdin, and natural population analyses closely corresponded to the experimental observations. When 2,3-bis[(3-pyridylmethyl)amino]-2(Z)-butene-1,4-dinitrile disodium salt was treated with dimethyl sulfate at lower temperatures the alkylation reaction prevailed, whereas at higher temperatures the alkylating agent acted as a hydride anion acceptor, which favored the elimination reaction. The tetraalkylated dinitrile 2,3-bis[methyl(3-pyridylmethyl)amino]-2(Z)-butene-1,4-dinitrile was used in the synthesis of tribenzoporphyrazine bearing methyl(3-pyridylmethyl)amino groups, which was subsequently subjected to solvatochromic and metallation studies. The changes observed during metallation seem to result from the coordination of the 3-pyridyl group by a palladium ion. This could influence the configuration of the methyl(3-pyridylmethyl)amino moiety, causing more effective donation of a lone pair of electrons from peripheral nitrogen to the macrocyclic ring. .

  16. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interactive Chemical Reactivity Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, Moritz P; Bosson, Mael; Redon, Stephane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force-feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the Samson programming environment.

  18. Kinetics of biological decolorisation of anthraquinone based Reactive Blue 19 using an isolated strain of Enterobacter sp.F NCIM 5545.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Pinjari, Dipak V

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to evaluate the bacterial decolorisation of Reactive Blue 19 by an Enterobacter sp.F which was isolated from a mixed culture from anaerobic digester for biogas production. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequencing comparisons indicate that Enterobacter sp.F was 99.7% similar to Enterobacter cloacae ATCC13047. The kinetics of Reactive Blue 19 dye decolorisation by bacterium had been estimated. Effects of substrate concentration, oxygen, temperature, pH, glucose and glucose to microbe weight ratio on the rate of decolorisation were investigated to understand key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorisation. The maximum decolorisation efficiency of Reactive Blue 19 was 90% over period of 24 h for optimized parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this research study is the report where Enterobacter sp.F has been reported with about 90% decolorizing ability against anthraquinone based Reactive Blue 19 dye.

  19. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, H P; Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Monitoring inflammatory diseases and osteoclastogenesis with osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (total sRANKL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has recently attracted increased interest. The purpose...

  20. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  1. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  2. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  3. Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include ... and very important. It's also important to include physical activity in your daily routine. Your doctor can help ...

  4. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  5. A Reactive Intermediate, [Ni5(C6H4N3)6(CO)4], in the Formation of Nonameric Clusters of Nickel, [Ni9(C6H4N3)12(CO)6] and [Ni9(C6H4N3)12(CO)6].2(C3H7NO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhradeep Mistry; Srinivasan Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Three new molecular compounds, [Ni5(bta)6(CO)4], I, [Ni9(bta)12(CO)6], II, [Ni9(bta)12(CO)6].2(C3H7NO), III, (bta = benzotriazole) were prepared employing solvothermal reactions. Of these, I have pentanuclear nickel, whereas II and III have nonanuclear nickel species. The structures are formed by the connectivity between the nickel and benzotriazole giving rise to the 5- and 9-membered nickel clusters. The structures are stabilised by extensive $\\ldots$ and C-H$\\ldots$ interactions. Compound II and III are solvotamorphs as they have the same 9-membered nickel clusters and have different solvent molecules. To the best of our knowledge, the compounds I-III represent the first examples of the same transition element existing in two distinct coordination environment in this class of compounds. The studies reveal that compound I is reactive and could be an intermediate in the preparation of II and III. Thermal studies indicate that the compounds are stable upto 350°C and at higher temperatures (∼800°C) the compounds decompose into NiO.Magnetic studies reveal that II is anti-ferromagnetic.

  6. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Henriette Pia; Jacobsen, S; Jensen, T;

    2007-01-01

    with sandwich ELISA; serum total sRANKL concentration was determined using a two-site sandwich ELISA; and hsCRP was analysed by turbidimetry in 300 Danish blood donors (183 M and 117 F) with a median age of 43 years (range 18-64 years). Variability due to biological variation and sampling time was studied...

  7. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...... communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across...

  8. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, K.; Scholte, H.S.; Groen, I.I.A.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Ghebreab, S.

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible

  9. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ramakrishnan; H.S. Scholte; I.I.A. Groen; A.W.M. Smeulders; S. Ghebreab

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HM

  10. MATERIALS FOR INTERMEDIATE TELUGU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KELLEY, GERALD B.

    ONE OF THE FOUR DRAVIDIAN LANGUAGES RECOGNIZED BY THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION OF 1950 AS OFFICIAL LANGUAGES OF THE COUNTRY, TELUGU IS SPOKEN BY 42 MILLION PEOPLE IN ANDHRA PRADESH. THESE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ARE DESIGNED FOR THE INTERMEDIATE STUDENT OF TELUGU AND ARE DIVIDED INTO NEWSPAPER READINGS AND DIALOGUES OF EVERYDAY CONVERSATION. SUBJECTS…

  11. Heterocycles and Reactive Intermediates in the Undergraduate Organic Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. Dean; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for experiments involving the nitrile oxide cycloaddition with enamines. The experiment is suitable for advanced undergraduate organic laboratories or beginning undergraduate research. (JN)

  12. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  13. Proofs of the Technical Results Justifying a Biologically Inspired Algorithm for Reactive Navigation of Nonholonomic Robots in Maze-Like Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, Alexey S; Savkin, Andrey V

    2011-01-01

    We present technical results justifying a method for guidance of a Dubins-like vehicle with saturated control towards a target in a steady simply connected maze-like environment. The vehicle always has access to to the target relative bearing angle and the distance to the nearest point of the maze if it is within the given sensor range. The proposed control law is composed by biologically inspired reflex-level rules. Mathematically rigorous analysis of this law is provided; its convergence and performance are confirmed by computer simulations and experiments with real robots.

  14. Comparison of coatings from reactive star shaped PEG-stat-PPG prepolymers and grafted linear PEG for biological and medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, J; Ademovic, Z; Ameringer, T; Klee, D; Moeller, M

    2005-01-01

    Grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a common strategy for reducing nonspecific interactions of surfaces with proteins. We have used grafting at "cloud point" solution conditions that ensures maximum grafting density of linear methoxy terminated PEG-aldehyde (mPEG-ald, M(w) = 5000 and 30000). In an alternative approach, surfaces were modified with layers prepared from isocyanate terminated, star shaped poly(ethylene glycol-stat-propylene glycol) prepolymers (80% ethylene glycol, six arms, M(w) = 3000, 12,000, and 18,000; this compound will be referred to as "Star PEG" in the text). Due to the highly reactive endgroups, these molecules form a dense network on the substrate with a high polymer surface coverage. The two systems were compared regarding their ability to prevent unspecific adsorption of insulin and lysozyme. The layers were analyzed by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, and XPS. Protein adsorption was monitored by surface MALDI-TOF MS and fluorescence microscopy. No protein adsorption could be detected on Star PEG coatings and on mPEG-ald 5000, whereas mPEG-ald 30,000 could only prevent adsorption of lysozyme but not of the smaller insulin.

  15. Linking wood source and charring temperature to the stability and biological reactivity of PyOM in a temperate forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christy; Filley, Timothy; Hatton, Pierre Joseph; Nadelhoffer, Knute; Stark, Ruth; Bird, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Fire is a major mediator of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests, releasing significant quantities of greenhouse gases, soot, and aerosols while simultaneously depositing pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) onto forest soil. The condensed aromatic structure of PyOM imparts a resistance to weathering and decay and potentially promotes soil C stabilization and sequestration. This resistance however, is largely dependent upon the physiochemical characteristics of source material and production temperature. Few studies have been able to determine the stability and reactivity of well-characterized PyOM in field or laboratory decay studies. To address this, we added highly 13C-enriched red maple (RM) or jack pine (JP) pyrolyzed at 200, 300, 450 or 600°C to a low C, near-surface soil (0.5%; 0-20 cm-depth) at 60% water holding capacity and 11% of native soil C. We then incubated the samples in the dark at 25°C for 6 months. The results of 13CO2 evolution measurements indicated that both pyrolysis temperature and wood species played a significant role in PyOM mineralization. PyOM mineralization rates decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature for either species. RM mineralization rates were consistently greater (~5 to ~25%) than for JP soil.

  16. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  17. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  18. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  19. A novel system for simultaneous in vivo tracking and biological assessment of leukemia cells and ex vivo generated leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Martin G; Ericson, Marna E; Weigel, Brenda J; Herron, Michael J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Kren, Betsy T; Levine, Bruce L; Serody, Jon S; June, Carl H; Taylor, Patricia A; Blazar, Bruce R

    2004-06-01

    To determine the mechanisms by which adoptive immunotherapy could reduce lethality to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), a novel technique was developed to track both leukemic blasts and adoptively transferred cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) independently and simultaneously in mice. To follow the fate of ex vivo generated anti-AML-reactive CTLs, splenocytes obtained from enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were cocultured with AML lysate-pulsed dendritic cells, which subsequently were expanded by exposure to anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibody-coated magnetic microspheres. To track AML cells, stable transfectants of C1498 expressing DsRed2, a red fluorescent protein, were generated. Three factors related to CTLs correlated with disease-free survival: (a). CTL L-selectin expression. L-Selectin high fractions resulted in 70% disease-free survival, whereas L-selectin low-expressing CTLs resulted in only 30% disease-free survival. (b). Duration of ex vivo expansion (9 versus 16 days). Short-term expanded CTLs could be found at high frequency in lymphoid organs for longer than 4 weeks after transfer, whereas long-term expanded CTLs were cleared from the system after 2 weeks. Duration of expansion correlated inversely with L-selectin expression. (c). CTL dose. A higher dose (40 versus 5 x 10(6)) resulted in superior disease-free survival. This survival advantage was achieved with short-term expanded CTLs only. The site of treatment failure was mainly the central nervous system where no CTLs could be identified at AML sites.

  20. N-Acyliminium Intermediates in Solid-Phase Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quement, Sebastian Thordal le; Petersen, Rico; Meldal, M.

    2010-01-01

    N-Acyliminium ions are powerful intermediates in synthetic organic chemistry. Examples of their use are numerous in solution-phase synthesis, but there are unmerited few reports on these highly reactive electrophiles in solid-phase synthesis. The present review covers the literature to date and i...

  1. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  2. S-S bond reactivity in metal-perthiocarboxylato compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Guijarro, Alejandro; González-Prieto, Rodrigo; Castillo, Oscar; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Zamora, Félix

    2010-02-14

    While M-percarboxylato species are elusive intermediates, their sulfur containing analogues are known in some cases. The feasibility of isolation of M-perthioacetato compounds allowed, in this work, to obtain new insights into the pathways that follow the reactivity of M-E-ER (E = O, S) fragments. Herein we report on the isolation of two new M-perthioacetato compounds: trans-[Pt(CH(3)CS(2)S)(2)] () and [Ni(CH(3)CSS)(CH(3)CS(2)S)] (), which have been fully characterized, including X-ray structures. Reactivity of these compounds towards PPh(3) has been studied combining UV-vis monitorization and NMR measurements. Overall the accumulated data suggest that the evolution of the perthioacetato ligand in complexes and by reaction with PPh(3) consists of a complex multistep pathway in which the sulfur transfer is preceded by electron transfer. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that the transference of two electrons from the phosphorus to the sulfur atom is not concerted, suggesting that the first step of the reaction with PPh(3) is the monoelectronic electron transfer followed by P-S bond formation. The results presented here show a novel pathway in the field of S-S bond reactivity processes relevant in biological, synthetic systems and in hydrocarbon desulfurization processes.

  3. 活性氧在铁过载影响成骨细胞生物活性中的作用%Function of reactive species in effect of iron overload on the biological activity of osteoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何银锋; 高超; 赵国阳; 张林林; 张增利; 林华; 徐又佳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of iron overload on the biological activity of human osteoblasts (hFOB1. 19) in vitro, and to observe the function of reactive species in this progress. Methods Osteoblasts were cultured in vitro and divided into 4 groups. One group was treated with 200 μmol/L ferric ammonium citrate ( FAC) ; one group was treated with 2.5 mmol/L antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) ; one group was pretreated with NAC for lh and then treated with the same concentration of FAC intervention ; and the last group was normal control group. After 48 - hour culturing, the levels of reactive oxygen species ( ROS) in each group were detected using flow cytometry. Cell viability was detected using CCK -8 assay. The expression of OPG, BGP, and COL1 mRNA was detected using RT-PCR. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was detected using ALP viability kit. Results The levels of reactive oxygen species among different groups were significantly different ( P < 0. 05). The level in FAC group was higher than that in control group, and the level in FAC + NAC group was significantly lower than that in FAC group, but higher than that in NAC group. The content of active oxygen in each group was negatively correlated with osteoblast activity, the optical density ratio of OPG, BGP, and COL1mRNA expression, and alkaline phosphatase activity ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The effect of iron overload on reducing the biological activity of osteoblasts may be associated with increased reactive oxygen species caused by iron overload.%目的 观察铁过载对人成骨细胞(hFOB1.19)生物活性的影响,同时观察活性氧在这一实验变化过程中的作用.方法 体外培养成骨细胞,一组运用200 μmol/L枸橼酸铁铵(FAC)干预,一组运用2.5 mmol/L抗氧化剂N-乙酰半胱氨酸(NAC)干预,一组NAC预处理1 h后运用相同浓度FAC干预,一组为正常对照;细胞培养48 h后,流式细胞仪检测各组细胞内活性氧(ROS)的水平;CCK-8法检测各组

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Nitrene Radical Intermediates in Catalytic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Petrus; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Schneider, Sven; de Bruin, Bas

    2017-07-04

    Nitrene radical complexes are reactive intermediates with discrete spin density at the nitrogen-atom of the nitrene moiety. These species have become important intermediates for organic synthesis, being invoked in a broad range of C-H functionalization and aziridination reactions. Nitrene radical complexes have intriguing electronic structures, and are best described as one-electron reduced Fischer-type nitrenes. They can be generated by intramolecular single electron transfer to the 'redox non-innocent' nitrene moiety at the metal. Nitrene radicals generated at open-shell cobalt(II) have thus far received most attention in terms of spectroscopic characterization, reactivity screening, catalytic application and (computational and experimental) mechanistic studies, but some interesting iron and precious metal catalysts have also been employed in related reactions involving nitrene radicals. In some cases, redox-active ligands are used to facilitate intramolecular single electron transfer from the complex to the nitrene moiety. Organic azides are among the most attractive nitrene precursors in this field, typically requiring pre-activated organic azides (e.g. RSO2N3, (RO)2P(=O)N3, ROC(=O)N3 and alike) to achieve efficient and selective catalysis. Challenging, non-activated aliphatic organic azides were recently added to the palette of synthetically useful reactions proceeding via nitrene radical intermediates. This concept article describes the electronic structure of nitrene radical complexes, emphasizes on their usefulness in the catalytic synthesis of various organic products, and highlights the important developments in the field. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  7. The role of hydroxo-bridged dinuclear species and the influence of "innocent" buffers in the reactivity of cis-[Co(III)(cyclen)(H₂O)₂]³⁺ and [Co(III)(tren)(H₂O)₂]³⁺ complexes with biologically relevant ligands at physiological pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basallote, Manuel G; Martínez, Manuel; Vázquez, Marta

    2014-07-28

    In view of the relevance of the reactivity of inert tetraamine Co(III) complexes having two substitutionally active cis positions capable of interact with biologically relevant ligands, the study of the reaction of cis-[Co(cyclen)(H2O)2](3+) and [Co(tren)(H2O)2](3+) with chlorides, inorganic phosphate and 5'-CMP (5'-cytidinemonophosphate) has been pursued at physiological pH. The results indicate that, in addition to the actuation of the expected labilising conjugate-base mechanism, the formation of mono and inert bis hydroxo-bridged species is relevant for understanding their speciation and reactivity. The reactivity pattern observed also indicates the key role played by the "innocent" buffers frequently used in most in vitro studies, which can make the results unreliable in many cases. The differences between the reactivity of inorganic and biologically relevant phosphates has also been found to be remarkable, with outer-sphere hydrogen bonding interactions being a dominant factor for the process. While for the inorganic phosphate substitution process the formation of μ-η(2)-OPO2O represents the termination of the reactivity monitored, for 5'-CMP only the formation of η(1)-OPO3 species is observed, which evolve with time to the final dead-end bis hydroxo-bridged complexes. The promoted hydrolysis of the 5'-CMP phosphate has not been observed in any of the processes studied.

  8. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  9. Dee-Mack Intermediate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Frank Reliford, the Principal at Dee-Mack Intermediate since 2005, is familiar to almost every child in the community. 260 Students attend Reliford's school, and their status is a point of pride: Dee-Mack Intermediate is consistently one of the highest performing schools in the state. The change in student performance correlates to the…

  10. Intermediate dosimetric quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, A M; Hahn, K; Rossi, H H

    1992-04-01

    The transfer of energy from ionizing radiation to matter involves a series of steps. In wide ranges of their energy spectra photons and neutrons transfer energy to an irradiated medium almost exclusively by the production of charged particles which ionize and thereby produce electrons that can ionize in turn. The examination of these processes leads to a series of intermediate quantities. One of these is kerma, which has long been employed as a measure of the energy imparted in the first of the interactions. It depends only on the fluence of uncharged particles and is therefore--unlike absorbed dose and electron fluence--insensitive to local differences of receptor geometry and composition. An analogous quantity for charged-particle fields, cema (converted energy per unit mass), is defined, which quantifies the energy imparted in terms of the interactions of charged particles, disregarding energy dissipation by secondary electrons. Cema can be expressed as an integral over the fluence of ions times their stopping power. However, complications arise when the charged particles are electrons, and when their fluence cannot be separated from that of the secondaries. The resulting difficulty can be circumvented by the definition of reduced cema. This quantity corresponds largely to the concept employed in the cavity theory of Spencer and Attix. In reduced cema not all secondary electrons but all electrons below a chosen cutoff energy, delta, are considered to be absorbed locally. When the cutoff energy is reduced, cema approaches absorbed dose and thereby becomes sensitive to highly local differences in geometry or composition. With larger values of delta, reduced cema is a useful parameter to specify the dose-generating potential of a charged-particle field 'free in air' or in vacuo. It is nearly equal to the mean absorbed dose in a sphere with radius equal to the range of electrons of energy delta. Reduced cema is a function of the fluence at the specified location at

  11. Keto-Enol Thermodynamics of Breslow Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathias; Breugst, Martin; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Berkessel, Albrecht

    2016-04-20

    Breslow intermediates, first postulated in 1958, are pivotal intermediates in carbene-catalyzed umpolung. Attempts to isolate and characterize these fleeting amino enol species first met with success in 2012 when we found that saturated bis-Dipp/Mes imidazolidinylidenes readily form isolable, though reactive diamino enols with aldehydes and enals. In contrast, triazolylidenes, upon stoichiometric reaction with aldehydes, gave exclusively the keto tautomer, and no isolable enol. Herein, we present the synthesis of the "missing" keto tautomers of imidazolidinylidene-derived diamino enols, and computational thermodynamic data for 15 enol-ketone pairs derived from various carbenes/aldehydes. Electron-withdrawing substituents on the aldehyde favor enol formation, the same holds for N,N'-Dipp [2,6-di(2-propyl)phenyl] and N,N'-Mes [2,4,6-trimethylphenyl] substitution on the carbene component. The latter effect rests on stabilization of the diamino enol tautomer by Dipp substitution, and could be attributed to dispersive interaction of the 2-propyl groups with the enol moiety. For three enol-ketone pairs, equilibration of the thermodynamically disfavored tautomer was attempted with acids and bases but could not be effected, indicating kinetic inhibition of proton transfer.

  12. Pyrimidine Nucleobase Radical Reactivity in DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  13. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  14. Coinage Metal Hydrides: Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Abraham J; Lalic, Gojko; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2016-08-10

    Hydride complexes of copper, silver, and gold encompass a broad array of structures, and their distinctive reactivity has enabled dramatic recent advances in synthesis and catalysis. This Review summarizes the synthesis, characterization, and key stoichiometric reactions of isolable or observable coinage metal hydrides. It discusses catalytic processes in which coinage metal hydrides are known or probable intermediates, and presents mechanistic studies of selected catalytic reactions. The purpose of this Review is to convey how developments in coinage metal hydride chemistry have led to new organic transformations, and how developments in catalysis have in turn inspired the synthesis of reactive new complexes.

  15. Chemical reactivity drives spatiotemporal organisation of bacterial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Víctor; Sekowska, Agnieszka; Danchin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we examine how bacterial metabolism is shaped by chemical constraints acting on the material and dynamic layout of enzymatic networks and beyond. These are moulded not only for optimisation of given metabolic objectives (e.g. synthesis of a particular amino acid or nucleotide) but also for curbing the detrimental reactivity of chemical intermediates. Besides substrate channelling, toxicity is avoided by barriers to free diffusion (i.e. compartments) that separate otherwise incompatible reactions, along with ways for distinguishing damaging vs. harmless molecules. On the other hand, enzymes age and their operating lifetime must be tuned to upstream and downstream reactions. This time dependence of metabolic pathways creates time-linked information, learning and memory. These features suggest that the physical structure of existing biosystems, from operon assemblies to multicellular development may ultimately stem from the need to restrain chemical damage and limit the waste inherent to basic metabolic functions. This provides a new twist of our comprehension of fundamental biological processes in live systems as well as practical take-home lessons for the forward DNA-based engineering of novel biological objects. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  16. Gulf of Maine intermediate water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, T.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Garfield, N. III

    1979-01-01

    The thermohaline dynamics of the Gulf of Maine are analyzed from the two year, eight cruise, data set of Colton, Marak, Nickerson, and Stoddard (1968). Six water masses are described: the Maine Surface Water, Maine Intermediate Water, and the Maine Bottom Water as interior water masses; and the Scotian Shelf Water, the Slope Water, and the Georges Bank Water as exterior water masses. Particular attention is given to the formation and disposition of the Maine Intermediate Water. Salt balance, T-S volume, and T-S drift analyses are used to provide transport and mixing estimates for the year 1966. The Slope Water entered at depth through the Northeast Channel at a rate of 2600 km/sup 3//yr; while the Scotian Shelf Water entered the surface and intermediate layers, mostly during winter intrusions, at a rate of 5200 km/sup 3//yr. The surface and intermediate layers exported a total of 7900 km/sup 3//yr in a 3:5 ratio, respectively. The Maine Intermediate Water tends to collect over the Wilkinson Basin during the stratified season, to exit via the Great South Channel during early spring, and to exit via the Northeast Channel during spring and summer. Comparisons are made between the estimated winter heat loss of 280 Ly/d and the observed heat losses of 230 Ly/d (surface layers) and 360 Ly/d (surface and intermediate layers). A limit for the Scotian Shelf Water contribution is about -70 Ly/d. It is concluded that the Maine Intermediate Water is produced locally and that it is exported in significant quantities.

  17. Catalytic Oxidation with a Non-Heme Iron Complex That Generates a Low-Spin FeIIIOOH Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard; Lubben, Marcel; Hage, Ronald; Que, Jr.; Feringa, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    The antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM) is proposed to act via a low-spin iron(III) hydroperoxide intermediate called “activated bleomycin”. To gain more insight into the mechanistic aspects of catalytic oxidation by these intermediates we have studied the reactivity of [(N4Py)Fe(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 (1) (N4Py

  18. Nodular calcified neurocysticercosis with signs of reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coeli, Gustavo Nunes Medina; Tiengo, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Silva, Guilherme Carlos da; Silva, Leandro Urquiza Marques Alves da, E-mail: gustavonmc@yahoo.com.br [Department of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis, Hospital Escola de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Silva, Afonso Carlos da [Medical Practice, Hospital Escola de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Jose Otavio Meyer [Clinica Sul Mineira Tomosul and Clinica Magsul, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Neurocysticercosis is a disease characterized by the involvement of the central nervous system by the intermediate larval stage of the parasite Taenia solium. The larva degeneration process and the inflammatory reaction of the body cause clinical symptoms. The authors report a case of clinical and radiological reactivation of nodular calcified neurocysticercosis in a patient who was asymptomatic for more than 20 years. Antiparasitic treatment showed a good response (author)

  19. Organophosphate Poisoning and Intermediate Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yilmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects that occur after acute organophosphate poisoning (OP can manifest three phases, namely, acute cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome and delayed-type polyneuropathy. Clinical signs and symptoms of organophosphate poisoning depend on the accumulation of acetylcholine at the nerve junction. Organophosphate poisoning causes three main clinical findings; acute cholinergic crisis consisting of muscarinic, nicotinic and central nervous system symptoms, intermediate syndrome with recurrence of cholinergic symptoms or muscle weakness without fasciculation 24-96 hours after poisoning and delayed-type polyneuropathy that can usually occur several days or weeks after acute exposure to organic phosphorus compounds. In this article, intermediate syndrome, which is a late complication, has been reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(1.000: 70-83

  20. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Radhey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5 to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  1. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  2. Biological effects of exposure to intermediate neutron and repair mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Onishi, Takeo; Onizuka, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was made on cytotoxic effects of neutron capture using chicken B-cell line mutants, DT40, KURO{sup -/-}, RAD54 {sup -/-} and KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-}. Suspensions of these cells were exposed to two times X-radiation at various doses and the cell surviving was evaluated. The sensitivity to radiation was highest in the double defective mutant, KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-} and followed by that of RAD54 {sup -/-}, a homologous recombination mutant, whereas KURO {sup -/-} cell, a non-homologous end-joining mutant showed a peculiar surviving curve composed of two phases and the cell was highly sensitive to a low-dose radiation. This indicates that there are two different DNA repair systems for double-strand breaks and the system for non-homologous end-joining repair can be involved in all phases of cell cycle, but the system for the homologous one is involved only in S-phase. Therefore, it was thought that variation of sensitivity to radiation exposure depending to the phase of cell cycle might explain the alternation of repair system depending to the phase progressing of cell cycle. It was thus likely that the recovery from radiation injury, which is still a black box might be explained with the double strand breaks of DNA. (M.N.)

  3. A TCP model for external beam treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Seán

    2013-03-01

    Biological models offer the ability to predict clinical outcomes. The authors describe a model to predict the clinical response of intermediate-risk prostate cancer to external beam radiotherapy for a variety of fractionation regimes.

  4. Cestina pro Pokrocile (Intermediate Czech).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Grazyna; And Others

    The textbook in intermediate Czech is designed for second-year students of the language and those who already have a basic knowledge of Czech grammar and vocabulary. It is appropriate for use in a traditional college language classroom, the business community, or a government language school. It can be covered in a year-long conventional…

  5. Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for…

  6. Learning through Literature: Geography, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Mary Ellen

    This resource book provides specific strategies and activities for integrating the intermediate geography curriculum with related children's literature selections. The book includes the following sections: (1) "World Geography Overview"; (2) "Oceans"; (3) "Polar Regions"; (4) "Islands"; (5) "Rain Forests"; (6) "Mountains"; (7) "Forests"; (8)…

  7. Reactive Attachment Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder. Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) Children with RAD are less likely to interact with other people because of negative experiences with adults in their early years. They have difficulty calming ...

  8. Reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive perforating collagenosis is a rare cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. We hereby describe a case of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis in a patient of diabetes and chronic renal failure.

  9. Monadic Functional Reactive Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, A.J. van der; Shan, C

    2013-01-01

    Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a way to program reactive systems in functional style, eliminating many of the problems that arise from imperative techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative FRP formulation that is based on the notion of a reactive computation: a monadic computatio

  10. Selective insertion of sulfur dioxide reduction intermediates on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeres, Eduardo; Debacher, Nito A; Smaniotto, Alessandra; de Castro, Karen M; Benetoli, Luís O B; de Souza, Eduardo P; Moreira, Regina de F P M; Lopes, Cristiane N; Schreiner, Wido H; Canle, Moisés; Santaballa, J Arturo

    2014-04-22

    Graphite microparticles (d50 6.20 μm) were oxidized by strong acids, and the resultant graphite oxide was thermally exfoliated to graphene oxide sheets (MPGO, C/O 1.53). Graphene oxide was treated with nonthermal plasma under a SO2 atmosphere at room temperature. The XPS spectrum showed that SO2 was inserted only as the oxidized intermediate at 168.7 eV in the S 2p region. Short thermal shocks at 600 and 400 °C, under an Ar atmosphere, produced reduced sulfur and carbon dioxide as shown by the XPS spectrum and TGA analysis coupled to FTIR. MPGO was also submitted to thermal reaction with SO2 at 630 °C, and the XPS spectrum in the S 2p region at 164.0 eV showed that this time only the nonoxidized episulfide intermediate was inserted. Plasma and thermal treatment produced a partial reduction of MPGO. The sequence of thermal reaction followed by plasma treatment inserted both sulfur intermediates. Because oxidized and nonoxidized intermediates have different reactivities, this selective insertion would allow the addition of selective types of organic fragments to the surface of graphene oxide.

  11. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    a reduction in size, caused by crowding, virtually nothing is known about longer-lasting effects after transmission to the definitive host. This study is the first to use in vitro cultivation with feeding of adult trematodes to investigate how numbers of parasites in the intermediate host affect the size......Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... and fecundity of adult parasites. For this purpose, we examined two different infracommunities of parasites in crustacean hosts. Firstly, we used experimental infections of Maritrema novaezealandensis in the amphipod, Paracalliope novizealandiae, to investigate potential density-dependent effects in single...

  12. PERIPHERAL RETINOSCHISIS IN INTERMEDIATE UVEITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Srivastava, Sunil K; Nucci, Paolo; Baynes, Kimberly; Neri, Piergiorgio; Lowder, Careen Y

    2017-01-11

    To examine cases of intermediate uveitis complicated by retinoschisis and review the pathogenetic hypothesis. A retrospective chart review of patients with intermediate uveitis. Data were collected at three uveitis referral centers on sex, age, best-corrected visual acuity, degree of vitritis, extent and location of snowbanking, presence of hard exudates, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, and extent and nature of retinal elevations. A series of 23 eyes of 20 patients were examined; patient's age ranged from 10 years to 70 years and follow-up period from 8 months to 6 years. Twenty-two eyes had retinoschisis (95.6%), and 1 had retinoschisis associated with serous retinal detachment (4.3%). Extensive inferior pars plana exudates with snowbanking were present in 12 eyes (52.2%), whereas 3 eyes had inferior snowballs over the elevated retina. Neovascularization of the vitreous base accompanied by vitreous hemorrhage occurred in one eye. There was no coexisting macular pathology in 16 eyes, whereas 4 eyes had cystoid macular edema. The appearance of peripheral retinoschisis in this series of uncontrolled intermediate uveitis patients seems to be secondary to a complex balance between the persistent fluorescein leakage, a subclinical peripheral ischemia, and the constant low-grade vitreous inflammation that causes vitreous shrinkage and traction. The results of this study suggest that the absence of macroscopic changes in the retina does not preclude ischemic peripheral abnormalities, and the detection of a peripheral retinoschisis in an intermediate uveitis patient with active fluorescein leakage must suggest the need for a more aggressive form of treatment despite the good visual acuity.

  13. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.

  14. Reactive N emissions from beef cattle feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) are fed to meet the nutritional needs of beef cattle in feedlots. However, only from 10 to 15% of fed N is retained in animals. Most N is excreted. Chemical and biological processes transform manure N into ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrate. These reactive forms of ...

  15. Biodegradation of Reactive blue 13 in a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic fluidized beds system with a Pseudomonas sp. isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Xingwang; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L1 capable of degrading the azo textile dye Reactive blue 13, was isolated from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor. A continuous two-stage anaerobic/aerobic biological fluidized bed system was used to decolorize and mineralize Reactive blue 13. The key factors affecting decolorization were investigated and the efficiency of degradation was also optimized. An overall color removal of 83.2% and COD removal of 90.7% was achieved at pH 7, a residence time of 70 h and a glucose concentration of 2 g/L, HRT=70 h and C(glucose)=2000 mg/L. Oxygen was contributing to blocking the azo bond cleavage. Consequently, decolorization occurred in the anaerobic reactor while partial mineralization was achieved in the aerobic reactor. A possible degradation pathway based on the analysis of intermediates and involving azoreduction, desulfonation, deamination and further oxidation reactions is presented.

  16. Glycosylation intermediates studied using low temperature 1H- and 19F-DOSY NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Yan; Ge, Wenzhi; Jia, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature 1H- and 19F-DOSY have been used for analyzing reactive intermediates in glycosylation reactions, where a glycosyl trichloroacetimidate donor has been activated using different catalysts. The DOSY protocols have been optimized for low temperature experiments and provided new insight...

  17. Reactivity of hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives towards electrogenerated HO radicals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a lot of interest in the study of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their role in many areas such as medicine, biology and chemistry. Among the ROS, HO radicals are the most reactive species and the extension of their reaction with organics can lead to the formation of CO2 thus the genera...

  18. Impact of reactive settler models on simulated WWTP performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Jeppsson, Ulf; Batstone, Damien J.

    2006-01-01

    Including a reactive settler model in a wastewater treatment plant model allows representation of the biological reactions taking place in the sludge blanket in the settler, something that is neglected in many simulation studies. The idea of including a reactive settler model is investigated for ...

  19. Reactive conducting polymers as actuating sensors and tactile muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, T F

    2008-09-01

    Films of conducting polymers when used as electrodes in an electrolytic solution oxidize and reduce under the flow of anodic and cathodic currents, respectively. The electrochemical reactions induce conformational movements of the chains, generation or destruction of free volume and interchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte giving a gel that reacts, swells or shrinks. Electric pulses acting on reactive gels constituted by polymers, solvent and ions are the closest artificial materials to those that constitute actuating biological organs. The electrochemical reaction under the flow of a constant current promotes a progressive change of color, volume, porosity, stored charge and storage or release of ions. The reaction is kinetically controlled by the conformational movements or by the diffusion of counterions through the gel; it works under electrochemical equilibrium and defines, at any intermediate oxidation state, equilibrium potentials. Any variable (mechanical, chemical, optical, magnetic, etc) acting on the equilibrium will induce a change in the working potential of any device, driven by a constant current, based on this reaction; actuating-sensing devices based on the electrochemical properties are expected. Artificial muscles able to sense pushed weights, electrolyte concentration or ambient temperature during actuation are described. The activation energy of the reaction includes structural information and allows the obtention of the conformational energy, the heart of both actuating and sensing properties.

  20. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In her article "Intermedial Strategies and Memory in Contemporary Novels" Sara Tanderup discusses a tendency in contemporary literature towards combining intermedial experiments with a thematic preoccupation with memory and trauma. Analyzing selected works by Steven Hall, Jonathan Safran Foer...

  1. Reactive Programming in Java

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Programming in gaining a lot of excitement. Many libraries, tools, and frameworks are beginning to make use of reactive libraries. Besides, applications dealing with big data or high frequency data can benefit from this programming paradigm. Come to this presentation to learn about what reactive programming is, what kind of problems it solves, how it solves them. We will take an example oriented approach to learning the programming model and the abstraction.

  2. Pelamis WEC - intermediate scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yemm, R.

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the successful building and commissioning of an intermediate 1/7th scale model of the Pelamis Wave Energy Converter (WEC) and its testing in the wave climate of the Firth of Forth. Details are given of the design of the semi-submerged articulated structure of cylindrical elements linked by hinged joints. The specific programme objectives and conclusions, development issues addressed, and key remaining risks are discussed along with development milestones to be passed before the Pelamis WEC is ready for full-scale prototype testing.

  3. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  4. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses.

  5. 34 CFR 200.17 - Intermediate goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate goals. 200.17 Section 200.17 Education... Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.17 Intermediate goals. Each State must establish intermediate goals that increase in equal increments over the period...

  6. Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M C

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical simplicity of black holes, combined with their links to some of the most energetic events in the universe, means that black holes are key objects for fundamental physics and astrophysics. Until recently, it was generally believed that black holes in nature appear in two broad mass ranges: stellar-mass (roughly 3-20 solar masses), which are produced by the core collapse of massive stars, and supermassive (millions to billions of solar masses), which are found in the centers of galaxies and are produced by a still uncertain combination of processes. In the last few years, however, evidence has accumulated for an intermediate-mass class of black holes, with hundreds to thousands of solar masses. If such objects exist they have important implications for the dynamics of stellar clusters, the formation of supermassive black holes, and the production and detection of gravitational waves. We review the evidence for intermediate-mass black holes and discuss future observational and theoretical work t...

  7. Métodos de obtenção, reatividade e importância biológica de 4-tiazolidinonas Preparation methods, reactivity and biological importance of 4-thiazolidinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P. Liesen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules containing the 4-thiazolidinone ring are known to possess a wide range of biological properties including antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities among others. These compounds can be synthesized by cyclization reactions involving alpha-haloacetic acid or alpha-mercaptoacetic acid and employed in several chemoselective reactions. Comprehensive reviews have been written on 4-thiazolidinones in 1961 by Brown and in 1980 by Singh et al. In the recent literature, some new synthesis methods for 4-thiazolidinone derivatives and several reactions have been reported. These advances warrant to review the chemical and biological properties of compounds with this important heterocycle employed in synthetic organic chemistry and medicinal chemistry.

  8. Intermediate view synthesis from stereoscopic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Chaohui; An Ping; Zhang Zhaoyang

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for synthesizing intermediate views from a pair of stereoscopic images. In order to synthesize high-quality intermediate views, the block matching method together with a simplified multi-window technique and dynamic programming is used in the process of disparity estimation. Then occlusion detection is performed to locate occluded regions and their disparities are compensated. After the projecton of the left-to-right and right-to-left disparities onto the intermediate image, intermediate view is synthesized considering occluded regions. Experimental results show that our synthesis method can obtain intermediate views with higher quality.

  9. Elusive Terminal Copper Arylnitrene Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoda, Abolghasem Gus; Jiang, Quan; Bertke, Jeffery A; Cundari, Thomas R; Warren, Timothy H

    2017-06-01

    We report herein three new modes of reactivity between arylazides N3 Ar with a bulky copper(I) β-diketiminate. Addition of N3 Ar(X3) (Ar(X3) =2,4,6-X3 C6 H2 ; X=Cl or Me) to [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) results in triazenido complexes from azide attack on the β-diketiminato backbone. Reaction of [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) with bulkier azides N3 Ar leads to terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu]=NAr that dimerize via formation of a C-C bond at the arylnitrene p-position to give the dicopper(II) diketimide 4 (Ar=2,6-(i) Pr2 C6 H3 ) or undergo nitrile insertion to give diazametallocyclobutene 8 (Ar=4-Ph-2,6-iPr2 C6 H2 ). Importantly, reactivity studies reveal both 4 and 8 to be "masked" forms of the terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu=NAr that undergo nitrene group transfer to PMe3 , (t) BuNC, and even into a benzylic sp(3) C-H bond of ethylbenzene. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Displays for future intermediate UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Daniel; Metzler, James; Blakesley, David; Rister, Courtney; Nuhu, Abdul-Razak

    2008-04-01

    The Dedicated Autonomous Extended Duration Airborne Long-range Utility System (DAEDALUS) is a prototype Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that won the 2007 AFRL Commander's Challenge. The purpose of the Commander's Challenge was to find an innovative solution to urgent warfighter needs by designing a UAV with increased persistence for tactical employment of sensors and communication systems. DAEDALUS was chosen as a winning prototype by AFRL, AFMC and SECAF. Follow-on units are intended to fill an intermediate role between currently fielded Tier I and Tier II UAV's. The UAV design discussed in this paper, including sensors and displays, will enter Phase II for Rapid Prototype Development with the intent of developing the design for eventual production. This paper will discuss the DAEDALUS UAV prototype system, with particular focus on its communications, to include the infrared sensor and electro-optical camera, but also displays, specifically man-portable.

  11. Intermediate Jacobians of moduli spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arapura, D; Arapura, Donu; Sastry, Pramathanath

    1996-01-01

    Let $SU_X(n,L)$ be the moduli space of rank n semistable vector bundles with fixed determinant L on a smooth projective genus g curve X. Let $SU_X^s(n,L)$ denote the open subset parametrizing stable bundles. We show that if g>3 and n > 1, then the mixed Hodge structure on $H^3(SU_X^s(n, L))$ is pure of type ${(1,2),(2,1)}$ and it carries a natural polarization such that the associated polarized intermediate Jacobian is isomorphic J(X). This is new when deg L and n are not coprime. As a corollary, we obtain a Torelli theorem that says roughly that $SU_X^s(n,L)$ (or $SU_X(n,L)$) determines X. This complements or refines earlier results of Balaji, Kouvidakis-Pantev, Mumford-Newstead, Narasimhan-Ramanan, and Tyurin.

  12. Intermediate inflation from rainbow gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to dualize theories based on deformed dispersion relations and Einstein gravity so as to map them into theories with trivial dispersion relations and rainbow gravity. This often leads to "dual inflation" without the usual breaking of the strong energy condition. We identify the dispersion relations in the original frame which map into "intermediate" inflationary models. These turn out to be particularly simple: power-laws modulated by powers of a logarithm. The fluctuations predicted by these scenarios are near, but not exactly scale-invariant, with a red running spectral index. These dispersion relations deserve further study within the context of quantum gravity and the phenomenon of dimensional reduction in the ultraviolet.

  13. Adsorbed formate: the key intermediate in the oxidation of formic acid on platinum electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Angel; Cabello, Gema; Gutiérrez, Claudio; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2011-12-07

    The electrooxidation of formic acid on Pt and other noble metal electrodes proceeds through a dual-path mechanism, composed of a direct path and an indirect path through adsorbed carbon monoxide, a poisoning intermediate. Adsorbed formate had been identified as the reactive intermediate in the direct path. Here we show that actually it is also the intermediate in the indirect path and is, hence, the key reaction intermediate, common to both the direct and indirect paths. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the dehydration of formic acid on Pt electrodes requires adjacent empty sites, and it is demonstrated that the reaction follows an apparently paradoxical electrochemical mechanism, in which an oxidation is immediately followed by a reduction.

  14. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Role of physical anthropology in intermediate and secondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Pamela C

    2005-01-01

    The role of physical anthropology in precollegiate education has been limited, but has the potential to play a vital and integral role in promoting students' understanding of themselves and others. This study describes the development, implementation, and results of a program constructed on an inquiry-based learning model that introduces middle and high school students to the content of physical anthropology. Demonstrated student learning indicates that intermediate and secondary students are capable of acquiring and applying complex content about human evolution and diversity. Program findings indicate that students frequently had previous knowledge about the hominid fossil record but little information about the significance of human biological diversity. Teaching intermediate and high school students about our common evolutionary heritage and the fact that humans exhibit clinal variation were found to be both powerful and effective content material. The fact that program participants lacked previous knowledge about the relationship between human biological diversity (illustrated in this program by light and dark skin color) and the erroneous sociocultural construction of this diversity confirmed the suspicion that this content is not being addressed in precollegiate education. Traditionally, intermediate and secondary students are taught about human variation within the context of social studies, reading, communication, and fine-arts classes. This program identifies a new paradigm for teaching about human variation. Providing students with scientific knowledge about human origins and diversity provides a constructive starting point, creating a common platform and knowledge base on which to then frame discussions about cultural variation. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Reactive Power Compensation Method Considering Minimum Effective Reactive Power Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yiyu; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Zhang; Li, Xuenan; Zuo, Xianghong; Zhen, Jiao; Sudan, Teng

    2017-05-01

    According to the calculation model of minimum generator reactive power reserve of power system voltage stability under the premise of the guarantee, the reactive power management system with reactive power compensation combined generator, the formation of a multi-objective optimization problem, propose a reactive power reserve is considered the minimum generator reactive power compensation optimization method. This method through the improvement of the objective function and constraint conditions, when the system load growth, relying solely on reactive power generation system can not meet the requirement of safe operation, increase the reactive power reserve to solve the problem of minimum generator reactive power compensation in the case of load node.

  17. Reactive standard deontic logic

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbay, Dov M.; Straßer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a reactive variant of SDL (standard deontic logic): SDLR1 (reactive standard deontic logic). Given a Kripkean view on the semantics of SDL in terms of directed graphs where arrows -> represent the accessibility relation between worlds, reactive models add two elements: arrows -> are labelled as 'active' or 'inactive', and double arrows a dagger connect arrows, e.g. (x(1) -> x(2)) a dagger (x(3) -> x(4)). The idea is that passing through x(1) -> x(2) activates a switch represented...

  18. Dendritic Morphology of Hippocampal and Amygdalar Neurons in Adolescent Mice Is Resilient to Genetic Differences in Stress Reactivity: e38971

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anup G Pillai; Danielle de Jong; Sofia Kanatsou; Harm Krugers; Alana Knapman; Jan-Michael Heinzmann; Florian Holsboer; Rainer Landgraf; Marian Joëls; Chadi Touma

    2012-01-01

    ...) compared to the intermediate (IR) and low (LR) stress reactive mice line presents a phenotype, with respect to neuroendocrine parameters, sleep architecture, emotional behavior and cognition, that recapitulates some of the features observed...

  19. Dendritic Morphology of Hippocampal and Amygdalar Neurons in Adolescent Mice Is Resilient to Genetic Differences in Stress Reactivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Anup G; de Jong, Danielle; Kanatsou, Sofia; Krugers, Harm; Knapman, Alana; Heinzmann, Jan-Michael; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer; Joels, Marian; Touma, Chadi

    2012-01-01

    ...) compared to the intermediate (IR) and low (LR) stress reactive mice line presents a phenotype, with respect to neuroendocrine parameters, sleep architecture, emotional behavior and cognition, that recapitulates some of the features observed...

  20. Determinação da segurança biológica do xampu de cetoconazol: teste de irritação ocular e avaliação do potencial de citotoxicidade in vitro Determination of the biological reactivity of ketoconazole in shampoo: draize eye test and cytotoxity test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inara Staub

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cetoconazol é um agente antifúngico, que pode ser incorporado em diferentes formas farmacêuticas, como, por exemplo, xampus e cremes. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a segurança biológica in vivo (teste de irritação ocular e in vitro (teste de citotoxicidade do xampu de cetoconazol degradado sob ação da luz. Para tanto, a formulação foi exposta à radiação UV-C (254 nm e foram empregados dois métodos para a determinação quantitativa do cetoconazol: CLAE e ensaio microbiológico. Os resultados demonstraram alteração do cetoconazol em presença da luz - presença de picos secundários no cromatograma e diminuição da atividade antifúngica - entretanto, não demonstraram alteração na segurança biológica entre xampu de cetoconazol e xampu de cetoconazol contendo produtos de degradação.Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent and can be incorporated into several dosage forms, as an example it could be mentioned shampoos and creams. The aim of this work was to assess the biological reactivity in vivo (Draize eye test and in vitro (cytotoxity test of ketoconazole in shampoo degradeted under action of light. The formulation was exposed to UV-C (254 nm radiation and two methods were used for the quantitative determination of ketoconazole: HPLC and microbiological assay. The results showed alteration in ketoconazole in presence of light - secondary peaks in chromatogram and decrease in antifungal activity - however, no alteration on the biological reactivity between ketoconazole shampoo and ketoconazole shampoo containing degradation products was observed.

  1. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  2. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-30

    1978, 34, 523. 30. Lehninger , A. L., " Biochemistry ," Worth Publ. Inc., New York, 1970, p. 161. 31. Green, A. L.; Smith, H. J.; Biochem. J., 1958, 68...nerve agent antidotes focuses on nonquaternary cholinesterase reactivators. In principle , it should be possible to find nonquaternary hydroximic acid...elicit pronounced physiological responses. In principle , it should be possible to develop nonquaternary AChE reactivators that would not only equal

  3. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  4. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  5. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  6. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  7. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandan eRamakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2 and V3. However BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  8. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Kandan; Scholte, H Steven; Groen, Iris I A; Smeulders, Arnold W M; Ghebreab, Sennay

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW) model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2, and V3. However, BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  9. Cyanine polyene reactivity: scope and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Alexander P; Nani, Roger R; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-07-28

    Cyanines are indispensable fluorophores that form the chemical basis of many fluorescence-based applications. A feature that distinguishes cyanines from other common fluorophores is an exposed polyene linker that is both crucial to absorption and emission and subject to covalent reactions that dramatically alter these optical properties. Over the past decade, reactions involving the cyanine polyene have been used as foundational elements for a range of biomedical techniques. These include the optical sensing of biological analytes, super-resolution imaging, and near-IR light-initiated uncaging. This review surveys the chemical reactivity of the cyanine polyene and the biomedical methods enabled by these reactions. The overarching goal is to highlight the multifaceted nature of cyanine chemistry and biology, as well as to point out the key role of reactivity-based insights in this promising area.

  10. Menstrual cycle and cue reactivity in women smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kevin M; DeSantis, Stacia M; Carpenter, Matthew J; Saladin, Michael E; LaRowe, Steven D; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2010-02-01

    Emerging research suggests potential effects of the menstrual cycle on various aspects of smoking behavior in women, but results to date have been mixed. The present study sought to explore the influence of menstrual cycle phase on reactivity to smoking in vivo and stressful imagery cues in a sample of non-treatment-seeking women smokers. Via a within-subjects design, nicotine-dependent women (N = 37) participated in a series of four cue reactivity sessions, each during a distinct biologically verified phase of the menstrual cycle (early follicular [EF], mid-follicular [MF], mid-luteal [ML], and late luteal [LL]). Subjective (Questionnaire of Smoking Urges-Brief; QSU-B) and physiological (skin conductance and heart rate) measures of craving and reactivity were collected and compared across phases. Subjective reactive craving (QSU-B) to smoking in vivo cues varied significantly across the menstrual cycle (p = .02) and was higher in both EF and MF phases versus ML and LL phases, but this finding was not sustained when controlling for reactivity to neutral cues. Heart rate reactivity to stressful imagery cues (p = .01) and skin conductance reactivity to smoking in vivo cues (p = .05) varied significantly across the menstrual cycle upon controlling for reactivity to neutral cues, with highest reactivity during the MF phase. Menstrual cycle phase may have an effect on reactivity to smoking-related and stressful cues among women smokers. These findings contribute to an expanding literature, suggesting menstrual cycle effects on smoking behaviors in women.

  11. All biology is computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowetz, Florian

    2017-03-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science.

  12. All biology is computational biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science. PMID:28278152

  13. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Sena, Laura A.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to th...

  14. Models of reactive oxygen species in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Weiqin; Ogasawara, Marcia A.; Huang, Peng

    2007-01-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been observed in cancer, degenerative diseases, and other pathological conditions. ROS can stimulate cell proliferation, promote genetic instability, and induce adaptive responses that enable cancer cells to maintain their malignant phenotypes. However, when cellular redox balance is severely disturbed, high levels of ROS may cause various damages leading to cell death. The studies of ROS effects on biological systems, their underlying...

  15. Seronegative reactive spondyloarthritis and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Ceribelli, Angela; Massarotti, Marco; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritidies represent a group of conditions affecting the axial and peripheral muscoloskeletal apparatus and are often associated with psoriasis, infections, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Other diseases included in this category are psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis. Reactive arthritis is an elusive spondyloarthritis, commonly occurring 1 to 3 weeks after a digestive or a genitourinary tract infection, in which microorganisms do not infect the joint directly. Reactive arthritis is classically characterized by large-joint arthritis, urethritis in men and cervicitis in women, and eye inflammation (usually conjunctivitis or uveitis) but encompasses numerous other symptoms and signs, including manifestations of dermatologic interest such as keratoderma blenorrhagicum and circinate balanitis. The diagnosis of reactive arthritis is clinical, and the infectious agent cannot always be identified due to disease latency after the infection. Most cases are self-limiting, but reactive arthritis may become chronic in 30% of cases. Treatment options include anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids, and sulfasalazine; biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) blockers, have been recently used, but there are only a few randomized clinical trials on the treatment of reactive arthritis. The effectiveness of antimicrobials needs further evaluation.

  16. Discriminating malaria from dengue fever in endemic areas: clinical and biological criteria, prognostic score and utility of the C-reactive protein: a retrospective matched-pair study in French Guiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Epelboin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue and malaria are two major public health concerns in tropical settings. Although the pathogeneses of these two arthropod-borne diseases differ, their clinical and biological presentations are unspecific. During dengue epidemics, several hundred patients with fever and diffuse pain are weekly admitted at the emergency room. It is difficult to discriminate them from patients presenting malaria attacks. Furthermore, it may be impossible to provide a parasitological microscopic examination for all patients. This study aimed to establish a diagnostic algorithm for communities where dengue fever and malaria occur at some frequency in adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A sub-study using the control groups of a case-control study in French Guiana--originally designed to compare dengue and malaria co-infected cases to single infected cases--was performed between 2004 and 2010. In brief, 208 patients with malaria matched to 208 patients with dengue fever were compared in the present study. A predictive score of malaria versus dengue was established using .632 bootstrap procedures. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, age, tachycardia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and CRP>5 mg/l were independently associated with malaria. The predictive score using those variables had an AUC of 0.86 (95%CI: 0.82-0.89, and the CRP was the preponderant predictive factor. The sensitivity and specificity of CRP>5 mg/L to discriminate malaria from dengue were of 0.995 (95%CI: 0.991-1 and 0.35 (95%CI 0.32-0.39, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical and biological score performed relatively well for discriminating cases of dengue versus malaria. Moreover, using only the CRP level turned to be a useful biomarker to discriminate feverish patients at low risk of malaria in an area where both infections exist. It would avoid more than 33% of unnecessary parasitological examinations with a very low risk of missing a malaria attack.

  17. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  18. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the:...

  19. Air Conditioning. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of seven terminal objectives for an intermediate air conditioning course. The titles of the seven terminal objectives are Refrigeration Cycle, Job Requirement Skills, Air Conditioning, Trouble Shooting, Performance Test, Shop Management, and S.I.E.…

  20. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  1. Air Conditioning. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of seven terminal objectives for an intermediate air conditioning course. The titles of the seven terminal objectives are Refrigeration Cycle, Job Requirement Skills, Air Conditioning, Trouble Shooting, Performance Test, Shop Management, and S.I.E.…

  2. The Reactive Sulfur Species Concept: 15 Years On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Gregory I.; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Ali, Wesam; Jacob, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, in 2001, the concept of “Reactive Sulfur Species” or RSS was advocated as a working hypothesis. Since then various organic as well as inorganic RSS have attracted considerable interest and stimulated many new and often unexpected avenues in research and product development. During this time, it has become apparent that molecules with sulfur-containing functional groups are not just the passive “victims” of oxidative stress or simple conveyors of signals in cells, but can also be stressors in their own right, with pivotal roles in cellular function and homeostasis. Many “exotic” sulfur-based compounds, often of natural origin, have entered the fray in the context of nutrition, ageing, chemoprevention and therapy. In parallel, the field of inorganic RSS has come to the forefront of research, with short-lived yet metabolically important intermediates, such as various sulfur-nitrogen species and polysulfides (Sx2−), playing important roles. Between 2003 and 2005 several breath-taking discoveries emerged characterising unusual sulfur redox states in biology, and since then the truly unique role of sulfur-dependent redox systems has become apparent. Following these discoveries, over the last decade a “hunt” and, more recently, mining for such modifications has begun—and still continues—often in conjunction with new, innovative and complex labelling and analytical methods to capture the (entire) sulfur “redoxome”. A key distinction for RSS is that, unlike oxygen or nitrogen, sulfur not only forms a plethora of specific reactive species, but sulfur also targets itself, as sulfur containing molecules, i.e., peptides, proteins and enzymes, preferentially react with RSS. Not surprisingly, today this sulfur-centred redox signalling and control inside the living cell is a burning issue, which has moved on from the predominantly thiol/disulfide biochemistry of the past to a complex labyrinth of interacting signalling and control

  3. [Low reactive laser therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    The type, characteristics and effect of low reactive laser equipment used for pain treatment in Japan are described in this section. Currently, low reactive laser therapy equipments marketed and used in Japan include diode laser therapeutic device with semiconductor as a medium consisting of aluminum, gallium and arsenic. Low reactive laser equipment comes in three models, the first type has a capacity of generating 1,000 mW output, and the second type has a capacity of generating 10 W output. The third type has four channels of output, 60, 100, 140 and 180 mW and we can select one channel out of the four channels. This model is also used as a portable device because of its light weight, and we can carry it to wards and to the outside of the hospital. Semiconductor laser has the capacity of deepest penetration and the effect tends to increase proportionally to the increasing output. Low reactive laser therapy is less invasive and lower incidence of complications. Although low reactive laser therapy might be effective for various pain disorders, the effect is different depending on the type of pain. We should keep in mind that this therapy will not give good pain relief equally in all patients with pain.

  4. High-valent iron in chemical and biological oxidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, John T

    2006-04-01

    Various aspects of the reactivity of iron(IV) in chemical and biological systems are reviewed. Accumulated evidence shows that the ferryl species [Fe(IV)O](2+) can be formed under a variety of conditions including those related to the ferrous ion-hydrogen peroxide system known as Fenton's reagent. Early evidence that such a species could hydroxylate typical aliphatic C-H bonds included regioselectivities and stereospecificities for cyclohexanol hydroxylation that could not be accounted for by a freely diffusing hydroxyl radical. Iron(IV) porphyrin complexes are also found in the catalytic cycles of cytochrome P450 and chloroperoxidase. Model oxo-iron(IV) porphyrin complexes have shown reactivity similar to the proposed enzymatic intermediates. Mechanistic studies using mechanistically diagnostic substrates have implicated a radical rebound scenario for aliphatic hydroxylation by cytochrome P450. Likewise, several non-heme diiron hydroxylases, AlkB (Omega-hydroxylase), sMMO (soluble methane monooxygenase), XylM (xylene monooxygenase) and T4moH (toluene monooxygenase) all show clear indications of radical rearranged products indicating that the oxygen rebound pathway is a ubiquitous mechanism for hydrocarbon oxygenation by both heme and non-heme iron enzymes.

  5. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  6. INTERMEDIATE-ENERGY LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, William

    2002-11-25

    from each port can be subdivided into several separate beams, each of which can serve an independent experimental station. All told, 50 or more scientific teams can simultaneously and independently conduct research using intense photon beams from a single intermediate-energy synchrotron radiation facility.

  7. Spectroscopic capture and reactivity of a low-spin cobalt(IV)-oxo complex stabilized by binding redox-inactive metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seungwoo; Pfaff, Florian F; Kwon, Eunji; Wang, Yong; Seo, Mi-Sook; Bill, Eckhard; Ray, Kallol; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-22

    High-valent cobalt-oxo intermediates are proposed as reactive intermediates in a number of cobalt-complex-mediated oxidation reactions. Herein we report the spectroscopic capture of low-spin (S=1/2) Co(IV)-oxo species in the presence of redox-inactive metal ions, such as Sc(3+), Ce(3+), Y(3+), and Zn(2+), and the investigation of their reactivity in C-H bond activation and sulfoxidation reactions. Theoretical calculations predict that the binding of Lewis acidic metal ions to the cobalt-oxo core increases the electrophilicity of the oxygen atom, resulting in the redox tautomerism of a highly unstable [(TAML)Co(III)(O˙)](2-) species to a more stable [(TAML)Co(IV)(O)(M(n+))] core. The present report supports the proposed role of the redox-inactive metal ions in facilitating the formation of high-valent metal-oxo cores as a necessary step for oxygen evolution in chemistry and biology.

  8. Stabilization of reactive species by supramolecular encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Albano; Ballester, Pablo

    2016-03-21

    Molecular containers have attracted the interest of supramolecular chemists since the early beginnings of the field. Cavitands' inner cavities were quickly exploited by Cram and Warmuth to construct covalent containers able to stabilize and assist the characterization of short-lived reactive species such as cyclobutadiene or o-benzyne. Since then, more complex molecular architectures have been prepared able to store and isolate a myriad of fleeting species (i.e. organometallic compounds, cationic species, radical initiators…). In this review we cover selected examples of the stabilization of reactive species by encapsulation in molecular containers from the first reports of covalent containers described by Cram et al. to the most recent examples of containers with self-assembled structure (metal coordination cages and hydrogen bonded capsules). Finally, we briefly review examples reported by Rebek et al. in which elusive reaction intermediates could be detected in the inner cavities of self-folding resorcin[4]arene cavitands by the formation of covalent host-guest complexes. The utilization of encapsulated reactive species in catalysis or synthesis is not covered.

  9. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  10. Electrochemical Detection of Transient Cobalt Hydride Intermediates of Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedner, Eric S; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-07-06

    A large variety of molecular cobalt complexes are used as electrocatalysts for H2 production, but the key cobalt hydride intermediates are frequently difficult to detect and characterize due to their high reactivity. We report that a combination of variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry and foot-of-the-wave analysis (FOWA) can be used to detect transient Co(III)H and Co(II)H intermediates of electrocatalytic H2 production by [Co(II)(P(tBu)2N(Ph)2)(CH3CN)3](2+) and Co(II)(dmgBF2)2(CH3CN)2. In both cases, reduction of a transient catalytic intermediate occurs at a potential that coincides with the Co(II/I) couple. Each reduction displays quasireversible electron-transfer kinetics, consistent with reduction of a Co(III)H intermediate to Co(II)H, which is then protonated by acid to generate H2. A bridge-protonated Co(I) species was ruled out as a catalytic intermediate for Co(II)(dmgBF2)2(CH3CN)2 from voltammograms recorded at 1000 psi of H2. Density functional theory was used to calculate Co(III)-H and Co(II)-H bond strengths for both catalysts. Despite having very different ligands, the cobalt hydrides of both catalysts possess nearly identical heterolytic and homolytic Co-H bond strengths for the Co(III)H and Co(II)H intermediates.

  11. Accessing non-natural reactivity by irradiating nicotinamide-dependent enzymes with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Megan A.; Greenberg, Norman R.; Oblinsky, Daniel G.; Hyster, Todd K.

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes are ideal for use in asymmetric catalysis by the chemical industry, because their chemical compositions can be tailored to a specific substrate and selectivity pattern while providing efficiencies and selectivities that surpass those of classical synthetic methods. However, enzymes are limited to reactions that are found in nature and, as such, facilitate fewer types of transformation than do other forms of catalysis. Thus, a longstanding challenge in the field of biologically mediated catalysis has been to develop enzymes with new catalytic functions. Here we describe a method for achieving catalytic promiscuity that uses the photoexcited state of nicotinamide co-factors (molecules that assist enzyme-mediated catalysis). Under irradiation with visible light, the nicotinamide-dependent enzyme known as ketoreductase can be transformed from a carbonyl reductase into an initiator of radical species and a chiral source of hydrogen atoms. We demonstrate this new reactivity through a highly enantioselective radical dehalogenation of lactones—a challenging transformation for small-molecule catalysts. Mechanistic experiments support the theory that a radical species acts as an intermediate in this reaction, with NADH and NADPH (the reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, respectively) serving as both a photoreductant and the source of hydrogen atoms. To our knowledge, this method represents the first example of photo-induced enzyme promiscuity, and highlights the potential for accessing new reactivity from existing enzymes simply by using the excited states of common biological co-factors. This represents a departure from existing light-driven biocatalytic techniques, which are typically explored in the context of co-factor regeneration.

  12. Mild and rapid method for the generation of ortho-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Abdul kadar; Cobb, Alexander J A; Varvounis, George

    2012-01-20

    A new mild method has been devised for generating o-(naphtho)quinone methides via fluoride-induced desilylation of silyl derivatives of o-hydroxybenzyl(or 1-naphthylmethyl) nitrate. The reactive o-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates were trapped by C, O, N, and S nucleophiles and underwent "inverse electron-demand" hetero-Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles to give stable adducts. The method has useful potential application in natural product synthesis and drug research.

  13. Direct Evidence of a Dinuclear Copper Intermediate in Cu(I)-Catalyzed Azide–Alkyne Cycloadditions

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, B. T.; Malik, J.A.; FOKIN, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has become a commonly employed method for the synthesis of complex molecular architectures under challenging conditions. Despite the widespread use of copper-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions, the mechanism of these processes has remained difficult to establish due to the involvement of multiple equilibria between several reactive intermediates. Real-time monitoring of a representative cycloaddition process via heat flow reaction calo...

  14. The chemical synthesis of porphobilinogen an important intermediate of the biosynthesis of the "pigments of life"

    OpenAIRE

    Bobal, Pavel; Neier, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    Porphobilinogen is the second dedicated intermediate in the biosynthesis of «pigments of life». Only very few alkylpyrroles have been isolated from natural sources so far. The absence of stabilising substituents confers to porphobilinogen a high reactivity. The chemical synthesis of porphobilinogen had to take its sensitivity into account. The published synthesis of this unusual pyrrole are reviewed. The synthetic strategies used are analysed and compared with the biosynthesis.

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC PROBING OF POTENTIAL SURFACES IN REACTIVE COLLISIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Telle, H.

    1985-01-01

    For the investigation of unstable intermediates, ABC*, which constitute the "transition states" in some simple reactive collisions, spectroscopic methods are beginning to provide valuable results. In a (relatively) simple approach molecules are photodissociated, and the interaction potentials during the process of separation (half-collision) are mapped in either absorption or emission ; the method will be described exemplary for the photolysis of NaI, giving rise to emission from NaI≠*. For r...

  16. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  17. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  18. Language in use intermediate : teacher's book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  19. Biocatalysis: synthesis of chiral intermediates for drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ramesh N

    2006-11-01

    Chirality is a key factor in the safety and efficacy of many drug products and thus the production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand for the bulk preparation of drug substances and agricultural products. There has been an increasing awareness of the enormous potential of the use of microorganisms and microorganism-derived enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivities. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthesis of chiral intermediates for drugs.

  20. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Pierre O., E-mail: pierre.hubin@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM – UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France 103, Boulevard St Michel, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • M06-2X functional is suitable to model key steps of proline-catalyzed reactions. • Investigation of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction mechanism. • Influence of water molecules on the C–C bond formation step. • Mechanism for the reaction of proline-derived enamines with benzhydrylium cations. - Abstract: The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange–correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  1. Reactive Turing machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, J.C.M.; Luttik, B.; Tilburg, P.J.A. van

    2013-01-01

    We propose reactive Turing machines (RTMs), extending classical Turing machines with a process-theoretical notion of interaction, and use it to define a notion of executable transition system. We show that every computable transition system with a bounded branching degree is simulated modulo diverge

  2. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  3. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  4. Clojure reactive programming

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Clojure developer who is interested in using Reactive Programming to build asynchronous and concurrent applications, this book is for you. Knowledge of Clojure and Leiningen is required. Basic understanding of ClojureScript will be helpful for the web chapters, although it is not strictly necessary.

  5. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  6. Stingray-inspired robot with simply actuated intermediate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Lincoln; Gaiennie, Jack; Noble, Nick; Erickson, Jonathan C.

    2016-04-01

    Batoids, or rays, utilize unique forms of locomotion that may offer more efficient techniques of motorized propulsion in various marine environments. We present a novel biomimetic engineering design and assembly of a stingray-inspired robot swimmer. The robots locomotion mimics the Dasyatis americana, or southern stingray, whose distinction among rays is its intermediate motion, characterized by sweeping strokes that propagate between 1/2-1 wavelength of the fin profile in the posterior direction. Though oscillatory ( wavelengths) ray-based robots have been created, this project demonstrates new engineering possibilities in what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first intermediately propelled batoid-based robot. The robots fins were made of silicone rubber, cast in a 3-D printed mold, with wingspan of 42 cm (1/2 - 1/5 scale for males and females, respectively, scale of model organism). Two anteriorly placed servomotors per fin were used, all controlled by one wirelessly enabled Arduino microcontroller. Each servomotor oscillated a flexible rod with cylindrical joint, whose frequency, speed, and front-back phase delay were user-programmed over wireless connection. During free-swimming tests, the fin profile developed about 0.8 wavelength, qualifying for successful mimicry of its biological inspiration. The robot satisfactorily maintained straight-line motion, reaching average peak velocity of 9.4+/-1.0 cm/s (0.27-0.03 body lengths/second) at its optimum flapping frequency of 1.4 Hz. This is in the same order of magnitude of speed normalized to body length achieved by others in two recent batoid-based projects. In summary, our robot performed intermediate stingray locomotion with relatively fewer components, which reveals robust potential for innovation of the simple intermediate batoid-based robot swimmer.

  7. Ionic and Covalent Stabilization of Intermediates and Transition States in Catalysis by Solid Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-10-29

    Reactivity descriptors describe catalyst properties that determine the stability of kinetically relevant transition states and adsorbed intermediates. Theoretical descriptors, such as deprotonation energies (DPE), rigorously account for Brønsted acid strength for catalytic solids with known structure. Here, mechanistic interpretations of methanol dehydration turnover rates are used to assess how charge reorganization (covalency) and electrostatic interactions determine DPE and how such interactions are recovered when intermediates and transition states interact with the conjugate anion in W and Mo polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and gaseous mineral acids. Turnover rates are lower and kinetically relevant species are less stable on Mo than W POM clusters with similar acid strength, and such species are more stable on mineral acids than that predicted from W-POM DPE–reactivity trends, indicating that DPE and acid strength are essential but incomplete reactivity descriptors. Born–Haber thermochemical cycles indicate that these differences reflect more effective charge reorganization upon deprotonation of Mo than W POM clusters and the much weaker reorganization in mineral acids. Such covalency is disrupted upon deprotonation but cannot be recovered fully upon formation of ion pairs at transition states. Predictive descriptors of reactivity for general classes of acids thus require separate assessments of the covalent and ionic DPE components. Here, we describe methods to estimate electrostatic interactions, which, taken together with energies derived from density functional theory, give the covalent and ionic energy components of protons, intermediates, and transition states. In doing so, we provide a framework to predict the reactive properties of protons for chemical reactions mediated by ion-pair transition states.

  8. Ionic and covalent stabilization of intermediates and transition states in catalysis by solid acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-10-29

    Reactivity descriptors describe catalyst properties that determine the stability of kinetically relevant transition states and adsorbed intermediates. Theoretical descriptors, such as deprotonation energies (DPE), rigorously account for Brønsted acid strength for catalytic solids with known structure. Here, mechanistic interpretations of methanol dehydration turnover rates are used to assess how charge reorganization (covalency) and electrostatic interactions determine DPE and how such interactions are recovered when intermediates and transition states interact with the conjugate anion in W and Mo polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and gaseous mineral acids. Turnover rates are lower and kinetically relevant species are less stable on Mo than W POM clusters with similar acid strength, and such species are more stable on mineral acids than that predicted from W-POM DPE-reactivity trends, indicating that DPE and acid strength are essential but incomplete reactivity descriptors. Born-Haber thermochemical cycles indicate that these differences reflect more effective charge reorganization upon deprotonation of Mo than W POM clusters and the much weaker reorganization in mineral acids. Such covalency is disrupted upon deprotonation but cannot be recovered fully upon formation of ion pairs at transition states. Predictive descriptors of reactivity for general classes of acids thus require separate assessments of the covalent and ionic DPE components. Here, we describe methods to estimate electrostatic interactions, which, taken together with energies derived from density functional theory, give the covalent and ionic energy components of protons, intermediates, and transition states. In doing so, we provide a framework to predict the reactive properties of protons for chemical reactions mediated by ion-pair transition states.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  10. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  11. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    canonical model that characterizes crucial dynamical properties, such as mono- and multistationarity and stability of steady states, of all models in the class. We show that if the core model does not have conservation laws, then the introduction of intermediates does not change the steady...... techniques, we study systematically the effects of intermediate, or transient, species in biochemical systems and provide a simple, yet rigorous mathematical classification of all models obtained from a core model by including intermediates. Main examples include enzymatic and post-translational modification...... systems, where intermediates often are considered insignificant and neglected in a model, or they are not included because we are unaware of their existence. All possible models obtained from the core model are classified into a finite number of classes. Each class is defined by a mathematically simple...

  12. The second national audit of intermediate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Gladman, John R F; Forsyth, Duncan R; Holditch, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Intermediate care services have developed internationally to expedite discharge from hospital and to provide an alternative to an emergency hospital admission. Inconsistencies in the evidence base and under-developed governance structures led to concerns about the care quality, outcomes and provision of intermediate care in the NHS. The National Audit of Intermediate Care was therefore established by an interdisciplinary group. The second national audit reported in 2013 and included crisis response teams, home-based and bed-based services in approximately a half of the NHS. The main findings were evidence of weak local strategic planning, considerable under-provision, delays in accessing the services and lack of mental health involvement in care. There was a very high level of positive patient experience reported across all types of intermediate care, though reported involvement with care decisions was less satisfactory.

  13. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  14. Xanthine Oxidase Potentiation of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Isolated Canine Peripheral Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Reduclton Poci 010704-0188, ’ $$r ’lgom DC 2� 1 AGENCY USE ONLY ,’Leave blan/r) 2 REPORT DATE 3 REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 1 1989 Reprint 4...Agency SR90-31 Bethesda, MD 20889-5145 APONSORING/MENITORINQ AGENCY NAME(S) AND 10 S SORING/ MONITORING Defense Nuclear Agency T AGENCY REPORT NUMBER...Green fluorescence was monitored between 515 and 545 nm after exci- tation by a mercury arc lamp equipped with a 485/22 nm excitation filter. PMNs

  15. Formation and detoxification of reactive intermediates in the metabolism of chlorinated ethenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg, JETV; Janssen, DB; Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T. van

    2001-01-01

    Short-chain halogenated aliphatics, such as chlorinated ethenes, constitute a large group of priority pollutants. This paper gives an overview on the chemical and physical properties of chlorinated aliphatics that are critical in determining their toxicological characteristics and recalcitrance to b

  16. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in heme degradation process catalyzed by heme oxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankar Prasad Rath

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl group at one of its meso-positions as the first fundamental step of the heme cleavage process. It was also found that meso-amino heme undergoes similar ring-cleavage process while reacting with dioxygen in presence of pyridine as an axial ligand. The present paper briefly reviews the reactions of model meso-hydroxylated heme and its analogues with dioxygen, and their relevance in the heme degradation process.

  17. Radiolysis studies on reactive intermediates. Technical progress report, November 1, 1978-November 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L.

    1979-11-01

    Analysis methods for electron spin echo modulation patterns were improved and were used to determine the silver atom solvation structure in water and methanol and the geometry of solvated electrons in organic matrices. New evidence for presolvated electrons in polar matrices was obtained, and the mechanism of electron solvation in pure and in mixed matrices was clarified.

  18. Radiolysis studies on reactive intermediates. Technical progress report, November 1, 1977--November 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L.

    1978-11-01

    During the past year a more quantitative characterization was developed of the localization and solvation processes of excess electrons and in particular the presolvated state of excess electrons produced by high energy chemistry. In addition, it was demonstrated how radical environments may be studied by the tunnelling mode mechanism of electron spin-lattice relaxation and atom solvation and radical orientation on surfaces were studied by electron spin-echo modulation techniques.

  19. Determination of Reactive Intermediates During Anodic Oxygen-transfer Reactions at Lead Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Shi-yun; ZHANG Wen; GAO Meng-nan; GU Fen-lin; WANG Qing-jiang; JIN Li-tong

    2004-01-01

    The anodic discharge of water to produce adsorbed hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) is considered to be a prerequisite to anodic O-transfer reactions at a PbO2 electrode. In this work, a method was studied by means of high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) combined with electrochemical detection(ED) so as to investigate the production of hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) in the process of the anodic discharge of H2O at a PbO2 electrode. The voltammetric data obtained at the PbO2 electrode for the oxidation of salicylic acid to salicylate hydroxylation products(DHBAs) and the detection of DHBAs by means of HPLC-ED confirm the proposed mechanism.

  20. The role of reactive oxygen intermediates in experimental coccidioidomycois in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viriyakosol Suganya

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidioidomycosis is usually a self-limited infection in immunocompentent people. In immunocompentent human beings second infections due to Coccidioides are very rare, indicating that recovery from infection results in protective immunity. In experimental animals, immunization with several different proteins or attenuated mutants protects against a virulent challenge. To explore what mechanisms are responsible for protective immunity, we investigated the course of Coccidioides infection in the gp91phox knock out mouse that has a defect in the oxidative burst that results in chronic granulomatous disease. Results We found that the gp91phox knock out mice were somewhat more resistant to intraperitoneal infection and equally as resistant to low dose intranasal infection, but slightly more susceptible to high dose intranasal infection compared to control mice. The gp91phox knock out mice made a more robust inflammatory response to infection than controls, as measured by histology and production of inflammatory cytokines. The gp91phox knock out mice were as protected by immunization with the recombinant Coccidioides protein Ag2/PRA as the controls were against either intraperitoneal or intranasal infection. Coccidioides immitis arthroconidia and spherules were significantly more resistant to H2O2 treatment in vitro than Aspergillus fumigatus spores. Conclusion These data suggest that oxidative burst may not be required for protective immunity to coccidioidomycois.

  1. Free Radicals and Reactive Intermediates for the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    2001-01-01

    This grant provided partial support for participation in the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment. The NASA-sponsored SOLVE mission was conducted Jointly with the European Commission-sponsored Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO 2000). Researchers examined processes that control ozone amounts at mid to high latitudes during the arctic winter and acquired correlative data needed to validate the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III satellite measurements that are used to quantitatively assess high-latitude ozone loss. The campaign began in September 1999 with intercomparison flights out of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards. CA. and continued through March 2000. with midwinter deployments out of Kiruna. Sweden. SOLVE was co-sponsored by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP). Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP). Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP). and Earth Observing System (EOS) of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) as part of the validation program for the SAGE III instrument.

  2. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  3. Reactive Air Aluminization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  4. Enhanced reactivity of dinuclear Copper(I) acetylides in dipolar cycloadditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Fokin, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Dinuclear alkynyl copper(I) complexes exhibit superior reactivity toward organic azides compared to their monomeric analogues. DFT studies indicate that the second copper center facilitates the formation of the cupracycle in the rate-determining step and stabilizes the metallacycle intermediate...... itself. These findings support the experimentally determined rate law and shed light on the origin of high reactivity of the in situ generated copper acetylides....

  5. Tailoring protein nanomechanics with chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedle, Amy E M; Mora, Marc; Lynham, Steven; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi

    2017-06-06

    The nanomechanical properties of elastomeric proteins determine the elasticity of a variety of tissues. A widespread natural tactic to regulate protein extensibility lies in the presence of covalent disulfide bonds, which significantly enhance protein stiffness. The prevalent in vivo strategy to form disulfide bonds requires the presence of dedicated enzymes. Here we propose an alternative chemical route to promote non-enzymatic oxidative protein folding via disulfide isomerization based on naturally occurring small molecules. Using single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy, supported by DFT calculations and mass spectrometry measurements, we demonstrate that subtle changes in the chemical structure of a transient mixed-disulfide intermediate adduct between a protein cysteine and an attacking low molecular-weight thiol have a dramatic effect on the protein's mechanical stability. This approach provides a general tool to rationalize the dynamics of S-thiolation and its role in modulating protein nanomechanics, offering molecular insights on how chemical reactivity regulates protein elasticity.

  6. Tailoring protein nanomechanics with chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedle, Amy E. M.; Mora, Marc; Lynham, Steven; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi

    2017-06-01

    The nanomechanical properties of elastomeric proteins determine the elasticity of a variety of tissues. A widespread natural tactic to regulate protein extensibility lies in the presence of covalent disulfide bonds, which significantly enhance protein stiffness. The prevalent in vivo strategy to form disulfide bonds requires the presence of dedicated enzymes. Here we propose an alternative chemical route to promote non-enzymatic oxidative protein folding via disulfide isomerization based on naturally occurring small molecules. Using single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy, supported by DFT calculations and mass spectrometry measurements, we demonstrate that subtle changes in the chemical structure of a transient mixed-disulfide intermediate adduct between a protein cysteine and an attacking low molecular-weight thiol have a dramatic effect on the protein's mechanical stability. This approach provides a general tool to rationalize the dynamics of S-thiolation and its role in modulating protein nanomechanics, offering molecular insights on how chemical reactivity regulates protein elasticity.

  7. Structure-activity relationship for the reactivators of acetylcholinesterase inhibited by nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca, Kamil; Musilek, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Karasova, Jana; Soukup, Ondrej; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Hrabinova, Martina

    2013-08-01

    Nerve agents such as sarin, VX and tabun are organophosphorus compounds able to inhibit an enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE reactivators and anticholinergics are generally used as antidotes in the case of intoxication with these agents. None from the known AChE reactivators is able to reactivate AChE inhibited by all kinds of nerve agents. In this work, reactivation potency of seventeen structurally different AChE reactivators was tested in vitro and subsequently, relationship between their chemical structure and biological activity was outlined. VX was chosen as appropriate member of the nerve agent family.

  8. Biologi Radiasi

    OpenAIRE

    Milla Yoesfianda

    2008-01-01

    Biologi radiasi adalah ilmu yang mempelajari tentang pengaruh dari ionisasi radiasi dalam tubuh makhluk hidup. Kemungkinan terjadinya efek biologis akibat interaksi radiasi dan jaringan tubuh manusia, berbanding lurus dengan besarnya dosis radiasi yang mengenai jaringan tubuh tersebut. Radiasi dapat mengakibatkan efek baik secara langsung maupun tidak langsung. Efek yang merusak secara biologis dari radiasi ionisasi diklasifikasikan menjadi tiga kategori utama, yaitu efek somatik determin...

  9. Structure and Bonding in Heme-Nitrosyl Complexes and Implications for Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Scheidt, W. Robert; Wolf, Matthew W. [Michigan; (Notre)

    2016-09-13

    This review summarizes our current understanding of the geometric and electronic structures of ferrous and ferric heme–nitrosyls, which are of key importance for the biological functions and transformations of NO. In-depth correlations are made between these properties and the reactivities of these species. Here, a focus is put on the discoveries that have been made in the last 10 years, but previous findings are also included as necessary. Besides this, ferrous heme–nitroxyl complexes are also considered, which have become of increasing interest recently due to their roles as intermediates in NO and multiheme nitrite reductases, and because of the potential role of HNO as a signaling molecule in mammals. In recent years, computational methods have received more attention as a means of investigating enzyme reaction mechanisms, and some important findings from these theoretical studies are also highlighted in this chapter.

  10. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  11. On reactive oxygen species measurement in living systems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Studies devoted to the detection and measurement of free radicals in biological systems generally generated accepted methods of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level analysis. When out of control, ROS induces tissue damage, chronic inflammatory processes and cellular functional disturbances. Aerobic organisms have adapted to defense against ROS aggression by developing potent antioxidant mechanisms. Recent advances in ROS measurement methodology allow the study of ROS biology at a previously un...

  12. [Biological weapons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  13. Mathematical biology

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, James D

    1993-01-01

    The book is a textbook (with many exercises) giving an in-depth account of the practical use of mathematical modelling in the biomedical sciences. The mathematical level required is generally not high and the emphasis is on what is required to solve the real biological problem. The subject matter is drawn, e.g. from population biology, reaction kinetics, biological oscillators and switches, Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, reaction-diffusion theory, biological wave phenomena, central pattern generators, neural models, spread of epidemics, mechanochemical theory of biological pattern formation and importance in evolution. Most of the models are based on real biological problems and the predictions and explanations offered as a direct result of mathematical analysis of the models are important aspects of the book. The aim is to provide a thorough training in practical mathematical biology and to show how exciting and novel mathematical challenges arise from a genuine interdisciplinary involvement with the biosci...

  14. Programming Reactive Extensions and LINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pro Reactive Extensions and LINQ is a deep dive into the next important technology for .NET developers: Reactive Extensions. This in-depth tutorial goes beyond what is available anywhere else to teach how to write WPF, Silverlight, and Windows Phone applications using the Reactive Extensions (Rx) to handle events and asynchronous method calls. Reactive programming allows you to turn those aspects of your code that are currently imperative into something much more event-driven and flexible. For this reason, it's sometimes referred to as LINQ for Events. Reactive programming hinges on the concep

  15. Outflow forces in intermediate mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Belloche, A; Klaassen, P D; Leurini, S; Jose-Garcia, I San; Aykutalp, A; Choi, Y; Endo, A; Frieswijk, W; Harsono, D; Karska, A; Koumpia, E; van der Marel, N; Nagy, Z; Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Risacher, C; van Weeren, R J; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A; Guesten, R; Boland, W; Baryshev, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate mass protostarsprovide a bridge between theories of low- and high-mass star formation. Emerging molecular outflows can be used to determine the influence of fragmentation and multiplicity on protostellar evolution through the correlation of outflow forces of intermediate mass protostars with the luminosity. The aim of this paper is to derive outflow forces from outflows of six intermediate mass protostellar regions and validate the apparent correlation between total luminosity and outflow force seen in earlier work, as well as remove uncertainties caused by different methodology. By comparing CO 6--5 observations obtained with APEX with non-LTE radiative transfer model predictions, optical depths, temperatures, densities of the gas of the molecular outflows are derived. Outflow forces, dynamical timescales and kinetic luminosities are subsequently calculated. Outflow parameters, including the forces, were derived for all sources. Temperatures in excess of 50 K were found for all flows, in line wi...

  16. The ARES High-level Intermediate Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Nicholas David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The LLVM intermediate representation (IR) lacks semantic constructs for depicting common high-performance operations such as parallel and concurrent execution, communication and synchronization. Currently, representing such semantics in LLVM requires either extending the intermediate form (a signi cant undertaking) or the use of ad hoc indirect means such as encoding them as intrinsics and/or the use of metadata constructs. In this paper we discuss a work in progress to explore the design and implementation of a new compilation stage and associated high-level intermediate form that is placed between the abstract syntax tree and when it is lowered to LLVM's IR. This highlevel representation is a superset of LLVM IR and supports the direct representation of these common parallel computing constructs along with the infrastructure for supporting analysis and transformation passes on this representation.

  17. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    C2H5O(e)P(O)OX + H20 - products (15) K BOX __a__ OX + H+ (16) Equations (7) and (8) show the reaction of enzyme (EOH) with EPMP to yield ethyl ...kinetics. The reactivation of ethyl methylphosphonyl-AChE proceeds via the mechanism shown in equation (14): K rr OX + EOP [OX°EOP] - EOP + products (14... ether eluant. The crude product was dissolved in a minimal amount of ether and placed on a silica-gel column. Fractions of 40 mL were collected and

  18. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  19. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  20. Governance-Default Risk Relationship and the Demand for Intermediated and Non-Intermediated Debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam Aldamen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of corporate governance on the demand for intermediated debt (asset finance, bank debt, non-bank private debt and non-intermediated debt (public debt in the Australian debt market. Relative to other countries the Australian debt market is characterised by higher proportions of intermediated or private debt with a lower inherent level of information asymmetry in that private lenders have greater access to financial information (Gray, Koh & Tong 2009. Our firm level, cross-sectional evidence suggests that higher corporate governance impacts demand for debt via the mitigation of default risk. However, this relationship is not uniform across all debt types. Intermediated debt such as bank and asset finance debt are more responsive to changes in governance-default risk relationship than non-bank and non-intermediated debt. The implication is that a firm’s demand for different debt types will reflect its governance-default risk profile.

  1. Menstrual cycle and cue reactivity in women smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Stacia M.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Saladin, Michael E.; LaRowe, Steven D.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Emerging research suggests potential effects of the menstrual cycle on various aspects of smoking behavior in women, but results to date have been mixed. The present study sought to explore the influence of menstrual cycle phase on reactivity to smoking in vivo and stressful imagery cues in a sample of non–treatment-seeking women smokers. Methods: Via a within-subjects design, nicotine-dependent women (N = 37) participated in a series of four cue reactivity sessions, each during a distinct biologically verified phase of the menstrual cycle (early follicular [EF], mid-follicular [MF], mid-luteal [ML], and late luteal [LL]). Subjective (Questionnaire of Smoking Urges–Brief; QSU-B) and physiological (skin conductance and heart rate) measures of craving and reactivity were collected and compared across phases. Results: Subjective reactive craving (QSU-B) to smoking in vivo cues varied significantly across the menstrual cycle (p = .02) and was higher in both EF and MF phases versus ML and LL phases, but this finding was not sustained when controlling for reactivity to neutral cues. Heart rate reactivity to stressful imagery cues (p = .01) and skin conductance reactivity to smoking in vivo cues (p = .05) varied significantly across the menstrual cycle upon controlling for reactivity to neutral cues, with highest reactivity during the MF phase. Discussion: Menstrual cycle phase may have an effect on reactivity to smoking-related and stressful cues among women smokers. These findings contribute to an expanding literature, suggesting menstrual cycle effects on smoking behaviors in women. PMID:19996146

  2. Intermediate filament genes as differentiation markers in the leech Helobdella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Dian-Han; Weisblat, David A

    2011-10-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton is a general feature of differentiated cells. Its molecular components, IF proteins, constitute a large family including the evolutionarily conserved nuclear lamins and the more diverse collection of cytoplasmic intermediate filament (CIF) proteins. In vertebrates, genes encoding CIFs exhibit cell/tissue type-specific expression profiles and are thus useful as differentiation markers. The expression of invertebrate CIFs, however, is not well documented. Here, we report a whole-genome survey of IF genes and their developmental expression patterns in the leech Helobdella, a lophotrochozoan model for developmental biology research. We found that, as in vertebrates, each of the leech CIF genes is expressed in a specific set of cell/tissue types. This allows us to detect earliest points of differentiation for multiple cell types in leech development and to use CIFs as molecular markers for studying cell fate specification in leech embryos. In addition, to determine the feasibility of using CIFs as universal metazoan differentiation markers, we examined phylogenetic relationships of IF genes from various species. Our results suggest that CIFs, and thus their cell/tissue-specific expression patterns, have expanded several times independently during metazoan evolution. Moreover, comparing the expression patterns of CIF orthologs between two leech species suggests that rapid evolutionary changes in the cell or tissue specificity of CIFs have occurred among leeches. Hence, CIFs are not suitable for identifying cell or tissue homology except among very closely related species, but they are nevertheless useful species-specific differentiation markers.

  3. Chemistry And Spectroscopy of Radicals, Biradicals, And Carbenes: Prediction ofΔHf And Reduced Reactivity%自由基、双自由基及卡宾的化学和谱学:其△Hf和反应活性降低的判断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter CHEN

    1997-01-01

    @@ Structure- activity relationships form the foundation of the design and optimization of new products and processes. Given the recent re- emergence of arene biradicals as the key reactive intermediate in the biological activity of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics, predictive models for the reactivity of such transient species would greatly facilitate the rational design of new therapeutic agents based on the natural products. The subject of this report is the validation of a qualitative model for ΔHf of singlet carbenes and biradicals, and its further application to the rate of hydrogen abstraction by singlet biradicals related to the p - benzyne moiety generated in the activated forms of the enediyne antitumor antibiotics[1]. The prediction of an reduced abstraction rate by the biradicals implies a long - lived species that may be itself involved in site - selectivity of DNA damage.

  4. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  5. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte;

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  6. Impact of reactive settler models on simulated WWTP performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernaey, K V; Jeppsson, U; Batstone, D J; Ingildsen, P

    2006-01-01

    Including a reactive settler model in a wastewater treatment plant model allows representation of the biological reactions taking place in the sludge blanket in the settler, something that is neglected in many simulation studies. The idea of including a reactive settler model is investigated for an ASM1 case study. Simulations with a whole plant model including the non-reactive Takács settler model are used as a reference, and are compared to simulation results considering two reactive settler models. The first is a return sludge model block removing oxygen and a user-defined fraction of nitrate, combined with a non-reactive Takács settler. The second is a fully reactive ASM1 Takács settler model. Simulations with the ASM1 reactive settler model predicted a 15.3% and 7.4% improvement of the simulated N removal performance, for constant (steady-state) and dynamic influent conditions respectively. The oxygen/nitrate return sludge model block predicts a 10% improvement of N removal performance under dynamic conditions, and might be the better modelling option for ASM1 plants: it is computationally more efficient and it will not overrate the importance of decay processes in the settler.

  7. Controlling the ambiphilic nature of σ-arylpalladium intermediates in intramolecular cyclization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Daniel; Fernández, Israel

    2014-01-21

    The reactivity of main group organometallics, such as organolithium compounds (RLi) and Grignard reagents (RMgX), is quite straightforward. In these species the R group usually exhibits nucleophilic reactivity without any possibility of inducing electrophilic character. In contrast, in organopalladium complexes, researchers can switch the reactivity from electrophilic to nucleophilic relatively simply. Although σ-aryl and σ-vinylpalladium complexes are commonly used as electrophiles in C-C bond-forming reactions, recent research has demonstrated that they can also react with carbon-heteroatom multiple bonds in a nucleophilic manner. Nevertheless, researchers have completely ignored the issue of controlling the ambiphilic nature of such species. This Account describes our efforts toward selectively promoting the same starting materials toward either electrophilic α-arylation or nucleophilic addition reactions to different carbonyl groups. We could tune the properties of the σ-arylpalladium intermediates derived from amino-tethered aryl halides and carbonyl compounds to achieve chemoselective transformations. Therefore, chemists can control the ambiphilic nature of such intermediates and, consequently, the competition between the alternative reaction pathways by the adequate selection of the reaction conditions and additives (base, presence/absence of phenol, bidentate phosphines). The nature of the carbonyl group (aldehydes, ketones, esters, and amides) and the length of the tether connecting it to the aniline moiety also play an important role in the outcome of these processes. Our joint computational and experimental efforts to elucidate the reaction mechanism of these palladium-catalyzed transformations suggest that beyond the formation of the four-membered azapalladacycle, two major factors help to control the dual character of the palladium(II) intermediates derived from 2-haloanilines. First, their high nucleophilicity strongly modifies the interaction of

  8. Naval reactors physics handbook. Volume 3: The physics of intermediate spectrum reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehn, J.R. [ed.] [Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1958-09-01

    The present volume has been prepared for persons with some knowledge of the physics of nuclear reactors. It is intended to make available the accumulated physics experience of the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in its work on intermediate spectrum reactors. Only those portions have been selected which were deemed to be most useful and significant to other physicists concerned with the problems of reactor design. The volume is divided into four parts which are more or less independent of one another. Part 1 (Chaps. 2--9), Investigation of Reactor Characteristics by Critical Assemblies, reflects the importance of the properties of critical assemblies and of the techniques for obtaining experimental information about such assemblies. Part 2 (Chaps. 10--20), Reactivity Effects Associated with Reactor Operation, details the use of both critical assemblies and reactor theory to make and test predictions of the manner in which the reactivity of an intermediate power reactor will vary during operation. Part 3 (Chaps. 21--26), Heat Generation and Nuclear Materials Problems, considers how reactor heat generation is spread out in space and time, and what nuclear effects result from the presence of beryllium or sodium in the reactor. Part 4 (Chaps. 27--38), Reactor Kinetics and Temperature Coefficients, relates to the transient or near-transient behavior of intermediate reactors.

  9. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  10. The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mawji, Edward; Schlitzer, Reiner; Dodas, Elena Masferrer; Abadie, Cyril; Abouchami, Wafa; Anderson, Robert F.; Baars, Oliver; Bakker, Karel; Baskaran, Mark; Bates, Nicholas R.; Bluhm, Katrin; Bowie, Andrew; Bown, Johann; Boye, Marie; Boyle, Edward A.; Branellec, Pierre; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Bucciarelli, Eva; Buesseler, Ken; Butler, Edward; Cai, Pinghe; Cardinal, Damien; Casciotti, Karen; Chaves, Joaquin; Cheng, Hai; Chever, Fanny; Church, Thomas M.; Colman, Albert S.; Conway, Tim M.; Croot, Peter L.; Cutter, Gregory A.; de Souza, Gregory F.; Dehairs, Frank; Deng, Feifei; Huong Thi Dieu, [Unknown; Dulaquais, Gabriel; Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Fitzsimmons, Jessica; Fleisher, Martin; Frank, Martin; Friedrich, Jana; Fripiat, Francois; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Gamo, Toshitaka; Solsona, Ester Garcia; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Godoy, Jose Marcus; Gonzalez, Santiago; Grossteffan, Emilie; Hatta, Mariko; Hayes, Christopher T.; Heller, Maija Iris; Henderson, Gideon; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Jeandel, Catherine; Jenkins, William J.; John, Seth; Kenna, Timothy C.; Klunder, Maarten; Kretschmer, Sven; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Laan, Patrick; Labatut, Marie; Lacan, Francois; Lam, Phoebe J.; Lannuzel, Delphine; le Moigne, Frederique; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Lu, Yanbin; Masque, Pere; McClain, Charles R.; Measures, Christopher; Middag, Rob; Moffett, James; Navidad, Alicia; Nishioka, Jun; Noble, Abigail; Obata, Hajime; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Owens, Stephanie; Planchon, Frederic; Pradoux, Catherine; Puigcorbe, Viena; Quay, Paul; Radic, Amandine; Rehkaemper, Mark; Remenyi, Tomas; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Rintoul, Stephen; Robinson, Laura F.; Roeske, Tobias; Rosenberg, Mark; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Saito, Mak A.; Roshan, Saeed; Salt, Lesley; Sarthou, Geraldine; Schauer, Ursula; Scott, Peter; Sedwick, Peter N.; Sha, Lijuan; Shiller, Alan M.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Smethie, William; Smith, Geoffrey J.; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Speich, Sabrina; Stichel, Torben; Stutsman, Johnny; Swift, James H.; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Thomas, Alexander; Tsunogai, Urumu; Twining, Benjamin S.; van Aken, Hendrik M.; van Heuven, Steven; van Ooijen, Jan; van Weerlee, Evaline; Venchiarutti, Celia; Voelker, Antje H. L.; Wake, Bronwyn; Warner, Mark J.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Wu, Jingfeng; Wyatt, Neil; Yoshikawa, Hisayuki; Zheng, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Zichen; Zieringer, Moritz; Zimmer, Louise A.; de Baar, Henricus

    2015-01-01

    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014 (IDP2014) is the first publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2013. It consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 200 trace

  11. Intermediate Amharic Cultural Reader. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslau, Wolf

    This reader is intended to provide material for the intermediate-level student of Amharic, as well as to introduce the student to the cultural and social life of Ethiopia. The 39 texts were each prepared by a different student at Haile Selassie I University, thus providing the reader with a variety of language styles. The Amharic texts are…

  12. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  13. Modern Persian: Intermediate Level, Vol. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, Gernot; And Others

    The second of three volumes of an intergrated course in intermediate Persian is presented. This volume encompasses material appropriate for students entering the second year of Persian studies who have strong preparation in elementary Persian. Verbal skills should be on a level which will allow comprehensive discussion of a topic using simple,…

  14. Multiphase Gas in Intermediate Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Charlton, J; Januzzi, B; Churchill, Chris; Mellon, Rick; Charlton, Jane

    2000-01-01

    We present 40 quasar absorption line systems at intermediate redshifts (z~1), with focus on one of the most kinematically complex known, as examples of how the unique capabilities of space-based and ground-based facilities can be combined to glean much broader insights into astrophysical systems.

  15. Intermediality and politics in theatre and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapp, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applies the concepts of intermediality and politics to five performances by Rimini Protokoll, Christoph Schlingensief, and Igneous, and analyzes the implications that emerge on both a significational and a theoretical level. Based on the specific mediality involved, it argues that

  16. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. Klos (Tomas); F. Alkemade (Floortje)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstract Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of

  17. Teaching Vocabulary and Morphology in Intermediate Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Anthony; Kramer-Vida, Louisa; Hunt, Carolyn V.

    2015-01-01

    Direct vocabulary instruction of Tier 2 and Tier 3 words in intermediate-grade curricula is an important tool of literacy instruction because English is a language grafted from many roots and has not developed a one-to-one phoneme-grapheme correspondence. In addition to knowing graphemes and phonemes, students must formally learn words that cross…

  18. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium correspond...

  19. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of cr

  20. Korean Intermediate Course. Selected Newspaper Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this material is to provide reading matter for the last phase of the Defense Language Institute's extended and intermediate courses in Korean. (See ED 024 943 for the Korean Basic Course, Lesson Units 1-112.) The content of this volume is current, introduces important vocabulary not encountered elsewhere in the courses, and calls…

  1. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  2. Intermediate Tamil: A Self-Instructional Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Harold

    This self-instructional method for learning an intermediate level of Tamil is designed to follow an elementary level such as "Conversational Tamil." The material in this text concentrates on grammatical constructions not covered in that elementary text, particularly negatives of all kinds; in addition, this text uses the same transcription and the…

  3. Changes to the Intermediate Accounting Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lesley H.; Francisco, William H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ever-growing amount of information that must be covered in Intermediate Accounting courses. Due to recent accounting standards and the implementation of IFRS this trend is likely to continue. This report incorporates the results of a recent survey to examine the trend of spending more course time to cover this additional material.…

  4. Synthesis of the key intermediate of ramelteon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Bao Yu; Hao Min Liu; Yu Luo; Wei Lu

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric conjugated addition of allylcopper reagents derived from an allyl Grignard reagent and CuBr·Me2S to chiral α,β-unsaturated N-acyl oxazolidinones has been achieved. The synthetic procedure was applied to the preparation of the key intermediate of the novel nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic drug, ramelteon.

  5. C and C* among intermediate rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Sack; S. Watson

    2013-01-01

    Given a completely regular Hausdorff space X, an intermediate ring A(X) is a ring of real valued continuous functions between C*(X) and C(X). We discuss two correspondences between ideals in A(X) and z-filters on X, both reviewing old results and introducing new results. One correspondence, ZA, exte

  6. C and C* among intermediate rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sack, J.; Watson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Given a completely regular Hausdorff space X, an intermediate ring A(X) is a ring of real valued continuous functions between C*(X) and C(X). We discuss two correspondences between ideals in A(X) and z-filters on X, both reviewing old results and introducing new results. One correspondence, ZA, exte

  7. MNE Entrepreneurial Capabilities at Intermediate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoenen, Anne K.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Ambos, Björn

    2014-01-01

    and on the heterogeneous information that is generated through dissimilar markets within the region. Our study opens up for an interesting discussion of the independence of these mechanisms. In sum, we contribute to the understanding of the entrepreneurial role of intermediate units in general and RHQs in particular....

  8. Software Testing An ISEB Intermediate Certificate

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Covering testing fundamentals, reviews, testing and risk, test management and test analysis, this book helps newly qualified software testers to learn the skills and techniques to take them to the next level. Written by leading authors in the field, this is the only official textbook of the ISEB Intermediate Certificate in Software Testing.

  9. Intermediates and Generic Convergence to Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitas, Michael Marcondes de; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2016-01-01

    Known graphical conditions for the generic or global convergence to equilibria of the dynamical system arising from a reaction network are shown to be invariant under the so-called successive removal of intermediates, a systematic procedure to simplify the network, making the graphical conditions...

  10. Bridge: Intelligent Tutoring with Intermediate Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Research and Development Center and Psychology Department University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. 15260 The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology...problem never introduces more than one unfamiliar plan. Inteligent Tutoring With Intermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunniigbam 4 You must have a... Inteligent Tutoring With ntermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunningham 7 The requirements are specified at four differcnt levels, corresponding to

  11. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klos, T.B.; Alkemade, F.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of the market, s

  12. Guanosine radical reactivity explored by pulse radiolysis coupled with transient electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latus, A; Alam, M S; Mostafavi, M; Marignier, J-L; Maisonhaute, E

    2015-06-04

    We follow the reactivity of a guanosine radical created by a radiolytic electron pulse both by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. This original approach allows us to demonstrate that there is a competition between oxidation and reduction of these intermediates, an important result to further analyse the degradation or repair pathways of DNA bases.

  13. Supercharging SpyCatcher toward an intrinsically disordered protein with stimuli-responsive chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Bin

    2017-08-03

    We report a supercharged, intrinsically disordered protein, SpyCatcher(-), possessing stimuli-responsive reactivity toward SpyTag with tunable yields ranging from 4% to 98% depending on pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc. The CD and NMR studies reveal that the reaction occurs through a folded intermediate formed probably via a different mechanism from that of SpyCatcher.

  14. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  15. Chemical reactivity predictions: use of data mining techniques for analyzing regioselective azidolysis of epoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, Alice; Crotti, Paolo; Pietra, Daniele; Favero, Lucilla; Bianucci, Anna Maria

    2010-11-15

    Azidolysis of epoxides followed by reduction of the intermediate azido alcohols constitutes a valuable synthetic tool for the construction of beta-amino alcohols, an important chemical functionality occurring in many biologically active compounds of natural origin. However, depending on conditions under which the azidolysis is carried out, two regioisomeric products can be formed, as a consequence of the nucleophilic attack on both the oxirane carbon atoms. In this work, predictive models for quantitative structure-reactivity relationships were developed by means of multiple linear regression, k-nearest neighbor, locally weighted regression, and Gaussian Process regression algorithms. The specific nature of the problem at hand required the creation of appropriate new descriptors, able to properly reflect the most relevant features of molecular moieties directly involved in the opening process. The models so obtained are able to predict the regioselectivity of the azidolysis of epoxides promoted by sodium azide, in the presence of lithium perchlorate, on the basis of steric hindrance, and charge distribution of the substituents directly attached to the oxirane ring.

  16. Computational biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars Røeboe; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    Computation via biological devices has been the subject of close scrutiny since von Neumann’s early work some 60 years ago. In spite of the many relevant works in this field, the notion of programming biological devices seems to be, at best, ill-defined. While many devices are claimed or proved t...

  17. Introducing new reactivity descriptors: "Bond reactivity indices." Comparison of the new definitions and atomic reactivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology to obtain reactivity indices has been defined. This is based on reactivity functions such as the Fukui function or the dual descriptor and makes it possible to project the information of reactivity functions over molecular orbitals instead of the atoms of the molecule (atomic reactivity indices). The methodology focuses on the molecule's natural bond orbitals (bond reactivity indices) because these orbitals (with physical meaning) have the advantage of being very localized, allowing the reaction site of an electrophile or nucleophile to be determined within a very precise molecular region. This methodology gives a reactivity index for every Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), and we have verified that they have equivalent information to the reactivity functions. A representative set of molecules has been used to test the new definitions. Also, the bond reactivity index has been related with the atomic reactivity one, and complementary information has been obtained from the comparison. Finally, a new atomic reactivity index has been defined and compared with previous definitions.

  18. Familial reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Yasmeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC is one of the rare forms of transepidermal elimination in which genetically altered collagen is extruded from the epidermis. This disease usually starts in early childhood as asymptomatic umbilicated papules on extremities, and the lesions become more conspicuous with age. Aims: The objective of our study was to determine the clinico-pathological features of RPC and the response to various treatment modalities. Methods: Ten patients of RPC, belonging to five different families, were studied clinically. Various laboratory investigations were carried out and diagnosis was made by histopathology of the lesions. Patients were given various topical and oral treatments. Results: RPC is familial in most cases without any definite inheritance pattern. It begins in childhood and the lesions are usually recurrent and become profuse and large with age. Systemic diseases have no role in the onset of lesions. Conclusion: Oral and topical retinoids in combination with emollients is the best treatment option.

  19. 2010 Tetrapyrroles, Chemistry & Biology of Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angela Wilks

    2010-07-30

    The objective of the Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles Gordon Conference is to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines that otherwise would not interact. By bringing biologists, chemists, engineers and clinicians with a common interest in tetrapyrroles the conference provides a forum for cross-disciplinary ideas and collaboration. The perspective provided by biologists, chemists, and clinicians working in fields such as newly discovered defects in human porphyrin metabolism, the myriad of strategies for light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms, novel tetrapyrroles that serve as auxiliary chromophores or enzyme cofactors, synthetic strategies in the design of novel tetrapyrrole scaffolds, and tetrapyrrole based cell signaling and regulatory systems, makes this conference unique in the field. Over the years the growing evidence for the role of tetrapyrroles and their reactive intermediates in cell signaling and regulation has been of increasing importance at this conference. The 2010 conference on Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles will focus on many of these new frontiers as outlined in the preliminary program listed. Speakers will emphasize unpublished results and new findings in the field. The oral sessions will be followed by the highly interactive afternoon poster sessions. The poster sessions provide all conferees with the opportunity to present their latest research and to exchange ideas in a more informal setting. As in the past, this opportunity will continue during the nightly social gathering that takes place in the poster hall following the evening lectures. All conferees are encouraged to submit and present posters. At the conference the best poster in the areas of biology, chemistry and medicine will be selected by a panel of previous conference chairs.

  20. Structural Analysis of the Key Intermediate Formed during Transcription through a Nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H-W; Shaytan, A K; Hsieh, F-K; Kulaeva, O I; Kirpichnikov, M P; Studitsky, V M

    2013-01-01

    Transcription through chromatin by different RNA polymerases produces different biological outcomes and is accompanied by either nucleosome survival at the original location (Pol II-type mechanism) or backward nucleosome translocation along DNA (Pol III-type mechanism). It has been proposed that differences in the structure of the key intermediates formed during transcription dictate the fate of the nucleosomes. To evaluate this possibility, structure of the key intermediate formed during transcription by Pol III-type mechanism was studied by DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling. The Pol III-type mechanism is characterized by less efficient formation of the key intermediate required for nucleosome survival (Ø-loop, Pol II-type mechanism), most likely due to steric interference between the RNA polymerase and DNA in the Ø-loop. The data suggest that the lower efficiency of Ø-loop formation induces formation of a lower nucleosomal barrier and nucleosome translocation during transcription by Pol III-type mechanism.

  1. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  2. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhrman, Sonya

    2004-10-01

    The ocean is arguably the largest habitat on the planet, and it houses an astounding array of life, from microbes to whales. As a testament to this diversity and its importance, the discipline of biological oceanography spans studies of all levels of biological organization, from that of single genes, to organisms, to their population dynamics. Biological oceanography also includes studies on how organisms interact with, and contribute to, essential global processes. Students of biological oceanography are often as comfortable looking at satellite images as they are electron micrographs. This diversity of perspective begins the textbook Biological Oceanography, with cover graphics including a Coastal Zone Color Scanner image representing chlorophyll concentration, an electron micrograph of a dinoflagellate, and a photograph of a copepod. These images instantly capture the reader's attention and illustrate some of the different scales on which budding oceanographers are required to think. Having taught a core graduate course in biological oceanography for many years, Charlie Miller has used his lecture notes as the genesis for this book. The text covers the subject of biological oceanography in a manner that is targeted to introductory graduate students, but it would also be appropriate for advanced undergraduates.

  3. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  4. ROS: Crucial Intermediators in the Pathogenesis of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chencheng Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD indicates the contribution of oxidative stress to IVD degeneration (IDD, giving a novel insight into the pathogenesis of IDD. ROS are crucial intermediators in the signaling network of disc cells. They regulate the matrix metabolism, proinflammatory phenotype, apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence of disc cells. Oxidative stress not only reinforces matrix degradation and inflammation, but also promotes the decrease in the number of viable and functional cells in the microenvironment of IVDs. Moreover, ROS modify matrix proteins in IVDs to cause oxidative damage of disc extracellular matrix, impairing the mechanical function of IVDs. Consequently, the progression of IDD is accelerated. Therefore, a therapeutic strategy targeting oxidative stress would provide a novel perspective for IDD treatment. Various antioxidants have been proposed as effective drugs for IDD treatment. Antioxidant supplementation suppresses ROS production in disc cells to promote the matrix synthesis of disc cells and to prevent disc cells from death and senescence in vitro. However, there is not enough in vivo evidence to support the efficiency of antioxidant supplementation to retard the process of IDD. Further investigations based on in vivo and clinical studies will be required to develop effective antioxidative therapies for IDD.

  5. Changes in actin lysine reactivities during polymerization detected using a competitive labeling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock-De Gregori, S E; Mandala, S; Sachs, G A

    1982-11-10

    We have studied the structure of actin by measuring the relative reactivities of lysines with acetic anhydride using a competitive labeling procedure comparing monomeric globular actin. monomeric actin in the presence of salt, and filamentous actin polymerized in 100 mM NaCl and 100 mM NaCl, 2 mM MgCl2. We have identified 12 of the 19 lysines: 18, 50, 61, 68, 113, 191, 237, 290, 315, 325, 327, and 358. In all conditions, Lys (325, 327) is the most reactive. In globular actin, Lys 18, 191, 290, 314. and 358 are less than 20% as reactive as Lys (325, 327); the remaining have intermediate reactivities. On polymerization in the presence of NaCl and Mg2+, lysines 50, 61, 68, 113, and 290 become less reactive relative to Lys (325, 327). The changes in Lys 50, 61, and 113 are due largely to the polymerization event whereas those in Lys 68 and 290 appear to be an effect of Mg2+. Lys 18, 191, and 358 increase in relative reactivity when cation is added to the monomer and then become less reactive in the polymer, showing no large overall change in reactivity relative to the monomer in the absence of salt. Lysines that are reduced in reactivity upon polymerization indicate possible contact regions between actin monomers in the filament in the NH2-terminal third of the protein.

  6. Freeze-quenched iron-oxo intermediates in cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christiane; Schünemann, Volker; Lendzian, Friedhelm

    2005-12-09

    Since the discovery of cytochromes P450 and their assignment to heme proteins a reactive iron-oxo intermediate as the hydroxylating species has been discussed. It is believed that the electronic structure of this intermediate corresponds to an iron(IV)-porphyrin-pi-cation radical system (Compound I). To trap this intermediate the reaction of P450 with oxidants (shunt pathway) has been used. The common approaches are stopped-flow experiments with UV-visible spectroscopic detection or rapid-mixing/freeze-quench studies with EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic characterization of the trapped intermediate. Surprisingly, the two approaches seem to give conflicting results. While the stopped-flow data indicate the formation of a porphyrin-pi-cation radical, no such species is seen by EPR spectroscopy, although the Mössbauer data indicate iron(IV) for P450cam (CYP101) and P450BMP (CYP102). Instead, radicals on tyrosine and tryptophan residues are observed. These findings are reviewed and discussed with respect to intramolecular electron transfer from aromatic amino acids to a presumably transiently formed porphyrin-pi-cation radical.

  7. Reactivity mapping with electrochemical gradients for monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenborg, Sven O; Nicosia, Carlo; Chen, Pengkun; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2013-01-01

    Studying and controlling reactions at surfaces is of great fundamental and applied interest in, among others, biology, electronics and catalysis. Because reaction kinetics is different at surfaces compared with solution, frequently, solution-characterization techniques cannot be used. Here we report solution gradients, prepared by electrochemical means, for controlling and monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time. As a proof of principle, electrochemically derived gradients of a reaction parameter (pH) and of a catalyst (Cu(I)) have been employed to make surface gradients on the micron scale and to study the kinetics of the (surface-confined) imine hydrolysis and the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, respectively. For both systems, the kinetic data were spatially visualized in a two-dimensional reactivity map. In the case of the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, the reaction order (2) was deduced from it.

  8. Foldit Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Report 8/1/2013-7/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Foldit Biology NOOO 14-13-C-0221 Sb. GRANT NUMBER N/A Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Include area code) Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified (206) 616-2660 Zoran Popović Foldit Biology (Task 1, 2, 3, 4) Final Report...Period Covered by the Report August 1, 2013 – July 31, 2015 Date of Report: July 31, 2015 Project Title: Foldit Biology Contract Number: N00014-13

  9. Broadband Microwave Study of Reaction Intermediates and Products Through the Pyrolysis of Oxygenated Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Fritz, Sean; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    The rapidly growing list of potential plant-derived biofuels creates a challenge for the scientific community to provide a molecular-scale understanding of their combustion. Development of accurate combustion models rests on a foundation of experimental data on the kinetics and product branching ratios of their individual reaction steps. Therefore, new spectroscopic tools are necessary to selectively detect and characterize fuel components and reactive intermediates generated by pyrolysis and combustion. Substituted furans, including furanic ethers, are considered second-generation biofuel candidates. Following the work of the Ellison group, an 8-18 GHz microwave study was carried out on the unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition of the smallest furanic ether, 2-methoxy furan, and it`s pyrolysis intermediate, the 2-furanyloxy radical, formed in a high-temperature pyrolysis source coupled to a supersonic expansion. Details of the experimental setup and analysis of the spectrum of the radical will be discussed.

  10. Design and operation of a filter reactor for continuous production of a selected pharmaceutical intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Müller; Pedersen, Michael Jønch; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2012-01-01

    A novel filter reactor system for continuous production of selected pharmaceutical intermediates is presented and experimentally verified. The filter reactor system consists of a mixed flow reactor equipped with a bottom filter, to retain solid reactant particles, followed by a conventional plug...... flow reactor, where residual reactant is converted by titration. A chemical case study, production of the pharmaceutical intermediate allylcarbinol by a reaction between allylmagnesium chloride and 2-chloro-thioxanthone, in the presence of a side reaction is considered. The synthesis is conducted......-batch operation, are reduced impurity formation and the use of much lower reactor volumes (factor of 1000 based on the laboratory reactor) and less solvent consumption (from 5.8 to 2.3L/kg reactant). Added challenges include handling of continuous solid powder feeding, stable pumping of reactive slurries...

  11. Evolutionary Characteristics of China's Intermediate Manufactures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minsung Kang; Jeong-Dong Lee

    2007-01-01

    China's economic development is characterized by progressive integration with international production chains as an assembly producer. Japan and South Korea are the major partners providing intermediate products to China. The present paper analyzes the Chinese intermediate sector's present condition and evolutionary characteristics revealed in bilateral trade with Japan and South Korea. The analysis uses the framework of new trade theory represented by "intra-industry trade". Trade statistics from 1997 to 2004 are analyzed using the database published by the OECD. Results show that China's inter-industrial evolution is characterized by its expanding positioning in the manner of the flying geese development paradigm of Asian countries. Furthermore, intra-industrial evolution is characterized by a concentration on price competitiveness. The framework and results of the industrial analysis presented in this paper assist in the understanding of China's manufacturing evolution and of the policy-making decisions taken in the process.

  12. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...... functional ability permanently’. Key words: intermediate care, older people, discharge, interview, phenomenology...

  13. Is TW Pictoris really an intermediate polar?

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, A J

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a long ROSAT HRI observation of the candidate intermediate polar TW Pic. The power spectrum shows no sign of either the previously proposed white dwarf spin period or the proposed binary orbital period (1.996 hr and 6.06 hr respectively). The limits to the X-ray modulation are less than 0.3% in each case. In the absence of a coherent X-ray pulsation, the credentials of TW Pic for membership of the intermediate polar subclass must be suspect. We further suggest that the true orbital period of the binary may be the shorter of the two previously suggested, and that the longer period may represent a quasi-periodic phenomenon associated with the accretion disc.

  14. The application of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis to physical systems: a case study on floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburg, Scott; Neave, Melissa; Thompson-Laing, Justin

    2010-05-01

    Disturbances, defined as discrete events that disrupt physical and/or biological systems, are a component of every natural system. Disturbance ecology has been dominated, for the last 30 years or so, by the intermediate disturbance hypothesis that states that biological diversity will be maximised where disturbance occurs at an intermediate level. A wide range of disturbances and organisms have been examined with respect to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis and in many cases (especially with respect to sessile organisms) the theory has proven valid. In rivers, lakes, wetlands and floodplains, the predominant agent of disturbance is flooding. In flood disturbed environments, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis has been shown to apply to terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, but conflicting results have been observed when dealing with mobile organisms like macroinvertebrates, fish or amphibians. The argument for the validity of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (irrespective of disturbance type) stems from the notion that an intermediate frequency of disturbance promotes diversity by: 1) preventing the competitive exclusion by the dominant species that can arise in infrequently disturbed sites; and 2) facilitating greater diversity than that observed in highly-disturbed sites where only species tolerant of the disturbance can thrive. A singular omission in this logic, and indeed in research into the intermediate disturbance hypothesis more generally, has been the lack of focus on its application or relation to physical systems. This study addresses this lack by investigating whether an intermediate level of flood disturbance leads to a greater diversity of soil character (assessed using a wide range of physical and geochemical soil properties). Four flood frequency (or disturbance frequency) categories are included in this study spanning the range from frequent through to infrequent flood disturbance. These are: a high-inundation-frequency flood zone

  15. Emission of intermediate mass fragments during fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; de Souza, R. T.; Cornell, E.; Davin, B.; Hamilton, T. M.; Hulbert, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lou, Y.; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.; Wile, J. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ternary fission in the reaction 4He + 232Th at Elab=200 MeV has been observed. Intermediate mass fragments (IMF: 3fission. The widths of the energy spectra are relatively constant for neck fragments with Z>=4, suggesting little variability in the scission configurations. A linear dependence of on Z is observed for the neck IMFs. The observed trend is compared with a Coulomb trajectory model.

  16. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    , and Judd Morrissey and drawing on the theoretical perspectives of N. Katherine Hayles (media studies) and Andreas Huyssen (cultural memory studies), Tanderup argues that recent intermedial novels reflect a certain nostalgia celebrating and remembering the book as a visual and material object in the age...... of digital media while also highlighting the influence of new media on our cultural understanding and representation of memory and the past....

  17. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of credit rating analysts, and shows that this "revolving door" strengthens analysts' incentives to issue accurate ratings. The second chapter analyzes the value of experience for mutual fund managers a...

  18. International express student's book : pre-intermediate

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Liz

    1996-01-01

    The New Edition of International Express Pre-Intermediate retains all the keys features of this popular and successel four-level course. It combines engaging, up-to-date topics with a time-efficient and student-centred approach to language work, and clearly focused activities that reflect learner's real communicative needs - the ideal course for professional adults who use English for work, travel, and socializing.

  19. Discovery of the intermediate W boson

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Press conference on 25 January 1983 when the announcement was made of the discovery of the intermediate W boson at CERN. From right to left: Carlo Rubbia, spokesman of the UA1 experiment; Simon van der Meer, responsible for developing the stochastic cooling technique; Herwig Schopper, Director- General of CERN; Erwin Gabathuler, Research Director at CERN, and Pierre Darriulat, spokesman of the UA2 experiment, whose results confirmed those from Carlo Rubbia's experiment.

  20. Reactive Programming of Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Boussinot, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    Implementation of cellular automata using reactive programming gives a way to code cell behaviors in an abstract and modular way. Multiprocessing also becomes possible. The paper describes the implementation of cellular automata with the reactive programming language LOFT, a thread-based extension of C. Self replicating loops considered in artificial life are coded to show the interest of the approach.

  1. Element Yields of Intermediate-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C

    2003-01-01

    Intermediate mass stars occupy the mass range between 0.8-8 solar masses. In this review, evolutionary models of these stars from numerous sources are compared in terms of their input physics and predicted yields. In particular, the results of Renzini & Voli, van den Hoek & Groenewegen, and Marigo are discussed. Generally speaking, it is shown that yields of He-4, C-12, and N-14 decrease with increasing metallicity, reduced mass loss rate, and increased rotation rate. Integrated yields and recently published chemical evolution model studies are used to assess the relative importance of intermediate mass and massive stars in terms of their contributions to universal element buildup. Intermediate mass stars appear to play a major role in the chemical evolution of N-14, a modest role in the case of C-12, and a small role for He-4. Furthermore, the time delay in their release of nuclear products appears to play an important part in explaining the apparent bimodality in the distribution of damped Lyman alp...

  2. Capturing a flavivirus pre-fusion intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Kaufmann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available During cell entry of flaviviruses, low endosomal pH triggers the rearrangement of the viral surface glycoproteins to a fusion-active state that allows the release of the infectious RNA into the cytoplasm. In this work, West Nile virus was complexed with Fab fragments of the neutralizing mAb E16 and was subsequently exposed to low pH, trapping the virions in a pre-fusion intermediate state. The structure of the complex was studied by cryo-electron microscopy and provides the first structural glimpse of a flavivirus fusion intermediate near physiological conditions. A radial expansion of the outer protein layer of the virion was observed compared to the structure at pH 8. The resulting approximately 60 A-wide shell of low density between lipid bilayer and outer protein layer is likely traversed by the stem region of the E glycoprotein. By using antibody fragments, we have captured a structural intermediate of a virus that likely occurs during cell entry. The trapping of structural transition states by antibody fragments will be applicable for other processes in the flavivirus life cycle and delineating other cellular events that involve conformational rearrangements.

  3. Biology teachers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematics, Science and Biology teachers code switch when they teach. ... (by constantly translating back and forth), and argue for a 'separation approach' ..... for the classroom, only 3 students did not give an answer to this open-ended.

  4. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  5. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Bruno C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Results Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Conclusion Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  6. Intermediate photofragment distributions as probes of non-adiabatic dynamics at conical intersections: application to the Hartley band of ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu

    2015-11-21

    Quantum dynamics at a reactive two-state conical intersection lying outside the Franck-Condon zone is studied for a prototypical reaction of ultraviolet photodissociation of ozone in the Hartley band. The focus is on the vibrational distributions in the two electronic states at intermediate interfragment distances near the intersection. Such intermediate distributions of strongly interacting photofragments contain unique information on the location and shape of the conical intersection. Multidimensional Landau-Zener modeling provides a framework to reverse engineer the molecular geometry-dependent Massey parameter of the intersection from the intermediate distributions. The conceptual approach is demonstrated for the intermediate O-O bond stretch distributions which become strongly inverted on adiabatic passage through the intersection. It is further demonstrated that intermediate distributions can be reconstructed from the photoemission spectrum of the dissociating molecule. The illustration, given using quantum mechanical calculations of resonance Raman profiles for ozone, completes a practicable cycle of conversion of intermediate distributions into topographic features of the conical intersection.

  7. Generalized Reactive Manufacturing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蓓智

    2001-01-01

    Generalized reactive manufacturing system named GRMS is introduced. GRMS is a human-centered system based on Multi-agent. Its management and control organization is made up of three types of agents named device agent,task agent and shop-floor agent. GRMS adopts a top down and bottom- up competition and cooperation strategy based on the dynamic sifter and funnel To constrain the behavior of agents, a reward and penaity policy is introduced into the system and the closed-loop adjustment of GRMS is realized through such policy.Agents for the same task should be cooperated with each other and agents for different tasks should compete for survival in the dynamic changing environment. A distributed-hierarchical architecture with three levels of master-slave relationships among agents are proposed.Self-propelled process planning is also discussed. In order to evaluate GRMS, a time-driven simulation system-GRMOSS is developed to check the physical consistency of GRMS.

  8. Using Protein-Confined Proximity To Determine Chemical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomonori; Hoppmann, Christian; Yang, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2016-11-16

    Chemical reactivity is essential for functional modification of biomolecules with small molecules and the development of covalent drugs. The reactivity between a chemical functional group of a small molecule and that of a large biomolecule cannot be reliably predicted from the reactivity of the corresponding functional groups separately installed on two small molecules, because the proximity effect on reactivity resulting from the binding of the small molecule to the biomolecule is challenging to achieve by mixing two small molecules. Here we present a new strategy to determine the chemical reactivity of two functional groups in the context of close proximity afforded by proteins. The functional groups to be tested were separately installed at the interface of two interacting proteins in the format of amino acid side chains via the expansion of the genetic code. Reaction of the two functional groups resulted in covalent cross-linking of interacting proteins, readily detectable by gel electrophoresis. Using this strategy, we evolved new synthetases to genetically encode N(ε)-fluoroacetyllysine (FAcK), an isosteric fluorine analogue of acetyllysine. We demonstrated that fluoroacetamide installed on FAcK, previously thought inert to biological functional groups, actually reacted with the thiol group of cysteine when in proximity. This strategy should be valuable for accurately evaluating chemical reactivity of small molecules toward large biomolecules, which will help avoid undesired side reactions of drugs and expand the repertoire of functional groups to covalently target biomolecules.

  9. Fault plane orientations of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Middle America Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Linda M.; Langstaff, Meredith A.; Silver, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes are often attributed to dehydration embrittlement reactivating preexisting weak zones. The orientation of presubduction faults is particularly well known offshore of Middle America, where seismic reflection profiles show outer rise faults dipping toward the trench and extending >20 km into the lithosphere. If water is transported along these faults and incorporated into hydrous minerals, the faults may be reactivated later when the minerals dehydrate. In this case, the fault plane orientations should be the same in the outer rise and at depth, after accounting for the angle of subduction. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the directivity of 54 large (MW ≥ 5.7) earthquakes between 35 and 220 km depth in the Middle America Trench. For 12 of these earthquakes, the directivity vector allows us to identify the fault plane of the focal mechanism. Between 35 and 85 km depth, we observe both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes. The subvertical fault planes are consistent with the reactivation of outer rise faults, whereas the subhorizontal fault planes suggest the formation of new faults. Deeper than 85 km, we only observe subhorizontal faults, indicating that the outer rise faults are no longer being reactivated. The similarity with previous results from the colder Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone suggests that the mechanism generating these earthquakes, and controlling fault plane orientations, depends on pressure rather than temperature or other tectonic parameters and that the observed rupture characteristics constitute a basic feature of intermediate-depth seismicity. Exclusively subhorizontal faults may result from isobaric rupture propagation or the hindrance of seismic slip on preexisting weak subvertical planes.

  10. Preparation of Reactive Oligo(p-Phenylene Vinylene) Materials for Spatial Profiling of the Chemical Reactivity of Intracellular Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chenyao; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Libing; Hu, Rong; Chen, Hui; Lv, Fengting; Dai, Zhihui; Wang, Shu

    2016-05-01

    An oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative (OPV-pfp) functionalized with pentafluorophenol active ester is designed and synthesized. The high reactivity of OPV-pfp with biological small molecules or macromolecules containing amino groups under physiological conditions leads to spectral changes of OPV-pfp; thus, spatial reactivity discrimination for different subcellular structures inside cells is realized by triggering and imaging the fluorescence signal change of the OPV-pfp. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reatividade animal Confinement reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsiara Estanislau Maffei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A reatividade é definida como a reação do animal quando contido num ambiente de contenção móvel. Ela é quantificada por meio do teste de reatividade animal em ambiente de contenção móvel - REATEST®. Este teste consiste num dispositivo eletrônico acoplado à balança e num software específico. O dispositivo capta a movimentação que o animal provoca na balança, durante 20 segundos e a envia para o software que a processa determinando a reatividade do animal numa escala contínua de pontos. Pontuações maiores são de animais mais reativos (mais agressivo. A reatividade foi criada com os objetivos de solucionar os problemas até então existentes na seleção para temperamento e de permitir estimação de parâmetros genéticos mais confiáveis. Ela é uma característica objetiva que tem grande variabilidade fenotípica e é de quantificação rápida, fácil e segura, além de poder ser quantificada em qualquer tipo de balança, o que permite maior aplicabilidade. Ela não interfere nas práticas de manejo das fazendas porque é quantificada no momento da pesagem dos animais. Sua herdabilidade na raça Nelore é de 0,39 ao ano e 0,23 ao sobreano e suas correlações genéticas com ganho de peso diário são de -0,28 do nascimento até desmama e de -0,49 do desmame até ano. Já suas correlações genéticas com desenvolvimento do perímetro escrotal do ano ao sobreano variam de -0,25 e -0,41.The confinement reactivity (CR has been used as a measure of temperament in Brazil and it is defined as the animal reaction when contained in the scale. It is quantified through the animal reactivity test - REATEST®. This test consists of an electronic device coupled to the scale and of specific software. The device captures the movement that the animal provokes in the scale, during 20 seconds and sends it for the software that processes this movement and determines the animal CR in a continuous scale of points. Higher punctuations belong to

  12. 19-electron intermediates in the Ligand Substitution of CpW(CO)3with a Lewis Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James F.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Frei,Heinz; Harris, Charles B.

    2005-12-14

    Odd electron species are important intermediates in organometallic chemistry, participating in a variety of catalytic and electron-transfer reactions which produce stable even-electron products. While electron deficient 17-electron (17e) radicals have been well characterized, the possible existence of short-lived 19-electron (19e) radicals has been a subject of continuing investigation. 19e radicals have been postulated as intermediates in the photochemical ligand substitution and disproportionation reactions of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond, yet the reactions of these intermediates on diffusion-limited time scales (ns-{micro}s) have never been directly observed. This study resolves the 19e dynamics in the ligand substitution of 17e radicals CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup {sm_bullet}} (Cp = C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) with the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3}, providing the first complete description 19e reactivity.

  13. Reactions of Criegee Intermediates with Non-Water Greenhouse Gases: Implications for Metal Free Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2017-09-07

    High-level theoretical calculations suggest that a Criegee intermediate preferably interacts with carbon dioxide compared to two other greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide and methane. The results also suggest that the interaction between Criegee intermediates and carbon dioxide involves a cycloaddition reaction, which results in the formation of a cyclic carbonate-type adduct with a barrier of 6.0-14.0 kcal/mol. These results are in contrast to a previous assumption that the reaction occurs barrierlessly. The subsequent decomposition of the cyclic adduct into formic acid and carbon dioxide follows both concerted and stepwise mechanisms. The latter mechanism has been overlooked previously. Under formic acid catalysis, the concerted decomposition of the cyclic carbonate may be favored under tropospheric conditions. Considering that there is a strong nexus between carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and global warming, the high reactivity of Criegee intermediates could be utilized for designing efficient carbon capture technologies.

  14. Redefining the concept of reactive astrocytes as cells that remain within their unique domains upon reaction to injury

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Reactive astrocytes in neurotrauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration are thought to undergo cellular hypertrophy, based on their morphological appearance revealed by immunohistochemical detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, or nestin, all of them forming intermediate filaments, a part of the cytoskeleton. Here, we used a recently established dye-filling method to reveal the full three-dimensional shape of astrocytes assessing the morphology of reactive astrocytes in two neurotra...

  15. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  16. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  17. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  18. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  19. Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

  20. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  1. Intermediate filaments: from cell architecture to nanomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Harald; Bär, Harald; Kreplak, Laurent; Strelkov, Sergei V; Aebi, Ueli

    2007-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a major structural element of animal cells. They build two distinct systems, one in the nucleus and one in the cytoplasm. In both cases, their major function is assumed to be that of a mechanical stress absorber and an integrating device for the entire cytoskeleton. In line with this, recent disease mutations in human IF proteins indicate that the nanomechanical properties of cell-type-specific IFs are central to the pathogenesis of diseases as diverse as muscular dystrophy and premature ageing. However, the analysis of these various diseases suggests that IFs also have an important role in cell-type-specific physiological functions.

  2. q-Gamow States for intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, A; Zamora, D J

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper [Nuc. Phys. A {\\bf 948}, (2016) 19] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit-Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized [Physica A {\\bf 388} (2009) 601] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously "detects" pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq.(3.30)

  3. The intermediate age open cluster NGC 2660

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrelli, S; Tosi, M P; Marconi, G

    1999-01-01

    We present CCD UBVI photometry of the intermediate old open cluster NGC2660, covering from the red giants region to about seven magnitudes below the main sequence turn-off. Using the synthetic Colour - Magnitude Diagram method, we estimate in a self-consistent way values for distance modulus ((m-M)0 ~= 12.2), reddening (E(B-V) ~= 0.40), metallicity ([Fe/H] about solar), and age (age ~ 1 Gyr). A 30% population of binary stars turns out to be probably present.

  4. Organophosphate poisoning: Diagnosis of intermediate syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojara L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate compound (OPC poisoning with suicidal intent is common in Indian ICUs. The effect of OPCs is to produce a persistent depolarization of the neuromuscular junction leading to muscle weakness. After initial recovery from cholinergic crisis, some patients have resurgence of respiratory muscle paralysis requiring continued ventilatory support. This is termed intermediate syndrome (IMS. This could be due to a change in the type of neuromuscular block to a non depolarisation block characterized by a fade on tetanic stimulation. However peripheral nerve stimulation using train-of-four ratio (TOF and/tetanus have failed to consistently show such a change. We elected to study whether electro physiological monitoring using repetitive nerve stimulation might show a decremental response during IMS. Material & Methods: This was a prospective blinded study done from April 2002 to March 2003 in our ICU. 45 consecutive patients of OPC poisoning admitted during this period were included in this study. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS using a train of ten at 3Hz 10Hz and 30Hz (slow , intermediate and fast speeds respectively at the median nerve was done on all patients on day 1, 4, 7 and every 4th day thereafter until discharge. Patients were ventilated until ready to wean as per our usual protocol. The results of the RNS study were not revealed to the intensivist. Results: 9 out of 45 patients required ventilation for more than 6 days and showed overt signs of intermediate syndrome - proximal muscle weakness, twitching and respiratory weakness. Only 2 patients out of the 9 had a decremental response on RNS at 3Hz indicating a post-junctional dysfunction at the motor end-plate, Both patients had consumed a very large quantity of OPC and were deeply comatose for >4 days and required ventilation for >12 days. All other patients with IMS showed no changes on RNS. The exact type of poison consumed varied with each individual patient. Conclusion: RNS

  5. Photofissility of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppman, A.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Likhachev, V.P. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-10-01

    We use the recently developed MCMC/MCEF (Multi Collisional Monte Carlo plus Monte Carlo for Evaporation-Fission calculations) model to calculate the photo fissility and the photofission cross section at intermediate energies for the {sup 243} Am and for {sup 209} Bi, and compare them to results obtained for other actinides and to available experimental data. As expected, the results for {sup 243} Am are close to those for {sup 237} Np. The fissility for pre actinide nuclei is nearly one order of magnitude lower than that for the actinides. Both fissility and photofission cross section for {sup 209} Bi are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  6. Observational constraints on dual intermediate inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2014-01-01

    We explore the observational implications of models of intermediate inflation driven by modified dispersion relations, specifically those representing the phenomenon of dimensional reduction in the ultraviolet limit. These models are distinct from the standard ones because they do not require violations of the strong energy condition, and this is reflected in their structure formation properties. We find that they can naturally accommodate deviations from exact scale-invariance. They also make clear predictions for the running of the spectral index and tensor modes, rendering the models straightforwardly falsifiable. We discuss the observational prospects for these models and the implications these may have for quantum gravity scenarios.

  7. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  8. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  9. Opening the Black Box of Intermediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowinska, Agnieszka

    ) and at the interfirm level (between partners and within alliances and associations).The tentative results show that both of these levels are important in defining the intermediating firms' business models and in answering their environmental threats and in building up competitive advantage. The paper ends with a short...... dynamics. This paper draws on qualitative data originating with interviews with industry representatives and can also be regarded as a preliminary approach to a broader project. The analysis distinguishes between relational capital at the intrafirm level (the network among the company's employees...

  10. GFAP and vimentin deficiency alters gene expression in astrocytes and microglia in wild-type mice and changes the transcriptional response of reactive glia in mouse model for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Kamphuis; L. Kooijman; M. Orre; O. Stassen; M. Pekny; E.M. Hol

    2015-01-01

    Reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filament (IF) proteins Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Vimentin (VIM) surround amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The functional consequences of this upregulation are unclear. To identify molecular pathways coupled

  11. Atmospheric fates of Criegee intermediates in the ozonolysis of isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran B; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alexander P; Bates, Kelvin H; Schwantes, Rebecca H; Coggon, Matthew M; Zhang, Li; Feiner, Philip; Milller, David O; Skog, Kate M; Rivera-Rios, Jean C; Dorris, Matthew; Olson, Kevin F; Koss, Abigail; Wild, Robert J; Brown, Steven S; Goldstein, Allen H; de Gouw, Joost A; Brune, William H; Keutsch, Frank N; Seinfeld, John H; Wennberg, Paul O

    2016-04-21

    We use a large laboratory, modeling, and field dataset to investigate the isoprene + O3 reaction, with the goal of better understanding the fates of the C1 and C4 Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. Although ozonolysis can produce several distinct Criegee intermediates, the C1 stabilized Criegee (CH2OO, 61 ± 9%) is the only one observed to react bimolecularly. We suggest that the C4 Criegees have a low stabilization fraction and propose pathways for their decomposition. Both prompt and non-prompt reactions are important in the production of OH (28% ± 5%) and formaldehyde (81% ± 16%). The yields of unimolecular products (OH, formaldehyde, methacrolein (42 ± 6%) and methyl vinyl ketone (18 ± 6%)) are fairly insensitive to water, i.e., changes in yields in response to water vapor (≤4% absolute) are within the error of the analysis. We propose a comprehensive reaction mechanism that can be incorporated into atmospheric models, which reproduces laboratory data over a wide range of relative humidities. The mechanism proposes that CH2OO + H2O (k(H2O)∼ 1 × 10(-15) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1)) yields 73% hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), 6% formaldehyde + H2O2, and 21% formic acid + H2O; and CH2OO + (H2O)2 (k(H2O)2∼ 1 × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1)) yields 40% HMHP, 6% formaldehyde + H2O2, and 54% formic acid + H2O. Competitive rate determinations (kSO2/k(H2O)n=1,2∼ 2.2 (±0.3) × 10(4)) and field observations suggest that water vapor is a sink for greater than 98% of CH2OO in a Southeastern US forest, even during pollution episodes ([SO2] ∼ 10 ppb). The importance of the CH2OO + (H2O)n reaction is demonstrated by high HMHP mixing ratios observed over the forest canopy. We find that CH2OO does not substantially affect the lifetime of SO2 or HCOOH in the Southeast US, e.g., CH2OO + SO2 reaction is a minor contribution (production by stabilized Criegees is likely unimportant in regions dominated by the reactivity of ozone with isoprene. In contrast

  12. Reciprocal causation models of cognitive vs volumetric cerebral intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia in a pan-European twin cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toulopoulou, T.; van Haren, N.; Zhang, X.; Sham, P. C.; Cherny, S. S.; Campbell, D. D.; Picchioni, M.; Murray, R.; Boomsma, D. I.; Pol, H. H.; Brouwer, R.; Schnack, H.; Fananas, L.; Sauer, H.; Nenadic, I.; Weisbrod, M.; Cannon, T. D.; Kahn, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    In aetiologically complex illnesses such as schizophrenia, there is no direct link between genotype and phenotype. Intermediate phenotypes could help clarify the underlying biology and assist in the hunt for genetic vulnerability variants. We have previously shown that cognition shares substantial g

  13. Reciprocal causation models of cognitive vs volumetric cerebral intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia in a pan-European twin cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toulopoulou, T.; van Haren, N.; Zhang, X.; Sham, P. C.; Cherny, S. S.; Campbell, D. D.; Picchioni, M.; Murray, R.; Boomsma, D. I.; Pol, H. H.; Brouwer, R.; Schnack, H.; Fananas, L.; Sauer, H.; Nenadic, I.; Weisbrod, M.; Cannon, T. D.; Kahn, R. S.

    In aetiologically complex illnesses such as schizophrenia, there is no direct link between genotype and phenotype. Intermediate phenotypes could help clarify the underlying biology and assist in the hunt for genetic vulnerability variants. We have previously shown that cognition shares substantial

  14. Hydrothermal Reactivity of Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Gould, I.

    2013-12-01

    The reactivity of aqueous amines depends on temperature, pH, and redox state [1], all of which are highly variable in hydrothermal systems. Temperature and pH affect the ratio of protonated to unprotonated amines (R-NH2 + H+ = R-NH3+), which act as nucleophiles and electrophiles, respectively. We hypothesize that this dual nature can explain the pH dependence of reaction rates, and predict that rates will approach a maximum at pH = pKa where the ratio of protonated and unprotonated amines approaches one and the two compounds are poised to react with one another. Higher temperatures in hydrothermal systems allow for more rapid reaction rates, readily reversible reactions, and unique carbon-nitrogen chemistry in which water acts as a reagent in addition to being the solvent. In this study, aqueous benzylamine was used as a model compound to explore the reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and equilibria of amines under hydrothermal conditions. Experiments were carried out in anoxic silica glass tubes at 250°C (Psat) using phosphate-buffered solutions to observe changes in reaction rates and product distributions as a function of pH. The rate of decomposition of benzylamine was much faster at pH 4 than at pH 9, consistent with the prediction that benzylamine acts as both nucleophile and an electrophile, and our estimate that the pKa of benzylamine is ~5 at 250°C and Psat. Accordingly, dibenzylamine is the primary product of the reaction of two benzylamine molecules, and this reaction is readily reversible under hydrothermal conditions. Extremely acidic or basic pH can be used to suppress dibenzylamine production, which also suppresses the formation of all other major products, including toluene, benzyl alcohol, dibenzylimine, and tribenzylamine. This suggests that dibenzylamine is the lone primary product that then itself reacts as a precursor to produce the above compounds. Analog experiments performed with ring-substituted benzylamine derivatives and chiral

  15. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate and rest stops. 37.201 Section 37.201... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.201 Intermediate and rest stops. (a) Whenever an OTRB makes an intermediate or rest stop, a passenger with a disability, including an individual using a...

  16. Intermediate product selection and blending in the food processing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur A.; Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a capacitated intermediate product selection and blending problem typical for two-stage production systems in the food processing industry. The problem involves the selection of a set of intermediates and end-product recipes characterising how those selected intermediates...

  17. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  18. Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hernández

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins This paper studies a simple model of financial intermediation in order to understand how the lending-borrowing spread or interest margin charged by financial intermediaries is determined in equilibrium in a monetary economy. The main conclusion of the paper concerns the effect on the spread of changes in the distribution of monetary innovations. Thus, changes in the monetary-policy-rule followed by the Central Bank which alter the volatility of inflation will have important effects on the interest margin and also on the amount of credit available to investors. A crosssection empirical analysis strongly supports our hypothesis:

  19. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F. (Argonne National Lab. (USA)); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.).

  20. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, R M; Herleth, W H

    1990-01-01

    Several reactors in the United States are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, "ideal" beams of 1, 35, and 1000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive A1, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube.

  1. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  2. Scaffolded biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  3. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  4. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  5. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  6. The dose-dependence biological effect of laser fluence on rabbit fibroblasts derived from urethral scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongchong; Wu, Yuanyi; Xiao, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Two-micrometer laser vaporization resection has been used in clinic for years, but some patients received the treatment are still faced with excessive and abnormal wound repair which leads to the recurrent of urethral stricture eventually. Fibroblasts play a key role in the processes of "narrow-expansion/operation-restenosis" recurring problems. Here, we investigated the effect of laser fluence biomodulation on urethral scar fibroblasts as well as the underlying mechanism. Urethral scar fibroblasts were isolated and cultured, and laser irradiation (2 μm) was applied at different laser fluence or doses (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, 8, 32 J/cm(2)) with a single exposure in 1 day. The effect of 2-μm laser irradiation on cell proliferation, viability, and expression of scar formation related genes were investigated. Two-micrometer laser irradiation with intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) promoted scar fibroblasts proliferation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, while higher doses of 32 J/cm(2) are suppressive as it decreased the survival rate, viability, and proliferation of fibroblasts. In addition, qRT-PCR and Western blotting results both proven that collagen type I, collagen IV, MMP9, and CTGF display significant increase, yet the TGF-β1 expression was severely reduced at intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) group when compared with the others groups. Our findings suggest the scar formation-related genes are sensitive to intermediate laser irradiation dose, the most in scar fibroblasts. We revealed the bioeffect and molecular mechanism of 2-μm laser irradiation on rabbit urethral scar fibroblasts. Our study provides new insights into the mechanisms which involved in the excessive and abnormal wound repair of 2-μm laser vaporization resection. These results could potentially contribute to further study on biological effects and application of 2-μm laser irradiation in urethral stricture therapy.

  7. A Novel Intermediate in the Reaction of Seleno CYP119 with m-Chloroperbenzoic Acid†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Santhosh; Ouellet, Hugues; Du, Jing; McLean, Kirsty J.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Dawson, John H.; Munro, Andrew W.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 mediated monooxygenation generally proceeds via a reactive ferryl intermediate coupled to a ligand radical [Fe(IV)=O]+. referred to as Compound I (Cpd I). The proximal cysteine thiolate ligand is a critical determinant of the spectral and catalytic properties of P450 enzymes. To explore the effect of increased electron donation by the proximal ligand in the P450 catalytic cycle, we recently reported successful incorporation of SeCys into the active site of CYP119, a thermophilic cytochrome P450. Here we report relevant physical properties of SeCYP119 and a detailed analysis of the reaction of SeCYP119 with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. Our results indicate that the selenolate anion reduces rather than stabilizes Cpd I and also protects the heme from oxidative destruction, leading to the generation of a new stable species with an absorbance maximum at 406 nm. This stable intermediate can be returned to the normal ferric state by reducing agents and thiols, in agreement with oxidative modification of the selenolate ligand itself. Thus, in the seleno protein, the oxidative damage shifts from the heme to the proximal ligand, presumably because (a) increased electron donation more efficiently quenches reactive species such as Cpd I, and (b) the protection of the thiolate ligand provided by the protein active site structure is insufficient to shield the more oxidizable selenolate ligand. PMID:21381758

  8. A novel intermediate in the reaction of seleno CYP119 with m-chloroperbenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Santhosh; Ouellet, Hugues; Du, Jing; McLean, Kirsty J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Dawson, John H; Munro, Andrew W; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2011-04-12

    Cytochrome P450-mediated monooxygenation generally proceeds via a reactive ferryl intermediate coupled to a ligand radical [Fe(IV)═O]+• termed Compound I (Cpd I). The proximal cysteine thiolate ligand is a critical determinant of the spectral and catalytic properties of P450 enzymes. To explore the effect of an increased level of donation of electrons by the proximal ligand in the P450 catalytic cycle, we recently reported successful incorporation of SeCys into the active site of CYP119, a thermophilic cytochrome P450. Here we report relevant physical properties of SeCYP119 and a detailed analysis of the reaction of SeCYP119 with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. Our results indicate that the selenolate anion reduces rather than stabilizes Cpd I and also protects the heme from oxidative destruction, leading to the generation of a new stable species with an absorbance maximum at 406 nm. This stable intermediate can be returned to the normal ferric state by reducing agents and thiols, in agreement with oxidative modification of the selenolate ligand itself. Thus, in the seleno protein, the oxidative damage shifts from the heme to the proximal ligand, presumably because (a) an increased level of donation of electrons more efficiently quenches reactive species such as Cpd I and (b) the protection of the thiolate ligand provided by the protein active site structure is insufficient to shield the more oxidizable selenolate ligand.

  9. Global tropospheric hydroxyl distribution, budget and reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelieveld, Jos; Gromov, Sergey; Pozzer, Andrea; Taraborrelli, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The self-cleaning or oxidation capacity of the atmosphere is principally controlled by hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the troposphere. Hydroxyl has primary (P) and secondary (S) sources, the former mainly through the photodissociation of ozone, the latter through OH recycling in radical reaction chains. We used the recent Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM) to advance volatile organic carbon (VOC) chemistry in the general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) and show that S is larger than previously assumed. By including emissions of a large number of primary VOC, and accounting for their complete breakdown and intermediate products, MOM is mass-conserving and calculates substantially higher OH reactivity from VOC oxidation compared to predecessor models. Whereas previously P and S were found to be of similar magnitude, the present work indicates that S may be twice as large, mostly due to OH recycling in the free troposphere. Further, we find that nighttime OH formation may be significant in the polluted subtropical boundary layer in summer. With a mean OH recycling probability of about 67 %, global OH is buffered and not sensitive to perturbations by natural or anthropogenic emission changes. Complementary primary and secondary OH formation mechanisms in pristine and polluted environments in the continental and marine troposphere, connected through long-range transport of O3, can maintain stable global OH levels.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species in Vascular Formation and Development

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are derived from the metabolism of oxygen and are traditionally viewed as toxic byproducts that cause damage to biomolecules. It is now becoming widely acknowledged that ROS are key modulators in a variety of biological processes and pathological states. ROS mediate key signaling transduction pathways by reversible oxidation of certain signaling components and are involved in the signaling of growth factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, Notch, and Wnt and its dow...

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lun Zhang; Jiahui Li; Liang Zong; Xin Chen; Ke Chen; Zhengdong Jiang; Ligang Nan; Xuqi Li; Wei Li; Tao Shan; Qingyong Ma; Zhenhua Ma

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concent...

  12. Biological Chemistry of Hydrogen Selenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp-Sutton, Kellye A; Ashby, Michael T

    2016-11-22

    There are no two main-group elements that exhibit more similar physical and chemical properties than sulfur and selenium. Nonetheless, Nature has deemed both essential for life and has found a way to exploit the subtle unique properties of selenium to include it in biochemistry despite its congener sulfur being 10,000 times more abundant. Selenium is more easily oxidized and it is kinetically more labile, so all selenium compounds could be considered to be "Reactive Selenium Compounds" relative to their sulfur analogues. What is furthermore remarkable is that one of the most reactive forms of selenium, hydrogen selenide (HSe(-) at physiologic pH), is proposed to be the starting point for the biosynthesis of selenium-containing molecules. This review contrasts the chemical properties of sulfur and selenium and critically assesses the role of hydrogen selenide in biological chemistry.

  13. Biological Chemistry of Hydrogen Selenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellye A. Cupp-Sutton

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There are no two main-group elements that exhibit more similar physical and chemical properties than sulfur and selenium. Nonetheless, Nature has deemed both essential for life and has found a way to exploit the subtle unique properties of selenium to include it in biochemistry despite its congener sulfur being 10,000 times more abundant. Selenium is more easily oxidized and it is kinetically more labile, so all selenium compounds could be considered to be “Reactive Selenium Compounds” relative to their sulfur analogues. What is furthermore remarkable is that one of the most reactive forms of selenium, hydrogen selenide (HSe− at physiologic pH, is proposed to be the starting point for the biosynthesis of selenium-containing molecules. This review contrasts the chemical properties of sulfur and selenium and critically assesses the role of hydrogen selenide in biological chemistry.

  14. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  15. Key Intermediates of Carbon Dioxide Reduction on Silver from Vibrational Nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The design of efficacious, selective heterogeneous catalysts relies on the knowledge of the nature of active sites and reactive intermediates involved in the catalytic transformation. This is also true in the case of carbon dioxide reduction, an important scientific and technological problem. With the goal of furthering mechanistic understanding of a complex transformation that yields multiple products, we are employing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to image carbon dioxide photoreduction on individual Ag nanoparticles within a heterogeneous dispersion. The lack of ensemble-averaging is allowing us to detect fleeting intermediates in the adsorption and catalytic photoreduction processes. In particular, we have detected on some sites physisorbed CO_{2} and at others chemisorbed CO_{2}^{-} anion radical, a critical intermediate in carbon dioxide reduction. The primary product formed also appears to vary from one catalytic nanoparticle to another: CO, formaldehyde, or formic acid. The origin of such heterogeneities in adsorption and photoreduction behavior are being traced to differences in nanoparticle structure or surface composition, from which structure/activity relationships will be established, with aid from electronic structure theory. This single-nanoparticle approach is providing molecular-level insights into a broad range of industrially and environmentally relevant catalytic transformations.

  16. Characterization of intermediate products of solar photocatalytic degradation of ranitidine at pilot-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radjenović, Jelena; Sirtori, Carla; Petrović, Mira; Barceló, Damià; Malato, Sixto

    2010-04-01

    In the present study the mechanisms of solar photodegradation of H(2)-receptor antagonist ranitidine (RNTD) were studied in a well-defined system of a pilot plant scale Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC) reactor. Two types of heterogeneous photocatalytic experiments were performed: catalysed by titanium-dioxide (TiO(2)) semiconductor and by Fenton reagent (Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)), each one with distilled water and synthetic wastewater effluent matrix. Complete disappearance of the parent compounds and discreet mineralization were attained in all experiments. Furthermore, kinetic parameters, main intermediate products, release of heteroatoms and formation of carboxylic acids are discussed. The main intermediate products of photocatalytic degradation of RNTD have been structurally elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)) experiments performed at quadrupole-time of flight (QqToF) mass analyzer coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (UPLC). RNTD displayed high reactivity towards OH radicals, although a product of conduction band electrons reduction was also present in the experiment with TiO(2). In the absence of standards, quantification of intermediates was not possible and only qualitative profiles of their evolution could be determined. The proposed TiO(2) and photo-Fenton degradation routes of RNTD are reported for the first time.

  17. Unimolecular Decay of the Dimethyl-Substituted Criegee Intermediate in Alkene Ozonolysis: Decay Time Scales and the Importance of Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Greg T; Kurtén, Theo; Donahue, Neil M; Lester, Marsha I

    2017-08-17

    We used the steady-state master equation to model unimolecular decay of the Criegee intermediate formed from ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (tetramethylethylene, TME). Our results show the relative importance and time scales for both the prompt and thermal unimolecular decay of the dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, (CH3)2COO. Calculated reactive fluxes show the importance of quantum mechanical tunneling for both prompt and thermal decay to OH radical products. We constrained the initial energy distribution of chemically activated (CH3)2COO formed in TME ozonolysis by combining microcanonical rates k(E) measured experimentally under collision-free conditions and modeled using semiclassical transition-state theory (SCTST) with pressure-dependent yields of stabilized Criegee intermediates measured with scavengers in flow-tube experiments. Thermal decay rates under atmospheric conditions k(298 K, 1 atm) increase by more than 1 order of magnitude when tunneling is included. Accounting for tunneling has important consequences for interpreting pressure dependent yields of stabilized Criegee intermediates, particularly with regard to the fraction of Criegee intermediates formed in the zero-pressure limit.

  18. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; Ten Brink, Uri; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  19. Intermediate thinnings as a source of energywood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammallahti, K.; Laespae, O.; Nurmi, J. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Kannus (Finland)), e-mail: kati.sammallahti@metla.fi, e-mail: otto.laspa@metla.fi, e-mail: juha.nurmi@metla.fi

    2010-07-01

    During 2008 and 2009 10 hectares of spruce stand was harvested with an energy wood method and 3,8 hectares with a conventional method. Average DBH was 21 cm, length 19 m and the number of stems per hectare was 674. The harvester productivity was in this study 10 % higher with the conventional method (36,2 m3 / ha) than with the energy wood method (32,6 m3 / ha). The second part of the study consisted baling with a Timberjack 1490D residue baler on an intermediate thinning. In 2008 residues were baled from a total area of 8,7 hectares. Total yield was 218 bales and yield per hectare was 26 bales. Yield per hour was 19,7 bales and the average time consumption per bale was 3,18 minutes. (orig.)

  20. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  1. Simulations of Oligomeric Intermediates in Prion Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Kulkarni, R V; Slepoy, A; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.; Slepoy, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    We extend our previous stochastic cellular automata based model for areal aggregation of prion proteins on neuronal surfaces. The new anisotropic model allow us to simulate both strong beta-sheet and weaker attachment bonds between proteins. Constraining binding directions allows us to generate aggregate structures with the hexagonal lattice symmetry found in recently observed in vitro experiments. We argue that these constraints on rules may correspond to underlying steric constraints on the aggregation process. We find that monomer dominated growth of the areal aggregate is too slow to account for some observed doubling time-to-incubation time ratios inferred from data, and so consider aggregation dominated by relatively stable but non-infectious oligomeric intermediates. We compare a kinetic theory analysis of oligomeric aggregation to spatially explicit simulations of the process. We find that with suitable rules for misfolding of oligomers, possibly due to water exclusion by the surrounding aggregate, th...

  2. [The intermediate syndrome during organophosphorus pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benslama, A; Moutaouakkil, S; Charra, B; Menebhi, L

    2004-04-01

    Acute intoxication by organophosphate pesticides is frequent in Morocco. We report two cases of malathion poisoning complicated by intermediate syndrome. The purpose of this work is to describe distinctive features of this syndrome, it arises 48-96 h after the cholinergic crisis and it is characterized by respiratory paresis with difficulties of weaning from the assisted respiratory, deficit of proximal limbs, neck flexors, and cranial nerves. This syndrome coincides with the prolonged inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase, and is not due to the necrosis of muscular fiber's necrosis. Both clinical and electromyographic features are explained by a combined pre- and postsynaptic dysfunction of the neuromuscular transmission. The difficulty of this syndrome lies in its rarity and also its severity, because of the respiratory failure, which justifies medical supervision in intensive care unit, for at least 96 h, in expectation for the respiratory distress, all the more cholinergic syndrome is intense.

  3. Intermediate state trapping of a voltage sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Maragliano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) regulate ion channels and enzymes by undergoing conformational changes depending on membrane electrical signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying the VSD transitions are not fully understood. Here, we show that some mutations of I241 in the S1 segment of the Shaker...... Kv channel positively shift the voltage dependence of the VSD movement and alter the functional coupling between VSD and pore domains. Among the I241 mutants, I241W immobilized the VSD movement during activation and deactivation, approximately halfway between the resting and active states......, and drastically shifted the voltage activation of the ionic conductance. This phenotype, which is consistent with a stabilization of an intermediate VSD conformation by the I241W mutation, was diminished by the charge-conserving R2K mutation but not by the charge-neutralizing R2Q mutation. Interestingly, most...

  4. Intermediate Care Unit - defining substituyable admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Hanne; Ekmann, Anette Addy

    Background: Elderly patients have excess risk of functional decline and development of delirium. Studies have shown that 14-27 % of hospitalizations among elderly patients are substitutable. To lower the risk of unwanted consequences of hospitalizations, we implemented an Intermediate Care Unit...... (TUE). TUE was established in collaboration between Bispebjerg Hospital and the City of Copenhagen and took in patients whose hospitalization was regarded as substitutable. TUE offered a quick diagnostic assessment by a cross sectoral team of hospital doctors and community nurses. Home care was offered...... Care Unit.' Methods: From September 17, 2012 - June 24, 2014, 969 patients were treated at TUE. We registered both demographic-, treatment- and medical data and furthermore functional related variables. We used logistic regression to test the association between a combined graded variable of EWS...

  5. Picornavirus uncoating intermediate captured in atomic detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Yao; Li, Xuemei; Porta, Claudine; Walter, Thomas S.; Gilbert, Robert J.; Zhao, Yuguang; Axford, Danny; Williams, Mark; McAuley, Katherine; Rowlands, David J.; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Junzhi; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    It remains largely mysterious how the genomes of non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses are transferred across a membrane into the host cell. Picornaviruses are simple models for such viruses, and initiate this uncoating process through particle expansion, which reveals channels through which internal capsid proteins and the viral genome presumably exit the particle, although this has not been clearly seen until now. Here we present the atomic structure of an uncoating intermediate for the major human picornavirus pathogen CAV16, which reveals VP1 partly extruded from the capsid, poised to embed in the host membrane. Together with previous low-resolution results, we are able to propose a detailed hypothesis for the ordered egress of the internal proteins, using two distinct sets of channels through the capsid, and suggest a structural link to the condensed RNA within the particle, which may be involved in triggering RNA release. PMID:23728514

  6. q-Gamow states for intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastino, A. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Rocca, M.C., E-mail: mariocarlosrocca@gmail.com [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ferri, G.L. [Fac. de C. Exactas, National University La Pampa, Peru y Uruguay, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina); Zamora, D.J. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    In a recent paper Plastino and Rocca (2016) [18] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit–Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized Vignat and Plastino (2009) [2] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously “detects” pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq. (3.4).

  7. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  8. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  9. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek P. Adhikari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 1011.5 cm−3, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  10. [Intermediate care units and noninvasive ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heinrich F; Schönhofer, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate care units (IMC) have been introduced to provide optimal patient management according to disease severity and to bridge the gap between intensive care (ICU) and general wards. Most patients that are referred to an IMC need monitoring and intensive analgetic treatment. Over the past years noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and weaning have emerged as important new forms of active treatment in the IMC. Most studies that have been published so far demonstrate that an IMC improves patient outcome and lowers costs, although randomized controlled trials are missing. NIV reduces mortality, the need for intubation as well as ICU and hospital length of stay in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other disorders that cause respiratory failure. In many cases NIV can be performed in the IMC, a fact that reduces the number of ICU admissions, lowers costs and improves patient care. The high prevalence of pulmonary diseases and NIV emphasizes the importance of pneumologists as directors of both ICU and IMC.

  11. Precalibrating an intermediate complexity climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Neil R. [The Open University, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); Cameron, David [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Rougier, Jonathan [University of Bristol, Department of Mathematics, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Credible climate predictions require a rational quantification of uncertainty, but full Bayesian calibration requires detailed estimates of prior probability distributions and covariances, which are difficult to obtain in practice. We describe a simplified procedure, termed precalibration, which provides an approximate quantification of uncertainty in climate prediction, and requires only that uncontroversially implausible values of certain inputs and outputs are identified. The method is applied to intermediate-complexity model simulations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and confirms the existence of a cliff-edge catastrophe in freshwater-forcing input space. When uncertainty in 14 further parameters is taken into account, an implausible, AMOC-off, region remains as a robust feature of the model dynamics, but its location is found to depend strongly on values of the other parameters. (orig.)

  12. A traditional intermediate moisture meat: Beef cecina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cano, R; Dorantes-Alvarez, L; Hernandez-Sanchez, H; Gutierrez-Lopez, G F

    1994-01-01

    Cecina is an intermediate moisture meat produced and consumed to a large extent in Mexico. Four samples of cecina coming from different States of this country, were tested for water activity, colour, texture, fat, protein, moisture and chloride content. Sensory and microbiological analyses were also performed. Different fabrication methods for producing cecina were identified, involving large variations in the formulation of the product. There was a significant difference (P < 0·05) among samples regarding fat and chloride content, colour and texture. Differences in colour and saltiness were recorded through sensory analysis. Microbiological analysis showed higher counts than those recommended in the Mexican Official Standard for chopped and raw meat, due to poor sanitary conditions during production and marketing.

  13. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  14. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  15. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  16. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2011-08-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial microfabricated and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of microfabricated and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  17. Reactive Inkjet Printing: Reactive Inkjet Printing of Biocompatible Enzyme Powered Silk Micro-Rockets (Small 30/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, David A; Zhang, Yu; Smith, Patrick J; Zhao, Xiubo; Ebbens, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    On page 4048, X. Zhao, S. J. Ebbens, and co-workers demonstrate the ability to fabricate biocompatible silk microrockets via reactive inkjet printing. The microrockets are powered by catalase and undergo bubble propulsion in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Microrockets are capable of swimming in a large variety of media including biological solutions. Inkjet printing allows digital definition of enzyme distribution within the silk scaffold to control rocket directionality.

  18. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  19. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  20. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of