WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological nitrogen transformation

  1. Enhancing biological nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danso, S.K.A.; Eskew, D.L. (Joint FAO/IAEA Div. of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Vienna (Austria))

    1984-06-01

    Several co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) conducted by the Soil Fertility, Irrigation and Crop Production Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division have concentrated on finding the most efficient way of applying nitrogen fertilizers to various crops, using nitrogen-15 (/sup 15/N) as a tracer. The findings of these studies have been adopted in many countries around the world, resulting in savings of nitrogen fertilizers worth many millions of dollars every year. More recently, the Section's CRPs have focused on enhancing the natural process of biological di-nitrogen fixation. The /sup 15/N isotope technique has proven to be very valuable in studies of the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, allowing many more experiments than before to be done and yielding much new practical information. The Soils Section is now working to extend the use of the technique to other nitrogen-fixing symbioses.

  2. Transformation of fertilizer nitrogen in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soechting, H.

    1980-01-01

    Pot experiments are described in which the transformations between nitrogen added as fertilizer urea, plant-assimilated nitrogen, and different chemical fractions of soil or added straw nitrogen were studied with 15 N as a tracer. The data indicated that: (a) The transformation of added fertilizer nitrogen to immobilized amide nitrogen is decreased with added decomposable organic carbon. The transformation to immobilized α-amino N is increased, on the other hand, by the addition of decomposable organic carbon. (b) The freshly immobilized amide nitrogen is more readily remineralized than the α-amino form. The immobilization of added nitrogen continues in the presence of growing plants. (c) Mineralization of nitrogen added as 15 N-labelled straw is also increased with increasing fertilizer-nitrogen additions. (author)

  3. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, N. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Schramm, A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a µm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about n...

  4. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Schramm, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a µm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about n...... performing dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium have given new dimensions to the understanding of nitrogen cycling in nature, and the occurrence of these organisms and processes in stratified microbial communities will be described in detail.......Abstract  New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a µm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about...... nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium, and about the microorganisms performing the processes, has been produced by use of these techniques. During the last decade the discovery of anammmox bacteria and migrating, nitrate accumulating bacteria...

  5. Nitrogenous air pollutants: Chemical and biological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, D.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the health effects and chemistry of gaseous and particulate nitrogenous air pollutants are presented. Specific topics include Fourier transform infrared studies of nitrogenous compounds, the mechanism of peroxynitric acid formation, N-nitroso compounds in the air, the chemical transformations of nitrogen oxides during the sampling of combustion products, the atmospheric chemistry of peroxy nitrates, and the effects of nitrogen dioxide on lung metabolism. Attention is also given to the interaction of nitrogen oxides and aromatic hydrocarbons under simulated atmospheric conditions, the characterization of particulate amines, the role of ammonia in atmospheric aerosol chemistry, the relationship between sulfates and nitrates and tropospheric measurements of nitric acid vapor and particulate nitrates

  6. Synthetic biology approaches to engineering the nitrogen symbiosis in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christian; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is abundant in the earth's atmosphere but, unlike carbon, cannot be directly assimilated by plants. The limitation this places on plant productivity has been circumvented in contemporary agriculture through the production and application of chemical fertilizers. The chemical reduction of nitrogen for this purpose consumes large amounts of energy and the reactive nitrogen released into the environment as a result of fertilizer application leads to greenhouse gas emissions, as well as widespread eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. The environmental impacts are intensified by injudicious use of fertilizers in many parts of the world. Simultaneously, limitations in the production and supply of chemical fertilizers in other regions are leading to low agricultural productivity and malnutrition. Nitrogen can be directly fixed from the atmosphere by some bacteria and Archaea, which possess the enzyme nitrogenase. Some plant species, most notably legumes, have evolved close symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Engineering cereal crops with the capability to fix their own nitrogen could one day address the problems created by the over- and under-use of nitrogen fertilizers in agriculture. This could be achieved either by expression of a functional nitrogenase enzyme in the cells of the cereal crop or through transferring the capability to form a symbiotic association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. While potentially transformative, these biotechnological approaches are challenging; however, with recent advances in synthetic biology they are viable long-term goals. This review discusses the possibility of these biotechnological solutions to the nitrogen problem, focusing on engineering the nitrogen symbiosis in cereals.

  7. Biological Nitrogen Fixation on Legume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armiadi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is one of the major limiting factors for crop growth and is required in adequate amount, due to its function as protein and enzyme components. In general, plants need sufficient nitrogen supply at all levels of growth, especially at the beginning of growth phase. Therefore, the availability of less expensive N resources would reduce the production cost. The increasing use of chemical fertilizer would probably disturb soil microorganisms, reduce the physical and chemical characteristics of soil because not all of N based fertilizer applied can be absorbed by the plants. Approximately only 50% can be used by crops, while the rest will be altered by microorganism into unavailable N for crops or else dissappear in the form of gas. Leguminous crops have the capacity to immobilize N2 and convert into the available N if innoculated with Rhizobium. The amount of N2 fixed varies depending on legume species and their environment.

  8. 15N in biological nitrogen fixation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.

    1986-05-01

    A bibliography with 298 references on the use of the stable nitrogen isotope 15 N in the research on the biological fixation of dinitrogen is presented. The literature pertaining to this bibliography covers the period from 1975 to the middle of 1985. (author)

  9. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... emitted to the air. To identify the key regulators of these transformations we have combined data from studies of microbiology and performance in 10 experimental and full scale filters of varying design, loading, and management. Inhibition by nitrite controlled ammonium oxidation and pH, while biological...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency....

  10. Nitrogen Transformation and Microbial Spatial Distribution in Drinking Water Biofilter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yongxing; Zhang, Huining; Jin, Huizheng; Wu, Chengxia

    2018-02-01

    Well understanding the rule of nitrogen mutual transformation in biofilters is important for controlling the DBPs formation in the subsequent disinfection process. Ammonia nitrogen removal effect and nitrogen transformation approach in biofilter of drinking water was researched in the study. The biofilter removed ammonia of 48.5% and total phosphorus of 72.3%. And the removal rate of TN, NO3 --N, DON were 37.1%, 33.1%, 46.9%, respectively. Biomass and bioactivity of different depth of the biofilter were determined, too. The overall distribution of biomass showed a decreasing trend from top to bottom. The bioactivity in lower layer gradually increased. Especially the bioactivity of heterotrophic microorganisms showed a gradual increase trend. The amount of the nitrogen loss was 3.06mg/L. Non-nitrification pathway of “nitrogen loss” phenomenon in biofilter might exist assimilation, nitrification and denitrification in autotrophic.

  11. Modelling Nitrogen Transformation in Horizontal Subsurface Flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical model was developed to permit dynamic simulation of nitrogen interaction in a pilot horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland receiving effluents from primary facultative pond. The system was planted with Phragmites mauritianus, which was provided with root zone depth of 75 cm. The root zone was ...

  12. Nitrogen supply of crops by biological nitrogen fixation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.S.; Andersen, A.J.; Soerensen, H.; Thomsen, J.D.

    1985-02-01

    In the present work the contributions from combined N-sources and symbiotic nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen supply of field-grown peas and field beans were evaluated by means of 15 N fertilizer dilution. The effect of N-fertilizer, supplied at sowing and at different stages of plant development, on nitrogen fixation, yield and protein production in peas, was studied in pot experiments. (author)

  13. [Assimilation of biological nitrogen by European beaver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecherskiĭ, M V; Naumova, E I; Kostina, N V; Umarov, M M

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenase activity, the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria, the structure and functional characteristics of the complex of microorganisms, and the content of nitrogen and carbon were determined in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract of the European beaver. A high nitrogen-fixing activity in the large intestine correlated with an increase in nitrogen content in the chyme upon its transfer over the gastrointestinal tract. It is assumed that microbial nitrogen fixation plays a major role in nitrogen nutrition of the European beaver.

  14. Nitrogen transformations in wetlands: Effects of water flow patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidsson, T.

    1997-11-01

    In this thesis, I have studied nitrogen turnover processes in water meadows. A water meadow is a wetland where water infiltrates through the soil of a grassland field. It is hypothesized that infiltration of water through the soil matrix promotes nutrient transformations compared to surface flow of water, by increasing the contact between water, nutrients, soil organic matter and bacteria. I have studied how the balance between nitrogen removal (denitrification, assimilative uptake, adsorption) and release (mineralization, desorption) processes are affected by water flow characteristics. Mass balance studies and direct denitrification measurements at two field sites showed that, although denitrification was high, net nitrogen removal in the water meadows was poor. This was due to release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the soils. In laboratory studies, using {sup 15}N isotope techniques, I have shown that nitrogen turnover is considerably affected by hydrological conditions and by soil type. Infiltration increased virtually all the nitrogen processes, due to deeper penetration of nitrate and oxygen, and extended zones of turnover processes. On the contrary, soils and sediments with surface water flow, diffusion is the main transfer mechanism. The relation between release and removal processes sometimes resulted in shifts towards net nitrogen production. This occurred in infiltration treatments when ammonium efflux was high in relation to denitrification. It was concluded that ammonium and DON was of soil origin and hence not a product of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Both denitrification potential and mineralization rates were higher in peaty than in sandy soil. Vertical or horizontal subsurface flow is substantial in many wetland types, such as riparian zones, tidal salt marshes, fens, root-zone systems and water meadows. Moreover, any environment where aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems meet, and where water level fluctuates

  15. Aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes in N2-fixing cyanobacterial aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawonn, Isabell; Bonaglia, Stefano; Brüchert, Volker; Ploug, Helle

    2015-06-01

    Colonies of N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are key players in supplying new nitrogen to the ocean, but the biological fate of this fixed nitrogen remains poorly constrained. Here, we report on aerobic and anaerobic microbial nitrogen transformation processes that co-occur within millimetre-sized cyanobacterial aggregates (Nodularia spumigena) collected in aerated surface waters in the Baltic Sea. Microelectrode profiles showed steep oxygen gradients inside the aggregates and the potential for nitrous oxide production in the aggregates' anoxic centres. (15)N-isotope labelling experiments and nutrient analyses revealed that N(2) fixation, ammonification, nitrification, nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and possibly anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) can co-occur within these consortia. Thus, N. spumigena aggregates are potential sites of nitrogen gain, recycling and loss. Rates of nitrate reduction to ammonium and N(2) were limited by low internal nitrification rates and low concentrations of nitrate in the ambient water. Presumably, patterns of N-transformation processes similar to those observed in this study arise also in other phytoplankton colonies, marine snow and fecal pellets. Anoxic microniches, as a pre-condition for anaerobic nitrogen transformations, may occur within large aggregates (⩾1 mm) even when suspended in fully oxygenated waters, whereas anoxia in small aggregates (1.5 μM), O(2)-depleted water layers, for example, in the chemocline of the Baltic Sea or the oceanic mesopelagic zone, aggregates may promote N-recycling and -loss processes.

  16. Transformation of nitrogen and distribution of nitrogen-related bacteria in a polluted urban stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y; Jin, W B; Zhao, Q L; Zhang, G D; Yan, Y; Wan, J

    2009-01-01

    Most researchers focused on either nitrogen species or microbial community for polluted urban stream while ignoring the interaction between them and its effect on nitrogen transformation, which restricted the rational selection of an effective and feasible remediation technology. Taking Buji stream in Shenzhen (China) as target stream, the distribution of nitrogen-related bacteria was investigated by most probable number (MPN) besides analysis of nitrogen species etc. The nitrogen-related bacteria in sediment were 10(2) times richer than those in water. Owing to their faster growth, the MPN of ammonifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria were 10(5) and 10(2) times higher than those of nitrifying bacteria, respectively. The ammonifying bacteria numbers were significantly related to BOD5 in water, while nitrifying bacteria in sediment correlated well with nitrate in water. Thus, nitrification occurred mainly in sediment surface and was limited by low proportion of nitrifying bacteria. The denitrifying bacteria in sediment had good relationship with BOD5 and nitrite and nitrate in water. Low DO and rich organic compounds were beneficial to denitrification but unfavourable to nitrification. Denitrification was restricted by low nitrite and nitrate concentration. These results could be served as a reference for implementing the remediation scheme of nitrogen polluted urban stream.

  17. Use of 15N methodology to assess biological nitrogen fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardarson, G.

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics of legumes are their ability in symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for growth. For proper management and a full realization of the benefits of this plant-microbial association, it is necessary to estimate how much nitrogen is fixed under different conditions in the field. It is only after this is known that various factors can be manipulated so as to increase the amount and proportion of N a plant derives from biological fixation. A suitable method for accurately measuring the amount of N crops derive from fixation is therefore an important requirement in any programme aimed at maximizing biological nitrogen fixation. There are several methods available to measure N 2 fixation (Bergersen, 1980) based on (1) increment in N yield and plant growth, (2) nitrogen balance (3) acetylene reduction and (4) the use of isotopes of N. Only isotopic methods will be illustrated here. 20 refs, 2 figs, 9 tabs

  18. Transformation of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Silva, Eliane O; Furtado, Niege A J C

    2014-02-01

    The saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds include many drugs and compounds that may be used as synthons for the synthesis of other pharmacologically active substances. The need for new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles for organic synthesis, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry, including optically active derivatives, has increased interest in microbial synthesis. This review provides an overview of microbial technologies that can be valuable to produce new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles, including hydroxylated derivatives. The chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of microbial processes can be indispensable for the synthesis of new compounds. Microbial processes carried out with fungi, including Beauveria bassiana, Cunninghamella verticillata, Penicillium simplicissimum, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Rhodococcus erythropolis, biotransform many substrates efficiently. Among the biological activities of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds are antimicrobial, antitumor, antihypertensive and anti-HIV activities; some derivatives are effective for the treatment and prevention of malaria and trypanosomiasis, and others are potent glycosidase inhibitors.

  19. Biological effect of nitrogen ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Shu Shizhen

    1997-10-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ions with various doses. The biological effect in M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam energy and dose added, but there was on significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The results indicated the seedling height reduced with the increasing of dose for ion beam. The biological effect of nitrogen ion beam on M 1 stevia was lower than that of γ-rays. (6 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  20. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal by filamentous bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The availability of excess nutrients (phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)) in wastewater systems causes many water quality problems. These problems include eutrophication whereby algae grow excessively and lead to depletion of oxygen, death of the aquatic life and bad odours. Biological phosphorus removal has gained ...

  1. Modeling of nitrogen transformation in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfiana; Widowati; Putro, S. P.; Udjiani, T.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic model of nitrogen transformation in IMTA (Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture) is purposed. IMTA is a polyculture with several biotas maintained in it to optimize waste recycling as a food source. The purpose of this paper is to predict nitrogen decrease and nitrogen transformation in IMTA consisting of ammonia (NH3), Nitrite (NO2) and Nitrate (NO3). Nitrogen transformation of several processes, nitrification, assimilation, and volatilization. Numerical simulations are performed by providing initial parameters and values based on a review of previous research. The numerical results show that the rate of change in nitrogen concentration in IMTA decrease and reaches stable at different times.

  2. Patterns and controls on nitrogen cycling of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Nichole N.; Zaady, Eli; Weber, Bettina; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Biocrusts play a significant role in the nitrogen [N ] cycle within arid and semi-arid ecosystems, as they contribute major N inputs via biological fixation and dust capture, harbor internal N transformation processes, and direct N losses via N dissolved, gaseous and erosional loss processes (Fig. 1). Because soil N availability in arid and semi-arid ecosystems is generally low and may limit net primary production (NPP), especially during periods when adequate water is available, understanding the mechanisms and controls of N input and loss pathways in biocrusts is critically important to our broader understanding of N cycling in dryland environments. In particular, N cycling by biocrusts likely regulates short-term soil N availability to support vascular plant growth, as well as long-term N accumulation and maintenance of soil fertility. In this chapter, we review the influence of biocrust nutrient input, internal cycling, and loss pathways across a range of biomes. We examine linkages between N fixation capabilities of biocrust organisms and spatio-temporal patterns of soil N availability that may influence the longer-term productivity of dryland ecosystems. Lastly, biocrust influence on N loss pathways such as N gas loss, leakage of N compounds from biocrusts, and transfer in wind and water erosion are important to understand the maintenance of dryland soil fertility over longer time scales. Although great strides have been made in understanding the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling, there are important knowledge gaps in our understanding of the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling that should be the focus of future studies. Because work on the interaction of N cycling and biocrusts was reviewed in Belnap and Lange (2003), this chapter will focus primarily on research findings that have emerged over the last 15 years (2000-2015).

  3. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-05-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume-rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops.

  4. New insights into the evolutionary history of biological nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBoyd

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent reduction of dinitrogen (N2 to ammonia (NH3, accounts for roughly half of the bioavailable nitrogen supporting extant life. The fundamental requirement for fixed forms of nitrogen for life on Earth, both at present and in the past, has led to broad and significant interest in the origin and evolution of this fundamental biological process. One key question is whether the limited availability of fixed nitrogen was a factor in life’s origin or whether there were ample sources of fixed nitrogen produced by abiotic processes or delivered through the weathering of bolide impact materials to support this early life. If the latter, the key questions become what were the characteristics of the environment that precipitated the evolution of this oxygen sensitive process, when did this occur, and how was its subsequent evolutionary history impacted by the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis and the rise of oxygen in the Earth’s biosphere. Since the availability of fixed sources of nitrogen capable of supporting early life is difficult to glean from the geologic record, there are limited means to get direct insights into these questions. Indirect insights, however, can be gained by deep phylogenetic studies of nitrogenase structural gene products and additional gene products involved in the biosynthesis of the complex metal-containing prosthetic groups associated with this enzyme complex. Insights gained from such studies, as reviewed herein, challenge traditional models for the evolution of biological nitrogen fixation and provide the basis for the development of new conceptual models that explain the stepwise evolution of this highly complex and life sustaining process.

  5. Organic Nitrogen in Atmospheric Drops and Particles: Concentrations, (Limited) Speciation, and Chemical Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2003-12-01

    While quite a bit is known of the concentrations, speciation, and chemistry of inorganic forms of nitrogen in the atmosphere, the same cannot be said for organic forms. Despite this, there is growing evidence that organic N (ON) is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, especially in atmospheric condensed phases such as fog/cloud drops and aerosol particles. Although the major compounds that make up organic N are generally unknown, as are the sources of these compounds, it is clear that there are significant fluxes of ON between the atmosphere and ecosystems. It also appears that organic N can have significant effects in both spheres. The goal of our recent work in this area has been to better describe the atmospheric component of the biogeochemistry of organic nitrogen. Based on particle, gas, and fogwater samples from Northern California we have made three major findings: 1) Organic N represents a significant component, approximately 20%, of the total atmospheric N loading in these samples. This is broadly consistent with studies from other locations. 2) Amino compounds, primarily as combined amino acids, account for approximately 20% of the measured ON in our condensed phase samples. Given the properties of amino acids, these compounds could significantly affect the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particles. 3) Organic nitrogen in atmospheric particles and drops is transformed to inorganic forms - primarily ammonium, nitrate, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) - during exposure to sunlight and/or ozone. These chemical reactions likely increase the bioavailability of the condensed phase nitrogen pool and enhance its biological effects after deposition to ecosystems.

  6. Sources and transformations of anthropogenic nitrogen along an urban river–estuarine continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Pennino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization has altered the fate and transport of anthropogenic nitrogen (N in rivers and estuaries globally. This study evaluates the capacity of an urbanizing river–estuarine continuum to transform N inputs from the world's largest advanced (e.g., phosphorus and biological N removal wastewater treatment facility. Effluent samples and surface water were collected monthly along the Potomac River estuary from Washington D.C. to the Chesapeake Bay over a distance of 150 km. In conjunction with box model mass balances, nitrate stable isotopes and mixing models were used to trace the fate of urban wastewater nitrate. Nitrate concentrations and δ15N-NO3− values were higher down-estuary from the Blue Plains wastewater outfall in Washington D.C. (2.25 ± 0.62 mg L−1 and 25.7 ± 2.9 ‰, respectively compared to upper-estuary concentrations (1.0 ± 0.2 mg L−1 and 9.3 ± 1.4 ‰, respectively. Nitrate concentration then decreased rapidly within 30 km down-estuary (to 0.8 ± 0.2 mg L−1, corresponding to an increase in organic nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon, suggesting biotic uptake and organic transformation. TN loads declined down-estuary (from an annual average of 48 000 ± 5000 kg day−1 at the sewage treatment plant outfall to 23 000 ± 13 000 kg day−1 at the estuary mouth, with the greatest percentage decrease during summer and fall. Annually, there was a 70 ± 31 % loss in wastewater NO3− along the estuary, and 28 ± 6 % of urban wastewater TN inputs were exported to the Chesapeake Bay, with the greatest contribution of wastewater TN loads during the spring. Our results suggest that biological transformations along the urban river–estuary continuum can significantly transform wastewater N inputs from major cities globally, and more work is necessary to evaluate the potential of organic nitrogen and carbon to contribute to eutrophication and hypoxia.

  7. Impacts of insect biological control on soil N transformations in Tamarix-invaded ecosystems in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the impacts of insect biological control of Tamarix spp. on soil nitrogen (N) transformations is important because changes to N supply could alter plant community succession. We investigated short-term and longer-term impacts of herbivory by the northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda cari...

  8. Primary energy-transformations in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehninger, A.L.

    1980-10-01

    In this paper I shall review the main outlines of current research on the molecular aspects of the primary energy-coupling mechanisms in cells, those carried out by energy-transducing membranes. They include the capture of solar energy by the chloroplast membranes of green plants, used to generate carbohydrates and molecular oxygen from carbon dioxide and water, and the counterpart of photosynthesis, the process of respiration in heterotrophic organisms, in which reduced organic products generated by photosynthesis are oxidized at the expense of dioxygen to form carbon dioxide and water. Although the cycling of dioxygen, carbon dioxide, and organic matter between the plant and animal worlds is well known, it is not generally appreciated that the magnitude of biological energy flux in these cycles is huge compared to the total energy flux in man-made devices. A major consequence is that the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been increasing at a significant rate, at a time when there is also a decrease, at least in some parts of the world, in the counterbalancing utilization of CO/sub 2/ by green plants, due to deforestation. The greenhouse effect of increased atmospheric CO/sub 2/ may not only change the earth's climate, but also may influence the rate of photosynthesis. It is also not generally appreciated that energy flow in the biosphere leads to production of enormous amounts of organic matter potentially useful in furnishing man's energy requirements.

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation is not a major contributor to the nitrogen demand of a commercially growth South African sugarcane cultivar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefsloot, G.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Watt, D.A.; Cramer, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    It has previously been reported that endophytic diazotrophic bacteria contribute significantly to the nitrogen budgets of some graminaceous species. In this study the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation to the N-budget of a South African sugarcane cultivar was evaluated using 15N natural

  10. Nitrogen transport, transformation, and retention in the Three Gorges Reservoir : A mass balance approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ran, Xiangbin; Bouwman, Lex; Yu, Zhigang; Beusen, Arthur; Chen, Hongtao; Yao, Qingzhen

    2017-01-01

    Dam construction in river systems affects the biogeochemistry of nitrogen (N), yet most studies on N cycling in reservoirs do not consider the transformations and retention of the different N species. This study addresses the N inputs, transport, transformations, and retention in the Three Gorges

  11. Experience of application of the general-purpose pressure and pressure drop transformers on nitrogen tetroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishchuk, M.Kh.

    1979-01-01

    An experience of application of the general-purpose pressure and pressure drop transformers at the Nuclear Power Engineering Institute of the BSSR Academy of Sciences for measurements on nitrogen tetroxide has been described. The concrete recommendations on the types of transformers and the volume of preparational work before putting them into operation have been given

  12. Biochemical studies on certain biologically active nitrogenous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel kader, S.M.; El Sayed, M.M.; El Malt, E.A.; Shaker, E.S.; Abdel Aziz, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    Certain biologically active nitrogenous compounds such as alkaloids are widely distributed in many wild and medicinal plants such as peganum harmala L. (Phycophyllaceae). However, less literature cited on the natural compounds was extracted from the aerial parts of this plant; therefore this study was conducted on harmal leaves using several solvents. Data indicated that methanol extract was the inhibitoriest effect against some pathogenic bacteria, particularly Streptococcus pyogenus. Chromatographic separation illustrated that presence of four compounds; the most active one was the third compound (3). Elementary analysis (C, H, N) revealed that the primary chemical structure of the active antibacterial compound (C3) was: C17 H21 N3 O7 S with molecular weight 411. Spectroscopic analysis proved that coninical structure was = 1- thioformyl, 8?- D glucoperanoside- Bis- 2, 3 dihydroisopyridino pyrrol. This new compound is represented as a noval ?- carboline alkaloid compound

  13. Biological nitrogen removal from sewage via anammox: Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Wang, Shanyun; Cao, Shenbin; Miao, Yuanyuan; Jia, Fangxu; Du, Rui; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen removal from sewage via anammox is a promising and feasible technology to make sewage treatment energy-neutral or energy-positive. Good retention of anammox bacteria is the premise of achieving sewage treatment via anammox. Therefore the anammox metabolism and its factors were critically reviewed so as to form biofilm/granules for retaining anammox bacteria. A stable supply of nitrite for anammox bacteria is a real bottleneck for applying anammox in sewage treatment. Nitritation and partial-denitrification are two promising methods of offering nitrite. As such, the strategies for achieving nitritation in sewage treatment were summarized by reviewing the factors affecting nitrite oxidation bacteria growth. Meanwhile, the methods of achieving partial-denitrification have been developed through understanding the microorganisms related with nitrite accumulation and their factors. Furthermore, two cases of applying anammox in the mainstream sewage treatment plants were documented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitrogen Transformation and Removal in Horizontal Surface Flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential use of Constructed Mangrove Wetlands (CMWs) as a cheaper, effective and appropriate method for Nitrogen removal from domestic sewage of coastal zone in peri-urban cities was investigated from August 2007 to. September, 2008. Field investigations were made on horizontal surface flow constructed ...

  15. Transformation of nitrogenous fertilizers of surface and deep application in calcareous soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Dongfeng

    1990-01-01

    The transformations of 15 N labelled fertilizer N in calcareous soil were studied under greennhouse conditions. The experimental results indicate that the ratio of fixed ammonium is closely related to the methods of fertilizer application to the soil. When fertilizer N applied as deep dressing the fixation of nitrogen by clay minerals and microorganisms may markedly reduce the losses of nitrogen, but the amount of nitrogen fixed by the clay minerals and that by microorganisms showed negative correlation (r = -0.9185 ** ). The more the amount of fixed nitrogen by clay minerals, the less by microorganisms. No obvious interrelation between the residual utilization of urea, ammonium bicarbonate, ammonium sulfate and the ammount of nitrogen fixed by organisms can be observed, but the residual utilization of these fertilizers by the succeeding crop has been related to the total amount of mineral nitrogen

  16. Characterizing the transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of organic wastes and digestates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Yang, E-mail: yang.zeng@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Guardia, Amaury de; Daumoin, Mylene; Benoist, Jean-Claude [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia emissions varied depending on the nature of wastes and the treatment conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen losses resulted from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification can be estimated from biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification was the main process contributing to N losses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrification rate was negatively correlated to stripping rate of ammonia nitrogen. - Abstract: The transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of seven wastes were studied in ventilated air-tight 10-L reactors at 35 Degree-Sign C. Studied wastes included distinct types of organic wastes and their digestates. Ammonia emissions varied depending on the kind of waste and treatment conditions. These emissions accounted for 2-43% of the initial nitrogen. Total nitrogen losses, which resulted mainly from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification, accounted for 1-76% of the initial nitrogen. Ammonification was the main process responsible for nitrogen losses. An equation which allows estimating the ammonification flow of each type of waste according to its biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio was proposed. As a consequence of the lower contribution of storage and leachate rates, stripping and nitrification rates of ammonia nitrogen were negatively correlated. This observation suggests the possibility of promotingnitrification in order to reduce ammonia emissions.

  17. The transformation of nitrogen during pressurized entrained-flow pyrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliutina, Kristina; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2018-08-01

    The transformation of nitrogen in microalgae during entrained-flow pyrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris was systematically investigated at the temperatures of 600-900 °C and pressures of 0.1-4.0 MPa. It was found that pressure had a profound impact on the transformation of nitrogen during pyrolysis. The nitrogen retention in bio-char and its content in bio-oil reached a maximum value at 1.0 MPa. The highest conversion of nitrogen (50.25 wt%) into bio-oil was achieved at 1.0 MPa and 800 °C, which was about 7 wt% higher than that at atmospheric pressure. Higher pressures promoted the formation of pyrrolic-N (N-5) and quaternary-N (N-Q) compounds in bio-oil at the expense of nitrile-N and pyridinic-N (N-6) compounds. The X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results on bio-chars clearly evidenced the transformation of N-5 structures into N-6 and N-Q structures at elevated pressures. The nitrogen transformation pathways during pyrolysis of microalgae were proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial transformations of nitrogen, sulfur and iron dictate vegetation composition in wetlands: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon P.M. Lamers

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of studies on rhizospheric interactions between microbial communities and vegetation focus on pathogens, mycorrhizal symbiosis, and/or carbon transformations. Although the biogeochemical transformations of nitrogen (N, sulfur (S and iron (Fe have profound effects on plants, these effects have received far less attention. Firstly, all three elements are plant nutrients, and microbial activity significantly changes their mobility and availability. Secondly, microbial oxidation with oxygen supplied by radial oxygen loss (ROL from roots in wetlands causes acidification, while reduction using alternative electron acceptors leads to generation of alkalinity, affecting pH in the rhizosphere and hence plant composition. Thirdly, reduced species of all three elements may become phytotoxic. In addition, Fe cycling is tightly linked to that of S and phosphorus (P. As water level fluctuations are very common in wetlands, rapid changes in the availability of oxygen and alternative terminal electron acceptors will result in strong changes in the prevalent microbial redox reactions, with significant effects on plant growth. Depending on geological and hydrological settings, these interacting microbial transformations change the conditions and resource availability for plants, which are strong drivers of vegetation development and composition by changing relative competitive strengths. Conversely, microbial composition is strongly driven by vegetation composition. Therefore, the combination of micro- and macroecological knowledge is essential to understand the biogeochemical and biological key factors driving heterogeneity and total (i.e., micro-macro community composition at different spatial and temporal scales. As N and S inputs have drastically increased due to anthropogenic forcing and Fe inputs have decreased at a global scale, this combined approach has become even more urgent.

  19. Influence of natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Li, Kun; Chen, Meixue; Tong, Juan; Qi, Lu; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-01-01

    Sludge composting is one of the most widely used treatments for sewage sludge resource utilization. Natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor (NI) are widely used during composting and land application for nitrogen conservation, respectively. Three composting reactors (A--the control, B--natural zeolite addition, and C--3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) addition) were established to investigate the influence of NI and natural zeolite addition on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting conducted at the lab scale. The results showed that, in comparison with the control, natural zeolite addition accelerated organics degradation and the maturity of sludge compost was higher, while the DMPP addition slowed down the degradation of organic matters. Meanwhile, the nitrogen transformation functional genes including those responses for nitrification (amoA and nxrA) and denitrification (narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ) were quantified through quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the effects of natural zeolites and DMPP addition on nitrogen transformation. Although no significant difference in the abundance of nitrogen transformation functional genes was observed between treatments, addition of both natural zeolite and DMPP increases the final total nitrogen content by 48.6% and 23.1%, respectively. The ability of natural zeolite for nitrogen conservation was due to the absorption of NH3 by compost, and nitrogen conservation by DMPP was achieved by the source reduction of denitrification. Besides, it was assumed that the addition of natural zeolite and DMPP may affect the activity of these genes instead of the abundance.

  20. The Human Genome Project: big science transforms biology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Leroy; Rowen, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has transformed biology through its integrated big science approach to deciphering a reference human genome sequence along with the complete sequences of key model organisms. The project exemplifies the power, necessity and success of large, integrated, cross-disciplinary efforts - so-called ‘big science’ - directed towards complex major objectives. In this article, we discuss the ways in which this ambitious endeavor led to the development of novel technologies and a...

  1. Effects of nitrogen fertilization in cotton crop on Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Ricardo; Degrande, Paulo E.; Fernandes, Marcos G.; Nogueira, Rodrigo F.

    2007-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glove, is one of the pests of cotton crop and its relation with the host seem to depend on the amount of nitrogen available to the plant. The biology of A. gossypii using different cotton nitrogen fertility regimes was studied under greenhouse conditions, in Dourados, MS. A completely randomized design with nine replications in a factorial scheme (2x4x2)+1 was used. Two nitrogen sources (sulphate of ammonium and urea), four doses of nitrogen (50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1), two different times of nitrogen application and one additional treatment without nitrogen were taken as factors. The nymphal phases, the pre-reproductive, reproductive and pos-reproductive periods, longevity, the life cycle and fecundity of the cotton aphid were evaluated. The doses of nitrogen influenced the cotton aphid biology in both sources and times of application, favoring its development and fecundity. (author)

  2. Effects of floodgates operation on nitrogen transformation in a lake based on structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longji; Zhou, Haixuan; Xie, Xinyu; Li, Xueke; Zhang, Duoying; Jia, Liming; Wei, Qingbin; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Ma, Yingying

    2018-08-01

    Floodgates operation is one of the primary means of flood control in lake development. However, knowledge on the linkages between floodgates operation and nitrogen transformation during the flood season is limited. In this study, water samples from six sampling sites along Lake Xingkai watershed were collected before and after floodgates operation. The causal relationships between environmental factors, bacterioplankton community composition and nitrogen fractions were determined during flood season. We found that concentrations of nitrogen fractions decreased significantly when the floodgates were opened, while the concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and NO 3 - increased when the floodgates had been shut for a period. Further, we proposed a possible mechanism that the influence of floodgates operation on nitrogen transformation was largely mediated through changes in dissolved organic matter, dissolved oxygen and bacterioplankton community composition as revealed by structural equation modeling (SEM). We conclude that floodgates operation has a high risk for future eutrophication of downstream watershed, although it can reduce nitrogen content temporarily. Therefore, the environmental impacts of floodgates operation should be carefully evaluated before the floodwaters were discharged into downstream watershed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Nitrogen Transformations in Broiler Litter-Amended Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokoasse Kpomblekou-A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen mineralization rates in ten surface soils amended with (200 μg N g−1 soil or without broiler litter were investigated. The soil-broiler litter mixture was incubated at 25±1∘C for 28 weeks. A nonlinear regression approach for N mineralization was used to estimate the readily mineralizable organic N pools (N0 and the first-order rate constant (k. The cumulative N mineralized in the nonamended soils did not exceed 80 mg N kg−1 soil. However, in Decatur soil amended with broiler litter 2, it exceeded 320 mg N kg−1 soil. The greatest calculated N0 of the native soils was observed in Sucarnoochee soil alone (123 mg NO3− kg−1 soil which when amended with broiler litter 1 reached 596 mg N kg−1 soil. The added broiler litter mineralized initially at a fast rate (k1 followed by a slow rate (k2 of the most resistant fraction. Half-life of organic N remaining in the soils alone varied from 33 to 75 weeks and from 43 to 15 weeks in the amended soils. When N0 was regressed against soil organic N (=0.782∗∗ and C (=0.884∗∗∗, positive linear relationships were obtained. The N0 pools increased with sand but decreased with silt and clay contents.

  4. Effect of irrigation disruption and biological nitrogen on growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, the maximum (4.29 %) harvest index was obtained from irrigation disruption at third and second harvest with 9 L/ha of nitroxin application. In conclusion, lower amounts of nitrogen was needed to produced the optimal yield of seed in water deficit situation compared with non stress condition, while the nitrogen ...

  5. Effect of phosphate additive on the nitrogen transformation during pig manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; He, Shengzhou; Liang, Ying; Li, Guoxue; Li, Song; Chen, Shili; Nadeem, Faisal; Hu, Jingwei

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies revealed that phosphate, as an additive to composting, could significantly reduce NH 3 emission and nitrogen loss through change of pH and nitrogen fixation to form ammonium phosphate. However, few studies have explored the influence of pH change and phosphate additive on NO x - -N, NH 4 + -N, NH 3 , and N 2 O, which are dominate forms of nitrogen in composting. In this study, the equimolar H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , and K 2 HPO 4 were added into pig manure composting to evaluate the effect of H + and PO 4 3- on nitrogen transformation. As a result, we reached the conclusion that pH displays significant influence on adsorption from PO 4 3- to NH 4 + . The NH 4 + -N concentration in H 3 PO 4 treatment kept over 3 g kg -1 DM (dry matter) which is obviously higher than that in H 2 SO 4 treatment, and NH 4 + -N concentration in K 2 HPO 4 treatment (pH>8.5) is lower than 0.5 g kg -1 DM because adsorption capacity of PO 4 3- is greatly weakened and NH 4 + -N rapidly transformed to NH 3 -N influenced by high pH value. The N 2 O emission of composting is significantly correlated with incomplete denitrification of NO x - -N, and PO 4 3- addition could raise NO x - -N contents to restrict denitrification and further to promote N 2 O emission. The study reveals the influence mechanism of phosphate additive to nitrogen transformation during composting, presents theoretical basis for additive selection in nitrogen fixation, and lays foundation for study about nitrogen circulation mechanism during composting.

  6. Nitrogen removal in maturation waste stabilisation ponds via biological uptake and sedimentation of dead biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D; Newton, R J

    2010-01-01

    In this work a set of experiments was undertaken in a pilot-scale WSP system to determine the importance of organic nitrogen sedimentation on ammonium and total nitrogen removals in maturation ponds and its seasonal variation under British weather conditions, from September 2004 to May 2007. The nitrogen content in collected sediment samples varied from 4.17% to 6.78% (dry weight) and calculated nitrogen sedimentation rates ranged from 273 to 2868 g N/ha d. High ammonium removals were observed together with high concentrations of chlorophyll-a in the pond effluent. Moreover, chlorophyll-a had a very good correlation with the corresponding increment of VSS (algal biomass) and suspended organic nitrogen (biological nitrogen uptake) in the maturation pond effluents. Therefore, when ammonium removal reached its maximum, total nitrogen removal was very poor as most of the ammonia taken up by algae was washed out in the pond effluent in the form of suspended solids. After sedimentation of the dead algal biomass, it was clear that algal-cell nitrogen was recycled from the sludge layer into the pond water column. Recycled nitrogen can either be taken up by algae or washed out in the pond effluent. Biological (mainly algal) uptake of inorganic nitrogen species and further sedimentation of dead biomass (together with its subsequent mineralization) is one of the major mechanisms controlling in-pond nitrogen recycling in maturation WSP, particularly when environmental and operational conditions are favourable for algal growth.

  7. Influence of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions of intensive aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Sharma, Keshab; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing segments of the food economy in modern times. It is also being considered as an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, limited studies have been conducted on GHG emissions from aquaculture system. In this study, daily addition of fish feed and soluble starch at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 16:1 (w/w) was used to examine the effects of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and GHG emissions in a zero-water exchange intensive aquaculture system. The addition of soluble starch stimulated heterotrophic bacterial growth and denitrification, which led to lower total ammonia nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate concentrations in aqueous phase. About 76.2% of the nitrogen output was emitted in the form of gaseous nitrogen (i.e., N2 and N2O) in the treatment tank (i.e., aquaculture tank with soluble starch addition), while gaseous nitrogen accounted for 33.3% of the nitrogen output in the control tank (i.e., aquaculture tank without soluble starch addition). Although soluble starch addition reduced daily N2O emissions by 83.4%, it resulted in an increase of daily carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 91.1%. Overall, starch addition did not contribute to controlling the GHG emissions from the aquaculture system. © 2013.

  8. Towards an optimal experimental design for N2O model calibration during biological nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Valverde Pérez, Borja; Plósz, Benedek G.

    Process models describing nitrous oxide (N2O) production during biological nitrogen removal allow for the development of mitigation strategies of this potent greenhouse gas. N2O is an intermediate of nitrogen removal, hence its prediction is negatively affected by the uncertainty associated to it...... of strategies to minimize the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants....

  9. Improving food and agricultural production. Thailand. Biological nitrogen fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the mission was to assist the counterpart scientists in the analysis and interpretation of data relating to nitrogen fixation studies on grain legumes. The report briefly summarizes the discussions that were held with the counterparts

  10. In Situ Denitrification and Biological Nitrogen Fixation Under Enhanced Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen Deposition in UK Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sami; Saiz Val, Ernesto; Sgouridis, Fotis; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats

    2017-04-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) losses due to denitrification and biological N2 fixation (BNF) are the most uncertain components of the nitrogen (N) cycle in peatlands under enhanced atmospheric reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition. This uncertainty hampers our ability to assess the contribution of denitrification to the removal of biologically fixed and/or atmospherically deposited Nr in peatlands. This uncertainty emanates from the difficulty in measuring in situ soil N2 and N2O production and consumption in peatlands. In situ denitrification and its contribution to total N2O flux was measured monthly between April 2013 and October 2014 in peatlands in two UK catchments. An adapted 15N-Gas Flux method1 with low level addition of 15N tracer (0.03 ± 0.005 kg 15N ha-1) was used to measure denitrification and its contribution to net N2O production (DN2O/TN2O). BNF was measured in situ through incubation of selected sphagnum species under 15N2 gas tracer. Denitrification2 varied temporally and averaged 8 kg N-N2 ha-1 y-1. The contribution of denitrification was about 48% to total N2O flux3 of 0.05 kg N ha-1 y-1. Soil moisture, temperature, ecosystem respiration, pH and mineral N content mainly regulated the flux of N2 and N2O. Preliminary results showed suppression of BNF, which was 1.8 to 7 times lower in peatland mosses exposed to ˜15 to 20 kg N ha-1 y-1 Nr deposition in the UK than in peatland mosses in northern Sweden with background Nr deposition. Overall, the contribution of denitrification to Nr removal in the selected peatlands was ˜50% of the annual Nr deposition rates, making these ecosystems vulnerable to chronic N saturation. These results point to a need for a more comprehensive annual BNF measurement to more accurately account for total Nr input into peatlands and its atmospheric loss due to denitrification. References Sgouridis F, Stott A & Ullah S, 2016. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to

  11. Microbial nitrogen transformation potential in surface run-off leachate from a tropical landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangimbulude, Jubhar C.; Straalen, Nico M. van; Röling, Wilfred F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microbial nitrogen transformations can alleviate toxic ammonium discharge. ► Aerobic ammonium oxidation was rate-limiting in Indonesian landfill leachate. ►Organic nitrogen ammonification was most dominant. ► Anaerobic nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation potential were also high. ► A two-stage aerobic-anaerobic nitrogen removal system needs to be implemented. - Abstract: Ammonium is one of the major toxic compounds and a critical long-term pollutant in landfill leachate. Leachate from the Jatibarang landfill in Semarang, Indonesia, contains ammonium in concentrations ranging from 376 to 929 mg N L −1 . The objective of this study was to determine seasonal variation in the potential for organic nitrogen ammonification, aerobic nitrification, anaerobic nitrate reduction and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) at this landfilling site. Seasonal samples from leachate collection treatment ponds were used as an inoculum to feed synthetic media to determine potential rates of nitrogen transformations. Aerobic ammonium oxidation potential ( −1 h −1 ) was more than a hundred times lower than the anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes and organic nitrogen ammonification, which were of the same order of magnitude. Anaerobic nitrate oxidation did not proceed beyond nitrite; isolates grown with nitrate as electron acceptor did not degrade nitrite further. Effects of season were only observed for aerobic nitrification and anammox, and were relatively minor: rates were up to three times higher in the dry season. To completely remove the excess ammonium from the leachate, we propose a two-stage treatment system to be implemented. Aeration in the first leachate pond would strongly contribute to aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrate by providing the currently missing oxygen in the anaerobic leachate and allowing for the growth of ammonium oxidisers. In the second pond the remaining ammonium and produced nitrate can be converted by a

  12. NitroScape: A model to integrate nitrogen transfers and transformations in rural landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duretz, S. [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1091 Environnement et Grandes Cultures (EGC), 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Drouet, J.L., E-mail: Jean-Louis.Drouet@grignon.inra.fr [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1091 Environnement et Grandes Cultures (EGC), 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Durand, P. [INRA-AgroCampus, UMR 1069 Sol Agro et hydrosysteme Spatialisation (SAS), 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Hutchings, N.J. [Department of Agroecology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus (AU), Blichers Alle, 8830 Tjele (Denmark); Theobald, M.R. [Department of Chemistry and Agricultural Analysis, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Salmon-Monviola, J. [INRA-AgroCampus, UMR 1069 Sol Agro et hydrosysteme Spatialisation (SAS), 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Dragosits, U. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Maury, O. [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1091 Environnement et Grandes Cultures (EGC), 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Sutton, M.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Cellier, P. [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1091 Environnement et Grandes Cultures (EGC), 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    2011-11-15

    Modelling nitrogen transfer and transformation at the landscape scale is relevant to estimate the mobility of the reactive forms of nitrogen (N{sub r}) and the associated threats to the environment. Here we describe the development of a spatially and temporally explicit model to integrate N{sub r} transfer and transformation at the landscape scale. The model couples four existing models, to simulate atmospheric, farm, agro-ecosystem and hydrological N{sub r} fluxes and transformations within a landscape. Simulations were carried out on a theoretical landscape consisting of pig-crop farms interspersed with unmanaged ecosystems. Simulation results illustrated the effect of spatial interactions between landscape elements on N{sub r} fluxes and losses to the environment. More than 10% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions were due to indirect emissions. The nitrogen budgets and transformations of the unmanaged ecosystems varied considerably, depending on their location within the landscape. The model represents a new tool for assessing the effect of changes in landscape structure on N{sub r} fluxes. - Highlights: > The landscape scale is relevant to study how spatial interactions affect N{sub r} fate. > The NitroScape model integrates N{sub r} transfer and transformation at landscape scale. > NitroScape couples existing atmospheric, farm, agro-ecosystem and hydrological models. > Data exchanges within NitroScape are dynamic and spatially distributed. > More than 10% of the simulated N{sub 2}O emissions are due to indirect emissions. - A model integrating terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric processes of N{sub r} transfer and transformation at the landscape scale has been developed to simulate the effect of spatial interactions between landscape elements on N{sub r} fate.

  13. NitroScape: A model to integrate nitrogen transfers and transformations in rural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duretz, S.; Drouet, J.L.; Durand, P.; Hutchings, N.J.; Theobald, M.R.; Salmon-Monviola, J.; Dragosits, U.; Maury, O.; Sutton, M.A.; Cellier, P.

    2011-01-01

    Modelling nitrogen transfer and transformation at the landscape scale is relevant to estimate the mobility of the reactive forms of nitrogen (N r ) and the associated threats to the environment. Here we describe the development of a spatially and temporally explicit model to integrate N r transfer and transformation at the landscape scale. The model couples four existing models, to simulate atmospheric, farm, agro-ecosystem and hydrological N r fluxes and transformations within a landscape. Simulations were carried out on a theoretical landscape consisting of pig-crop farms interspersed with unmanaged ecosystems. Simulation results illustrated the effect of spatial interactions between landscape elements on N r fluxes and losses to the environment. More than 10% of the total N 2 O emissions were due to indirect emissions. The nitrogen budgets and transformations of the unmanaged ecosystems varied considerably, depending on their location within the landscape. The model represents a new tool for assessing the effect of changes in landscape structure on N r fluxes. - Highlights: → The landscape scale is relevant to study how spatial interactions affect N r fate. → The NitroScape model integrates N r transfer and transformation at landscape scale. → NitroScape couples existing atmospheric, farm, agro-ecosystem and hydrological models. → Data exchanges within NitroScape are dynamic and spatially distributed. → More than 10% of the simulated N 2 O emissions are due to indirect emissions. - A model integrating terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric processes of N r transfer and transformation at the landscape scale has been developed to simulate the effect of spatial interactions between landscape elements on N r fate.

  14. Investigation on thiosulfate-involved organics and nitrogen removal by a sulfur cycle-based biological wastewater treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Lu, Hui; Cui, Yanxiang; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-02-01

    Thiosulfate, as an intermediate of biological sulfate/sulfite reduction, can significantly improve nitrogen removal potential in a biological sulfur cycle-based process, namely the Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process. However, the related thiosulfate bio-activities coupled with organics and nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment lacked detailed examinations and reports. In this study, S2O3(2-) transformation during biological SO4(2-)/SO3(2-) co-reduction coupled with organics removal as well as S2O3(2-) oxidation coupled with chemolithotrophic denitrification were extensively evaluated under different experimental conditions. Thiosulfate is produced from the co-reduction of sulfate and sulfite through biological pathway at an optimum pH of 7.5 for organics removal. And the produced S2O3(2-) may disproportionate to sulfide and sulfate during both biological S2O3(2-) reduction and oxidation most possibly carried out by Desulfovibrio-like species. Dosing the same amount of nitrate, pH was found to be the more direct factor influencing the denitritation activity than free nitrous acid (FNA) and the optimal pH for denitratation (7.0) and denitritation (8.0) activities were different. Spiking organics significantly improved both denitratation and denitritation activities while minimizing sulfide inhibition of NO3(-) reduction during thiosulfate-based denitrification. These findings in this study can improve the understanding of mechanisms of thiosulfate on organics and nitrogen removal in biological sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  16. Estimates of biological nitrogen fixation by Pterocarpus lucens in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation by Pterocarpus lucens in a natural semi arid ecosystem, in Ferlo, Senegal was estimated using 15N natural abundance (15N) procedure. Other non-fixing trees accompanying P. lucens in the same area were also investigated as control. Results showed an important variation of 15N in leaves between ...

  17. Enhancing the biological nitrogen fixation of leguminous crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Legumes have the ability to establish a symbiotic interaction with soil bacteria, collectively termed as rhizobia. These bacteria can enhance growth and development of associated crops by transferring atmospheric nitrogen into a form that is available for plant growth or by improving nutrient uptake through modulation of ...

  18. Nitrogen-use-efficiency: a biologically meaningful definition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Aerts, R.

    1987-01-01

    A parameter to measure the efficiency of nitrogen use should include 1) the mean residence time of the N in the plant, ie the period during which the absorbed N can be used for C-fixation; and 2) the instantaneous rate of C-fixation per unit of N in the plant. It is essential to distinguish between

  19. The effect of urea fertiliser formulations on gross nitrogen transformations in a permanent grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Mary; Mueller, Christoph; Laughlin, Ronnie; Watson, Catherine; Richards, Karl; Lanigan, Gary; Forrestal, Patrick; McGeough, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Introduction By 2050, the current food production rate will need to increase by 70 % in order to meet the needs of the projected world population (FAO, 2014). Under the climate change response bill, Ireland has a target to reduce GHG emissions by 20% by 2020. Agriculture was responsible for almost one third of Ireland's overall Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in 2012, with 39% of these emissions arising from chemical/organic fertilisers in the form of nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O losses represent environmental damage through ozone depletion and global warming as well as acidification, eutrophication, surface and groundwater contamination and it also represents financial loss to the farmer (Cameron 2013). The contradictory aims of increasing food production while reducing GHG emissions will require an adjustment to the current system of agricultural production. As part of a larger study evaluating the switching of nitrogen (N) fertiliser formulation to minimise N2O emissions, (from calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) to urea based formulations), this experiment examined the effect of urea based fertiliser formulations on gross N transformations in a permanent pasture soil at Hillsborough, Co. Down, Northern Ireland. Study Design/Methodology A laboratory incubation study was undertaken, to examine the effect of urea in various combinations with two types of inhibitors on soil N dynamics and N2O and N2 emissions. The inhibitors examined were the urease inhibitor N-(butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (nBTPT) and the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD). The fertiliser products were labelled with 15N and the soil was incubated at 15 ° C at a water filled pore space of 65%. Soil mineral N (urea, NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) concentrations, gaseous losses (N2O and N2) and the 15N enrichments of NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, N2O and N2were analysed on 8 separate occasions over 25 days. An adapted numerical 15N tracing model (Müller et al., 2007) was used to quantify the effect of the inhibitors on

  20. Nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions from a riparian wetland soil: An undisturbed soil column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Leoz, Borja [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Antigueedad, Inaki [Department of Geodynamic, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Garbisu, Carlos [Department of Ecosystems, NEIKER-Tecnalia, E-48160 Derio (Spain); Ruiz-Romera, Estilita, E-mail: estilita.ruiz@ehu.es [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Riparian wetlands bordering intensively managed agricultural fields can act as biological filters that retain and transform agrochemicals such as nitrate and pesticides. Nitrate removal in wetlands has usually been attributed to denitrification processes which in turn imply the production of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O). Denitrification processes were studied in the Salburua wetland (northern Spain) by using undisturbed soil columns which were subsequently divided into three sections corresponding to A-, Bg- and B2g-soil horizons. Soil horizons were subjected to leaching with a 200 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -} L{sup -1} solution (rate: 90 mL day{sup -1}) for 125 days at two different temperatures (10 and 20 {sup o}C), using a new experimental design for leaching assays which enabled not only to evaluate leachate composition but also to measure gas emissions during the leaching process. Column leachate samples were analyzed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) were determined in the undisturbed soil columns. The A horizon at 20 {sup o}C showed the highest rates of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal (1.56 mg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O production (5.89 mg CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1} and 55.71 {mu}g N-N{sub 2}O kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}). For the Salburua wetland riparian soil, we estimated a potential nitrate removal capacity of 1012 kg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}, and potential greenhouse gas emissions of 5620 kg CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} and 240 kg N-N{sub 2}O ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. - Research Highlights: {yields}A new experimental design is proposed for leaching assays to simulate nitrogen transformations in riparian wetland soil. {yields}Denitrification is the main process responsible for nitrate removal in the riparian zone of Salburua wetland. {yields

  1. Enzymology of biological nitrogen fixation. Final report, May 1, 1987--April 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is of central importance in the earth`s nitrogen economy. Fixation of nitrogen is accomplished by a variety of microorganisms, all of them procaryotic. Some operate independently and some function symbiotically or associatively with photosynthesizing plants. Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished via the reaction: N{sub 2} + 8H{sup +} + 8e{sup {minus}} {yields} 2NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}. This reaction requires a minimum of 16 ATP under ideal laboratory conditions, so it is obvious that the energy demand of the reaction is very high. When certain nitrogen-fixing organisms are supplied fixed nitrogen (e.g., ammonium) the organisms use the fixed nitrogen and turn off their nitrogenase system, thus conserving energy. When the fixed nitrogen is exhausted, the organism reactivates its nitrogenase. The system is turned off by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyl transferase (DRAT) and turned back on by dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase (DRAG). The authors have investigated the details of how DRAT and DRAG are formed, how they function, and the genetics of their formation and operation.

  2. Influence of road salt on the biological removal of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Eliška Horniaková; Milan Búgel

    2007-01-01

    Processes occuring in the aeration tank remove nitrogen from the organic substances in wastewater by using the bacterii. Nitrification utilize the metabolism of aerobic bacterii Nitrosomonas, Nitrococus, Nitrospira, Nitrobacter Nitrocystis a Nitrosobolus. Pseudosomonas, Chromobacterium, Denitrobacillus a Micrococus are denitrification anaerobic bacterii. The bacterii are lithotrophic and they are sensitive to pH of wastewater. Chlorine and heavy metals are toxic for these bacterii. For a corr...

  3. The Human Genome Project: big science transforms biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Leroy; Rowen, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has transformed biology through its integrated big science approach to deciphering a reference human genome sequence along with the complete sequences of key model organisms. The project exemplifies the power, necessity and success of large, integrated, cross-disciplinary efforts - so-called 'big science' - directed towards complex major objectives. In this article, we discuss the ways in which this ambitious endeavor led to the development of novel technologies and analytical tools, and how it brought the expertise of engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians together with biologists. It established an open approach to data sharing and open-source software, thereby making the data resulting from the project accessible to all. The genome sequences of microbes, plants and animals have revolutionized many fields of science, including microbiology, virology, infectious disease and plant biology. Moreover, deeper knowledge of human sequence variation has begun to alter the practice of medicine. The Human Genome Project has inspired subsequent large-scale data acquisition initiatives such as the International HapMap Project, 1000 Genomes, and The Cancer Genome Atlas, as well as the recently announced Human Brain Project and the emerging Human Proteome Project.

  4. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and biological calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, G R; Zunic, W B; Durig, J R; Wuthier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the organic and mineral components of biological and synthetic calcium phosphate minerals. Raman spectroscopy provides information on biological minerals that is complimentary to more widely used infrared methodologies as some infrared-inactive vibrational modes are Raman-active. The application of FT-Raman technology has, for the first time, enabled the problems of high sample fluorescence and low signal-to-noise that are inherent in calcified tissues to be overcome. Raman spectra of calcium phosphates are dominated by a very strong band near 960 cm-1 that arises from the symmetric stretching mode (v1) of the phosphate group. Other Raman-active phosphate vibrational bands are seen at approximately 1075 (v3), 590 (v4), and 435 cm-1 (v2). Minerals containing acidic phosphate groups show additional vibrational modes. The different calcium phosphate mineral phases can be distinguished from one another by the relative positions and shapes of these bands in the Raman spectra. FT-Raman spectra of nascent, nonmineralized matrix vesicles (MV) show a distinct absence of the phosphate v1 band even though these structures are rich in calcium and phosphate. Similar results were seen with milk casein and synthetic Ca-phosphatidyl-serine-PO4 complexes. Hence, the phosphate and/or acidic phosphate ions in these noncrystalline biological calcium phosphates is in a molecular environment that differs from that in synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. In MV, the first distinct mineral phase to form contained acidic phosphate bands similar to those seen in octacalcium phosphate. The mineral phase present in fully mineralized MV was much more apatitic, resembling that found in bones and teeth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru, 01 February 1985 to 05 March 1985 (NODC Accession 9200026)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NITROP - 85 was the major field of experiment of an N.S.F. funded program entitled "Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru". this...

  6. Biological nitrogen (N) fixation - The source of N nutrient to increase yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiling, M.; Hardarson, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient. It is the nutrient that is most commonly deficient, contributing to reduced agricultural yields throughout the world. Developing countries used more than 85 million metric tones of nitrogenous fertilizer in 2003, worth billions of US dollars. Such fertilizer expenditure can be significantly reduced by incorporating biological nitrogen fixed leguminous crops into a growing rotation. In leguminous crops, a symbiotic relationship between a bacterium called Rhizobium and legumes can provide large amounts of nitrogen to the plant and subsequently to soils where they are grown. In this process the bacteria form nodules on the root system and convert the nitrogen coming from air into molecules that can be absorbed by the plants. Beside their fertilizing properties, legumes are rich in protein and constitute a very important role in the human and animal nutrition. In the Soil Science Unit (SSU) of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory fellows from all over the world receive training in the use of 15 N stable isotope techniques to optimise the nitrogen fixation. Several parameters such as the placement of the nodules on the legume root system, the amount of soil mineral nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer applied and the temperature have an impact on the amount of nitrogen fixed by the plant. It is therefore important to identify relative importance of these parameters on biological N fixation. The 15 N isotope dilution method is an appropriate technique to test the biological nitrogen fixation in the laboratory first. This useful knowledge can then be communicated to the farmers and can be tested under field conditions

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Combined Forms and Transformation of Fluorine in Tea Garden Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yong-li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on combined forms and transformation of fluorine in tea garden soil, soil pot experiment was carried out. The research object was red-yellow soil in Shizipu tea plantation in the south of Anhui Province. Five treatments were N0P0K0 (CK, N0P1K1 (N0, N1P1K1 (N1, N2P1K1 (N2, N3P1K1 (N3. Water-soluble fluorine content, exchangeable fluorine content, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine content, organic matter-bound fluorine content, ammonium nitrogen content and soil pH value in 0~15 cm soil layer were analyzed in 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, 90 days after fertilization. The results showed that compared with CK, in the short term (10 or 20 days after applying NPK, the content of water-soluble fluorine in 0~15 cm soil layer was decreased and the content of exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were increased. After 20 days, the content of soil water-soluble fluorine was increased and the content of soil exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were reduced. The effect on water-soluble fluorine and exchangeable fluorine increased with time and the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine in tea garden soil had a moderately positive correlation with the application rate of nitrogen while the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine had a quite highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01, but the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01. Therefore, nitrogen fertilizer changed the soil pH during its form transformation and thus affected the transformation and the availability of fluorine in soil.

  8. On the 'hysteresis' effect in the biological nitrogen removal :theory and full scale experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatano, F.

    1996-01-01

    The wastewater treatments plants localized in the Ruhr River (Germany), generally present a typical wastewater temperature variation curve during the winter period. These temperature changes produce specific effects on the nitrogen removal efficiencies in the activated sludge systems. The so called 'hysteresis' phenomenon is responsible for these effects. The paper deals with some simplified theoretical considerations and with a full scale experimental evaluations of the effects caused by the hysteresis phenomenon in the biological nitrogen removal

  9. Modelling nitrogen transformation and removal in mara river basin wetlands upstream of lake Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Aloyce W.; Muraza, Marwa; Norbert, Joel

    2018-06-01

    Lake Victoria, the largest lake in Africa, is a resource of social-economic potential in East Africa. This lake receives water from numerous tributaries including Mara River, which contributes about 4.8% of the total Lake water inflow. Unfortunately, Mara River basin faces environmental problems because of intensive settlement, agriculture, overgrazing in the basin and mining activities, which has lead to water pollution in the river, soil erosion and degradation, decreased soil fertility, loss of vegetation cover, decreased water infiltration capacity and increased sedimentation. One of the pollutants carried by the river includes nitrogen, which has contributed to ecological degradation of the Lake Victoria. Therefore this research work was intended to determine the effectiveness of Mara River wetland for removal of nitrogen and to establish nitrogen removal mechanisms in the wetland. To predict nitrogen removal in the wetland, the dynamics of nitrogen transformation was studied using a conceptual numerical model that takes into account of various processes in the system using STELLA II version 9.0®2006 software. Samples of model input from water, plants and sediments were taken for 45 days and were analyzed for pH, temperature, and DO in situ and chemical parameters such as NH3-N, Org-N, NO2-N, and NO3-N were analyzed in the laboratory in accordance with Standard methods. For plants, the density, dominance, biomass productivity and TN were determined and for sediments TN was analyzed. Inflow into the wetland was determined using stage-discharge relationship and was found to be 734,400 m3/day and the average wetland volume was 1,113,500 m3. Data collected by this study were used for model calibration of nitrogen transformation in this wetland while data from another wetland were used for model validation. It was found that about 37.8% of total nitrogen was removed by the wetland system largely through sedimentation (26.6%), plant uptake (6.6%) and

  10. Martensitic transformations, structure, and strengthness of processed high-nitrogen and high-carbon ferrous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Prokoshkina, V. G.

    2003-10-01

    Structures and properties of metastable austenitic alloys Fe-18Cr-16Ni-I2Mn-(0.17 to 0. 50)N, Fe-18Cr-12Mn-(0.48 to 1.12)N, Fe-18Cr-(0.1 to 1.18)N, and Fe-(12 to 20)Ni-(0.6 to 1.3)C, Fe-(6 to 8)Mn-(0.6 to 1.0)C, Fe-(5 to 6)Cr-(4 to 5)Mn-(0.6 to 0.8)C, Fe-6Cr-(1.0 to 1.3)C resulting from martensitic transformations under cooling and cold deformation (CD), as well as following tempering processes, were studied by magnetometry, X-ray and electron microscopy analyses, hardness measurements and mechanical properties tests. Martensite with a b.c.t. lattice was formed in all alloys with M_s{>}-196^circC during cooling. Under CD transformations of γ{to}α, γ{to}\\varepsilon{to}α, or γ{to}\\varepsilon types were realized depending on the alloy composition. Carbon increased but nitrogen decreased stacking fault energy. Thus carbon assists α-martensite formation but nitrogen promotese. As CD level and/or concentration of carbon and nitrogen increase residual stresses resulting from the CD also increase. The martensitic transformation during CD can decrease the residual stresses. Kinetic of tempering of b.c.t. thermal martensite differs from those of CD-induced martensite. In the second case, deformation aging, texture, and residual stresses are more visible. The maximal strengthening under CD takes place in (Mn+N)-steels. (Cr+N) and (Cr+Mn+N)-steels are high-strength, non-magnetic and corrosion resistant and are easily hardened by a low level of plastic deformation.

  11. Quantitative determination of nitrogen biological fixation by the N-15 isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basantes, Emilio; Trivelin, Paulo; Mui Tsai, Siu

    1993-01-01

    In order to quantify the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and to evaluate the mycorrhiza effect in the BNF, an experiment was carried on by applying 1 5 N -ammonium sulphate and mycorrhiza fungi to the soil. The treatments included legumes: mucuna negra(Stizolobium atterrinum Piper et Tracv) and caupi (Vigna unguiculoata L. Walp). Two control plants: non nodulating soybean (Glycine max L.Merril) and rice (Oryza sativa), were used for measuring the fixed N in the legumes by isotope dilution method. Both legumes and control plants assimmilated the same ammounts of nitrogen from the soil and fertilizer. The greater N content in the legumnes was determined as coming from the fixed nitrogen. Rice and non nodulating soybean showed to be good controls for measuring biological nitrogen fixation using isotopic dilution method. The values of fixed nitrogen for legumes calculated using rice as control plant were slightly greater than those with non nodulating soybean, nevertheless there were no significant statistical differences between the values. The mucuna fixed more N than caupi in both mycorrhiza treatments (76.7, 66.6 and 56. 7 per cent of N fixed, respectively). The mycorrhiza increased dry matter yield (13.84 per cent), accumulation of N in the plant(14.85 per cent N) and the biological N fixation (16.06 per cent N-fixed) in caupi

  12. Influence of road salt on the biological removal of nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Horniaková

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Processes occuring in the aeration tank remove nitrogen from the organic substances in wastewater by using the bacterii. Nitrification utilize the metabolism of aerobic bacterii Nitrosomonas, Nitrococus, Nitrospira, Nitrobacter Nitrocystis a Nitrosobolus. Pseudosomonas, Chromobacterium, Denitrobacillus a Micrococus are denitrification anaerobic bacterii. The bacterii are lithotrophic and they are sensitive to pH of wastewater. Chlorine and heavy metals are toxic for these bacterii. For a correct grow, reproduction and metabolism, temperature above 10 ºC is needed but the ideal temperature is from 20 to 30 ºC. An intensive cold reduces or even stops the activity of bacterii.Cold road salt flow to a sewage and then to the aeration basin. Many of nitrification microorganisms dead because their cells lyse and their content flow into the tank. NaCl is toxic for bacterii. From aeration basin a high amount of N-NH4 flows out. The sludge may be a slightly flocculate and the effluent water may be turbid

  13. Robust biological nitrogen fixation in a model grass-bacterial association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankievicz, Vânia C S; do Amaral, Fernanda P; Santos, Karina F D N; Agtuca, Beverly; Xu, Youwen; Schueller, Michael J; Arisi, Ana Carolina M; Steffens, Maria B R; de Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Stacey, Gary; Ferrieri, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    Nitrogen-fixing rhizobacteria can promote plant growth; however, it is controversial whether biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) from associative interaction contributes to growth promotion. The roots of Setaria viridis, a model C4 grass, were effectively colonized by bacterial inoculants resulting in a significant enhancement of growth. Nitrogen-13 tracer studies provided direct evidence for tracer uptake by the host plant and incorporation into protein. Indeed, plants showed robust growth under nitrogen-limiting conditions when inoculated with an ammonium-excreting strain of Azospirillum brasilense. (11)C-labeling experiments showed that patterns in central carbon metabolism and resource allocation exhibited by nitrogen-starved plants were largely reversed by bacterial inoculation, such that they resembled plants grown under nitrogen-sufficient conditions. Adoption of S. viridis as a model should promote research into the mechanisms of associative nitrogen fixation with the ultimate goal of greater adoption of BNF for sustainable crop production. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF CARBON, NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS TRANSFORMATIONS DURING MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Bogumiła Przywara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper exploitation of waste water treatment plant is strictly connected with monitoring of basic parameters and effectiveness of particular its stages. Legal requirements include not only organic compounds (BOD5, COD and general suspensions but also highly effective removal of nutrients: nitrogen and phosphorus. Effectiveness of removal of biogenic compounds interferes with temperature fluctuations, effluent quality, problems of active sediment. The aim of this study was to show changes in concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in the municipal wastewater after subsequent stages of mechanical-biological treatment. During researches samples were taken down by the wastewater treatment line: raw wastewater, after mechanical treatment, pre-denitrification, dephosphatation, denitrification, nitrification and treated wastewater. Another aspect of this study was determination of COD fractions, and their changes in the municipal wastewater, after the successive stages of mechanical-biological treatment. It allows separation of dissolved and non-dissolved organic substances, taking into account also their biodegradability and the lack of susceptibility to biological decomposition. It can also be a very important method of the processes control during wastewater treatment.

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhiza stimulates biological nitrogen fixation in two Medicago spp. through omproved phosphorus acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, H.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku no. 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * biological nitrogen fixation * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  16. Biochar application rate affects biological nitrogen fixation in red clover conditional on potassium availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mia, S.; van Groeningen, J.W.; Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Oram, N.J.; Bezemer, T.M.; Mommer, Liesje; Jeffery, S.

    2014-01-01

    Increased biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by legumes has been reported following biochar application to soils, but the mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly elucidated. We investigated the effects of different biochar application rates on BNF in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Red

  17. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate.

  18. Transformation and Deposition of Sulphur and Nitrogen Compounds in the Marine Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, O

    1995-10-01

    In this thesis the author performs a model study of the transformation and deposition of sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the marine boundary layer, including source-receptor relationships. The central part of the study is the development and testing of a variable scale trajectory model for Europe, with special emphasis on modelling the concentrations of gases and aerosols in the marine atmosphere and the deposition to sea. A one-dimensional version of the model was developed to model the chemical degradation of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in the marine boundary layer. Although the model reproduces the observed levels of DMS and methane sulphonic acid (MSA) well, the calculated DMS concentration is not always in phase with observed levels, probably because of a local coastal emission that is correlated with the shifting tide. Another version of the trajectory model, Atmospheric Chemistry and Deposition model (ACDEP), was developed to study the deposition of nitrogen compounds to the Danish sea waters. This model uses a new numerical scheme, the Eulerian Backward Iterative method. The model is able to reproduce observations of air concentrations and wet deposition fairly well; data for dry deposition were not available. The model was also used for calculation of deposition of nitrogen compounds to the Kattegat. Finally, a sensitivity study was performed on the model. 175 refs., 87 figs., 32 tabs.

  19. Seasonal photochemical transformations of nitrogen species in a forest stream and lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Porcal

    Full Text Available The photochemical release of inorganic nitrogen from dissolved organic matter is an important source of bio-available nitrogen (N in N-limited aquatic ecosystems. We conducted photochemical experiments and used mathematical models based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics to quantify the photochemical transformations of individual N species and their seasonal effects on N cycling in a mountain forest stream and lake (Plešné Lake, Czech Republic. Results from laboratory experiments on photochemical changes in N speciation were compared to measured lake N budgets. Concentrations of organic nitrogen (Norg; 40-58 µmol L-1 decreased from 3 to 26% during 48-hour laboratory irradiation (an equivalent of 4-5 days of natural solar insolation due to photochemical mineralization to ammonium (NH4+ and other N forms (Nx; possibly N oxides and N2. In addition to Norg mineralization, Nx also originated from photochemical nitrate (NO3- reduction. Laboratory exposure of a first-order forest stream water samples showed a high amount of seasonality, with the maximum rates of Norg mineralization and NH4+ production in winter and spring, and the maximum NO3- reduction occurring in summer. These photochemical changes could have an ecologically significant effect on NH4+ concentrations in streams (doubling their terrestrial fluxes from soils and on concentrations of dissolved Norg in the lake. In contrast, photochemical reactions reduced NO3- fluxes by a negligible (<1% amount and had a negligible effect on the aquatic cycle of this N form.

  20. Effects of pH on nitrogen transformations in media-based aquaponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Guimbaud, Christophe; Fang, Yingke

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of pH on performance and nitrogen transformations in aquaponics, media-based aquaponics operated at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 9.0 were systematically examined and compared in this study. Results showed that nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) reached its maximum of 50.9% at pH 6.0, followed by 47.3% at pH 7.5 and 44.7% at pH 9.0. Concentrations of nitrogen compounds (i.e., TAN, NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N) in three pH systems were all under tolerable levels. pH had significant effect on N2O emission and N2O conversion ratio decreased from 2.0% to 0.6% when pH increased from 6.0 to 9.0, mainly because acid environment would inhibit denitrifiers and lead to higher N2O emission. 75.2-78.5% of N2O emission from aquaponics was attributed to denitrification. In general, aquaponics was suggested to maintain pH at 6.0 for high NUE, and further investigations on N2O mitigation strategy are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A study on the migration and transformation law of nitrogen in urine in municipal wastewater transportation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Ren; Pengkang, Jin; Chenggang, Liang; Xiaochang, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Many studies suggest that the total nitrogen (TN) in urine is around 9,000 mg/L and about 80% of nitrogen in municipal wastewater comes from urine, because nitrogen mainly occurs in the form of urea in fresh human urine. Based on this fact, the study on the migration and transformation law of nitrogen in urine and its influencing factors was carried out. It can be seen from the experimental results that the transformation rate of urea in urine into ammonia nitrogen after standing for 20 days is only about 18.2%, but the urea in urine can be hydrolyzed into ammonia nitrogen rapidly after it is catalyzed directly with free urease or indirectly with microorganism. Adding respectively a certain amount of urease, activated sludge and septic-tank sludge to urine samples can make the maximum transformation rate achieve 85% after 1 day, 2 days and 6 days, respectively. In combination with some corresponding treatment methods, recycling of nitrogen in urine can be achieved. The results are of great significance in guiding denitrification in municipal wastewater treatment.

  2. Nitrogen transformation under different dissolved oxygen levels by the anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Marichromatium gracile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xuan; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhao, Chungui; Yang, Suping

    2017-06-01

    Marichromatium gracile: YL28 (M. gracile YL28) is an anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial strain that utilizes ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite as its sole nitrogen source during growth. In this study, we investigated the removal and transformation of ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite by M. gracile YL28 grown in a combinatorial culture system of sodium acetate-ammonium, sodium acetate-nitrate and sodium acetate-nitrite in response to different initial dissolved oxygen (DO) levels. In the sodium acetate-ammonium system under aerobic conditions (initial DO = 7.20-7.25 mg/L), we detected a continuous accumulation of nitrate and nitrite. However, under semi-anaerobic conditions (initial DO = 4.08-4.26 mg/L), we observed a temporary accumulation of nitrate and nitrite. Interestingly, under anaerobic conditions (initial DO = 0.36-0.67 mg/L), there was little accumulation of nitrate and nitrite, but an increase in nitrous oxide production. In the sodium acetate-nitrite system, nitrite levels declined slightly under aerobic conditions, and nitrite was completely removed under semi-anaerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, M. gracile YL28 was able to grow using nitrite as the sole nitrogen source in situations when nitrogen gas produced by denitrification was eliminated. Taken together, the data indicate that M. gracile YL28 performs simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification at low-DO levels and uses nitrite as the sole nitrogen source for growth. Our study is the first to demonstrate that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria perform heterotrophic ammonia-oxidization and denitrification under anaerobic conditions.

  3. Molecular eyes: proteins that transform light into biological information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Mathes, T.

    2013-01-01

    Most biological photoreceptors are protein/cofactor complexes that induce a physiological reaction upon absorption of a photon. Therefore, these proteins represent signal converters that translate light into biological information. Researchers use this property to stimulate and study various

  4. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  5. Coupling of microbial nitrogen transformations and climate in sclerophyll forest soils from the Mediterranean Region of central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Cecilia A; Armesto, Juan J

    2018-06-01

    The Mediterranean region of central Chile is experiencing extensive "mega-droughts" with detrimental effects for the environment and economy of the region. In the northern hemisphere, nitrogen (N) limitation of Mediterranean ecosystems has been explained by the decoupling between N inputs and plant uptake during the dormant season. In central Chile, soils have often been considered N-rich in comparison to other Mediterranean ecosystems of the world, yet the impacts of expected intensification of seasonal drought remain unknown. In this work, we seek to disentangle patterns of microbial N transformations and their seasonal coupling with climate in the Chilean sclerophyll forest-type. We aim to assess how water limitation affects microbial N transformations, thus addressing the impact of ongoing regional climate trends on soil N status. We studied four stands of the sclerophyll forest-type in Chile. Field measurements in surface soils showed a 67% decline of free-living diazotrophic activity (DA) and 59% decrease of net N mineralization rates during the summer rainless and dormant season, accompanied by a stimulation of in-situ denitrification rates to values 70% higher than in wetter winter. Higher rates of both free-living DA and net N mineralization found during spring, provided evidence for strong coupling of these two processes during the growing season. Overall, the experimental addition of water in the field to litter samples almost doubled DA but had no effect on denitrification rates. We conclude that coupling of microbial mediated soil N transformations during the wetter growing season explains the N enrichment of sclerophyll forest soils. Expected increases in the length and intensity of the dry period, according to climate change models, reflected in the current mega-droughts may drastically reduce biological N fixation and net N mineralization, increasing at the same time denitrification rates, thereby potentially reducing long-term soil N capital

  6. Biological invasion by Myrica faya in Hawaii: Plant demography, nitrogen fixation, ecosystem effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitousek, P.M.; Walker, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Myrica faya, an introduced actinorhizal nitrogen fixer, in invading young volcanic sites in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. We examined the population biology of the invader and ecosystem-level consequences of its invasion in open-canopied forests resulting from volcanic cinder-fall. Although Myrica faya is nominally dioecious, both males and females produce large amounts of fruit that are utilized by a number of exotic and native birds, particularly the exotic Zosterops japonica. In areas of active colonization, Myrica seed rain under perch trees of the dominant native Metrosideros polymorpha ranged from 6 to 60 seeds m -2 yr -1 ; no seeds were captured in the open. Planted seeds of Myrica also germinated an established better under isolated individuals of Metrosideros than in the open. Diameter growth of Myrica is > 15-fold greater than that of Metrosideros, and the Myrica population is increasing rapidly. Rates of nitrogen fixation were measured using the acetylene reduction assay calibrated with 15 N. Myrica nodules reduced acetylene at between 5 and 20 μmol g -1 h -1 , a rate that extrapolated to nitrogen fixation of 18 kg ha -1 in a densely colonized site. By comparison, all native sources of nitrogen fixation summed to 0.2 kg ha -1 yr -1 , and precipitation added -1 yr -1 . Measurements of litter decomposition and nitrogen release, soil nitrogen mineralization, and plant growth in bioassays all demonstrated that nitrogen fixed by Myrica becomes available to other organisms as well. We conclude that biological invasion by Myrica faya alters ecosystem-level properties in this young volcanic area; at least in this case, the demography and physiology of one species controls characteristics of a whole ecosystem

  7. [Nitrogen fixation potential of biological soil crusts in southeast edge of Tengger Desert, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Pan, Yan-Xia; Liu, Yan-Mei; Su, Jie-Qiong

    2012-08-01

    Taking three typical types of biological soil crusts (BSCs), i.e., cyanobacterial-algal crust, lichen crust, and moss crust, in the southeast fringe of Tengger Desert as test objects, this paper studied their nitrogen fixation potential, seasonal fluctuation, and responses to the environmental factors from June 2010 to May 2011. During the whole study period, the nitrogenase activity (NA) of the cyanobacterial-algal, lichen, and moss crusts had significant difference, being 14-133, 20-101, and 4-28 micromol x m(-2) x h(-1), respectively, which indicated the critical role of the species composition of BSCs in nitrogen fixation. The NA of the three crust types had similar response characteristics to environmental factors. The NA had less correlation with the precipitation during the study period, but was positively correlated to the spring > summer > winter. The high air temperature in summer and the low air temperature (desert zone had nitrogen fixation capacity throughout the year, and the controlling effects of environmental factors on the nitrogen fixation were hierarchical. Water condition was the key factor affecting the nitrogen fixation rate and duration of the crusts, while under the conditions of sufficient water supply and carbon storage, heat condition dominated the crusts nitrogen fixation rate.

  8. [Transformation Regularity of Nitrogen in Aqueous Product Derived from Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Sewage Sludge in Subcritical Water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-qing; Sun, Zhen; Zhang, Jing-lai

    2015-06-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction in subcritical water is a potential way to treat sewage sludge as a resource rather than a waste. This study focused on the transformation regularity of nitrogen in aqueous product which was derived from hydrothermal liquefaction of sewage sludge under different operating conditions. Results showed, within the studied temperature scope and time span, the concentration of total nitrogen (TN) fluctuated in the range of 2867.62 mg x L(-1) to 4171.30 mg x L(-1). The two major exiting formation of nitrogen in aqueous product was ammonia nitrogen (NH4+ -N) and organic nitrogen (Org-N). NH4+ -N possessed 54.6%-90.7% of TN, while Org-N possessed 7.4%-44.5%. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen (NO- -N) was far more less than NH4+ -N and Org-N. Temperature had a great influence on the transformation regularity of nitrogen. Both the concentration of TN and Org-N increased accordingly to the increase of reaction temperature. With the reaction time prolonging, the concentration of TN and Org-N increased, while the concentration of NH4+ -N increased first, then became stationary, and then decreased slightly.

  9. Nitrogen utilization and transformation in red soil fertilized with urea and ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gang; Zhang Qinzheng; Ye Qingfu; Zhu Zhujun; Xi Haifu; He Zhenli

    1998-01-01

    The influence of fertilization with urea and ryegrass on nitrogen utilization and transformation in red soil has been studied by using 15 N tracer method. When urea and ryegrass were applied alone or in combination, the percentage of N uptaken by ryegrass for labelled urea was 3 and 1.7 times that from labelled ryegrass for the application rate of 200 mgN·kg -1 and 100 mgN·kg -1 , respectively; combining application of ryegrass and urea reduced uptake of urea N and increased uptake of ryegrass N by ryegrass plant, but the percentage of N residue in soil increased for urea and decreased for ryegrass; when urea and ryegrass were applied alone, the percentage of N residue in soil from labelled ryegrass was more than 69% while that from labelled urea was less than 25%, and much more ryegrass N was incorporated into humus than urea N

  10. From Cookbook to Collaborative: Transforming a University Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Sherry S.

    2009-01-01

    As described in "How People Learn," "Developing Biological Literacy," and by the Commission on Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences during the 1960s and early 1970s, laboratories should promote guided-inquiries or investigations, and not simply consist of cookbook or verification activities. However, the only word that could describe…

  11. Lessons from life. The biology of business transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J S

    2001-01-01

    Biology and business face similar challenges when it comes to change. Living organisms experience constant change. And successful health care organizations must be ready and willing to embrace transition if they are to survive. Take an in-depth look at the biology-to-business metaphor and see how to better manage information technology changes in your organization.

  12. Key intermediates in nitrogen transformation during microwave pyrolysis of sewage sludge: a protein model compound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Tian, Yu; Cui, Yanni; Zuo, Wei; Tan, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen transformations with attention to NH3 and HCN were investigated at temperatures of 300-800°C during microwave pyrolysis of a protein model compound. The evolution of nitrogenated compounds in the char, tar and gas products were conducted. The amine-N, heterocyclic-N and nitrile-N compounds were identified as three important intermediates during the pyrolysis. NH3 and HCN were formed with comparable activation energies competed to consume the same reactive substances at temperatures of 300-800°C. The deamination and dehydrogenation of amine-N compounds from protein cracking contributed to the formation of NH3 (about 8.9% of Soy-N) and HCN (6.6%) from 300 to 500°C. The cracking of nitrile-N and heterocyclic-N compounds from the dehydrogenation and polymerization of amine-N generated HCN (13.4%) and NH3 (31.3%) between 500 and 800°C. It might be able to reduce the HCN and NH3 emissions through controlling the intermediates production at temperatures of 500-800°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-06-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration.

  14. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  15. Planetary Biology and Microbial Ecology: Molecular Ecology and the Global Nitrogen cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, Molly Stone (Editor); Nealson, Kenneth H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Planetary Biology and Molecular Ecology's summer 1991 program, which was held at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The purpose of the interdisciplinary PBME program is to integrate, via lectures and laboratory work, the contributions of university and NASA scientists and student interns. The goals of the 1991 program were to examine several aspects of the biogeochemistry of the nitrogen cycle and to teach the application of modern methods of molecular genetics to field studies of organisms. Descriptions of the laboratory projects and protocols and abstracts and references of the lectures are presented.

  16. Calculation of Biological Assets Fair Value and Their Transformations Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmyla Khoruzhiy

    2013-01-01

    In the article the IAS 41 'Agriculture' (fair value of biological assets and agricultural products) terminology has been considered within the Russian theory and practice of accounting. A multifactor model of assets and liabilities fair value calculation has been proposed. It has been found that the application of fair value to measure biological assets and agricultural produce may be a burdensome due to the requirement of fair value calculation at each balance sheet date. In addition, some r...

  17. Soil gross nitrogen transformations in responses to land use conversion in a subtropical karst region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejun; Liu, Jing; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Liang; Wang, Kelin

    2018-04-15

    Gross nitrogen (N) transformations can provide important information for assessing indigenous soil N supply capacity and soil nitrate leaching potential. The current study aimed to assess the variation of gross N transformations in response to conversion of maize-soybean fields to sugarcane, mulberry, and forage grass fields in a subtropical karst region of southwest China. Mature forests were included for comparison. Gross rates of N mineralization (GNM) were highest in the forests, intermediate in the maize-soybean and forage grass fields, and lowest in the sugarcane and mulberry fields, suggesting capacity of indigenous soil N supply derived from organic N mineralization was lowered after conversion to sugarcane and mulberry fields. The relative high indigenous soil N supply capacity in the maize-soybean fields was obtained at the cost of soil organic N depletion. Gross nitrification (GN) rates were highest in the forests, intermediate in the forage grass fields and lowest in the other three agricultural land use types. The nitrate retention capacity (24.1 ± 2.0% on average) was similar among the five land use types, implying that nitrate leaching potential was not changed after land use conversion. Microbial biomass N exerted significant direct effects on the rates of N mineralization, nitrification, ammonium immobilization and nitrate immobilization. Soil organic carbon, total N and exchangeable magnesium had significant indirect effects on these N transformation rates. Our findings suggest that forage grass cultivation instead of other agricultural land uses should be recommended from the perspective of increasing indigenous soil N supply while not depleting soil organic N pool. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromosomal Aberrations Associated with Clonal Evolution and Leukemic Transformation in Fanconi Anemia: Clinical and Biological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anaemia (FA is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and extreme risk of leukemic transformation. Bone marrow surveillance is an important part of the clinical management of FA and often reveals cytogenetic aberrations. Here, we review bone marrow findings in FA and discuss the clinical and biological implications of chromosomal aberrations associated with leukemic transformation.

  19. Attenuated radon transform: theory and application in medicine and biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, G.T.

    1979-06-01

    A detailed analysis is given of the properties of the attenuated Radon transform and of how increases in photon attenuation influence the numerical accuracy and computation efficiency of iterative and convolution algorithms used to determine its inversion. The practical applications for this work involve quantitative assessment of the distribution of injected radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides in man and animals for basic physiological and biochemical studies as well as clinical studies in nuclear medicine. A mathematical structure is developed using function theory and the theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces which lends itself to better understanding the spectral properties of the attenuated Radon transform. The continuous attenuated Radon transform reduces to a matrix operator for discrete angular and lateral sampling, and the reconstruction problem reduces to a system of linear equations. For the situation of variable attenuation coefficient frequently found in nuclear medicine applications of imaging the heart and chest, the procedure developed in this thesis involves iterative techniques of performing the generalized inverse. For constant attenuation coefficient less than 0.15 cm/sup -1/, convolution methods can reliably reconstruct a 30 cm object with 0.5 cm resolution. However, for high attenuation coefficients or for the situation where there is variable attenuation such as reconstruction of distribution of isotopes in the heart, iterative techniques developed in this thesis give the best results. (ERB)

  20. Stabilization of organic matter and nitrogen immobilization during mechanical-biological treatment and landfilling of residual municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss-Ziegler, C.

    2000-04-01

    Synthesis of humic substances and nitrogen immobilization during mechanical-biological treatment of waste and the behavior of biologically stabilized waste under anaerobic landfill conditions were investigated. Samples were taken from a large-scale treatment plant. Anaerobic conditions were simulated in lab scale test cells. Humic substances were analyzed photometrically and gravimetrically. The nitrogen immobilization was investigated by sequential leaching tests and by analyzing the non acid hydrolyzable nitrogen. Humic acids were mainly synthesized during the beginning of the intensive rotting phase. Later on in the process no significant changes occurred. The humic acid content rose up to 6,8 % DS org. It correlated well with the stability parameters respiration activity and accumulated gas production. In the coarse of the treatment the nitrogen load emitted during the consecutive leaching tests dropped from 50 % down to less than 20 % total nitrogen. The non acid hydrolyzable nitrogen rose from 17 up to 42 % Kjeldahl nitrogen content. Nevertheless the mechanical-biological treatment is not significantly shortening the aftercare period of a landfill concerning liquid nitrogen emissions. The reduced nitrogen emission potential is released more slowly. When reactive waste material was exposed to anaerobic conditions, humic and fulvic acids were synthesized up to the point when intensive gas production started and then were remineralized. Stabilized waste materials after treatment of various intensity behaved differently under anaerobic conditions. Steady and decreasing humic acid contents were observed. (author)

  1. It's the System, Stupid: How Systems Biology Is Transforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    So far, little is known about systems biology and its potential for changing how we diagnose and treat disease. That will change soon, say the systems experts, who advise payers to begin learning now about how it could make healthcare efficient.

  2. Evaluation of wastewater nitrogen transformation in a natural wetland (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia) using dual-isotope analysis of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Takemon, Yasuhiro; Makabe, Akiko; Yoshimizu, Chikage; Kohzu, Ayato; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tumurskh, Dashzeveg; Tayasu, Ichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nagata, Toshi

    2011-01-01

    The Tuul River, which provides water for the daily needs of many residents of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, has been increasingly polluted by wastewater from the city's sewage treatment plant. Information on water movement and the transformation of water-borne materials is required to alleviate the deterioration of water quality. We conducted a synoptic survey of general water movement, water quality including inorganic nitrogen concentrations, and isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ 15 N-NO 3 - , δ 18 O-NO 3 - , and δ 15 N-NH 4 + ) and water (δ 18 O-H 2 O) in a wetland area that receives wastewater before it enters the Tuul River. We sampled surface water, groundwater, and spring water along the two major water routes in the wetland that flow from the drain of the sewage treatment plant to the Tuul River: a continuous tributary and a discontinuous tributary. The continuous tributary had high ammonium (NH 4 + ) concentrations and nearly stable δ 15 N-NH 4 + , δ 15 N-NO 3 - , and δ 18 O-NO 3 - concentrations throughout its length, indicating that nitrogen transformation (i.e., nitrification and denitrification) during transit was small. In contrast, NH 4 + concentrations decreased along the discontinuous tributary and nitrate (NO 3 - ) concentrations were low at many points. Values of δ 15 N-NH 4 + , δ 15 N-NO 3 - , and δ 18 O-NO 3 - increased with flow along the discontinuous route. Our results indicate that nitrification and denitrification contribute to nitrogen removal in the wetland area along the discontinuous tributary with slow water transport. Differences in hydrological pathways and the velocity of wastewater transport through the wetland area greatly affect the extent of nitrogen removal. - Research Highlights: → Dual-isotope analysis of nitrate was used to assess wastewater nitrogen status. → Wetland that receives the wastewater contributed to nitrogen removal. → Differences in hydrological pathways greatly affect the extent of nitrogen removal.

  3. EnviroAtlas - Cultivated biological nitrogen fixation in agricultural lands by 12-digit HUC in the Conterminous United States, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset contains data on the mean cultivated biological nitrogen fixation (C-BNF) in cultivated crop and hay/pasture lands per 12-digit Hydrologic...

  4. Quinones from plants of northeastern Brazil: structural diversity, chemical transformations, NMR data and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q; Santos, Allana Kellen L; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Santos, Hélcio S; Oliveira, Mailcar F; Costa, Sonia M O; Pessoa, Otilia D L; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-05-20

    The present review focus in quinones found in species of Brazilian northeastern Capraria biflora, Lippia sidoides, Lippia microphylla and Tabebuia serratifolia. The review cover ethnopharmacological aspects including photography of species, chemical structure feature, NMR datea and biological properties. Chemical transformations of lapachol to form enamine derivatives and biological activities are discussed.

  5. Transformations of Nitrogen from Secondary Treated Wastewater when Infiltrated in Managed Aquifer Recharge Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Wefer-Roehl, Annette; Kübeck, Christine; Schüth, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL seeks to address water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. Within this framework, we conduct column experiments to investigate transformations of nitrogen species when secondary treated wastewater (STWW) is infiltrated through two natural soils being considered for managed aquifer recharge. The soils vary considerably in organic matter content, with total organic matter determined by loss on ignition of 6.8 and 2.9 percent by mass for Soil 1 and Soil 2, respectively. Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations as high as 8.6 mg/L have been measured in pore water samples from Soil #1, indicating that ammonium could be a contaminant of concern in MAR applications using STWW, with consideration of the EU limit of 0.5 mg/L for NH4+. The two forms of nitrogen with the highest concentrations in the secondary treated wastewater are nitrate (NO3-) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). In water samples taken from the soil columns, a mass balance of measured ions shows a deficit of nitrogen in ionic form in the upper to middle depths of the soil, suggesting the presence of unmeasured species. These are likely nitrous oxide or dinitrogen gas, which would signify that denitrification is occurring. Measurements of N2O from water samples will verify its presence and spatial variation. The ammonium concentrations increase slowly in the upper parts of the soil but then increase more sharply at greater depth, after NO3- is depleted, suggesting that DON is the source of the produced NH4+. The production of NH4+ is presumed to be facilitated microbiologically. It is hypothesized that at higher organic carbon to total nitrogen (C:N) ratios, more NH4+ will be formed. To test this, in the experiments with Soil #2, three different inflow waters are used, listed in order of decreasing C:N ratio: STWW, STWW with NO3- added to a concentration of 80 mg

  6. Optimization of free ammonia concentration for nitrite accumulation in shortcut biological nitrogen removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Shim, Hojae; Park, Seong-Jun; Kim, Seung-Jin; Bae, Wookeun

    2006-03-01

    A shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) utilizes the concept of a direct conversion of ammonium to nitrite and then to nitrogen gas. A successful SBNR requires accumulation of nitrite in the system and inhibition of the activity of nitrite oxidizers. A high concentration of free ammonia (FA) inhibits nitrite oxidizers, but unfortunately decreases the ammonium removal rate as well. Therefore, the optimal range of FA concentration is necessary not only to stabilize nitrite accumulation but also to achieve maximum ammonium removal. In order to derive such optimal FA concentrations, the specific substrate utilization rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were measured. The optimal FA concentration range appeared to be 5-10 mg/L for the adapted sludge. The simulated results from the modified inhibition model expressed by FA and ammonium/nitrite concentrations were shown very similar to the experimental results.

  7. Studies on biological effects of nitrogen ion implantation in different genotype rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jiahua; Xia Yingwu; Shu Qingyao

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of nitrogen ion implantation on different genotype rice (Oryza sativa L) were studied. The results showed that there were obvious differences in physiological damages for the M 1 generation, mutation frequencies and mutagenic efficiencies of chlorophyll, heading date and plant height for M 2 generation of different genotypes. Treated by nitrogen ions, the varieties with high mutation frequency and mutagenic efficiency of chlorophyll in the M 2 generation were not necessarily high in those of heading date and plant height. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity of Fu8530 and Fuxian No.6 which were bred by using early maturing and semidwarf mutants as maternal plant was low. The early maturing and high stature mutation were not induced with these two varieties

  8. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOGENIC LANDSCAPES RECULTIVATION ON FUNCTIONING OF SOIL MICROORGANISMS COMMUNITIES WHICH TAKE PART IN TRANSFORMATION OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Syshchykova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is established that mining recultivation of tailings dams slimes promotes restoration of numerical structure of soil microorganisms community which take part in processes of nitrogen compounds transformation. The certificate of that is number restoration of the organotrophic bacteria of a nitrogen cycle to 0.3 million CFU/g of soil and increase by 2-3 times of streptomycetes quantity in blankets. The received results of quantitative structure of the microorganisms which are taking part in processes of nitrogen mineral compounds transformation in the chernozem usual allow to claim that in blankets the number of microorganisms makes 3.89 and 2.33 million CFU/g soil. It should be noted that the best conditions for microflora development are formed on slime with drawing 50 cm of loess-like loam and 30 cm of a fertile layer. The microorganism quantity on the specified monitoring area increases by 3-4 times in the soil of a fertile layer and by 1.3-1.6 times in loess-like loam in comparison with slime without recultivation. Increase of microbiological processes intensity, extremely important, considering strengthening of ecosystems self-regulation functions. It is established high level of microbiological transformation of organic substance, the indicator is made 7.3-11.1 in the edatopes of the recultivated slimes. Increasing indicators of microbiological transformation and mineralization of organic compounds in the technozems confirm restoration of a slimes biogenity at carrying out of recultivation that promotes an intensification of mineralization processes and assimilation by plants nitrogen compounds in the soil. Keywords: microorganisms, nitrogen compounds, technozems, mining recultivation.

  9. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  10. Biological nitrogen fixation in common bean and faba bean using N-15 methodology and two reference crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvache, Marcelo.

    1989-01-01

    A field was conducted on a Typic ustropepts soil located at 'La Tola', the experimental campus of the Agricultural Sciences Faculty at Tumbaco, Ecuador. The objectives were to quantify faba bean (Vicia faba) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) biological nitrogen fixation, using quinoa (chenopodium quinoa) and maize (Zea mays) as reference crops. The average values were 80 and 70 per cent for faba bean and 42 and 14 per cent for common bean, respectively. It was assumed that nitrogen use eficiency was the same for fixing crops but observed that a crop with high nitrogen use efficiency overestimates legume biological nitrogen fixation. Results suggests that greater caution is needed when selecting reference crops for legumes with nitrogen fixation

  11. Biological soil crusts emit large amounts of NO and HONO affecting the nitrogen cycle in drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Wu, Dianming; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Dryland systems currently cover ˜40% of the world's land surface and are still expanding as a consequence of human impact and global change. In contrast to that, information on their role in global biochemical processes is limited, probably induced by the presumption that their sparse vegetation cover plays a negligible role in global balances. However, spaces between the sparse shrubs are not bare, but soils are mostly covered by biological soil crusts (biocrusts). These biocrust communities belong to the oldest life forms, resulting from an assembly between soil particles and cyanobacteria, lichens, bryophytes, and algae plus heterotrophic organisms in varying proportions. Depending on the dominating organism group, cyanobacteria-, lichen-, and bryophyte-dominated biocrusts are distinguished. Besides their ability to restrict soil erosion they fix atmospheric carbon and nitrogen, and by doing this they serve as a nutrient source in strongly depleted dryland ecosystems. In this study we show that a fraction of the nitrogen fixed by biocrusts is metabolized and subsequently returned to the atmosphere in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). These gases affect the radical formation and oxidizing capacity within the troposphere, thus being of particular interest to atmospheric chemistry. Laboratory measurements using dynamic chamber systems showed that dark cyanobacteria-dominated crusts emitted the largest amounts of NO and HONO, being ˜20 times higher than trace gas fluxes of nearby bare soil. We showed that these nitrogen emissions have a biogenic origin, as emissions of formerly strongly emitting samples almost completely ceased after sterilization. By combining laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data we made a best estimate of global annual emissions amounting to ˜1.1 Tg of NO-N and ˜0.6 Tg of HONO-N from biocrusts. This sum of 1.7 Tg of reactive nitrogen emissions equals ˜20% of the soil release under natural vegetation according

  12. Combined Pre-Precipitation, Biological Sludge Hydrolysis and Nitrogen Reduction - A Pilot Demonstration of Integrated Nutrient Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, G. H.; Jørgensen, P. E.; Strube, R.

    1992-01-01

    solubilization was 10-13% of the suspended COD. The liquid phase of the hydrolyzed sludge, the hydrolysate, was separated from the suspended fraction by centrifugation and added to the biological nitrogen removal stage to support denitrification. The hydrolysate COD consisted mainly of volatile fatty acids......A pilot study was performed to investigate advanced wastewater treatment by pre-precipitation in combination with biological nitrogen removal supported by biological sludge hydrolysis. The influent wastewater was pretreated by addition of a pre-polymerized aluminum salt, followed by flocculation......, resulting in high denitrification rates. Nitrogen reduction was performed based on the Bio-Denitro principle in an activated sludge system. Nitrogen was reduced from 45 mg/l to 9 mg/l and phosphorus was reduced from 11 mg/l to 0.5 mg/l. The sludge yield was low, approx. 0.3-0.4 gCOD/gCOD removed...

  13. Experimentation of netlike hydro gel nitrogen containing polymer sorbents for biological liquids purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karieva, Z.M.; Karimova, N. Kh.

    2003-01-01

    The high efficiency of hydrogels synthesized earlier in comparison with Pharmacopoeia sorbents are interesting to study comprehensively for the number of the toxins of biological liquids. Taking into considerations the high electoral sorption ability of ethynilpiperidol polymers to the hydro phobic interaction it may be suggested that they have a high detoxication ability. The detoxication characteristics of studied polymers have advantages over the known sorbents. Experiences with animals showed that in identical conditions of experiment in application of netlike polymers the survival grew 90%. Synthesis and investigations of netlike hydrogels polymer materials on nitrogen containing monomers of ethynil piperidol were given in the work. (author)

  14. Investigating Viruses during the Transformation of Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Bernard

    2017-03-10

    This Reflections article describes my early work on viral enzymes and the discovery of mRNA capping, how my training in medicine and biochemistry merged as I evolved into a virologist, the development of viruses as vaccine vectors, and how scientific and technological developments during the 1970s and beyond set the stage for the interrogation of nearly every step in the reproductive cycle of vaccinia virus (VACV), a large DNA virus with about 200 genes. The reader may view this article as a work in progress, because I remain actively engaged in research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) notwithstanding 50 memorable years there. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable energy transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthesis supports the biosphere. Currently, human activity appropriates about one fourth of terrestrial photosynthetic net primary production (NPP) to support our GDP and nutrition. The cost to Earth systems of "our cut" of NPP is thought to be rapidly driving several Earth systems outside of bounds that were established on the geological time scale. Even with a fundamental realignment of human priorities, changing the unsustainable trajectory of the anthropocene will require reengineering photosynthesis to more efficiently meet human needs. Artificial photosynthetic systems are envisioned that can both supply renewable fuels and serve as platforms for exploring redesign strategies for photosynthesis. These strategies can be used in the nascent field of synthetic biology to make vast, much needed improvements in the biomass production efficiency of photosynthesis.

  16. Investigating the formation and toxicity of nitrogen transformation products of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole in wastewater treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Victoria; Sanchís, Josep; Abad, Jose Luís; Ginebreda, Antoni; Farré, Marinella; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental monitoring of recently discovered TPs of diclofenac in wastewater and surface water. • Quantitative determination of non-detected TPs of sulfamethoxazole in wastewater and impacted surface waters. • Toxicity assessment of diclofenac and its TPs in a panel of standard assays of aquatic organism. • Only nitro-diclofenac proved to be more toxic than the parent compound. - Abstract: Diclofenac (DCF) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) are highly consumed pharmaceuticals and concentrated in effluents from conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) since they are not completely eliminated. Under microbial mediated nitrification/denitrification processes occurring in nitrifying activated sludge DCF biotransformed into its nitroso and nitro derivatives (NO-DCF and NO 2 -DCF, respectively). SMX was biotransformed under denitrification conditions in water/sediment batch reactors into its nitro and desamino derivatives (NO 2 -SMX and Des-SMX, respectively). Four transformation products (TPs) from DCF and SMX were analized in wastewaters (WW) and receiving surface waters (SW). Nitrifying/denitrifying-derivatives of DCF and SMX were detected for the first time in WW and SW at one order of magnitude lower than their parent compounds. Relationships observed among levels of NO-DCF, NO 2 -DCF and nitrogen-species tentatively suggested that nitrification/denitrification processes are involved in nitration and nitrosation of DCF during biological WW treatment. Acute toxicity of analytes to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri was assessed individually and in mixtures with other relevant micropollutants. Individual effects showed these compounds as not harmful and not toxic. However, synergism effects observed in mixtures evidenced that contribution of these compounds to overall toxicity of complex environmental samples, should not be dismissed.

  17. Investigating the formation and toxicity of nitrogen transformation products of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole in wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Victoria; Sanchís, Josep [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Abad, Jose Luís [RUBAM-IIQAC-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, Barcelona (Spain); Ginebreda, Antoni; Farré, Marinella [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Pérez, Sandra, E-mail: spsqam@idaea.csic.es [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barceló, Damià [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, Emili Grahit 101, Girona (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Environmental monitoring of recently discovered TPs of diclofenac in wastewater and surface water. • Quantitative determination of non-detected TPs of sulfamethoxazole in wastewater and impacted surface waters. • Toxicity assessment of diclofenac and its TPs in a panel of standard assays of aquatic organism. • Only nitro-diclofenac proved to be more toxic than the parent compound. - Abstract: Diclofenac (DCF) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) are highly consumed pharmaceuticals and concentrated in effluents from conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) since they are not completely eliminated. Under microbial mediated nitrification/denitrification processes occurring in nitrifying activated sludge DCF biotransformed into its nitroso and nitro derivatives (NO-DCF and NO{sub 2}-DCF, respectively). SMX was biotransformed under denitrification conditions in water/sediment batch reactors into its nitro and desamino derivatives (NO{sub 2}-SMX and Des-SMX, respectively). Four transformation products (TPs) from DCF and SMX were analized in wastewaters (WW) and receiving surface waters (SW). Nitrifying/denitrifying-derivatives of DCF and SMX were detected for the first time in WW and SW at one order of magnitude lower than their parent compounds. Relationships observed among levels of NO-DCF, NO{sub 2}-DCF and nitrogen-species tentatively suggested that nitrification/denitrification processes are involved in nitration and nitrosation of DCF during biological WW treatment. Acute toxicity of analytes to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri was assessed individually and in mixtures with other relevant micropollutants. Individual effects showed these compounds as not harmful and not toxic. However, synergism effects observed in mixtures evidenced that contribution of these compounds to overall toxicity of complex environmental samples, should not be dismissed.

  18. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOGENIC LANDSCAPES RECULTIVATION ON FUNCTIONING OF SOIL MICROORGANISMS COMMUNITIES WHICH TAKE PART IN TRANSFORMATION OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syshchykova Oksana Vitalyevna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is established that mining recultivation of tailings dams slimes promotes restoration of numerical structure of soil microorganisms community which take part in processes of nitrogen compounds transformation. The certificate of that is number restoration of the organotrophic bacteria of a nitrogen cycle to 0.3 million CFU/g of soil and increase by 2-3 times of streptomycetes quantity in blankets. The received results of quantitative structure of the microorganisms which are taking part in processes of nitrogen mineral compounds transformation in the chernozem usual allow to claim that in blankets the number of microorganisms makes 3.89 and 2.33 million CFU/g soil. It should be noted that the best conditions for microflora development are formed on slime with drawing 50 cm of loess-like loam and 30 cm of a fertile layer. The microorganism quantity on the specified monitoring area increases by 3-4 times in the soil of a fertile layer and by 1.3-1.6 times in loess-like loam in comparison with slime without recultivation. Increase of microbiological processes intensity, extremely important, considering strengthening of ecosystems self-regulation functions. It is established high level of microbiological transformation of organic substance, the indicator is made 7.3-11.1 in the edatopes of the recultivated slimes. Increasing indicators of microbiological transformation and mineralization of organic compounds in the technozems confirm restoration of a slimes biogenity at carrying out of recultivation that promotes an intensification of mineralization processes and assimilation by plants nitrogen compounds in the soil.

  19. Soybean seed treatment with nickel improves biological nitrogen fixation and urease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José eLavres Junior

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is an essential micronutrient required for plants’ metabolism due to its role as a structural component of urease and hydrogenase, which in turn perform nitrogen (N metabolism in many legume species. Seed treatment with cobalt, molybdenum and Bradyrhizobium strains has been widely practiced to improve crops. Additionally, seed treatment together with Ni fertilization of soybean might improve the efficiency of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, boosting grain dry matter yield and N content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of soybean seed treatment with Ni rates (0, 45, 90,135, 180, 360 and 540 mg kg-1 on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, directly by the 15N natural abundance method (δ15N‰ and by measurement of urease [E.C. 3.5.1.5] activity, as well as indirectly by nitrogenase (N-ase activity [E.C. 1.18.6.1]. Soybean plants (cultivar BMX Potência RR were grown in a sandy soil up to the R7 developmental stage (grain maturity, at which point the nutrient content in the leaves, chlorophyll content, urease and N-ase activities, Ni and N content in the grains, nodulation (at R1 - flowering stage, as well as the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (δ15N ‰, were evaluated. The proportion of N derived from N2 fixation varied from 77 to 99% using the natural 15N abundance method and non-nodulating Panicum miliaceum and Phalaris canariensis as references. A Ni rate of 45 mg kg-1 increased BNF by 12% compared to the control. The increased N uptake in the grains was closely correlated with chlorophyll content in the leaves, urease and N-ase activities, as well as with nodulation. Grain dry matter yield and aerial part dry matter yield increased, respectively, by 84% and 51% in relation to the control plants at 45 mg kg-1 Ni via seed treatment. Despite, Ni concentration was increased with Ni-seed treatment, Ni rates higher than 135 mg kg-1 promoted negative effects on plant growth and yield. In these

  20. The transformation of nitrogen in soil under Robinia Pseudacacia shelterbelt and in adjoining cultivated field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajdak, L.; Gaca, W.

    2009-04-01

    The shelterbelts perform more than twenty different functions favorable to the environment, human economy, health and culture. The most important for agricultural landscape is increase of water retention, purification of ground waters and prevent of pollution spread in the landscape, restriction of wind and water erosion effects, isolation of polluting elements in the landscape, preservation of biological diversity in agricultural areas and mitigation of effects of unfavorable climatic phenomena. Denitrification is defined as the reduction of nitrate or nitrite coupled to electron transport phosphorylation resulting in gaseous N either as molecular N2 or as an oxide of N. High content of moisture, low oxygen, neutral and basic pH favour the denitrification. Nitrate reductase is an important enzyme involved in the process of denitrification. The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalyzed by nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase is catalyzed reduction nitrite to nitrous oxide. The conversion of N2O to N2 is catalyzed by nitrous oxide reductase. This process leads to the lost of nitrogen in soil mainly in the form of N2 and N2O. Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas which cause significant depletion of the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer. The investigations were carried out in Dezydery Chlapowski Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). Our investigations were focused on the soils under Robinia pseudacacia shelterbelt and in adjoining cultivated field. The afforestation was created 200 years ago and it is consist of mainly Robinia pseudacacia with admixture of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. This shelterbelt and adjoining cultivated field are located on grey-brown podzolic soil. The aim of this study is to present information on the changes of nitrate reductase activity in soil with admixture urea (organic form of nitrogen) in two different concentrations 0,25% N and 0,5% N. Our results have shown that this process

  1. Role of plants in nitrogen and sulfur transformations in floating hydroponic root mats: A comparison of two helophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Rania A B; Kuschk, Peter; Wiessner, Arndt; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Müller, Jochen A; Köser, Heinz

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge about the roles helophytes play in constructed wetlands (CWs) is limited, especially regarding their provision of organic rhizodeposits. Here, transformations of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur were monitored in a CW variety, floating hydroponic root mat (FHRM), treating synthetic wastewater containing low concentration of organic carbon. Two helophytes, Phragmites australis and Juncus effusus, were compared in duplicates. Striking differences were found between the FHRM of the two helophytes. Whereas ammonium was removed in all FHRMs to below detection level, total nitrogen of 1.15 ± 0.4 g m(-2) d(-1) was removed completely only in P. australis systems. The mats with J. effusus displayed effective nitrification but incomplete denitrification as 77% of the removed ammonium-nitrogen accumulated as nitrate. Furthermore, the P. australis treatment units showed on average 3 times higher sulfate-S removal rates (1.1 ± 0.45 g m(-2) d(-1)) than the systems planted with J. effusus (0.37 ± 0.29 g m(-2) d(-1)). Since the influent organic carbon was below the stoichiometric requirement for the observed N and S transformation processes, helophytes' organic rhizodeposits apparently contributed to these transformations, while P. australis provided about 6 times higher bioavailable organic rhizodeposits than J. effusus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Intercropping on Biological Yield, Percentage of Nitrogen and Morphological Characteristics of Coriander and Fenugreek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bigonah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the intercropping arrangements of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L., a field experiment was conducted during growing season of 2010 at Agriculture Research Station, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments included: mono-crop of fenugreek (A, %25 of optimum density of coriander + %175 of optimum density of fenugreek (B, %50 of optimum density of coriander + %150 of optimum density of fenugreek (C, %75 of optimum density of coriander + %125 of optimum density of fenugreek (D, %100 of optimum density of coriander + %100 of optimum density of fenugreek (E, mono-crop of coriander (F, %125 of optimum density of coriander + %75 of optimum density of fenugreek (G, %150 of optimum density of coriander + %50 of optimum density of fenugreek (H, %175 of optimum density of coriander + %25 of optimum density of fenugreek (I. Biological yield harvested in coriander at %5 flowering stage and in fenugreek at %20 flowering stage. The result showed that B treatment had highest plant height and biological yield of fenugreek, highest total land equivalent ratio and also B treatment had lowest essential oil contents of leaf, essential oil yield and biological yield of coriander. I treatment had lowest biological yield of fenugreek and it had highest essential oil contents of leaf, essential oil yield and plant height in coriander. Also A and E treatments had highest percent of nitrogen of biomass in fenugreek and coriander, respectively.

  3. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  4. Distribution patterns of nitrogen micro-cycle functional genes and their quantitative coupling relationships with nitrogen transformation rates in a biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Ji, Guodong; Bai, Xueyuan

    2016-06-01

    The present study explored the distribution patterns of nitrogen micro-cycle genes and the underlying mechanisms responsible for nitrogen transformation at the molecular level (genes) in a biotrickling filter (biofilter). The biofilter achieved high removal efficiencies for ammonium (NH4(+)-N) (80-94%), whereas nitrate accumulated at different levels under a progressive NH4(+)-N load. Combined analyses revealed the anammox, nas, napA, narG, nirS, and nxrA genes were the dominant enriched genes in different treatment layers. The presence of simultaneous nitrification, ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were the primary factors accounted for the robust NH4(+)-N treatment performance. The presence of DNRA, nitrification, and denitrification was determined to be a pivotal pathway that contributed to the nitrate accumulation in the biofilter. The enrichment of functional genes at different depth gradients and the multi-path coupled cooperation at the functional gene level are conducive to achieving complete nitrogen removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous forest soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  6. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  7. Effective Biological Nitrogen Removal Treatment Processes for Domestic Wastewaters with Low C/N Ratios: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Sheng-Peng; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Merkey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    with high efficiency and relative low costs. However, the removal of nitrogen from domestic wastewater with a low carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio can often be limited in municipal wastewater plants (WWTPs) because organic carbon is a limiting factor for denitrification. The present work reviews innovative....... They can effectively be used for nitrogen removal from low C/N domestic wastewater without external carbon addition. In addition, conventional and alternative carbon sources for enhanced biological nitrogen removal were also reviewed. We conclude that alternative carbon sources such as wine distillery...... at large scale for nitrogen removal from low C/N domestic wastewater, (2) further method logic are explored to introduce the Anammox pathway into domestic wastewater treatment, and (3) alternative carbon sources are explored and optimized for supporting the denitrification. With these efforts, cost...

  8. Optimization of operation conditions for the startup of aerobic granular sludge reactors biologically removing carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Holliger, Christof

    2014-08-01

    The transformation of conventional flocculent sludge to aerobic granular sludge (AGS) biologically removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (COD, N, P) is still a main challenge in startup of AGS sequencing batch reactors (AGS-SBRs). On the one hand a rapid granulation is desired, on the other hand good biological nutrient removal capacities have to be maintained. So far, several operation parameters have been studied separately, which makes it difficult to compare their impacts. We investigated seven operation parameters in parallel by applying a Plackett-Burman experimental design approach with the aim to propose an optimized startup strategy. Five out of the seven tested parameters had a significant impact on the startup duration. The conditions identified to allow a rapid startup of AGS-SBRs with good nutrient removal performances were (i) alternation of high and low dissolved oxygen phases during aeration, (ii) a settling strategy avoiding too high biomass washout during the first weeks of reactor operation, (iii) adaptation of the contaminant load in the early stage of the startup in order to ensure that all soluble COD was consumed before the beginning of the aeration phase, (iv) a temperature of 20 °C, and (v) a neutral pH. Under such conditions, it took less than 30 days to produce granular sludge with high removal performances for COD, N, and P. A control run using this optimized startup strategy produced again AGS with good nutrient removal performances within four weeks and the system was stable during the additional operation period of more than 50 days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen transformations in response to temperature and rainfall manipulation in oak savanna: A global change experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, R. L.; Boutton, T. W.; Tjoelker, M. G.; Volder, A.; Briske, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are projected to elevate global surface air temperatures by 1.1 to 6.4°C by the end of the century, and potentially magnify the intensity and variability of seasonal precipitation distribution. The mid-latitude grasslands of North America are predicted to experience substantial modification in precipitation regimes, with a shift towards drier summers and wetter spring and fall seasons. Despite these predictions, little is known concerning the effects of these global climate change drivers or their potential interactive effects on nitrogen (N) cycling processes. The purpose of this study is to quantify seasonal variation in rates of N-mineralization, nitrification, and N-losses via leaching in soil subjected to experimental warming and rainfall manipulation. Research was conducted at the Texas A&M Warming and Rainfall Manipulation (WaRM) Site in College Station where eight 9x18m rainout shelters and two unsheltered controls were established in post oak savanna in 2003. Replicate annual rainfall redistribution treatments (n = 4) are applied at the shelter level (long term mean vs. 40% of summer redistributed to fall and spring with same annual total). Warming treatments (ambient vs. 24-hr IR canopy warming of 1-3°C) were applied to planted monocultures of juniper and little bluestem, and a juniper-grass combination. Both juniper and little bluestem are key species within the post oak savanna region. Plots were sampled from the full factorial design during years six and seven of the WaRM experiment. Soil N-mineralization, nitrification, and N-losses via leaching were assessed quarterly for two years using the resin core incubation method. Rainfall, species composition, and time interacted significantly to influence both ammonification and nitrification. Highest rates of ammonification (0.115 mg NH4+ -N/ kg soil/day) occurred in grass monocultures during summer in the control rainfall plots, whereas highest rates of

  10. History on the biological nitrogen fixation research in graminaceous plants: special emphasis on the Brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldani, José I; Baldani, Vera L D

    2005-09-01

    This review covers the history on Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF) in Graminaceous plants grown in Brazil, and describes research progress made over the last 40 years, most of which was coordinated by Johanna Döbereiner. One notable accomplishment during this period was the discovery of several nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as the rhizospheric (Beijerinckia fluminensis and Azotobacter paspali), associative (Azospirillum lipoferum, A. brasilense, A. amazonense) and the endophytic (Herbaspirillum seropedicae, H. rubrisubalbicans, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, Burkholderia brasilensis and B. tropica). The role of these diazotrophs in association with grasses, mainly with cereal plants, has been studied and a lot of progress has been achieved in the ecological, physiological, biochemical, and genetic aspects. The mechanisms of colonization and infection of the plant tissues are better understood, and the BNF contribution to the soil/plant system has been determined. Inoculation studies with diazotrophs showed that endophytic bacteria have a much higher BNF contribution potential than associative diazotrophs. In addition, it was found that the plant genotype influences the plant/bacteria association. Recent data suggest that more studies should be conducted on the endophytic association to strengthen the BNF potential. The ongoing genome sequencing programs: RIOGENE (Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus) and GENOPAR (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) reflect the commitment to the BNF study in Brazil and should allow the country to continue in the forefront of research related to the BNF process in Graminaceous plants.

  11. Using synthetic biology to distinguish and overcome regulatory and functional barriers related to nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex process requiring multiple genes working in concert. To date, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif gene cluster, divided into seven operons, is one of the most studied systems. Its nitrogen fixation capacity is subject to complex cascade regulation and physiological limitations. In this report, the entire K. pneumoniae nif gene cluster was reassembled as operon-based BioBrick parts in Escherichia coli. It provided ~100% activity of native K. pneumoniae system. Based on the expression levels of these BioBrick parts, a T7 RNA polymerase-LacI expression system was used to replace the σ(54-dependent promoters located upstream of nif operons. Expression patterns of nif operons were critical for the maximum activity of the recombinant system. By mimicking these expression levels with variable-strength T7-dependent promoters, ~42% of the nitrogenase activity of the σ(54-dependent nif system was achieved in E. coli. When the newly constructed T7-dependent nif system was challenged with different genetic and physiological conditions, it bypassed the original complex regulatory circuits, with minor physiological limitations. Therefore, we have successfully replaced the nif regulatory elements with a simple expression system that may provide the first step for further research of introducing nif genes into eukaryotic organelles, which has considerable potentials in agro-biotechnology.

  12. Advances in wastewater nitrogen removal by biological processes: state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G. Capodaglio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the state-of-the-art of the most recent advances in biological nitrogen removal, including process design criteria and technological innovations. With reference to the Modified Ludzck Ettinger (MLE process (pre-denitrification and nitrification in the activated sludge process, the most common nitrogen removal process used nowadays, a new design equation for the denitrification reactor based on specific denitrification rate (SDNR has been proposed. In addition, factors influencing SDNR (DO in the anoxic reactor; hydrodynamic behavior are analyzed, and technological solutions are proposed. Concerning technological advances, the paper presents a summary of various “deammonification” processes, better known by their patent names like ANAMMOX®, DEMON®, CANON®, ANITA® and others. These processes have already found applications in the treatment of high-strength wastewater such as digested sludge liquor and landfill leachate. Among other emerging denitrification technologies, consideration is given to the Membrane Biofilm Reactors (MBfRs that can be operated both in oxidation and reduction mode.

  13. Effect of salinity on N₂O production during shortcut biological nitrogen removal from landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mu; Liu, Tiantian; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Xiao, Han

    2014-05-01

    Three identical SBR adapted to different salinity were applied to investigate the characteristics of the treatment performance and N2O production [Formula: see text] during shortcut biological nitrogen removal from landfill leachate under various operating parameters. Increase of salinity might deteriorate the activity of the microorganisms leading to the increase of [Formula: see text] , however, the system could be gradually adapted to the inhibition and alleviate the detrimental effect to some extent. The system acclimated to high salinity provided better performance under high salinity shock and a lower possibility of [Formula: see text] , while a sudden decrease in salinity can cause a temporary increase in [Formula: see text] . High salinity strengthened the influence of high ammonia nitrogen concentration and low DO concentration on [Formula: see text] while the strengthening effect was unconspicuous at high DO concentration. The anoxic phase did not produce a significant amount of N2O even at the lowest C/N ratio of 0.5 and was less susceptible to salinity. Characterization of the biomass composition using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that the relative proportion of Nitrosomonas europaea was increased with the increase of the salinity, which may be an important factor for the strengthening effect of salinity on [Formula: see text] . Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. INFLUENCE OF BIOLOGICAL AND THERMAL TRANSFORMED SEWAGE SLUDGE APPLICATION ON MANGANESE CONTENT IN PLANTS AND SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Koncewicz-Baran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of sewage sludge treatment methods, due to the agent (chemical, biological, thermal leads to the formation of varying ‘products’ properties, including the content of heavy metals forms. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of biologically and thermally transformed sewage sludge on the manganese content in plants and form of this element in the soil. The study was based on a two-year pot experiment. In this study was used stabilized sewage sludge collected from Wastewater Treatment Plant Krakow – ”Płaszów” and its mixtures with wheat straw in the gravimetric ratio 1:1 in conversion to material dry matter, transformed biologically (composting by 117 days in a bioreactor and thermally (in the furnace chamber with no air access by the following procedure exposed to temperatures of 130 °C for 40 min → 200 °C for 30 min. In both years of the study biologically and thermally transformed mixtures of sewage sludge with wheat straw demonstrated similar impact on the amount of biomass plants to the pig manure. Bigger amounts of manganese were assessed in oat biomass than in spring rape biomass. The applied sewage sludge and its biologically and thermally converted mixtures did not significantly affect manganese content in plant biomass in comparison with the farmyard manure. The applied fertilization did not modify the values of translocation and bioaccumulation ratios of manganese in the above-ground parts and roots of spring rape and oat. No increase in the content of the available to plants forms of manganese in the soil after applying biologically and thermally transformed sewage sludge mixtures with straw was detected. In the second year, lower contents of these manganese forms were noted in the soil of all objects compared with the first year of the experiment.

  15. Biological nitrogen fixation in relation to energy forest production. Progress report, 1978-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarholm, M; Granhall, U

    1981-01-01

    Different pasture legumes, Alnus incana and Myrica gale have been tested in pot experiments and field trials with respect to their use as biological N-fertilizers in relation to energy forest production. So far experiments have been mainly concerned with their establishemnts as on intercrop with Galix at a mire site with ombrotrophic peat and in two clayish arable soils. Laboratory experiments have been made to determine optimal conditions for growth and nitrogen fixation of wild and Alaska lupines in relation to varous soil amendments in the form of lime, ash, NPKMo, and Fe. A pilot experiment of the terrelations between willows and grey alder growing together in peat has been started at Uppsala.

  16. SOIL NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS AND ROLE OF LIGHT FRACTION ORGANIC MATTER IN FOREST SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depletion of soil organic matter through cultivation may alter substrate availability for microbes, altering the dynamic balance between nitrogen (N) immobilization and mineralization. Soil light fraction (LF) organic matter is an active pool that decreases upon cultivation, and...

  17. Use of nitrogen-15 in soil-plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.; Subbiah, B.V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the selected work carried out in the country and elsewhere on the fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency, fate and balance-sheet, soil and fertilizer nitrogen transformations and biological nitrogen fixation using 15 N is given. 129 refs., 4 tabs

  18. New, national bottom-up estimate for tree-based biological nitrogen fixation in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen is a limiting nutrient in many ecosystems, but is also a chief pollutant from human activity. Quantifying human impacts on the nitrogen cycle and investigating natural ecosystem nitrogen cycling both require an understanding of the magnitude of nitrogen inputs from biolo...

  19. Determination of biological nitrogen fixation capacities of winter and spring lentil varieties by using ''1''5N methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to determine the biological nitrogen fixation capacities of winter and spring varieties of lentil which have of agronomic importance under the Central Anatolia region, the field experiments (winter and spring) were carried out. In both experiments, the effects of two different iconoclasts and different harvesting times on the biological nitrogen fixation capacities of lentil varieties, were investigated. The field experiments were conducted using by randomized block design as split-split plot for 4 replications. Barley was selected as the reference crop and 20 cm row spacing were used for lentil and barley. Inoculations were done immediately before sowing. 10.0 kg N/ ha for lentil varieties as 10.0 % ''1''5N atom excess and 40.0 kg N/ ha for barley (reference crop) as 2.0 % ''1''5N atom excess ammonium sulphate fertilizer were applied. In addition, 60.0 kgP 2 O 5 / ha were applied as triple superphosphate for all treatments. Plants were harvested at the different growth stages and than plant materials prepared for the analysis. Total nitrogen and % ''1''5N atom excess analysis were done by Kjeldahl method and Emission spectrometer, respectively. The amount of nitrogen fixation capacities of winter and spring lentil varieties were calculated according to the A-Value method (IAEA 1990). The results showed us that the winter varieties of lentil had higher dry matter yields and nitrogen fixation capacities than the spring varieties. Inoculation treatments had no statistically significant effects on the percentage of nitrogen derived from atmosphere (% Ndfa) and the amount of fixed nitrogen (kg N/ ha) for both experiments. In comparison between the harvesting times, the highest amount of fixed nitrogen was found at the pod formation stage for all cultivars. The average amounts of % Ndfa and fixed nitrogen (kg N/ ha) were 75.0 and 70.0 for winter cultivars, 70.0 and 45.0 for spring cultivars, respectively

  20. Biological inquiry: a new course and assessment plan in response to the call to transform undergraduate biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldey, Ellen S; Abercrombie, Clarence L; Ivy, Tracie M; Kusher, Dave I; Moeller, John F; Rayner, Doug A; Smith, Charles F; Spivey, Natalie W

    2012-01-01

    We transformed our first-year curriculum in biology with a new course, Biological Inquiry, in which >50% of all incoming, first-year students enroll. The course replaced a traditional, content-driven course that relied on outdated approaches to teaching and learning. We diversified pedagogical practices by adopting guided inquiry in class and in labs, which are devoted to building authentic research skills through open-ended experiments. Students develop core biological knowledge, from the ecosystem to molecular level, and core skills through regular practice in hypothesis testing, reading primary literature, analyzing data, interpreting results, writing in disciplinary style, and working in teams. Assignments and exams require higher-order cognitive processes, and students build new knowledge and skills through investigation of real-world problems (e.g., malaria), which engages students' interest. Evidence from direct and indirect assessment has guided continuous course revision and has revealed that compared with the course it replaced, Biological Inquiry produces significant learning gains in all targeted areas. It also retains 94% of students (both BA and BS track) compared with 79% in the majors-only course it replaced. The project has had broad impact across the entire college and reflects the input of numerous constituencies and close collaboration among biology professors and students.

  1. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Wang Xiaoteng; Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed biological effects of N + implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. ► N + implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. ► At doses beyond 15 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place. ► CAT was essential for H 2 O 2 removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. ► HAsA–GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N + with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N + beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 10 16 to 15 × 10 16 ions cm −2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 10 16 ions cm −2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA–GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  2. [Effects of snow pack on soil nitrogen transformation enzyme activities in a subalpine Abies faxioniana forest of western Sichuan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Yin, Rui; Li, Zhi-Ping; Gou, Xiao-Lin; Tang, Shi-Shan

    2014-05-01

    This study characterized the dynamics of the activities of urease, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase in both soil organic layer and mineral soil layer under three depths of snow pack (deep snowpack, moderate snowpack and shallow snowpack) over the three critical periods (snow formed period, snow stable period, and snow melt period) in the subalpine Abies faxoniana forest of western Sichuan in the winter of 2012 and 2013. Throughout the winter, soil temperature under deep snowpack increased by 46.2% and 26.2%, respectively in comparison with moderate snowpack and shallow snowpack. In general, the three nitrogen-related soil enzyme activities under shallow snowpack were 0.8 to 3.9 times of those under deep snowpack during the winter. In the beginning and thawing periods of seasonal snow pack, shallow snowpack significantly increased the activities of urease, nitrate and nitrite reductase enzyme in both soil organic layer and mineral soil layer. Although the activities of the studied enzymes in soil organic layer and mineral soil layer were observed to be higher than those under deep- and moderate snowpacks in deep winter, no significant difference was found under the three snow packs. Meanwhile, the effects of snowpack on the activities of the measured enzymes were related with season, soil layer and enzyme type. Significant variations of the activities of nitrogen-related enzymes were found in three critical periods over the winter, and the three measured soil enzymes were significantly higher in organic layer than in mineral layer. In addition, the activities of the three measured soil enzymes were closely related with temperature and moisture in soils. In conclusion, the decrease of snow pack induced by winter warming might increase the activities of soil enzymes related with nitrogen transformation and further stimulate the process of wintertime nitrogen transformation in soils of the subalpine forest.

  3. Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed soybean roots differ in their nodulation and nitrogen fixation response to genistein and salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadian, Aria; Modarres Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated response differences of normal and transformed (so-called 'hairy') roots of soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.), cv L17) to the Nod-factor inducing isoflavone genistein and salinity by quantifying growth, nodulation, nitrogen fixation and biochemical changes. Composite soybean plants were generated using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of non-nodulating mutant nod139 (GmNFR5α minus) with complementing A. rhizogenes K599 carrying the wild-type GmNFR5α gene under control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. We used genetic complementation for nodulation ability as only nodulated roots were scored. After hairy root emergence, primary roots were removed and composite plants were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum (strain CB1809) pre-induced with 10 μM genistein and watered with NaCl (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM). There were significant differences between hairy roots and natural roots in their responses to salt stress and genistein application. In addition, there were noticeable nodulation and nitrogen fixation differences. Composite plants had better growth, more root volume and chlorophyll as well as more nodules and higher nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) compared with natural roots. Decreased lipid peroxidation, proline accumulation and catalase/peroxidase activities were found in 'hairy' roots under salinity stress. Genistein significantly increased nodulation and nitrogen fixation and improved roots and shoot growth. Although genistein alleviated lipid peroxidation under salinity stress, it had no significant effect on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In general, composite plants were more competitive in growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixation than normal non-transgenic even under salinity stress conditions.

  4. Systems biology of bacterial nitrogen fixation: High-throughput technology and its integrative description with constraint-based modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resendis-Antonio Osbaldo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial nitrogen fixation is the biological process by which atmospheric nitrogen is uptaken by bacteroids located in plant root nodules and converted into ammonium through the enzymatic activity of nitrogenase. In practice, this biological process serves as a natural form of fertilization and its optimization has significant implications in sustainable agricultural programs. Currently, the advent of high-throughput technology supplies with valuable data that contribute to understanding the metabolic activity during bacterial nitrogen fixation. This undertaking is not trivial, and the development of computational methods useful in accomplishing an integrative, descriptive and predictive framework is a crucial issue to decoding the principles that regulated the metabolic activity of this biological process. Results In this work we present a systems biology description of the metabolic activity in bacterial nitrogen fixation. This was accomplished by an integrative analysis involving high-throughput data and constraint-based modeling to characterize the metabolic activity in Rhizobium etli bacteroids located at the root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris (bean plant. Proteome and transcriptome technologies led us to identify 415 proteins and 689 up-regulated genes that orchestrate this biological process. Taking into account these data, we: 1 extended the metabolic reconstruction reported for R. etli; 2 simulated the metabolic activity during symbiotic nitrogen fixation; and 3 evaluated the in silico results in terms of bacteria phenotype. Notably, constraint-based modeling simulated nitrogen fixation activity in such a way that 76.83% of the enzymes and 69.48% of the genes were experimentally justified. Finally, to further assess the predictive scope of the computational model, gene deletion analysis was carried out on nine metabolic enzymes. Our model concluded that an altered metabolic activity on these enzymes induced

  5. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  6. C-H functionalization directed by transformable nitrogen heterocycles: synthesis of ortho-oxygenated arylnaphthalenes from arylphthalazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Medellin, Derek C; Kornienko, Alexander

    2014-01-21

    Two protocols for oxygenation of aromatic C-H bonds ortho-positioned to the phthalazine ring were developed. The transannulation of the phthalazine ring to a naphthalene moiety by an Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction led to the synthesis of naphtho[2,1-c]chromenes, 1-(ortho-hydroxyaryl)naphthalenes and 6,7-dihydrobenzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]oxepine. This new strategy based on the utilization of transformable nitrogen heterocycles in C-H functionalization chemistry can be potentially applicable to the synthesis of a broad range of biaryl compounds.

  7. Comparison of biochar, zeolite and their mixture amendment for aiding organic matter transformation and nitrogen conservation during pig manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Ren, Xiuna; Zhao, Junchao; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Meijing; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the impact of biochar, zeolite and their mixture on nitrogen conservation and organic matter transformation during pig manure (PM) composting. Four treatments were set-up from PM mixed with wheat straw and then applied 10% biochar (B), 10% zeolite (Z) and 10% biochar+10% zeolite (B+Z) into composting mixtures (dry weight basis), while treatment without additives applied used as control. Results indicated that adding B, Z and B+Z could obviously (pcompost quality indicated that the combined use of biochar and zeolite could be more useful for PM composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of nitrogen transformations in a southern California constructed wastewater treatment wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartoris, J.J.; Thullen, J.S.; Barber, L.B.; Salas, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    A 9.9-ha combined habitat and wastewater treatment demonstration wetland was constructed and planted in the summer of 1994, at Eastern Municipal Water District’s (EMWD) Hemet/San Jacinto Regional Water Reclamation Facility (RWRF) in southern California. From January 1996 through September 1997, the marsh–pond–marsh wetland system was operated to polish an average of 3785 m3 d−1 (1×106 gal day−1) of secondary-treated effluent from the RWRF. Nitrogen removal was a major objective of this wetland treatment. Weekly inflow/outflow water quality monitoring of the wetland was supplemented with biannual, 45-station synoptic surveys within the system to determine internal distribution patterns of the nitrogen species (total ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and organic nitrogen), total organic carbon (TOC), and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254). Synoptic surveys were carried out during May 22 and September 17, 1996, and May 6 and September 25, 1997 and the results were mapped using the ARC/INFO processing package and inverse distance weighted mathematical techniques. Distribution patterns of the various nitrogen species, TOC, and UV254 within the wetland indicate that the nitrogen dynamics of the system are influenced both by variations in treatment plant loading, and, increasingly, by the degree of coverage and maturity of the emergent vegetation.

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation in three long-term organic and conventional arable crop rotation experiments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Arjun; Li, Fucui; Askegaard, Margrethe

    2017-01-01

    Biological nitrogen (N) fixation (BNF) by legumes in organic cropping systems has been perceived as a strategy to substitute N import from conventional sources. However, the N contribution by legumes varies considerably depending on legumes species, as well as local soil and climatic conditions...

  10. Biological Effects of Potato Plants Transformation with Glucose Oxidase Gene and their Resistance to Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Grabelnych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is known that regulation of plant tolerance to adverse environmental factors is connected with short term increase of the concentration of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are signalling molecules for the induction of protective mechanisms. Introduction and expression of heterologous gox gene, which encodes glucose oxidase enzyme in plant genome, induce constantly higher content of hydrogen peroxide in plant tissues. It is not known how the introduction of native or modified gox gene affects the plant resistance to high-temperature stress, one of the most commonly used model for the study of stress response and thermal tolerance. In this study, we investigated biological effects of transformation and evaluated the resistance to temperature stress of potato plants with altered levels of glucose oxidase expression. Transformation of potato plants by gox gene led to the more early coming out from tuber dormancy of transformed plants and slower growth rate. Transformants containing the glucose oxidase gene were more sensitive to lethal thermal shock (50 °C, 90 min than the transformant with the empty vector (pBI or untransformed plants (CK. Pre-heating of plants at 37 °C significantly weakened the damaging effect of lethal thermal shock. This attenuation was more significant in the non-transformed plants.

  11. Malignant transformation in vitro: criteria, biological markers, and application in environmental screening of carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.

    1979-01-01

    Biological markers which distinguish malignantly transformed fibroblasts from their normal counterpart include pleomorphic morphology, lowered requirement for nutritional factors, loss of density inhibition of growth, complex topography as discernible by scanning electron microscopy, loss in surface proteins, incomplete glycosylation of membrane glycolylipids and glycoproteins, increased production of specific proteases, decreased organization of the cytoskeleton, and acquisition of neoantigens. Several of these markers are not consistently found in transformed epithelial cells and therefore cannot serve to distinguish unequivocally neoplastic epithelial cells from the normal counterparts. The only criteria associated with the transformed nature of both fibroblasts and epithelial cells are the ability of the cells to proliferate in semisolid medium and to induce tumors in appropriate hosts. In vitro systems represent a powerful tool for screening the mutagenic/oncogenic potential of physical, chemical, and environmental agents. Fibroblasts rather than epithelial cells are preferred for this purpose at the present time because of the clear-cut phenotypic differences between the normal and the transformed cells. These systems have been useful in establishing that malignant transformation can be induced by doses as low as 1 rad of X rays or 0.1 rad of neutrons, and that fractionation at low dose levelsleads to enhanced transformation. They have been useful in identifying a large number of hazardous chemicals and in evaluating the relationship between the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of radiation and chemicals

  12. Nitrogen transformation and nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar amendment and fertilizer stabilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar as a soil amendment and the use of fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) have been shown to reduce N2O emissions, but the mechanisms or processes involved are not well understood. The objective of this research was to investigate N transformation processes and the relationship...

  13. Optimal Plant Carbon Allocation Implies a Biological Control on Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, I. C.; Stocker, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The degree to which nitrogen availability limits the terrestrial C sink under rising CO2 is a key uncertainty in carbon cycle and climate change projections. Results from ecosystem manipulation studies and meta-analyses suggest that plant C allocation to roots adjusts dynamically under varying degrees of nitrogen availability and other soil fertility parameters. In addition, the ratio of biomass production to GPP appears to decline under nutrient scarcity. This reflects increasing plant C exudation into the soil (Cex) with decreasing nutrient availability. Cex is consumed by an array of soil organisms and may imply an improvement of nutrient availability to the plant. Thus, N availability is under biological control, but incurs a C cost. In spite of clear observational support, this concept is left unaccounted for in Earth system models. We develop a model for the coupled cycles of C and N in terrestrial ecosystems to explore optimal plant C allocation under rising CO2 and its implications for the ecosystem C balance. The model follows a balanced growth approach, accounting for the trade-offs between leaf versus root growth and Cex in balancing C fixation and N uptake. We assume that Cex is proportional to root mass, and that the ratio of N uptake (Nup) to Cex is proportional to inorganic N concentration in the soil solution. We further assume that Cex is consumed by N2-fixing processes if the ratio of Nup:Cex falls below the inverse of the C cost of N2-fixation. Our analysis thereby accounts for the feedbacks between ecosystem C and N cycling and stoichiometry. We address the question of how the plant C economy will adjust under rising atmospheric CO2 and what this implies for the ecosystem C balance and the degree of N limitation.

  14. Regional constraints to biological nitrogen fixation in post-fire forest communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenik, Stephanie; Perakis, Steven S.; Hibbs, David

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a key ecological process that can restore nitrogen (N) lost in wildfire and shape the pace and pattern of post-fire forest recovery. To date, there is limited information on how climate and soil fertility interact to influence different pathways of BNF in early forest succession. We studied asymbiotic (forest floor and soil) and symbiotic (the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus) BNF rates across six sites in the Klamath National Forest, California, USA. We used combined gradient and experimental phosphorus (P) fertilization studies to explore cross-site variation in BNF rates and then related these rates to abiotic and biotic variables. We estimate that our measured BNF rates 22 years after wildfire (6.1–12.1 kg N·ha-1·yr-1) are unlikely to fully replace wildfire N losses. We found that asymbiotic BNF is P limited, although this is not the case for symbiotic BNF in Ceanothus. In contrast, Ceanothus BNF is largely driven by competition from other vegetation: in high-productivity sites with high potential evapotranspiration (Et), shrub biomass is suppressed as tree biomass increases. Because shrub biomass governed cross-site variation in Ceanothus BNF, this competitive interaction led to lower BNF in sites with high productivity and Et. Overall, these results suggest that the effects of nutrients play a larger role in driving asymbiotic than symbiotic fixation across our post-fire sites. However, because symbiotic BNF is 8–90x greater than asymbiotic BNF, it is interspecific plant competition that governs overall BNF inputs in these forests.

  15. Effects of land use change on soil gross nitrogen transformation rates in subtropical acid soils of Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongbo; Xu, Zhihong

    2015-07-01

    Land use change affects soil gross nitrogen (N) transformations, but such information is particularly lacking under subtropical conditions. A study was carried out to investigate the potential gross N transformation rates in forest and agricultural (converted from the forest) soils in subtropical China. The simultaneously occurring gross N transformations in soil were quantified by a (15)N tracing study under aerobic conditions. The results showed that change of land use types substantially altered most gross N transformation rates. The gross ammonification and nitrification rates were significantly higher in the agricultural soils than in the forest soils, while the reverse was true for the gross N immobilization rates. The higher total carbon (C) concentrations and C / N ratio in the forest soils relative to the agricultural soils were related to the greater gross N immobilization rates in the forest soils. The lower gross ammonification combined with negligible gross nitrification rates, but much higher gross N immobilization rates in the forest soils than in the agricultural soils suggest that this may be a mechanism to effectively conserve available mineral N in the forest soils through increasing microbial biomass N, the relatively labile organic N. The greater gross nitrification rates and lower gross N immobilization rates in the agricultural soils suggest that conversion of forests to agricultural soils may exert more negative effects on the environment by N loss through NO3 (-) leaching or denitrification (when conditions for denitrification exist).

  16. Pathway and mechanism of nitrogen transformation during composting: Functional enzymes and genes under different concentrations of PVP-AgNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Haoran; Chen, Yaoning; Zhang, Jiachao; Zhu, Yuan; Yuan, Yujie; Xie, Yankai; Fang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) were applied at different concentrations to reduce total nitrogen (TN) losses and the mechanisms of nitrogen bio-transformation were investigated in terms of the nitrogen functional enzymes and genes. Results showed that mineral N in pile 3 which was treated with AgNPs at a concentration of 10 mg/kg compost was the highest (6.58 g/kg dry weight (DW) compost) and the TN loss (47.07%) was the lowest at the end of composting. Correlation analysis indicated that TN loss was significantly correlated with amoA abundance. High throughput sequencing showed that the dominant family of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was Nitrosomonadaceae, and the number of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) reduced after the beginning of composting when compared with day 1. In summary, treatment with AgNPs at a concentration of 10 mg/kg compost was considerable to reduce TN losses and reserve more mineral N during composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Summer nitrogenous nutrient transport and its fate in the Taiwan Strait: A coupled physical-biological modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Hong, Huasheng; Jiang, Yuwu; Chai, Fei; Yan, Xiao-Hai

    2013-09-01

    In order to understand the fate of nutrients in the Taiwan Strait during summer, we built a coupled physical-biological numerical ocean model, which can capture the basic hydrographic and biological features within the strait. The nutrient that we chose to model is dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). The model includes individual reservoirs for nitrate (NO3) and ammonium (NH4). Both the observational evidence and model results show that NO3 in the strait originates primarily from the upwelling subsurface water in the northern South China Sea (SCS) that enters the strait via the eastern and western routes separated by the Taiwan Bank. The coupled physical and biological effects on the NO3 transport at these two routes are highlighted in the study. For the western route, the shallow topography and the coastal upwelling intensify the biological uptake of NO3 in the whole water column. Consequently, the nitrogenous contribution by this route is mainly in form of the particulate organic nitrogen (PON). In contrast, NO3 is transported conservatively below the nitricline at the deep eastern route, contributing the whole NO3 supply in the TWS. The model estimates the fluxes of DIN and PON into the TWS, from the northern SCS, are 1.8 and 4 kmol s-1, respectively. Over half (˜1 kmol s-1) of the DIN is synthesized into PON by the phytoplankton in the strait. Overall, this study estimates the physical and biological effects on the nutrient transport in the TWS during summer.

  18. Artificial intelligence models for predicting the performance of biological wastewater treatment plant in the removal of Kjeldahl Nitrogen from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, D. S.; Thalla, Arun Kumar

    2017-11-01

    The current work demonstrates the support vector machine (SVM) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) modeling to assess the removal efficiency of Kjeldahl Nitrogen of a full-scale aerobic biological wastewater treatment plant. The influent variables such as pH, chemical oxygen demand, total solids (TS), free ammonia, ammonia nitrogen and Kjeldahl Nitrogen are used as input variables during modeling. Model development focused on postulating an adaptive, functional, real-time and alternative approach for modeling the removal efficiency of Kjeldahl Nitrogen. The input variables used for modeling were daily time series data recorded at wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) located in Mangalore during the period June 2014-September 2014. The performance of ANFIS model developed using Gbell and trapezoidal membership functions (MFs) and SVM are assessed using different statistical indices like root mean square error, correlation coefficients (CC) and Nash Sutcliff error (NSE). The errors related to the prediction of effluent Kjeldahl Nitrogen concentration by the SVM modeling appeared to be reasonable when compared to that of ANFIS models with Gbell and trapezoidal MF. From the performance evaluation of the developed SVM model, it is observed that the approach is capable to define the inter-relationship between various wastewater quality variables and thus SVM can be potentially applied for evaluating the efficiency of aerobic biological processes in WWTP.

  19. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Gang, E-mail: xg335300@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Research and Development of Fine Chemicals, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wang Xiaoteng [Department of Agricultural Resources and Environment, College of Agricultural, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng [College of Life Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed biological effects of N{sup +} implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup +} implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At doses beyond 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAT was essential for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAsA-GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N{sup +} with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N{sup +} beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  20. Improving the biological nitrogen removal process in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos, M; Carrera, J; Lafuente, J

    2004-04-01

    The Biological Nitrogen Removal (BNR) process of some pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants has important operational problems. This study shows that, in order to solve these problems, the design of industrial BNR processes should start by analysing three key parameters: the characteristics of the wastewater load, the determination of the maximum TKN removal rate and the detection of toxic or inhibitory compounds in the wastewater. A case study of this analysis in pharmaceutical wastewater is presented here. In this case, the conventional TKN analytical method does not make an accurate characterisation of the wastewater load because it measures a concentration of 100 mg TKN l(-1) whereas the real concentration, determined with a modified TKN analytical method, is 150-500 mg TKN l(-1). Also, the TKN removal of the treatment system is insufficient in some periods because it falls below legal requirements. This problem might be a consequence of the wrong characterisation of wastewater during the design process. The maximum TKN removal at 27 degrees C (24 mg N g VSS(-1) d(-1) or 197 mg N l(-1) d(-1)) was evaluated in a pilot-scale plant. This value is six times greater than the average NLR applied in the full-scale plant. Finally, some of the components of the wastewater, such as p-phenylenediamine, might have inhibitory or toxic effects on the biological process. P-phenylenediamine causes a large decrease in the nitrification rate. This effect was determined by respirometry. This methodology shows that the effect is mainly inhibitory with a contact time of 30 min and if the contact time is longer, 14 hours, a toxic effect is observed.

  1. Biological Nitrogen Fixation by Legumes and N Uptake by Coffee Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Sá Mendonça

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manures are an alternative for substituting or supplementing mineral nitrogen fertilizers. The aim of this study was to quantify biological N fixation (BNF and the N contribution derived from BNF (N-BNF to N levels in leaves of coffee intercropped with legumes grown on four family farms located in the mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest Biome in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The following green manures were evaluated: pinto peanuts (Arachis pintoi, calopo (Calopogonium mucunoides, crotalaria (Crotalaria spectabilis, Brazilian stylo (Stylosanthes guianensis, pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan, lablab beans (Dolichos lablab, and velvet beans (Stizolobium deeringianum, and spontaneous plants. The experimental design was randomized blocks with a 4 × 8 factorial arrangement (four agricultural properties and eight green manures, and four replications. One hundred grams of fresh matter of each green manure plant were dried in an oven to obtain the dry matter. We then performed chemical and biochemical characterizations and determined the levels of 15N and 14N, which were used to quantify BNF through the 15N (δ15N natural abundance technique. The legumes C. mucunoides, S. guianensis, C. cajan, and D. lablab had the highest rates of BNF, at 46.1, 45.9, 44.4, and 42.9 %, respectively. C. cajan was the legume that contributed the largest amount of N (44.42 kg ha-1 via BNF.C. cajan, C. spectabilis, and C. mucunoides transferred 55.8, 48.8, and 48.1 %, respectively, of the N from biological fixation to the coffee plants. The use of legumes intercropped with coffee plants is important in supplying N, as well as in transferring N derived from BNF to nutrition of the coffee plants.

  2. Structural Transformation upon Nitrogen Doping of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films by Microwave Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chung Teng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular properties and surface morphology of undoped and N-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD films deposited by microwave plasma CVD with addition of nitrogen are investigated with various spectroscopic techniques. The results of spatially resolved Raman scattering, ATR/FT-IR and XPS spectra show more amorphous and sp2/sp3 ratio characteristics in N-doped UNCD films. The surface morphology in AFM scans shows larger nanocrystalline diamond clusters in N-doped UNCD films. Incorporation of nitrogen into UNCD films has promoted an increase of amorphous sp2-bonded carbons in the grain boundaries and the size of nanocrystalline diamond grains that are well correlated to the reported enhancement of conductivity and structural changes of UNCD films.

  3. Arctic shelves as platforms for biogeochemical activity: Nitrogen and carbon transformations in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Amber K.; McTigue, Nathan D.; Gardner, Wayne S.; Dunton, Kenneth H.

    2017-10-01

    Continental shelves comprise 50% of marine denitrification. The Hanna Shoal region, part of the continental shelf system in the northeast Chukchi Sea, Alaska, is recognized for its high biodiversity and productivity. We investigated the role of sediments in organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling at five stations on the shallow Hanna Shoal. In particular, we asked (1) how much sediment organic matter is remineralized in the Chukchi Sea, and what factors drive this degradation, (2) do sediments function as a net source for fixed nitrogen (thus fueling primary production in the overlying water), or as a net sink for fixed nitrogen (thereby removing it from the system), and (3) what is the balance between sediment NH4+ uptake and regeneration, and what factors drive NH4+ cycling? We conducted dark sediment core incubations to measure sediment O2 consumption, net N2 and nutrient (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, PO43-) fluxes, and rates of sediment NH4+ cycling, including uptake and regeneration. Rates of sediment O2 consumption and NH4+ and PO43- efflux suggest that high organic matter remineralization rates occurred in these cold (-2 °C) sediments. We estimated that total organic carbon remineralization accounted for 20-57% of summer export production measured on the Chukchi Shelf. Net N2 release was the dominant nitrogen flux, indicating that sediments acted as a net sink for bioavailable nitrogen via denitrification. Organic carbon remineralization via denitrification accounted for 6-12% of summer export production, which made up 25% of the total organic carbon oxidized in Hanna Shoal sediments. These shallow, productive Arctic shelves are ;hotspots; for organic matter remineralization.

  4. Urbanization effects on soil nitrogen transformations and microbial biomass in the subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather A. Enloe; B. Graeme Lockaby; Wayne C. Zipperer; Greg L. Somers

    2015-01-01

    As urbanization can involve multiple alterations to the soil environment, it is uncertain how urbanization effects soil nitrogen cycling. We established 22–0.04 ha plots in six different land cover types—rural slash pine (Pinus elliottii) plantations (n=3), rural natural pine forests (n=3), rural natural oak forests (n=4), urban pine forests (n=3), urban oak forests (n...

  5. Litter Controls Earthworm-Mediated Carbon and Nitrogen Transformations in Soil from Temperate Riparian Buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Kernecker; Joann K. Whalen; Robert L. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient cycling in riparian buffers is partly influenced by decomposition of crop, grass, and native tree species litter. Nonnative earthworms in riparian soils in southern Quebec are expected to speed the processes of litter decomposition and nitrogen (N) mineralization, increasing carbon (C) and N losses in gaseous forms or via leachate. A 5-month microcosm experiment evaluated the effect of Aporrectodea turgida on the decomposition of 3 litter types (deciduous leaves, reed canarygrass, an...

  6. A biologically inspired neural network model to transformation invariant object recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Li, Yaqin; Siddiqui, Faraz

    2007-09-01

    Transformation invariant image recognition has been an active research area due to its widespread applications in a variety of fields such as military operations, robotics, medical practices, geographic scene analysis, and many others. The primary goal for this research is detection of objects in the presence of image transformations such as changes in resolution, rotation, translation, scale and occlusion. We investigate a biologically-inspired neural network (NN) model for such transformation-invariant object recognition. In a classical training-testing setup for NN, the performance is largely dependent on the range of transformation or orientation involved in training. However, an even more serious dilemma is that there may not be enough training data available for successful learning or even no training data at all. To alleviate this problem, a biologically inspired reinforcement learning (RL) approach is proposed. In this paper, the RL approach is explored for object recognition with different types of transformations such as changes in scale, size, resolution and rotation. The RL is implemented in an adaptive critic design (ACD) framework, which approximates the neuro-dynamic programming of an action network and a critic network, respectively. Two ACD algorithms such as Heuristic Dynamic Programming (HDP) and Dual Heuristic dynamic Programming (DHP) are investigated to obtain transformation invariant object recognition. The two learning algorithms are evaluated statistically using simulated transformations in images as well as with a large-scale UMIST face database with pose variations. In the face database authentication case, the 90° out-of-plane rotation of faces from 20 different subjects in the UMIST database is used. Our simulations show promising results for both designs for transformation-invariant object recognition and authentication of faces. Comparing the two algorithms, DHP outperforms HDP in learning capability, as DHP takes fewer steps to

  7. Biological fixation and nitrogen transfer by three legume species in mango and soursop organic orchards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Gleicia Miranda; Barroso, Deborah Guerra

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and the N transfer derived from BNF of the legume species - Gliricidia sepium (gliricidia), Crotalaria juncea (sunnhemp) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) - for an intercropped organic orchard with mango and soursop, through the 15 N natural abundance method. The following inter cropping systems were evaluated: mango and soursop with gliricidia; mango and soursop with sunnhemp; mango and soursop with pigeon pea; and mango and soursop as control. Gliricidia showed the highest BNF potential (80%) , followed by sunnhemp (64.5%) and pigeon pea (45%). After two sunnhemp prunes, 149.5 kg ha -1 of N per year were supplied, with 96.5 kg derived from BNF. After three annual prunes, gliricidia supplied 56.4 and 80.3 kg ha -1 of N per year, with 45 and 64 kg derived from BNF, in two consecutive years. The quantity of N supplied to the system was higher than the mango and soursop requirements. Variations in the natural abundance of 15 N were found only in soursop leaves. Gliricidia and sunnhemp were prominent in N transfer, with approximately 22.5 and 40% respectively. Green manuring using gliricidia permits fractioning of the N supply, which is an advantage in N obtention by the fruit trees (author)

  8. Simultaneous biological removal of sulfur, nitrogen and carbon using EGSB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Yu Zhenguo [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Lee Duu-Jong [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Dept. of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China)

    2008-04-15

    High-rate biological conversion of sulfide and nitrate in synthetic wastewater to, respectively, elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) and nitrogen-containing gas (such as N{sub 2}) was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. A novel strategy was adopted to first cultivate mature granules using anaerobic sludge as seed sludge in sulfate-laden medium. The cultivated granules were then incubated in sulfide-laden medium to acclimate autotrophic denitrifiers. The incubated granules converted sulfide, nitrate, and acetate simultaneously in the same EGSB reactor to S{sup 0}, N-containing gases and CO{sub 2} at loading rates of 3,0 kg S m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, 1.45 kg N m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, and 2.77 kg Ac m{sup -1} d{sup -1}, respectively, and was not inhibited by sulfide concentrations up to 800 mg l{sup -1}. Effects of the C/N ratio on granule performance were identified. The granules cultivated in the sulfide-laden medium have Pseudomonas spp. and Azoarcus sp. presenting the heterotrophs and autotrophs that co-work in the high-rate EGSB-SDD (simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification) reactor. (orig.)

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation in the oxygen-minimum region of the eastern tropical North Pacific ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Amal; Chang, Bonnie X; Widner, Brittany; Bernhardt, Peter; Mulholland, Margaret R; Ward, Bess B

    2017-10-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) was investigated above and within the oxygen-depleted waters of the oxygen-minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Ocean. BNF rates were estimated using an isotope tracer method that overcame the uncertainty of the conventional bubble method by directly measuring the tracer enrichment during the incubations. Highest rates of BNF (~4 nM day -1 ) occurred in coastal surface waters and lowest detectable rates (~0.2 nM day -1 ) were found in the anoxic region of offshore stations. BNF was not detectable in most samples from oxygen-depleted waters. The composition of the N 2 -fixing assemblage was investigated by sequencing of nifH genes. The diazotrophic assemblage in surface waters contained mainly Proteobacterial sequences (Cluster I nifH), while both Proteobacterial sequences and sequences with high identities to those of anaerobic microbes characterized as Clusters III and IV type nifH sequences were found in the anoxic waters. Our results indicate modest input of N through BNF in oxygen-depleted zones mainly due to the activity of proteobacterial diazotrophs.

  10. Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Menge, Duncan N.L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques have identified a wide range of organisms with the capacity to carry out biological nitrogen fixation (BNF)—greatly expanding our appreciation of the diversity and ubiquity of N fixers—but our understanding of the rates and controls of BNF at ecosystem and global scales has not advanced at the same pace. Nevertheless, determining rates and controls of BNF is crucial to placing anthropogenic changes to the N cycle in context, and to understanding, predicting and managing many aspects of global environmental change. Here, we estimate terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information on N fluxes with 15N relative abundance data for terrestrial ecosystems. Our estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58 (range of 40–100) Tg N fixed yr−1; adding conservative assumptions for geological N reduces our best estimate to 44 Tg N yr−1. This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed.

  11. Optimized biological nitrogen removal of high-strength ammonium wastewater by activated sludge modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsalam Elawwad

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater containing high ammonium concentrations is produced from various industrial activities. In this study, the author used a complex activated sludge model, improved by utilizing BioWin© (EnviroSim, Hamilton, Canada simulation software, to gain understanding of the problem of instability in biological nitrogen removal (BNR. Specifically, the study focused on BNR in an industrial wastewater treatment plant that receives high-strength ammonium wastewater. Using the data obtained from a nine-day sampling campaign and routinely measured data, the model was successfully calibrated and validated, with modifications to the sensitive stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. Subsequently, the calibrated model was employed to study various operating conditions in order to optimize the BNR. These operating conditions include alkalinity addition, sludge retention time, and the COD/N ratio. The addition of a stripping step and modifications to the configuration of the aerators are suggested by the author to increase the COD/N ratio and therefore enhance denitrification. It was found that the calibrated model could successfully represent and optimize the treatment of the high-strength ammonium wastewater.

  12. Enzymology and ecology of the nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Cole, Jeffrey A; Richardson, David J; Watmough, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle describes the processes through which nitrogen is converted between its various chemical forms. These transformations involve both biological and abiotic redox processes. The principal processes involved in the nitrogen cycle are nitrogen fixation, nitrification, nitrate assimilation, respiratory reduction of nitrate to ammonia, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) and denitrification. All of these are carried out by micro-organisms, including bacteria, archaea and some specialized fungi. In the present article, we provide a brief introduction to both the biochemical and ecological aspects of these processes and consider how human activity over the last 100 years has changed the historic balance of the global nitrogen cycle.

  13. Cuttlefish bone scaffold for tissue engineering: a novel hydrothermal transformation, chemical-physical, and biological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Elisa; Mele, Silvia; Foltran, Ismaela; Lesci, Isidoro Giorgio; Roveri, Norberto; Sabatino, Piera; Rimondini, Lia

    2012-09-27

    Natural resources are receiving growing interest because of their possible conversion from a cheap and easily available material into a biomedical product. Cuttlefish bone from Sepia Officinalis was investigated in order to obtain an hydroxyapatite porous scaffold using hydrothermal transformation. Complete conversion of the previous calcium carbonate (aragonite) phase into a calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite) phase was performed with an hydrothermal transformation at 200 °C (~ 15 atm), for four hours, with an aqueous solution of KH2PO4 in order to set the molar ratio Ca/P = 10/6 in a reactor (Parr 4382). The complete conversion was then analyzed by TGA, ATR-FTIR, x-ray diffraction, and SEM. Moreover, the material was biologically investigated with MC3T3-E1 in static cultures, using both osteogenic and maintenance media. The expression of osteogenic markers as ALP and osteocalcin and the cell proliferation were investigated. Cuttlefish bone has been successfully transformed from calcium carbonate into calcium phosphate. Biological characterization revealed that osteogenic markers are expressed using both osteogenic and maintenance conditions. Cell proliferation is influenced by the static culture condition used for this three-dimensional scaffold. The new scaffold composed by hydroxyapatite and derived for a natural source presents good biocompatibility and can be used for further investigations using dynamic cultures in order to improve cell proliferation and differentiation for bone tissue engineering.

  14. The Role of Biological Soil Crusts in Nitrogen Cycling and Soil Deflation in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, R. C.; Governali, F. C.; Spickard, A. M.; Virginia, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Although shrub expansion has been observed across the Arctic in moist tundra habitat, shrubs may be prevented from expanding in arid Arctic regions due to low soil moisture or soil erosion. This may be the case in Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, where katabatic winds off the Greenland Ice Sheet have eroded distinct patches of mixed shrub tundra, resulting in nearly barren low productivity areas dominated by biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and graminoids. The future trajectory of these bare patches - persisting in a low biomass state or returning to a shrub-dominated state - depends on the role of the biocrust as either a long-term landscape cover limiting revegetation or as a successional facilitator. Prior to this study, little was known about the physical and ecological development of West Greenland biocrusts and how they may influence future vegetation dynamics. We found that biocrusts took 230 ± 48 years to fully develop, and that later stages of biocrust development were related to increased thickness and penetration resistance and decreased soil moisture, factors limiting shrub seedling establishment. The nitrogen (N) fixing lichen Stereocaulon sp. was found throughout the study region at all stages of biocrust development. Natural 15N abundance suggests that Stereocaulon sp. obtains about half of its N from biological fixation, and that some biologically-fixed N is incorporated into the underlying soils over time. Although soil N and C concentrations increased slightly with biocrust development, their levels under the most developed biocrusts remained low compared to the surrounding shrub and graminoid tundra. Our results suggest that deflation patches, triggered by long-term variations in climate, may remain in a low-productivity ecosystem state for hundreds to thousands of years, if precipitation and temperature regimes do not dramatically alter the vegetation potential of the region. However, if future climate change in the Arctic favors greater

  15. Nitrogen-15 natural abundance of different soil N pools as a tool for assessing N transformation processes in alpine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Mikhail; Malysheva, Tatiana; Tiunov, Alexei; Kadulin, Maxim; Maslov, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen availability, net N mineralization, nitrification and 15N natural abundance of total soil N and small soil N pools (N-NH4+, N-NO3-, DON and microbial biomass N) were studied in a toposequence of alpine ecosystems in the Northern Caucasus. The toposequence was represented by (1) low productive alpine lichen heath (ALH) of the wind-exposed ridge and upper slope; (2) more productive Festuca varia grassland (FG) of the middle slope; (3) most productive Geranium gymnocaulon/Hedysarum caucasicum meadow (GHM) of the lower slope and (4) low productive snow bed community (SBC) of the slope bottom. Nitrogen transformation in the alpine soils produces distinct N pools with different 15N enrichment: DON/microbial biomass N > total N > N-NH4+ > N-NO3-. Grassland and meadow soils of the middle part of the toposequence are characterized by higher nitrogen transformation activities and higher δ15 values of total N and N-NH4+. Field incubation of alpine soils increased δ15N of N-NH4+ from -2.6 - +2.0‰ to +6.1 - +15.7‰. The N-NO3-produced in the incubation experiment had extremely low (negative) δ15N values (up to -14‰). We found a positive correlation between δ15N of different soil N pools (total N, N-NH4+ and N-NO3-) and net N mineralization and nitrification. Nitrification controls the formation of 15N enriched N-NH4+ pool while N mineralization probably had an important role in regulation of 15N enrichment of DON pool in alpine soils. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that 15N is more enriched in N-rich and more depleted in N-poor ecosystems. We conclude that δ15N values of different soil N pools could be a good indicator of microbial N transformation in alpine soils of the Northern Caucasus. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by Russian Science Foundation (16-14-10208).

  16. Relating N2O emissions during biological nitrogen removal with operating conditions using multivariate statistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilaki, V; Volcke, E I P; Nandi, A K; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Katsou, E

    2018-04-26

    Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to investigate the dependencies and underlying patterns between N 2 O emissions and online operational variables (dissolved oxygen and nitrogen component concentrations, temperature and influent flow-rate) during biological nitrogen removal from wastewater. The system under study was a full-scale reactor, for which hourly sensor data were available. The 15-month long monitoring campaign was divided into 10 sub-periods based on the profile of N 2 O emissions, using Binary Segmentation. The dependencies between operating variables and N 2 O emissions fluctuated according to Spearman's rank correlation. The correlation between N 2 O emissions and nitrite concentrations ranged between 0.51 and 0.78. Correlation >0.7 between N 2 O emissions and nitrate concentrations was observed at sub-periods with average temperature lower than 12 °C. Hierarchical k-means clustering and principal component analysis linked N 2 O emission peaks with precipitation events and ammonium concentrations higher than 2 mg/L, especially in sub-periods characterized by low N 2 O fluxes. Additionally, the highest ranges of measured N 2 O fluxes belonged to clusters corresponding with NO 3 -N concentration less than 1 mg/L in the upstream plug-flow reactor (middle of oxic zone), indicating slow nitrification rates. The results showed that the range of N 2 O emissions partially depends on the prior behavior of the system. The principal component analysis validated the findings from the clustering analysis and showed that ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and temperature explained a considerable percentage of the variance in the system for the majority of the sub-periods. The applied statistical methods, linked the different ranges of emissions with the system variables, provided insights on the effect of operating conditions on N 2 O emissions in each sub-period and can be integrated into N 2 O emissions data processing at wastewater treatment plants

  17. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  18. Development of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for biological nitrogen removal in domestic wastewater treatment (Case study: Surabaya City, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, I. Made Wahyu; Soedjono, Eddy Setiadi; Fitriani, Nurina

    2017-11-01

    Domestic wastewater effluent is the main contributor to diverse water pollution problems. The contaminants contained in the wastewater lead the low quality of water. The presence of ammonium and nitrate along with phosphorus are potentially cause eutrophication and endanger aquatic life. Excess nutrients, mostly N and P is the main cause of eutrophication which is result in oxygen depletion, biodiversity reduction, fish kills, odor and increased toxicity. Most of the domestic wastewater in Surabaya City still contains nitrogen that exceeded the threshold. The range of ammonium and orthophosphate concentration in the domestic wastewater is between 6.29 mg/L - 38.91 mg/L and 0.44 mg/L - 1.86 mg/L, respectively. An advance biological nitrogen removal process called anammox is a sustainable and cost effective alternative to the basic method of nitrogen removal, such as nitrification and denitrification. Many research have been conducted through anammox and resulted promisingly way to remove nitrogen. In this process, ammonium will be oxidized with nitrite as an electron acceptor to produce nitrogen gas and low nitrate in anoxic condition. Anammox requires less oxygen demand, no needs external carbon source, and low operational cost. Based on its advantages, anammox is possible to apply in domestic wastewater treatment in Surabaya with many further studies.

  19. Quinoline based furanones and their nitrogen analogues: Docking, synthesis and biological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhbir Lal Khokra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A small library of twenty-four quinoline based butenolides also known as furanones and their nitrogen analogues was prepared by using two different aroylpropionic acids, viz. 3-(2-naphthoylpropionic acid (3 and 3-(biphenyl-4-ylpropionic acid (4, as starting materials. The 3-aroylpropionic acids were reacted with different 6-substituted-2-chloroquinolin-3-carbaldehydes (2a–d to obtain the corresponding furan-2(3H-ones (5a–h. The purified and characterized furanones were then converted into their corresponding 2(3H-pyrrolones (6a–h and N-benzyl-pyrrol-2(3H-ones (7a–h. The antimicrobial activities of the title compounds were evaluated against two strains of each Gram +ve (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, Gram −ve bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against fungal strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. In vivo anti-inflammatory potential of the title compounds was investigated by standard method. Majority of the compounds showed significant antibacterial activity against both the Gram +ve strains. Eight most potent anti-inflammatory compounds (5b, 5d, 5h, 6b, 7b, 7d, 7f, 7h which exhibited >53% inhibition in edema, were also screened for their in vivo analgesic activity. All the tested compounds were found to have significant reduction in ulcerogenic action but only three compounds (5d, 5h and 7h showed comparable analgesic activity to standard drug, diclofenac. The results were also validated using in silico approach and maximum mol doc score was obtained for compounds 7a–h. On comparing the in vivo and in silico anti-inflammatory results of synthesized compounds, N-benzyl pyrrolones (7a–h emerged as the potent anti-inflammatory agents. It was also observed that compounds that possess electron withdrawing group such as Cl or NO2 are more biologically active.

  20. Yield and biological nitrogen fixation of cowpea varieties in the semi-arid region of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago de Freitas, Ana Dolores; Fernandes Silva, Acácia; Valadares de Sá Barretto Sampaio, Everardo

    2012-01-01

    Cowpea is an important crop in small properties of the Brazilian semi-arid region, where it is cultivated without fertilizer application. In spite of the fundamental role played by biological Nitrogen fixation (BNF), little is known of the symbiosis between cowpea varieties and native rhizobia or recommended rhizobia strains. A field experiment was conducted aiming to estimate BNF and productivities of local varieties, in association with two previously described bradyrhizobial inoculant strains and native rhizobia (no inoculation). The plants received 20 kg ha −1 of enriched 15 N fertilizer to allow the use of the isotopic dilution method. After harvest (80 days) straw and grain biomass was determined. The varieties differed in grain and straw productivity and in N and N derived from atmosphere (%Ndfa). Corujinha had the highest grain productivity (1147 kg ha −1 ), followed by Sempre Verde (920 kg ha −1 ), Azul (912 kg ha −1 ) and Cariri (889 kg ha −1 ). Costela de Vaca had the highest straw productivity (2258 kg ha −1 ), highest N content in the straw (28 g ha −1 ) and highest BNF (79 %Ndfa, corresponding to 45 kg ha −1 of N for total aboveground biomass and 39 kg ha −1 for the straw), but the lowest grain productivity (381 kg ha −1 ) and the lowest harvest index (0.14). The inoculations did not significantly alter productivities, N contents or %Ndfa but there was a tendency of lower grain productivities in the non-inoculated plants, which was reflected in lower total and biologically fixed N quantities, indicating that the native strains may be slightly less efficient. -- Highlights: ► We estimate N fixation and productivities of local cowpea varieties in Brazil. ► Plants were inoculated or not with two recommended rhizobia strains. ► All local varieties had high proportions of their N derived from the air (%Ndfa). ► They differed in BNF in grain and straw productivity. ► Inoculation did not alter productivities or %Ndfa but

  1. An Untargeted Metabolomics Survey from a Perturbation Model of Nitrogen Transformation in a Tropical Wastewater Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Angel Cokro, Anisa; Umashankar, Shivshankar

    states. We develop analytic procedures for identifying reliable mass features that are modulated over the time, and are significantly correlated with shifts in physiochemical states. Our methods are widely applicable, and point towards to development of an eco-systems biology approach suitable...

  2. Multivariate analysis and determination of the best indirect selection criteria to genetic improvement the biological nitrogen fixation ability in common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golparvar Reza Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the best indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of biological nitrogen fixation, sixty four common bean genotypes were cultivated in two randomized complete block design. Genotypes were inoculated with bacteria Rhizobium legominosarum biovar Phaseoli isolate L-109 only in one of the experiments. The second experiment was considered as check for the first. Correlation analysis showed positive and highly significant correlation of majority of the traits with percent of nitrogen fixation. Step-wise regression designated that traits percent of total nitrogen of shoot, number of nodule per plant and biological yield accounted for 92.3 percent of variation exist in percent of nitrogen fixation. Path analysis indicated that these traits have direct and positive effect on percent of nitrogen fixation. Hence, these traits are promising indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation capability in common bean genotypes especially in early generations.

  3. Biological nitrogen fixation in Crotalaria species estimated using the 15N isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samba, R.T.; Neyra, M.; Gueye, M.; Sylla, S.N.; Ndoye, I.; Dreyfus, B.

    2002-01-01

    Growing in Senegal by using 15 N direct isotope dilution technique. Two non-fixing plants, Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis served as reference plants. The amount of nitrogen fixed two months after planting was obtained using the average of the two reference plants. The atom % 15 N excess in the Crotalaria species was significantly lower than that of the reference plants, indicating that significant nitrogen fixation occurred in the three plants. Significant differences were observed between the Crotalaria species; C. ochroleuca yielded more dry matter weight and total nitrogen than did C. perrottetti and C. retusa. The % nitrogen derived from atmosphere (%Ndfa) in leaves and stems was also higher in C. ochroleuca. There was no significant difference in %Ndfa in the whole plant between the three Crotalaria species (47% to 53%). In contrast, interspecific variability was observed based on the %Ndfa. C. ochroleuca significantly exhibited the higher amount of total nitrogen fixed, equivalent to 83 kg of nitrogen fixed per hectare. Based on these data, it was concluded that C. ochroleuca could be used in multiple cropping systems in Senegal for making more nitrogen available to other plants. (author)

  4. Biogeochemical spatio-temporal transformation of copper in Aspergillus niger colonies grown on malachite with different inorganic nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomina, Marina; Bowen, Andrew D; Charnock, John M; Podgorsky, Valentin S; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2017-03-01

    This work elucidates spatio-temporal aspects of the biogeochemical transformation of copper mobilized from malachite (Cu 2 (CO 3 )(OH) 2 ) and bioaccumulated within Aspergillus niger colonies when grown on different inorganic nitrogen sources. It was shown that the use of either ammonium or nitrate determined how copper was distributed within the colony and its microenvironment and the copper oxidation state and succession of copper coordinating ligands within the biomass. Nitrate-grown colonies yielded ∼1.7× more biomass, bioaccumulated ∼7× less copper, excreted ∼1.9× more oxalate and produced ∼1.75× less water-soluble copper in the medium in contrast to ammonium-grown colonies. Microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that as the mycelium matured, bioaccumulated copper was transformed from less stable and more toxic Cu(I) into less toxic Cu(II) which was coordinated predominantly by phosphate/malate ligands. With time, a shift to oxalate coordination of bioaccumulated copper occurred in the central older region of ammonium-grown colonies. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Advances in algal-prokaryotic wastewater treatment: A review of nitrogen transformations, reactor configurations and molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Keeley, Ryan; Zalivina, Nadezhda; Halfhide, Trina; Scott, Kathleen; Zhang, Qiong; van der Steen, Peter; Ergas, Sarina J

    2018-07-01

    The synergistic activity of algae and prokaryotic microorganisms can be used to improve the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment, particularly with regards to nitrogen removal. For example, algae can provide oxygen through photosynthesis needed for aerobic degradation of organic carbon and nitrification and harvested algal-prokaryotic biomass can be used to produce high value chemicals or biogas. Algal-prokaryotic consortia have been used to treat wastewater in different types of reactors, including waste stabilization ponds, high rate algal ponds and closed photobioreactors. This review addresses the current literature and identifies research gaps related to the following topics: 1) the complex interactions between algae and prokaryotes in wastewater treatment; 2) advances in bioreactor technologies that can achieve high nitrogen removal efficiencies in small reactor volumes, such as algal-prokaryotic biofilm reactors and enhanced algal-prokaryotic treatment systems (EAPS); 3) molecular tools that have expanded our understanding of the activities of algal and prokaryotic communities in wastewater treatment processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Highly selective transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N2 based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Youzhi; Bai, Jing; Li, Jinhua; Luo, Tao; Qiao, Li; Zeng, Qingyi; Zhou, Baoxue

    2017-11-15

    A highly selective method for transforming ammonia nitrogen to N 2 was proposed, based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions (PEC-chlorine) system. The PEC-chlorine system was facilitated by a visible light response WO 3 nanoplate array (NPA) electrode in an ammonia solution containing chloride ions (Cl - ). Under illumination, photoholes from WO 3 promote the oxidation of Cl - to chlorine radical (Cl). This radical can selectively transform ammonia nitrogen to N 2 (79.9%) and NO 3 - (19.2%), similar to the breakpoint chlorination reaction. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 10.6% (PEC without Cl - ) to 99.9% with the PEC-chlorine system within 90 min operation, which can be attributed to the cyclic reactions between Cl - /Cl and the reaction intermediates (NH 2 , NHCl, etc.) that expand the degradation reactions from the surface of the electrodes to the whole solution system. Moreover, Cl is the main radical species contributing to the transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N 2 , which is confirmed by the tBuOH capture experiment. Compared to conventional breakpoint chlorination, the PEC-chlorine system is a more economical and efficient means for ammonia nitrogen degradation because of the fast removal rate, no additional chlorine cost, and its use of clean energy (since it is solar-driven). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. History on the biological nitrogen fixation research in graminaceous plants: special emphasis on the Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I. Baldani

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the history on Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF in Graminaceous plants grown in Brazil, and describes research progress made over the last 40 years, most of whichwas coordinated by Johanna Döbereiner. One notable accomplishment during this period was the discovery of several nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as the rhizospheric (Beijerinckia fluminensis and Azotobacter paspali, associative (Azospirillum lipoferum, A. brasilense, A. amazonense and the endophytic (Herbaspirillum seropedicae, H. rubrisubalbicans, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, Burkholderia brasilensis and B. tropica. The role of these diazotrophs in association with grasses, mainly with cereal plants, has been studied and a lot of progress has been achieved in the ecological, physiological, biochemical, and genetic aspects. The mechanisms of colonization and infection of the plant tissues are better understood, and the BNF contribution to the soil/plant system has been determined. Inoculation studies with diazotrophs showed that endophytic bacteria have a much higher BNF contribution potential than associative diazotrophs. In addition, it was found that the plant genotype influences the plant/bacteria association. Recent data suggest that more studies should be conducted on the endophytic association to strengthen the BNF potential. The ongoing genome sequencing programs: RIOGENE (Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and GENOPAR (Herbaspirillum seropedicae reflect the commitment to the BNF study in Brazil and should allow the country to continue in the forefront of research related to the BNF process in Graminaceous plants.A presente revisão aborda a história da Fixação Biológica de Nitrogênio (FBN em Gramíneas no Brasil, procurando mostrar a evolução da pesquisa na área iniciada a mais de 40 anos sob a liderança da pesquisadora Johanna Döbereiner. Um aspecto marcante deste período foi a descoberta de diversas bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio atmosf

  8. Fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari affects nitrogen transformation processes and related microorganisms in the rice rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eYang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari performs an important ecosystem service by assisting its host with acquiring soil nitrogen (N, but little is known regarding how this fungus influences soil N nutrient properties and microbial communities. In this study, we investigated the impact of P. liquidambari on N dynamics,the abundance and composition of N cycling genes in rhizosphere soil treated with three levels of N (urea. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and diazotrophs were assayed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis at four rice growing stages (S0: before planting, S1: tillering stage, S2: grain filling stage, and S3: ripening stage. A significant increase in the available nitrate and ammonium contents was found in the rhizosphere soil of endophyte-infected rice under low N conditions. Moreover, P. liquidambari significantly increased the potential nitrification rates (PNR, affected the abundance and community structure of AOA, AOB and diazotrophs under low N conditions in the S1 and S2 stages. The root exudates were determined due to their important role in rhizosphere interactions. P. liquidambari colonization altered the exudation of organic compounds by rice roots and P. liquidambari increased the concentration of soluble saccharides, total free amino acids and organic acids

  9. Nitrogen transformation of reclaimed wastewater in a pipeline by oxygen injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, L E; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Sevilla, J; Marrero, M C; Hernández, A

    2009-06-01

    A study of oxygen injection was performed in a completely filled gravity pipe, which is part of the South Tenerife reclaimed wastewater reuse scheme (Spain), in order to inhibit the appearance of anaerobic conditions by a nitrification-denitrification process. The pipe was 0.6 m in diameter and 62 km long and made of cast iron with a concrete inner coating, A high-pressure oxygen injection system was installed at 16 km from the pipe inlet, where severe anaerobic conditions appear. Experiments on oxygen injection were carried out with three different concentrations (7, 15 and 30 mg l(-1) O2). In all experiments, oxygen dissolved properly after injection, and no gas escapes were detected during water transportation. Most oxygen was consumed in the nitrification process, due to the low COD/NH4-N ratio, leading to a maximum production of oxidized nitrogen compounds of 7.5 mg l(-1) NO(x)-N with the 30 mg l(-1) O2 dose. Nitrification occured with nitrite accumulation, attributed to the presence of free ammonia within the range 1.2-1.4 mg l(-). Once the oxygen had been consumed, an apparent half-order denitrification took place, with limitation of biodegradable organic matter. The anoxic conditions led to a complete inhibition of sulphide generation.

  10. Litter Controls Earthworm-Mediated Carbon and Nitrogen Transformations in Soil from Temperate Riparian Buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kernecker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient cycling in riparian buffers is partly influenced by decomposition of crop, grass, and native tree species litter. Nonnative earthworms in riparian soils in southern Quebec are expected to speed the processes of litter decomposition and nitrogen (N mineralization, increasing carbon (C and N losses in gaseous forms or via leachate. A 5-month microcosm experiment evaluated the effect of Aporrectodea turgida on the decomposition of 3 litter types (deciduous leaves, reed canarygrass, and soybean stem residue. Earthworms increased CO2 and N2O losses from microcosms with soybean residue, by 112% and 670%, respectively, but reduced CO2 and N2O fluxes from microcosms with reed canarygrass by 120% and 220%, respectively. Litter type controlled the CO2 flux (soybean ≥ deciduous-mix litter = reed canarygrass > no litter and the N2O flux (soybean ≥ no litter ≥ reed canarygrass > deciduous-mix litter. However, in the presence of earthworms, there was a slight increase in C and N gaseous losses of C and N relative to their losses via leachate, across litter treatments. We conclude that litter type determines the earthworm-mediated decomposition effect, highlighting the importance of vegetation management in controlling C and N losses from riparian buffers to the environment.

  11. EnviroAtlas - Biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset contains data on the mean biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems per 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) in 2006....

  12. Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Lars Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen diskuterer ordet "transformation" med udgangspunkt i dels hvorledes ordet bruges i arkitektfaglig terminologi og dels med fokus på ordets potentielle indhold og egnethed i samme teminologi.......Artiklen diskuterer ordet "transformation" med udgangspunkt i dels hvorledes ordet bruges i arkitektfaglig terminologi og dels med fokus på ordets potentielle indhold og egnethed i samme teminologi....

  13. TRANSFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  14. Invasive Andropogon gayanus (gamba grass) is an ecosystem transformer of nitrogen relations in Australian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter-Rachor, N A; Setterfield, S A; Douglas, M M; Hutley, L B; Cook, G D; Schmidt, S

    2009-09-01

    Invasion by the African grass Andropogon gayanus is drastically altering the understory structure of oligotrophic savannas in tropical Australia. We compared nitrogen (N) relations and phenology of A. gayanus and native grasses to examine the impact of invasion on N cycling and to determine possible reasons for invasiveness of A. gayanus. Andropogon gayanus produced up to 10 and four times more shoot phytomass and root biomass, with up to seven and 2.5 times greater shoot and root N pools than native grass understory. These pronounced differences in phytomass and N pools between A. gayanus and native grasses were associated with an altered N cycle. Most growth occurs in the wet season when, compared with native grasses, dominance of A. gayanus was associated with significantly lower total soil N pools, lower nitrification rates, up to three times lower soil nitrate availability, and up to three times higher soil ammonium availability. Uptake kinetics for different N sources were studied with excised roots of three grass species ex situ. Excised roots of A. gayanus had an over six times higher-uptake rate of ammonium than roots of native grasses, while native grass Eriachne triseta had a three times higher uptake rate of nitrate than A. gayanus. We hypothesize that A. gayanus stimulates ammonification but inhibits nitrification, as was shown to occur in its native range in Africa, and that this modification of the soil N cycle is linked to the species' preference for ammonium as an N source. This mechanism could result in altered soil N relations and could enhance the competitive superiority and persistence of A. gayanus in Australian savannas.

  15. Biological role in the transformation of platinum-group mineral grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Frank; Zammit, Carla M.; Shar, Sahar S.; Etschmann, Barbara; Bottrill, Ralph; Southam, Gordon; Ta, Christine; Kilburn, Matthew; Oberthür, Thomas; Ball, Andrew S.; Brugger, Joël

    2016-04-01

    Platinum-group elements are strategically important metals. Finding new deposits is becoming increasingly difficult owing to our limited understanding of the processes that affect their mobility in surface environments. Microorganisms have been shown to promote the mobility of metals around ore deposits. Here we show that microorganisms influence the mobility of platinum-group elements in mineral grains collected from Brazil, Australia and Colombia. Scanning electron microscopy showed biofilms covering the platinum-group mineral grains. The biofilms contained abundant platinum-group element nanoparticles and microcrystalline aggregates, and were dominated by Proteobacteria, many of which were closely related to known metal-resistant species. Some platinum-group mineral grains contained carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, selenium and iodine, suggesting the grains may be biogenic in origin. Molecular analyses show that Brazilian platinum-palladium grains hosted specific bacterial communities, which were different in composition from communities associated with gold grains, or communities in surrounding soils and sediments. Nano-phase metallic platinum accumulated when a metallophillic bacterium was incubated with a percolating platinum-containing medium, suggesting that biofilms can cause the precipitation of mobile platinum complexes. We conclude that biofilms are capable of forming or transforming platinum-group mineral grains, and may play an important role for platinum-group element dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments.

  16. The Design and Transformation of Biofundamentals: A Nonsurvey Introductory Evolutionary and Molecular Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymkowsky, Michael W; Rentsch, Jeremy D; Begovic, Emina; Cooper, Melanie M

    2016-01-01

    Many introductory biology courses amount to superficial surveys of disconnected topics. Often, foundational observations and the concepts derived from them and students' ability to use these ideas appropriately are overlooked, leading to unrealistic expectations and unrecognized learning obstacles. The result can be a focus on memorization at the expense of the development of a meaningful framework within which to consider biological phenomena. About a decade ago, we began a reconsideration of what an introductory course should present to students and the skills they need to master. The original Web-based course's design presaged many of the recommendations of the Vision and Change report; in particular, a focus on social evolutionary mechanisms, stochastic (evolutionary and molecular) processes, and core ideas (cellular continuity, evolutionary homology, molecular interactions, coupled chemical reactions, and molecular machines). Inspired by insights from the Chemistry, Life, the Universe & Everything general chemistry project, we transformed the original Web version into a (freely available) book with a more unified narrative flow and a set of formative assessments delivered through the beSocratic system. We outline how student responses to course materials are guiding future course modifications, in particular a more concerted effort at helping students to construct logical, empirically based arguments, explanations, and models. © 2016 M. W. Klymkowsky et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Carbon and nitrogen - The key to biological activity, diversity and productivity in a Haplic Acrisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okae-Anti, Daniel; Torkpo, Addison; Kankam-Boadu, Maryross; Agyei Frimpong, Kwame; Obuobi, Daniel

    2004-10-01

    Soil organic matter is important because it impacts all soil quality functions. Much less information is available on the dynamics of the residual carbon and nitrogen content and their distribution in continuously cropped arable fields. We described the values of the soil properties, pH, moisture content, organic carbon and total nitrogen considering them to be random variables. We treated their spatial variation as a function of the distance between observations within the study site, a continuously-cropped field dominated by Haplic Acrisols. We discussed the nature and structure of the modeled functions, the semivariograms, and interpreted these in the light of the potential of these soils to sustain agricultural productivity. At these sites there had been no conversion of natural forests to agriculture so the paper does not discuss soil carbon storage for either the regional or global storage. All the properties studied showed spatial non-stationarity for the distances covered, indicating that the variance between pairs of observations increased as separating distances also increased. pH, moisture content and total nitrogen were fitted with the power model whereas the linear model best fitted organic carbon. Total nitrogen had the least nugget variance and pH the highest estimated exponent, α, from the power equations. The soils are highly variable in terms of input or return of organic residue to provide a sink for carbon and nitrogen and the breakdown of these materials as affected by pH, moisture availability and microorganisms. (author)

  18. Carbon and nitrogen - The key to biological activity, diversity and productivity in a Haplic Acrisol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae-Anti, Daniel [Department of Soil Science, School of Agriculture, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)] E-mail: dokaent@yahoo.co.uk; Torkpo, Addison; Kankam-Boadu, Maryross; Agyei Frimpong, Kwame [Department of Soil Science, School of Agriculture, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Obuobi, Daniel [Department of Computer Science and Information Technology, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana)

    2004-10-01

    Soil organic matter is important because it impacts all soil quality functions. Much less information is available on the dynamics of the residual carbon and nitrogen content and their distribution in continuously cropped arable fields. We described the values of the soil properties, pH, moisture content, organic carbon and total nitrogen considering them to be random variables. We treated their spatial variation as a function of the distance between observations within the study site, a continuously-cropped field dominated by Haplic Acrisols. We discussed the nature and structure of the modeled functions, the semivariograms, and interpreted these in the light of the potential of these soils to sustain agricultural productivity. At these sites there had been no conversion of natural forests to agriculture so the paper does not discuss soil carbon storage for either the regional or global storage. All the properties studied showed spatial non-stationarity for the distances covered, indicating that the variance between pairs of observations increased as separating distances also increased. pH, moisture content and total nitrogen were fitted with the power model whereas the linear model best fitted organic carbon. Total nitrogen had the least nugget variance and pH the highest estimated exponent, {alpha}, from the power equations. The soils are highly variable in terms of input or return of organic residue to provide a sink for carbon and nitrogen and the breakdown of these materials as affected by pH, moisture availability and microorganisms. (author)

  19. TRANSFORMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  20. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10–107 Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system. PMID:21121071

  1. Ureic nitrogen transformation in multi-layer soil columns treated with urease and nitrification inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Camilla; Garcia-Mina, Josè M; Ciavatta, Claudio; Marzadori, Claudio

    2009-06-10

    The use of N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), as a urease inhibitor, is one of the most successful strategies utilized to increase the efficiency of urea-based fertilization. To date, NBPT has been added to the soil incorporated in fertilizers containing either urea or the inhibitor at a fixed percentage on the urea weight. The possibility of using NBPT physically separated from urea-based fertilizers could make its use more flexible. In particular, a granulated product containing NBPT could be utilized in soils treated with different urea-based fertilizers including livestock urine, the amount depending on soil characteristics and/or the urea source (e.g., mineral fertilizer, organo-mineral fertilizer, or animal slurry). In this study, a multilayer soil column device was used to investigate the influence of an experimental granular product (RV) containing NBPT and a garlic extract, combining the ability to protect NBPT by oxidation and nitrification inhibition activity, on (a) spatial variability of soil urease and nitrification activities and (b) timing of urea hydrolysis and mineral-N form accumulation (NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+)) in soil treated with urea. The results clearly demonstrated that RV can, effectively, inhibit the soil urease activity along the soil column profile up to 8-10 cm soil layer depth and that the inhibition power of RV was dependent on time and soil depth. However, nitrification activity is not significantly influenced by RV addition. In addition, the soil N transformations were clearly affected by RV; in fact, RV retarded urea hydrolysis and reduced the accumulation of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N ions along the soil profile. The RV product was demonstrated to be an innovative additive able to modify some key ureic N trasformation processes correlated with the efficiency of the urea-based fertilization, in a soil column higher than 10 cm.

  2. Use of isotopes for increasing biological nitrogen fixation and yield of pastures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yunyin

    1992-05-01

    The N-15 natural abundance and N-15 isotope dilution (ID) methods for measuring dinitrogen fixation and nitrogen transfer in alfalfa and alfalfa intercropped with meadow fescue were compared in three experiments. Although both methods gave essentially the same estimates the precision of the values obtained differed, and values obtained by the isotope dilution method were more precise. Similarly, the N-15 natural abundance method was not very suitable for detecting N transfer from legume to non-legume. Greater amounts of N transfer were detected by the ID method, and with a greater precision. Mixed cropping sometimes gave slight to high increases in % nitrogen fixation compared to alfalfa cropped alone. On the whole alfalfa was found to be a high nitrogen fixer, with fixation values from the second harvest onwards almost always greater than 80% and often close to 100%. 23 refs, 30 tabs

  3. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields of transformers and possible biological and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Sezgin, Gaye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2014-12-01

    Physiological processes in organisms can be influenced by extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic energy. Biological effect studies have great importance; as well as measurement studies since they provide information on the real exposure situations. In this study, the leakage magnetic fields around a transformer were measured in an apartment building in Küçükçekmece, Istanbul, and the measurement results were evaluated with respect to the international exposure standards. The transformer station was on the bottom floor of a three-floor building. It was found that people living and working in the building were exposed to ELF magnetic fields higher than the threshold magnetic field value of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Many people living in this building reported health complaints such as immunological problems of their children. There were child-workers working in the textile factories located in the building. Safe distances or areas for these people should be recommended. Protective measures could be implemented to minimize these exposures. Further residential exposure studies are needed to demonstrate the exposure levels of ELF magnetic fields. Precautions should, therefore, be taken either to reduce leakage or minimize the exposed fields. Shielding techniques should be used to minimize the leakage magnetic fields in such cases.

  4. Influence of litter quality and fertilization on microbial nitrogen transformations in short-rotation forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slapokas, T

    1991-01-01

    Microbial decomposition of different types of litters in short-rotation forests was studied using the litter-bag technique. The impact of earthworm activity on leaf decomposition was included in one study and fungal succession was recorded in certain willow leaf litters. Soil fertility affected leaf compositions, which in turn influenced decomposition rates. Contents of macroelements, (esp. N), water-soluble and lingnified substances, and tannins (i.e. astringency) were observed during decomposition. Directly after leaf-fall most litters lost 5-27 per cent of their dry weight, mainly trough leaching. Thereafter, the various litters converged regarding their contents of certain leaf constituents, e.g. water-soluble and lignified substances and potassium. Mineral-nutrient loss rates from litters were often positively related to initial nutrient contents; in fact, N was transported into N-poor litters. N-contents increased until net mineralization began. Decomposition and N-transformations in a low-humified peat were followed at a cultivated bog. Mean decomposition in a drained, rotovated, and limed control plot was 2.6 per cent yr{sup -1}. Rates in fertilized plots were not shown to be higher, even though their bulk density and degree of humification had increased. N-mineralization rates in planted plot increase over the years. Pools of ammonium- and nitrate-N were lowest during periods of rapid plant growth. Nitrification occurred in both field and laboratory incubations of peat. In the top 10 cm of peat in plots receiving fixed N only, immobilization in 7-year-old stands was 53 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, whereas it was lower in liquid-N fertilized plots. Much of this fertilizer-N (ca. 1500 kg ha{sup -1} over 7 years) must have been immobilized in deeper peat layers or lost, partly through denitrification. One-year N-budgets are presented for alder stands with and without added fertilizer-N. (au).

  5. Modeling Nitrous Oxide Production during Biological Nitrogen Removal via Nitrification and Denitrification: Extensions to the General ASM Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    2011-01-01

    on N2O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO2– participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among......Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N2O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N2O...

  6. Control of a Biological Nitrogen Removal Process in an Intensified Single Reactor Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen removing granular sludge process is a novel and intensified process. However, its stable operation and control remains a challenging problem. In this contribution, a new process oriented approach is used to develop, evaluate and benchmark control strategies to ensure stable operation...

  7. Estimation of Corn Yield and Soil Nitrogen via Soil Electrical Conductivity Measurement Treated with Organic, Chemical and Biological Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khalilzade

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Around the world maize is the second crop with the most cultivated areas and amount of production, so as the most important strategic crop, have a special situation in policies, decision making, resources and inputs allocation. On the other side, negative environmental consequences of intensive consumption of agrochemicals resulted to change view concerning food production. One of the most important visions is sustainable production of enough food plus attention to social, economic and environmental aspects. Many researchers stated that the first step to achieve this goal is optimization and improvement of resources use efficiencies. According to little knowledge on relation between soil electrical conductivity and yield of maize, beside the environmental concerns about nitrogen consumption and need to replace chemical nitrogen by ecological inputs, this study designed and aimed to evaluate agroecological characteristics of corn and some soil characteristics as affected by application of organic and biological fertilizers under field conditions. Materials and Methods In order to probing the possibility of grain yield and soil nitrogen estimation via measurement of soil properties, a field experiment was conducted during growing season 2010 at Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. A randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Treatments included: 1- manure (30 ton ha-1, 2-vermicompost (10 ton ha-1, 3- nitroxin (containing Azotobacter sp. and Azospirillum sp., inoculation was done according to Kennedy et al., 4- nitrogen as urea (400 kg ha-1 and 5- control (without fertilizer. Studied traits were soil pH, soil EC, soil respiration rate, N content of soil and maize yield. Soil respiration rate was measured using equation 1: CO2= (V0- V× N×22 Equation 1 In which V0 is the volume of consumed acid for control treatment titration, V is of the volume of consumed acid for sample treatment

  8. Transfer of biologically fixed nitrogen to the non-legume component of mixed pastures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haystead, A.

    1983-01-01

    Pasture ecosystems are extremely diverse, as are the management procedures imposed upon them by the pastoralist. In low input pasture enterprises in marginal areas, legume nitrogen fixation is frequently (but not invariably) crucial to continued productivity. Legumes usually do not dominate a pasture and their role in transferring fixed nitrogen to a non-legume, frequently graminaceous, species is important. Methods for measuring this transfer are critically assessed in terms of their usefulness in realistic pasture environments. Existing techniques all have serious disadvantages in this respect. Isotopic studies of individual processes within the transfer system are described and some new lines of investigation are proposed. The value of isotopic studies in improving pasture management is discussed. (author)

  9. Effect of martensitic phase transformation on the hardening behavior and texture evolution in a 304L stainless steel under compression at liquid nitrogen temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakmak, Ercan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Choo, Hahn, E-mail: hchoo@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The martensitic phase transformation behavior and its relations with the macroscopic hardening rate and the evolutions in the crystallographic texture of the constituent phases were studied for a 304L stainless steel that exhibits the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction was used to measure the evolutions of phase fractions and texture in terms of pole figures as a function of the applied compressive strain at the liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The phase transformation analyses show that the hcp-martensite phase fraction reaches a significant level of about 22 wt% at 15% applied strain and remains constant. The bcc-martensite phase fraction increases continuously with the deformation that correlates well with the macroscopic hardening behavior. Furthermore, the texture analyses show that transformation has dominant effect on the bcc-martensite texture evolution with little influence from subsequent plastic deformation at current testing conditions.

  10. Effect of martensitic phase transformation on the hardening behavior and texture evolution in a 304L stainless steel under compression at liquid nitrogen temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakmak, Ercan; Vogel, Sven C.; Choo, Hahn

    2014-01-01

    The martensitic phase transformation behavior and its relations with the macroscopic hardening rate and the evolutions in the crystallographic texture of the constituent phases were studied for a 304L stainless steel that exhibits the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction was used to measure the evolutions of phase fractions and texture in terms of pole figures as a function of the applied compressive strain at the liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The phase transformation analyses show that the hcp-martensite phase fraction reaches a significant level of about 22 wt% at 15% applied strain and remains constant. The bcc-martensite phase fraction increases continuously with the deformation that correlates well with the macroscopic hardening behavior. Furthermore, the texture analyses show that transformation has dominant effect on the bcc-martensite texture evolution with little influence from subsequent plastic deformation at current testing conditions

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, M.; Voříšková, A.; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, M.; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * nitrogen acquisition * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  12. Biological Hydrogen Production: Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation with Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    process.7 The reaction is of great economic importance given that the world’s industrial production of nitrogenous fertilizer increased 27-fold between... Enzymatic Saccharification and Fermentation of Paper and Pulp Industry Effluent for Biohydrogen Production . Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 2010, 35, pp...Reactor Setup and Operation 11 4.2 Operational Comparison: SBR and CBR 12 4.3 Effect of pH and Loading on Hydrogen Production 13 4.4 Enzymatic Source

  13. Integrated biological treatment of fowl manure for nitrogen recovery and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmanik, Roy; Nejidat, Ali; Bar-Sinay, Boaz; Gross, Amit

    2013-03-15

    Biowaste such as animal manure poses an environmental threat, due to among others, uncontrolled emissions of ammonia and additional hazardous gases to the atmosphere. This study presents a quantitative analysis of an alternative biowaste management approach aimed at nitrogen recovery and reduction of contamination risks. The suggested technology combines anaerobic digestion of nitrogen-rich biowaste with biofiltration of the resulting gaseous ammonia. A compost-based biofilter is used to capture the ammonia and convert it to nitrate by nitrifying microorganisms. Nitrogen mass balance was applied to quantify the system's capacity under various fowl manure-loading regimes and ammonia loading rates. The produced nitrate was recovered and its use as liquid fertilizer was evaluated with cucumber plant as a model crop. In addition, emissions of other hazardous gases (N(2)O, CH(4) and H(2)S) were monitored before and after biofiltration to evaluate the efficiency of the system for treating these gases. It was found that nitrate-rich liquid fertilizer can be continuously produced using the suggested approach, with an over 67 percentage of nitrogen recovery, under an ammonia loading rate of up to 40 g NH(3) per cubic meter biofilter per hour. Complete elimination of NH(3), H(2)S, CH(4) and N(2)O was achieved, demonstrating the potential of the suggested technology for mitigating emission of these gases from fowl manure. Moreover, the quality of the recovered fertilizer was demonstrated by higher yield performance of cucumber plant compared with control plants treated with a commonly applied organic liquid fertilizer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Robust biological nitrogen removal by creating multiple tides in a single bed tidal flow constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuansheng; Zhao, Yaqian; Rymszewicz, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Achieving effective total nitrogen (TN) removal is one of the major challenges faced by constructed wetlands (CWs). To address this issue, multiple "tides" were proposed in a single stage tidal flow constructed wetland (TFCW). With this adoption, exceptional TN removal (85% on average) was achieved under a high nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of around 28 g Nm(-2)day(-1), which makes the proposed system an adequate option to provide advanced wastewater treatment for peri-urban communities and rural area. It was revealed that the multiple "tides" not only promoted TN removal performance, but also brought more flexibility to TFCWs. Adsorption of NH4(+)-N onto the wetland medium (during contact period) and regeneration of the adsorption capacity via nitrification (during bed resting) were validated as the key processes for NH4(+)-N conversion in TFCWs. Moreover, simultaneous nitrification denitrification (SND) was found to be significant during the bed resting period. These findings will provide a new foundation for the design and modeling of nitrogen conversion and oxygen transfer in TFCWs. © 2013.

  15. Effect of organic matter application and water regimes on the transformation of fertilizer nitrogen in a Philippine soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomio; Padre, B.C. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments using the tracer technique showed that about 20 per cent of the fertilizer nitrogen added as basal to the Maahas clay soil was immobilized in submerged soils to which no organic material was added. The addition of organic matter to the soil increases the amount of nitrogen immobilized and the magnitude depends on the carbon to nitrogen ratio of the materials added. More fertilizer nitrogen was immobilized in the soils under upland and alternate wet-and-dry conditions than under submerged soil conditions. The uptake of fertilizer nitrogen by rice plants growing under submerged soil conditions ceased at the vegetative stage of growth because only a small amount of available nitrogen remains in the soil at this time, but the rice plant continued to absorb gradually untagged nitrogen from the soil throughout the reproductive stages of growth. Losses of fertilizer nitrogen were great under the alternate wet-and-dry conditions (submerged-upland). The loss of nitrogen from the soil-plant system was reduced by the addition of rice straw, which also reduced the uptake of fertilizer nitrogen but not the total dry matter production under the experimental conditions. Fertilizer nitrogen immobilized during the first crop remained mostly in the soil throughout the full period of the second crop. The total nitrogen uptake by rice plants was not affected by the soil moisture tension under the upland conditions used in the study but the movement of nitrogen from the leaves to the panicles during the reproductive stage seemed to decrease as the soil moisture tension increased. (auth.)

  16. Photolytic transformation products and biological stability of the hydrological tracer Uranine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, Lukasz; Olsson, Oliver; Lange, Jens; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Among many fluorescence tracers, Uranine (sodium fluorescein, UR) has most widely been used in hydrological research. Extensive use of UR for tracing experiments or commercial use might cause a potential risk of long-term environmental contamination. As any organic substance released to the environment, also UR is subjected to chemical and physical reactions that can be chemical, biological and photolysis processes. These processes transform the parent compound (PC) and have not been extensively investigated for UR. This study applies two OECDs (301 D and 301 F) tests and a screening water sediment test (WST) to investigate the biodegradability of the PC. Photolysis in water was explored by Xe lamp irradiation. Subsequently, the biodegradability of the photolysis mixtures was examined. The primary elimination of UR was monitored and structures of its transformation products (TPs) were elucidated by HPLC–FLD–MS/MS. UR was found not readily biodegradable, although small degradation rates could be observed in the OECD 301 D and WST. HPLC–FLD analysis showed high primary elimination of the tracer during photolysis. However, the low degree of mineralization found indicates that the UR was not fully degraded, instead transformed to TPs. A total of 5 photo-TPs were identified. According to MS/MS data, chemical structures could be proposed for all identified photo-TPs. Likewise the parent compound it was demonstrated that photo-TPs were largely recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Although we did not find indications for toxicity, target-oriented studies on the environmental impact of these photo-TPs are warranted. Results obtained in this study show that deeper investigations are necessary to fully understand fate and risk connected to the use of UR. - Highlights: • Uranine (UR) was not biodegraded in water and water-sediment system (WST). • Only small degradation rate occurred in OECD 301 D and WST. • Photolysis leads to incomplete mineralization of UR.

  17. Lecture to inquiry: The transformation of a tech prep biology teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Deborah Harris

    As teachers implement the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) many have to reform the instructional methods they have used throughout their careers. This case study examines the transformation of Laurie, a 20-year teacher, during her first year of change from a "traditional" textbook/lecture style of teaching to a facilitator of an inquiry-based classroom. Implementing change requires not only pedagogical expertise, but also the belief that the modifications can be made and that the outcomes are significant. Using Bandura's social cognitive theory as a framework, changes in Laurie's self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and motivation are followed throughout the transition. During her first year of change, Laurie used worksheets, small group activities, and guided inquiry activities, all strategies in which she had high self-efficacy and experienced positive student outcomes. She rarely used class forums, authentic assessment, and formative assessment. Factors that influenced her change were experiential professional development opportunities that allowed her to practice inquiry-based techniques, a change in her teaching environment from college prep chemistry to tech prep biology, autonomy regarding classroom decisions, and reflective decision making as she learned through experience. Using a standards-based biology textbook increased her self-efficacy toward using inquiry-based practices. The textbook format of embedding text in activities rather than adding activities to the text resulted in an increase of the number and frequency of activities done. Facilitating the textbook's Guided Inquiries and Extended Inquiries helped Laurie gain experience with inquiry-based methods. She also realized that when building from the students' concrete experiences, her students were able to attain higher-level thinking skills. The study revealed six factors contributing to Laurie's change process: (a) experiential professional development, (b) motivation for change

  18. [Responses of rhizosphere nitrogen and phosphorus transformations to different acid rain intensities in a hilly red soil tea plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Fu-sheng; Ye, Su-qiong; Yu, Su-qin; Fang, Xiang-min; Hu, Xiao-fei

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) plantation in hilly red soil region has been long impacted by acid deposition, however its effects on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transformations in rhizosphere soils remain unclear. A 25-year old tea plantation in a typical hilly red soil region was selected for an in situ simulation experiment treated by pH 4.5, pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and control. Rhizosihere and bulk soils were collected in the third year from the simulated acid deposition experiment. Soil mineral N, available P contents and major enzyme activities were analyzed using the chemical extraction and biochemical methods, and N and P mineralization rates were estimated using the indoor aerobic incubation methods. Our results showed that compared to the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5, respectively decreased 7.1%, 42.1% and 49.9% NO3(-)-N, 6.4%, 35.9% and 40.3% mineral N, 10.5%, 41.1% and 46.9% available P, 18.7%, 30.1% and 44.7% ammonification rate, 3.6%, 12.7% and 38.8% net N-mineralization rate, and 31.5%, 41.8% and 63.0% P mineralization rate in rhizosphere soils; however, among the 4 treatments, rhizosphere soil nitrification rate was not significantly different, the rhizosphere soil urease and acid phosphatase activities generally increased with the increasing intensity of acid rain (PpH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5 did not cause significant changes in NO3(-)-N, mineral N, available P as well as in the rates of nitrification, ammonification, net N-mineralization and P mineralization. With increasing the acid intensity, the rhizosphere effects of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N, mineral N, ammonification and net N-mineralization rates were altered from positive to negative effects, those of urease and acid phosphatease showed the opposite trends, those of available P and P mineralization were negative and that of nitrification was positive. In sum, prolonged elevated acid rain could reduce N and P transformation rates, decrease their availability, alter their rhizosphere

  19. Transformações biológicas: contribuições e perspectivas Biological transformations: contributions and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gonzaga de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a moment that amazingly advances are being reached on the development of technologies to obtain high value chemical compounds as polymers, fine chemicals, pharmaceutical industry intermediates and chemical entities, we cannot refuse that a meaningful progress is due to the maturing in knowledge of biological transformations. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are being widespread applied to generate processes and products with incredible success. In this review article we present the main contributions of biotechnology and biological catalytic processes to Chemistry, the most important evolution steps on enzymatic transformations, how it has being applied and which are the perspectives to academic and industrial environments. We also would like to stimulate the community to step out research in biotechnology applicable to chemical and pharmaceutical industries, trying to achieve what we believe to be the ideal layout: integrating chemical transformations, enzymatic conversions and fermentation processes.

  20. The use of the 15N isotope dilution technique to estimate the contribution of associated biological nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen nutrition of Paspalum notatum cv. batatais

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddey, R.M.; Doebereiner, Johanna

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a field experiment to investigate the use of the 15 N-dilution technique to measure the contribution of biological N 2 fixation to the N nutrition of the batatais cultivar of Paspalum notatum. The pensacola cultivar of this grass supports little associated N 2 fixation as evidenced by the low associated C 2 H 2 reduction activity and was thus used as a nonfixing control plant. The grasses were grown in 60-cm diameter concrete cylinders sunk into the soil, and the effects of four different addition rates of labelled nitrogen (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , were investigated. The data from seven harvests clearly demonstrated that there was a significant input of plant associated N 2 fixation to the nutrition of the batatais cultivar amounting to approximately 20 kg N ha -1 year -1 . Problems associated with the conduct of such isotope dilution experiments are discussed including the importance of using nonfixing control plants of similar growth habit, the advantages and disadvantages of growing the plants in cylinders as opposed to field plots, and the various methods of application of labelled N fertilizer

  1. Impact of TiO2 on the chemical and biological transformation of formulated chiral-metalaxyl in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junxing; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Chuanzhou; Hu, Jun

    2018-04-15

    The impacts of TiO 2 on the chemical and biological transformation of racemic metalaxyl wettable powder (rac-metalaxyl WP) in agricultural soils, and soil microorganisms were investigated. Under simulated solar irradiation, TiO 2 highly promoted the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP without changing the enantiomer fraction, with the promotion amplitude (60-1280%) being dependent on TiO 2 characteristics. TiO 2 characteristics showed different influence on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP in soils and aqueous solutions because their characteristics changed differently in soils. The impact of the mancozeb and other co-constituents on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP was smaller in soil media than in aqueous solution. Autoclave sterilization changed soil properties and subsequently weakened the promotion effects of TiO 2 on the chemical transformations of rac-metalaxyl WP to 0-233%. Microorganism biomass and bacterial community were not statistically significant changed by TiO 2 exposure regardless of rac-metalaxyl WP, suggesting that the promotional effects occurred mainly through chemical processes. The results also showed TiO 2 -soil interactions may be strengthened with TiO 2 (Degussa P25) aging time in soils, which decreased its promotion amplitude from 1060% (without aging) to 880% (aging for 20 days). Intermediate formed in soil biological transformation process was different from that in TiO 2 photocatalysis process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Paul J; Wilson, Kathleen L; Pung, Meredith A; Weiss, Lizabeth; Patel, Sheila; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Peterson, Christine; Porter, Valencia; Schadt, Eric; Chopra, Deepak; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2016-08-01

    To examine the effects of a comprehensive residential mind-body program on well-being. The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative was a quasi-randomized trial comparing the effects of participation in a 6-day Ayurvedic system of medicine-based comprehensive residential program with a 6-day residential vacation at the same retreat location. Retreat setting. 69 healthy women (n = 58) and men (n = 11) (mean age ± standard deviation, 53.6 ± 12 years). The Ayurvedic intervention addressed physical and emotional well-being through group meditation and yoga, massage, diet, adaptogenic herbs, lectures, and journaling. A battery of standardized questionnaires. Participants in the Ayurvedic program showed significant and sustained increases in ratings of spirituality (p < 0.01) and gratitude (p < 0.05) compared with the vacation group, which showed no change. The Ayurvedic participants also showed increased ratings for self-compassion (p < 0.01) as well as less anxiety at the 1-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Findings suggest that a short-term intensive program providing holistic instruction and experience in mind-body healing practices can lead to significant and sustained increases in perceived well-being and that relaxation alone is not enough to improve certain aspects of well-being.

  3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption fourier transform mass spectrometry for biological compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, R.; Buchanan, M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent development of matrix-assisted UV laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry has made possible the ionization and detection of extremely large molecules (with molecular weights exceeding 100,000 Daltons). This technique has generated enormous interest in the biological community for the direct examination of large peptides and oligonucleotides. Although this matrix-assisted ionization method has been developed and used almost exclusively with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers, research is currently in progress to demonstrate this technique with trapped ion mass spectrometers, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTMS). The potential capabilities of FTMS for wide mass range, high resolution measurement, and ion trapping experiments suggest that this instrumental technique should be useful for the detailed structural characterization of large ions generated by the matrix-assisted technique. We have recently demonstrated that matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption can be successfully used with FTMS for the ionization of small peptides. The objective of this report is to summarize the application and current limitations of matrix-assisted laser desorption FTMS for the characterization of peptides and oligonucleotides at the isomeric level. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Biological eleimination of nitrogen and phosphorus: Field results and modelling aspects. Rimozione biologica di azoto e fosforo: Risultati su scala reale ed aspetti modellistici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malpei, F.; Andreattola, G.; Canziani, R. (Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy))

    1992-07-01

    The processes described in this article can be easily adapted to existing biological activated sludge plants which eliminate nitrogen and provide for considerable savings with respect to traditional chemical precipitation methods, as well as the disposal of exhausted sludge. This article assesses this innovative combined nitrogen and the removal efficiencies of phosphorus removal method by analyzing the basic process schemes and real plant and simulated operating results.

  5. Freshwater Mussels as Biological Sensors and Cyclers of Aquatic Nitrogen Constituents: An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, A.; Just, C. L.; Mudumbai, R.; Dasgupta, S.; Newton, T. J.; Durst, J.; Boddicker, M. D.; Diken, M. B.; Bril, J.; Baidoo-Williams, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most extensive manifestations of anthropogenic mismanagement of nitrogen is eutrophication of the Gulf of Mexico. Leaching and runoff transport nitrate compounds-excess agricultural fertilizer and animal waste-via the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. Phytoplankton then multiplies exponentially, and consumes most of the dissolved oxygen. This hypoxia kills fish and other organisms, leading to so-called dead zones in the Gulf that can cover 6,000-7,000 square miles. Dead zone mitigation plans call for coupling management actions with enhanced monitoring, modeling, and research on nitrogen delivery to, as well as processing within, the Mississippi River. Our vision is to create a biosensor network of native freshwater mussels in a major river to monitor, comprehend, and ultimately model key components of the nitrogen cycle. Native freshwater mussels are a guild of long-lived, suspension feeding bivalves that perform important ecological functions in aquatic systems. Mussels can influence nutrient cycling by transferring nutrients from the water column to the riverbed. A major problem for environmental scientists is that relatively little is known about the diurnal behaviors of freshwater mussels or the impacts these behaviors may have on the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Our multidisciplinary team is performing a series of laboratory experiments exploring the feasibility of using freshwater mussels as sensors of and capacitors for nitrates. For sensing, we place Hall-effect sensors on mussels to monitor the rhythmic opening and closing of their valves (gape). One shortcoming of previous work is that mussels were monitored in artificial conditions: glued fast in laboratory flumes, or tethered in constrained settings. To overcome this shortcoming, our team has built a mussel microhabitat with a constant river water feed stock, solar simulator, and a variety of water chemistry sensor. A main thrust of our work is to develop the technology to monitor mussel

  6. Biological nitrogen and carbon removal in a gravity flow biomass concentrator reactor for municipal sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Hidaka, Taira; Campo, Pablo; Kleiner, Eric; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    A novel membrane system, the Biomass Concentrator Reactor (BCR), was evaluated as an alternative technology for the treatment of municipal wastewater. Because the BCR is equipped with a membrane whose average poresize is 20 μm (18-28 μm), the reactor requires low-pressure differential to operate (gravity). The effectiveness of this system was evaluated for the removal of carbon and nitrogen using two identical BCRs, identified as conventional and hybrid, that were operated in parallel. The conventional reactor was operated under full aerobic conditions (i.e., organic carbon and ammonia oxidation), while the hybrid reactor incorporated an anoxic zone for nitrate reduction as well as an aerobic zone for organic carbon and ammonia oxidation. Both reactors were fed synthetic wastewater at a flow rate of 71 L d(-1), which resulted in a hydraulic retention time of 9 h. In the case of the hybrid reactor, the recycle flow from the aerobic zone to the anoxic zone was twice the feed flow rate. Reactor performance was evaluated under two solids retention times (6 and 15 d). Under these conditions, the BCRs achieved nearly 100% mixed liquor solids separation with a hydraulic head differential of less than 2.5 cm. The COD removal efficiency was over 90%. Essentially complete nitrification was achieved in both systems, and nitrogen removal in the hybrid reactor was close to the expected value (67%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling nitrous oxide production during biological nitrogen removal via nitrification and denitrification: extensions to the general ASM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F

    2011-09-15

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N(2)O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N(2)O dynamics during both nitrification and denitrification in biological N removal. Six additional processes and three additional reactants, all involved in known biochemical reactions, have been added. The validity and applicability of the model is demonstrated by comparing simulations with experimental data on N(2)O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO(2)(-) participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among the four denitrification steps, the last one (N(2)O reduction to N(2)) seems to be inhibited first when O(2) is present. Overall, N(2)O production can account for 0.1-25% of the consumed N in different nitrification and denitrification systems, which can be well simulated by the proposed model. In conclusion, we provide a modeling structure, which adequately captures N(2)O dynamics in autotrophic nitrification and heterotrophic denitrification driven biological N removal processes and which can form the basis for ongoing refinements.

  8. Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in sequencing batch reactors: effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen concentration and influent particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wylie, Jason; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Removal of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from municipal wastewaters is required to mitigate eutrophication of receiving water bodies. While most treatment plants achieve good N removal using influent carbon (C), the use of influent C to facilitate enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is poorly explored. A number of operational parameters can facilitate optimum use of influent C and this study investigated the effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during aerobic period and influent solids on biological P and N removal in sequencing batch reactors (SRBs) using municipal wastewaters. Increasing cycle length from 3 to 6 h increased P removal efficiency, which was attributed to larger portion of N being removed via nitrite pathway and more biodegradable organic C becoming available for EBPR. Further increasing cycle length from 6 to 8 h decreased P removal efficiencies as the demand for biodegradable organic C for denitrification increased as a result of complete nitrification. Decreasing DO concentration in the aerobic period from 2 to 0.8 mg L(-1) increased P removal efficiency but decreased nitrification rates possibly due to oxygen limitation. Further, sedimented wastewater was proved to be a better influent stream than non-sedimented wastewater possibility due to the detrimental effect of particulate matter on biological nutrient removal.

  9. Conceptualization and validation of a dynamic model for the simulation of nitrogen transformations and fluxes in fish ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez-Montealegre, R.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Dam, van A.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen is a key element in aquatic environments and an important pond management variable. In aquaculture systems, nitrogen accumulation eventually leads to a deterioration of the system. The interactions between various N-species are complex and difficult to integrate. Modelling can improve our

  10. Metabolic features involved in drought stress tolerance mechanisms in peanut nodules and their contribution to biological nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Ana Laura; Bianucci, Eliana; Castro, Stella; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2017-10-01

    Legumes belong to the most important crops worldwide. They increase soil fertility due their ability to establish symbiotic associations with soil microorganisms, known as rhizobia, capable of fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere. However, they are frequently exposed to abiotic stress conditions in particular drought. Such adverse conditions impair the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and depend largely on the legume. Therefore, two peanut cultivars with contrasting tolerance to drought, namely the more tolerant EC-98 and the sensitive Granoleico, were investigated to elucidate the relative contribution of BNF to the tolerance to drought. The tolerant cultivar EC-98 sustained growth and BNF similar to the control condition despite the reduced water potential and photosynthesis, suggesting the functioning of distinct metabolic pathways that contributed to enhance the tolerance. The biochemical and metabolomics approaches revealed that nodules from the tolerant cultivar accumulated trehalose, proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), metabolites with known function in protecting against drought stress. The amide metabolism was severely affected in nodules from the sensitive cultivar Granoleico as revealed by the low content of asparagine and glutamine in the drought stressed plants. The sensitive cultivar upon rehydration was unable to re-establish a metabolism similar to well-watered plants. This was evidenced by the low level of metabolites and, transcripts and specific activities of enzymes from the carbon (sucrose synthase) and nitrogen (glutamine synthetase) metabolism which decreased below the values of control plants. Therefore, the increased content of metabolites with protective functions under drought stress likely is crucial for the full restoration upon rehydration. Smaller changes of drought stress-related metabolites in nodule are another trait that contributes to the effective control of BNF in the tolerant peanut cultivar (EC-98). Copyright © 2017

  11. Spatially robust estimates of biological nitrogen (N) fixation imply substantial human alteration of the tropical N cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Benjamin W; Smith, W Kolby; Townsend, Alan R; Nasto, Megan K; Reed, Sasha C; Chazdon, Robin L; Cleveland, Cory C

    2014-06-03

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the largest natural source of exogenous nitrogen (N) to unmanaged ecosystems and also the primary baseline against which anthropogenic changes to the N cycle are measured. Rates of BNF in tropical rainforest are thought to be among the highest on Earth, but they are notoriously difficult to quantify and are based on little empirical data. We adapted a sampling strategy from community ecology to generate spatial estimates of symbiotic and free-living BNF in secondary and primary forest sites that span a typical range of tropical forest legume abundance. Although total BNF was higher in secondary than primary forest, overall rates were roughly five times lower than previous estimates for the tropical forest biome. We found strong correlations between symbiotic BNF and legume abundance, but we also show that spatially free-living BNF often exceeds symbiotic inputs. Our results suggest that BNF in tropical forest has been overestimated, and our data are consistent with a recent top-down estimate of global BNF that implied but did not measure low tropical BNF rates. Finally, comparing tropical BNF within the historical area of tropical rainforest with current anthropogenic N inputs indicates that humans have already at least doubled reactive N inputs to the tropical forest biome, a far greater change than previously thought. Because N inputs are increasing faster in the tropics than anywhere on Earth, both the proportion and the effects of human N enrichment are likely to grow in the future.

  12. Spatially robust estimates of biological nitrogen (N) fixation imply substantial human alteration of the tropical N cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Benjamin W.; Smith, William K.; Townsend, Alan R.; Nasto, Megan K.; Reed, Sasha C.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the largest natural source of exogenous nitrogen (N) to unmanaged ecosystems and also the primary baseline against which anthropogenic changes to the N cycle are measured. Rates of BNF in tropical rainforest are thought to be among the highest on Earth, but they are notoriously difficult to quantify and are based on little empirical data. We adapted a sampling strategy from community ecology to generate spatial estimates of symbiotic and free-living BNF in secondary and primary forest sites that span a typical range of tropical forest legume abundance. Although total BNF was higher in secondary than primary forest, overall rates were roughly five times lower than previous estimates for the tropical forest biome. We found strong correlations between symbiotic BNF and legume abundance, but we also show that spatially free-living BNF often exceeds symbiotic inputs. Our results suggest that BNF in tropical forest has been overestimated, and our data are consistent with a recent top-down estimate of global BNF that implied but did not measure low tropical BNF rates. Finally, comparing tropical BNF within the historical area of tropical rainforest with current anthropogenic N inputs indicates that humans have already at least doubled reactive N inputs to the tropical forest biome, a far greater change than previously thought. Because N inputs are increasing faster in the tropics than anywhere on Earth, both the proportion and the effects of human N enrichment are likely to grow in the future.

  13. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal in membrane bioreactors: model development and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Alida; Mannina, Giorgio; Neumann, Marc B; Viviani, Gaspare; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are being increasingly used for wastewater treatment. Mathematical modeling of MBR systems plays a key role in order to better explain their characteristics. Several MBR models have been presented in the literature focusing on different aspects: biological models, models which include soluble microbial products (SMP), physical models able to describe the membrane fouling and integrated models which couple the SMP models with the physical models. However, only a few integrated models have been developed which take into account the relationships between membrane fouling and biological processes. With respect to biological phosphorus removal in MBR systems, due to the complexity of the process, practical use of the models is still limited. There is a vast knowledge (and consequently vast amount of data) on nutrient removal for conventional-activated sludge systems but only limited information on phosphorus removal for MBRs. Calibration of these complex integrated models still remains the main bottleneck to their employment. The paper presents an integrated mathematical model able to simultaneously describe biological phosphorus removal, SMP formation/degradation and physical processes which also include the removal of organic matter. The model has been calibrated with data collected in a UCT-MBR pilot plant, located at the Palermo wastewater treatment plant, applying a modified version of a recently developed calibration protocol. The calibrated model provides acceptable correspondence with experimental data and can be considered a useful tool for MBR design and operation.

  14. Isolation and Identification of Phosphate Solubilizing and Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria from Soil in Wamena Biological Garden, Jayawijaya, Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI WIDAWATI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NFB from soil samples of Wamena Biological Garden (WbiG. Eleven soil samples were collected randomly to estimate microbial population which used plate count method. The result showed that the microbial population ranged from 5.0x103-7.5x106 cells of bacteria/gram of soil and 5.0x103-1.5x107 cells of bacteria/gram of soil for PSB and NFB respectively. There were 17 isolates which have been identified till genus and species. The isolated microorganism were identified as PSB i.e. Bacillus sp., B. pantothenticus, B. megatherium, Flavobacterium sp., F. breve, Klebsiella sp., K. aerogenes, Chromobacterium lividum, Enterobacter alvei, E. agglomerans, Pseudomonas sp., Proteus sp. and as NFB i.e. Azotobacter sp., A. chroococcum, A. paspalii, Rhizobium sp., and Azospirillum sp.

  15. Respirometry applied for biological nitrogen removal process; Aplicacion de la respirometria al tratamiento biologico para la eliminacion del nitrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, E.

    2004-07-01

    In waste water treatment plants, the Biological Nitrogen Removal (BNR) has acquired a fundamental importance. The BNR processes are Nitrification ( aerobic) and Denitrification (anoxic). Since both processes are carried on living microorganisms, a lack of their bioactivity information might cause serious confusion about their control criteria and following up purposes. For this reason, the Re spirometry applied to those processes has reached an important role by getting an essential information in a timely manner through respiration rate measurements in static and dynamic modes and applications such as AUR (Ammonium Uptake Rate), Nitrification Capacity. RBCOD (Readily Biodegradable COD) as well as AUR related to SRT (Sludge age), RBCOD related to NUR (Specific Nitrate Uptake Rate) and others. By other side in this article we have introduced a not very well known applications related to denitrification, about the methanol acclimatization and generated bioactivity. (Author) 6 refs.

  16. Thermal expansion and phase transformations of nitrogen-expanded austenite studied with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-expanded austenite, _N, with high and low nitrogen contents was produced from AISI 316 grade stainless steel powder by gaseous nitriding in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the thermal expansion and thermal stability...... as a fitting parameter. The stacking fault density is constant for temperatures up to 680 K, whereafter it decreases to nil. Surprisingly, a transition phase with composition M4N (M = Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo) appears for temperatures above 770 K. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion depends on the nitrogen...

  17. Physicochemical and biological cycles in a tide dominated, nitrogen-polluted temperate estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Le Corre, P.; Birrien, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variations in the physicochemical and biological parameters in the Morlaix estuary on the Brittany coast of France were studied. Hydrographically, the estuary can be classified into 3 segments: the upper estuary where stratification always persists, the lower estuary where vertical homogeneity is permanent, and a middle estuary where there is a regular oscillation of stratification and homogeneity during every tidal cycle, stratification being associated with slack waters and ...

  18. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, David B

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well. (topical review)

  19. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  20. Some problems of biological effects under the combined action of nitrogen oxides, their metabolites and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The progress of power engineering envisages the intensive construction of nuclear-energy plants, where an organic or nuclear fuel is used. Nowadays the concept of nuclear-energy plant with the coolant based on dissociating N 2 O 4 is being developed. A great deal of radioactive and chemical products escapes into surroundings as the result of the power plants being in service. Their action on organisms is performed simultaneously, that could have an essential effect on the quantitative and qualitative regularities of response. The estimation of the combined effect of nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite and nitrate and radiation has been carried out on the base of the investigation into methemoglobin formation, genetic effects and the pathomorphological changes in lungs. The formation of methemoglobin has been studied on rats in 1, 3, 7 and 15 days after the single total irradiation of 300 and 700 R doses at the gamma-installation (UGU-420) using a radioactive 60 Co. Methemoglobin was determined in the interval of 15-180 min after NaNO 2 administration in the dosage of 7.0 mg per 100 g body weight. The irradiation essentially affects the process of methemoglobin formation and its reduction. The methemoglobin content in the blood of radiation exposed animals exceeds the value, that could be expected to obtain by summing up its concentration under the separate effects of nitrite and irradiation. The genetic effects of sodium nitrite and nitrate and X-radiation have been studied on the Drosophila. The one-day flies were exposed to the radiation dose of 1500 R in the medium with the sodium nitrite or nitrate contents of 0.1 or 1.0 g/l, respectively. The combined action estimated through the frequency of the dominant lethal mutation, recessive coupled with a lethal mutation sex, viability and fecundity definitely differs from the expected summing values of the separate effect indices of radiation and toxic factors. The morpho- and functional changes in the rat lungs (the

  1. Instability of biological nitrogen removal in a cokes wastewater treatment facility during summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Donghee; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-01-01

    Failure in nitrogen removal of cokes wastewater occurs occasionally during summer season (38 deg. C) due to the instability of nitrification process. The objective of this study was to examine why the nitrification process is unstable especially in summer. Various parameters such as pH, temperature, nutrients and pollutants were examined in batch experiments using activated sludge and wastewater obtained from a full-scale cokes wastewater treatment facility. Batch experiments showed that nitrification rate of the activated sludge was faster in summer (38 deg. C) than in spring or autumn (29 deg. C) and the toxic effects of cyanide, phenol and thiocyanate on nitrification were reduced with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, experiment using continuous reactor showed that the reduction rate in nitrification efficiency was higher at 38 deg. C than at 29 deg. C. In conclusion, the instability of full-scale nitrification process in summer might be mainly due to washing out of nitrifiers by fast growth of competitive microorganisms at higher temperature under increased concentrations of phenol and thiocyanate

  2. Simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the sulfur cycle-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Wang, Hai-Guang; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Liu, Wen-Tso; Brdjanovic, Damir; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2014-02-01

    Hong Kong has practiced seawater toilet flushing since 1958, saving 750,000 m(3) of freshwater every day. A high sulfate-to-COD ratio (>1.25 mg SO4(2-)/mg COD) in the saline sewage resulting from this practice has enabled us to develop the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process with minimal sludge production and oxygen demand. Recently, the SANI(®) process has been expanded to include Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) in an alternating anaerobic/limited-oxygen (LOS-EBPR) aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR). This paper presents further development - an anaerobic/anoxic denitrifying sulfur cycle-associated EBPR, named as DS-EBPR, bioprocess in an alternating anaerobic/anoxic SBR for simultaneous removal of organics, nitrogen and phosphorus. The 211 day SBR operation confirmed the sulfur cycle-associated biological phosphorus uptake utilizing nitrate as electron acceptor. This new bioprocess cannot only reduce operation time but also enhance volumetric loading of SBR compared with the LOS-EBPR. The DS-EBPR process performed well at high temperatures of 30 °C and a high salinity of 20% seawater. A synergistic relationship may exist between sulfur cycle and biological phosphorus removal as the optimal ratio of P-release to SO4(2-)-reduction is close to 1.0 mg P/mg S. There were no conventional PAOs in the sludge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. STRUCTURE AND SOME BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF Fe(III COMPLEXES WITH NITROGEN-CONTAINING LIGANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Bulhac

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Four coordination compounds of iron(III with ligands based on hydrazine and sulfadiazine: FeCl3·digsemi·2H2O (I (digsemi-semicarbazide diacetic acid dihydrazide, [Fe(HLSO4] (II (НL - sulfadiazine, [Fe(H2L1(H2O2](NO33·5H2O (III (H2L1-2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(nicotinoylhydrazone and [Fe(H2L2(H2O2](NO33•1.5H2O (IV (H2L2 - 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(isonicotinoylhydrazone were synthesized. The spectroscopic and structural characterisation as well as their biological, properties are presented.

  4. Biological and Physicochemical Parameters Related to the Nitrogen Cycle in the Rhizospheric Soil of Native Potato (Solanum phureja Crops of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Flórez-Zapata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N plays an important role in agricultural production. This study was designed to evaluate the presence of cultivable N cycle-associated microorganisms (nitrogen-fixing bacteria—NFB, proteolytic bacteria—PR, ammonifiers—AMO, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria—AOB, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria—NOB, and denitrifiers—DEN, and their relationship with physical-chemical and agronomic soil descriptors, in Solanum phureja rhizospheric soil samples, from traditional and organic crop management farms. A cluster analysis with the physical and chemical properties of soil, allowed to identify the organic matter content as an important factor that determines the outcome of that grouping. Significant differences (<0.05 between farms were found in the abundance of this groups, but correlation analysis showed that proteolytic and nitrogen fixing bacteria were the main nitrogen associated functional groups affected by soils' physical-chemical characteristics. The amount of ammonia available is affected by the agricultural management strategy, which consequently affects the NFB abundance. Finally the results showed that PR, protease activity and soil properties related with organic matter transformation has a positive relationship with productivity, which given the high organic matter content of the Andean soils being studied, we conclude that nitrogen mineralization process has an important role in the nitrogen cycle and its bioavailability in this ecosystem.

  5. Biological and Physicochemical Parameters Related to the Nitrogen Cycle in the Rhizospheric Soil of Native Potato (Solanum phureja) Crops of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, N.F; Velez, D.U

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) plays an important role in agricultural production. This study was designed to evaluate the presence of cultivable N cycle-associated microorganisms (nitrogen-fixing bacteria NFB, proteolytic bacteria PR, ammonifiers AMO, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria AOB, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria NOB, and denitrifiers DEN), and their relationship with physical-chemical and agronomic soil descriptors, in Solanum phureja rhizospheric soil samples, from traditional and organic crop management farms. A cluster analysis with the physical and chemical properties of soil, allowed to identify the organic matter content as an important factor that determines the outcome of that grouping. Significant differences (P<0.05) between farms were found in the abundance of this groups, but correlation analysis showed that proteolytic and nitrogen fixing bacteria were the main nitrogen associated functional groups affected by soils' physical-chemical characteristics. The amount of ammonia available is affected by the agricultural management strategy, which consequently affects the NFB abundance. Finally the results showed that PR, protease activity and soil properties related with organic matter transformation has a positive relationship with productivity, which given the high organic matter content of the Andean soils being studied, we conclude that nitrogen mineralization process has an important role in the nitrogen cycle and its bioavailability in this ecosystem.

  6. Visualizing Single Cell Biology: Nanosims Studies of Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Finzi, J. A.; Capone, D. G.; Popa, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Ng, W.; Spormann, A. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Weber, P. K.

    2007-12-01

    Filamentous nitrogen fixing (diazotrophic) cyanobacteria are key players in global nutrient cycling, but the relationship between CO2- and N2-fixation and intercellular exchange of these elements remains poorly understood in many genera. These bacteria are faced with the challenge of isolating regions of N-fixation (O2 inhibited) and photosynthetic (O2 producing) activity. We used isotope labeling in conjunction with a high-resolution isotope and elemental mapping technique (NanoSIMS) to quantitatively describe 13C and 15N uptake and transport in two aquatic cyanobacteria grown on NaH13CO3 and 15N2. The technical challenges of tracing isotopes within individual bacteria can be overcome with high resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS). In NanoSIMS analysis, samples are sputtered with an energetic primary beam (Cs+, O-) liberating secondary ions that are separated by the mass spectrometer and detected in a suite of electron multipliers. Five isotopic species may be analyzed concurrently with spatial resolution as fine as 50nm. A high sensitivity isotope ratio 'map' can then be generated for the analyzed area. Using sequentially harvested cyanobacteria in conjunction with enriched H13CO3 and 15N2 incubations, we measured temporal enrichment patterns that evolve over the course of a day's growth and suggest tightly regulated changes in fixation kinetics. With a combination of TEM, SEM and NanoSIMS analyses, we also mapped the distribution of C, N and Mo (a critical nitrogenase co-factor) isotopes in intact cells. Our results suggest that NanoSIMS mapping of metal enzyme co-factors may be a powerful method of identifying physiological and morphological characteristics within individual bacterial cells, and could be used to provide a 3-dimensional context for more traditional analyses such as immunogold labeling. Finally, we resolved patterns of isotope enrichment at multiple spatial scales: sub-cellular variation, cell-cell differences along filaments

  7. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetta, Pietro P M; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann; Bergkvist, Göran; Doltra, Jordi; Lopez-Bellido, Rafael J; Monti, Michele; Pappa, Valentini A; Reckling, Moritz; Topp, Cairistiona F E; Walker, Robin L; Rees, Robert M; Watson, Christine A; James, Euan K; Squire, Geoffrey R; Begg, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to provide sufficient N for production has encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertilizer, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume-based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha -1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years). BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertilizer was normally applied. Forage (e.g., grass and clover), as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes has the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  8. A comparative nitrogen balance and productivity analysis of legume and non-legume supported cropping systems: the potential role of biological nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro P M Iannetta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF to provide sufficient N for production have encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertiliser, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimising the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimise production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new, legume–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g. grains, forages and intercrops across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32-115 kg ha-1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc. was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years. BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertiliser was normally applied. Forage (e.g. grass and clover, as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes have the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  9. Molecular Basis on Nitrogen Utilization in Rice(Recent Topics of the Agricultunal Biological Science in Tohoku University)

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiko, HAYAKAWA; Soichi, KOJIMA; Mayumi, TABUCHI; Toru, KUDO; Tomoyuki, YAMAYA; Laboratory of Plant Cell Biochemistry, Department of Applied Plant Science, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University; Laboratory of Plant Cell Biochemistry, Department of Applied Plant Science, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University; Laboratory of Plant Cell Biochemistry, Department of Applied Plant Science, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University; Laboratory of Plant Cell Biochemistry, Department of Applied Plant Science, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University; Laboratory of Plant Cell Biochemistry, Department of Applied Plant Science, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the major provision for half of the world population and is the important model crop in terms of synteny. Nitrogen is a massive prerequisite element for rice during its life span. During evolutionary processes, rice has acquired strategic systems of nitrogen metabolism for the survival, i.e., the highly efficient ammonium assimilation in roots and nitrogen remobilization (nitrogen recycling). In our laboratory, research is underway to elucidate molecular mechanisms, ...

  10. Degradation of phenolics, nitrogen-heterocyclics and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in a rotating biological contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeswani, Hansa; Mukherji, Suparna

    2012-05-01

    The degradation of phenolics, heterocyclics and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a synthetic biomass gasifier wastewater with average COD of 1388 mg/L was studied in a three stage rotating biological contactor (RBC) using the pyrene degrader, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum and activated sludge consortia (1:3 v/v). As the organic loading rate (OLR) was varied from 3.3 to 14 g/m(2)/d, the COD removal ranged from 63.3% to 92.6%. Complete removal of all the constituents was observed at the lowest OLR of 3.3g/m(2)/d. At 24h hydraulic retention time (HRT) and OLR of 6.6g/m(2)/d complete removal of pyridine, quinoline and benzene and 85-96% removal of phenol, naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene was observed. E. aurantiacum was found to be the dominant bacteria in the biofilm. Clark's model provided good fits to data for all the three stages of the RBC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrogen Retention in Coastal Marine Sediments—a Field Study of the Relative Importance of Biological and Physical Removal in a Danish Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurentius Nielsen, Søren; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Banta, Gary

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the relative importance of physical versus biological loss processes for the removal of microphytobenthic (MPB) bound nitrogen in a coastal environment at different times of the year via a dual isotope labeling technique. We used 51Cr, binding to inorganic...... were able to discern the relative importance of physical and biological processes. The isotope marking was supplemented with measurements of sediment chlorophyll biomass and oxygen fluxes, allowing us to evaluate MPB biomass as well as primary production vs. respiration in the sediment. In spring...... was physically dominated due to low MPB biomasses and activity combined with a significant storm event. Our data support the hypothesis that the relative balance between physical and biological processes in determining retention and removal of MPB-bound nitrogen changes seasonally....

  12. Biological Nitrogen Fixation Efficiency in Brazilian Common Bean Genotypes as Measured by {sup 15}N Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzini, V. I.; Mendes, F. L. [Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, EMBRAPA-Amazonia Oriental, Belem, PA (Brazil); Muraoka, T.; Trevisam, A. R. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Adu-Gyamfi, J. J. [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2013-11-15

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) represents the main source of protein for the Brazilian and other Latin-American populations. Unlike soybean, which is very efficient in fixing atmospheric N{sub 2} symbiotically, common bean does not dispense with the need for N fertilizer application, as the biologically fixed N (BNF) seems incapable to supplement the total N required by the crop. A experiment under controlled conditions was conducted in Piracicaba, Brazil, to assess N{sub 2} fixation of 25 genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). BNF was measured by {sup 15}N isotope dilution using a non-N{sub 2} fixing bean genotype as a reference crop. The common bean genotypes were grown in low (2.2 mg N kg{sup -1} soil) or high N content soil (200 mg N kg{sup -1} soil), through N fertilizer application, as urea-{sup 15}N (31.20 and 1.4 atom % {sup 15}N, respectively). The bean seeds were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 strain and the plants were harvested at grain maturity stage. The contribution of BNF was on average 75% of total plant N content, and there were differences in N fixing capacity among the bean genotypes. The most efficient genotypes were Horizonte, Roxo 90, Grafite, Apore and Vereda, when grown in high N soil. None of the genotypes grown in low N soil was efficient in producing grains compared to those grown in high N soil, and therefore the BNF was not able to supply the total N demand of the bean crop. (author)

  13. Transforming waste biomass with an intrinsically porous network structure into porous nitrogen-doped graphene for highly efficient oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huang; Zhang, Jian; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Zhang, Chenyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-21

    Porous nitrogen-doped graphene with a very high surface area (1152 m(2) g(-1)) is synthesized by a novel strategy using intrinsically porous biomass (soybean shells) as a carbon and nitrogen source via calcination and KOH activation. To redouble the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity by tuning the doped-nitrogen content and type, ammonia (NH3) is injected during thermal treatment. Interestingly, this biomass-derived graphene catalyst exhibits the unique properties of mesoporosity and high pyridine-nitrogen content, which contribute to the excellent oxygen reduction performance. As a result, the onset and half-wave potentials of the new metal-free non-platinum catalyst reach -0.009 V and -0.202 V (vs. SCE), respectively, which is very close to the catalytic activity of the commercial Pt/C catalyst in alkaline media. Moreover, our catalyst has a higher ORR stability and stronger CO and CH3OH tolerance than Pt/C in alkaline media. Importantly, in acidic media, the catalyst also exhibits good ORR performance and higher ORR stability compared to Pt/C.

  14. Nitrogen management in grasslands and forage-based production systems – Role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Subbarao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N, the most critical and essential nutrient for plant growth, largely determines the productivity in both extensive and intensive grassland systems. Nitrification and denitrification processes in the soil are the primary drivers of generating reactive N (NO3-, N2O and NO, largely responsible for N loss and degradation of grasslands. Suppressing nitrification can thus facilitate retention of soil N to sustain long-term productivity of grasslands and forage-based production systems. Certain plants can suppress soil nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI. Recent methodological developments [e.g. bioluminescence assay to detect biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs from plant-root systems] led to significant advances in our ability to quantify and characterize BNI function in pasture grasses. Among grass pastures, BNI capacity is strongest in low-N environment grasses such as Brachiaria humidicola and weakest in high-N environment grasses such as Italian ryegrass (Lolium perenne and B. brizantha. The chemical identity of some of the BNIs produced in plant tissues and released from roots has now been established and their mode of inhibitory action determined on nitrifying Nitrosomonas bacteria. Synthesis and release of BNIs is a highly regulated and localized process, triggered by the presence of NH4+ in the rhizosphere, which facilitates release of BNIs close to soil-nitrifier sites. Substantial genotypic variation is found for BNI capacity in B. humidicola, which opens the way for its genetic manipulation. Field studies suggest that Brachiaria grasses suppress nitrification and N2O emissions from soil. The potential for exploiting BNI function (from a genetic improvement and a system perspective to develop production systems, that are low-nitrifying, low N2O-emitting, economically efficient and ecologically sustainable, is discussed.

  15. Detection and Characterization of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Biological Systems by Monitoring Species-Specific Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Micael; Zielonka, Jacek; Karoui, Hakim; Sikora, Adam; Michalski, Radosław; Podsiadły, Radosław; Lopez, Marcos; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Ouari, Olivier

    2018-05-20

    Since the discovery of the superoxide dismutase enzyme, the generation and fate of short-lived oxidizing, nitrosating, nitrating, and halogenating species in biological systems has been of great interest. Despite the significance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in numerous diseases and intracellular signaling, the rigorous detection of ROS and RNS has remained a challenge. Recent Advances: Chemical characterization of the reactions of selected ROS and RNS with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin traps and fluorescent probes led to the establishment of species-specific products, which can be used for specific detection of several forms of ROS and RNS in cell-free systems and in cultured cells in vitro and in animals in vivo. Profiling oxidation products from the ROS and RNS probes provides a rigorous method for detection of those species in biological systems. Formation and detection of species-specific products from the probes enables accurate characterization of the oxidative environment in cells. Measurement of the total signal (fluorescence, chemiluminescence, etc.) intensity does not allow for identification of the ROS/RNS formed. It is critical to identify the products formed by using chromatographic or other rigorous techniques. Product analyses should be accompanied by monitoring of the intracellular probe level, another factor controlling the yield of the product(s) formed. More work is required to characterize the chemical reactivity of the ROS/RNS probes, and to develop new probes/detection approaches enabling real-time, selective monitoring of the specific products formed from the probes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1416-1432.

  16. Effects of Wheat and Faba Bean Intercropping on Microorganism Involved in Nitrogen Transformation in the Rhizosphere Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Yan-fen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil microorganism is one of the key factors that affects soil ecological activity. It is an important symbol of soil health, and the soil nitrogen cycle is closely related to the microorganisms. The relationship between nitrogen and microorganisms under the intercropping is im-portant for the farmland ecosystem. In this paper, phospholipid fatty acids(PLFA analysis was used to determine soil microbial communi-ties, e.g., biomasses of anaerobic bacteria, aerobic bacteria, bacteria, fungi and actinobacteria. The abundance of nitrifying genes(AOB, AOA and three denitrifying genes (nirK, norB, nosZ were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The enzymes, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were measured using conventional methods. The results showed that along with the growth period, the TPLFAs(total phospholipid fatty acids increased and the bacterias, fungus, actinomyces and aerobic bacterias significantly(P<0.05 dif-fered between intercropping and monoculture. The greater abundance of AOB than AOA and the variation range of 105~106 were observed in all samples. The gene copies of norB and nosZ were pronounced by intercropping in the rhizosphere of faba bean at elongation and heading stages, respectively. The abundance of nirK remarkably(P<0.05differed between intercropping and monoculture. In intercropping rhizo-sphere, the contents of NO3--N were lower than monoculture, while the NH4+-N contents were converse (P<0.05. Conclusively, wheat and fa-ba bean intercropping system could change rhizosphere microenvironment, and then the microbial community structure in the soils, which would facilitate the conservation and supplying of soil nitrogen and reduce the nitrogen loss and pollution under the intercropping conditions to some extent. This might be the nitrogen nutrition mechanism for the overyielding of wheat and faba bean intercropping system.

  17. Investigating the Role of Hydrologic Residence Time in Nitrogen Transformations at the Sediment-Water Interface using Controlled Variable Head Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, T. B.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Briggs, M. A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2017-12-01

    Many important biogeochemical processes governing both carbon and nitrogen dynamics in streams take place at the sediment-water interface (SWI). This interface is highly variable in biogeochemical function, with stream stage often influencing the magnitude and direction of water and solute exchange through the SWI. It is well known that the SWI can be an important location for carbon and nitrogen transformations, including denitrification and greenhouse gas production. The degree of mixing of carbon and nitrate, along with oxygen from surface waters, is strongly influenced by hydrologic exchange at the SWI. We hypothesize that hydrologic residence time, which is also determined by the magnitude of exchange, is a key control on the fate of nitrate at the SWI and on the end products of denitrification. Previous studies in the headwaters of the Ipswich River in MA as part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiments (LINX II) and other long-term monitoring suggest that the Ipswich River SWI represents an important source of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. Using a novel constant-head infiltrometer ring embedded in the stream sediments, we created four unique controlled down-welling (i.e., recharge) conditions, and tested how varying this hydrologic flux and thus the residence time distribution influenced biogeochemical function of the Ipswich River SWI. Specifically, we added isotopically-labelled 15N-nitrate to stream water during each controlled hydrologic flux experiment to quantify nitrate transformation rates, including denitrification end products, under the different hydrologic conditions. We also measured a suite of carbon and nitrogen solutes, along with dissolved oxygen conditions throughout each experiment to characterize the broader residence timescale and biogeochemical responses to the hydrologic manipulations. Initial results show that the oxic conditions of the SWI were strongly responsive to changes in hydrologic flux rates, thereby changing the

  18. Effects of nitrogen fertilization in cotton crop on Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) biology; Efeitos da adubacao nitrogenada em algodoeiro sobre a biologia de Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Ricardo; Degrande, Paulo E.; Fernandes, Marcos G.; Nogueira, Rodrigo F. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, MS (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias]. E-mail: rbarrosufms@yahoo.com.br, degrande@ufgd.edu.br

    2007-09-15

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glove, is one of the pests of cotton crop and its relation with the host seem to depend on the amount of nitrogen available to the plant. The biology of A. gossypii using different cotton nitrogen fertility regimes was studied under greenhouse conditions, in Dourados, MS. A completely randomized design with nine replications in a factorial scheme (2x4x2)+1 was used. Two nitrogen sources (sulphate of ammonium and urea), four doses of nitrogen (50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1), two different times of nitrogen application and one additional treatment without nitrogen were taken as factors. The nymphal phases, the pre-reproductive, reproductive and pos-reproductive periods, longevity, the life cycle and fecundity of the cotton aphid were evaluated. The doses of nitrogen influenced the cotton aphid biology in both sources and times of application, favoring its development and fecundity. (author)

  19. A biologically plausible transform for visual recognition that is invariant to translation, scale and rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eSountsov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Visual object recognition occurs easily despite differences in position, size, and rotation of the object, but the neural mechanisms responsible for this invariance are not known. We have found a set of transforms that achieve invariance in a neurally plausible way. We find that a transform based on local spatial frequency analysis of oriented segments and on logarithmic mapping, when applied twice in an iterative fashion, produces an output image that is unique to the object and that remains constant as the input image is shifted, scaled or rotated.

  20. A Biologically Plausible Transform for Visual Recognition that is Invariant to Translation, Scale, and Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sountsov, Pavel; Santucci, David M; Lisman, John E

    2011-01-01

    Visual object recognition occurs easily despite differences in position, size, and rotation of the object, but the neural mechanisms responsible for this invariance are not known. We have found a set of transforms that achieve invariance in a neurally plausible way. We find that a transform based on local spatial frequency analysis of oriented segments and on logarithmic mapping, when applied twice in an iterative fashion, produces an output image that is unique to the object and that remains constant as the input image is shifted, scaled, or rotated.

  1. From eggs to fossils: epigenesis and transformation of species in Pander's biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    Christian Heinrich Pander (1794-1865), a Russian scientist of German culture, is known for his epoch-making work in embryology, as well as for his important contributions to palaeontology. Indeed he viewed embryonic development and the history of the earth as two aspects of one and the same essential phenomenon, namely, a perpetual metamorphosis affecting the living world on different scales. He viewed embryology as a gradual, epigenetic transformation (as opposed to preformation) with an intermediary stage, the formation of simple germ-layers. As early as 1821, he argued more generally that species themselves transform under the influence of certain environmental factors. Pander thus embodies the very close link that existed between the triumph of epigenesis and the expansion of transformist theories in the early 19th century.

  2. The biotechnology (genetic transformation and molecular biology) of Bixa orellana L. (achiote).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Dobránszki, Judit; Rivera-Madrid, Renata

    2018-05-10

    Genetic transformation allows for greater bixin or norbixin production in achiote. Knowledge of genes that control the biosynthesis of these important secondary metabolites will allow for targeted amplification in transgenic plants. Annatto is a natural dye or coloring agent derived from the seeds, or their arils, of achiote (Bixa orellana L.), and is commercially known as E160b. The main active component of annatto dye is water-insoluble bixin, although water-soluble norbixin also has commercial applications. Relative to other antioxidants, bixin is light- and temperature stable and is thus safe for human consumption. Bixin is, therefore, widely applied as a dye and as an antioxidant in the medico-pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic, and dye industries. Even though bixin has also been isolated from leaves and bark, yield is lower than from seeds. More biotechnology-based research of this industrial and medicinal plant is needed. Building on provisional genetic transformation studies, it would be advantageous to transform genes that could result in greater bixin or norbixin production. Reliable protocols for the extraction of bixin and norbixin, as well as deeper knowledge of the genes that control the biosynthesis of these important secondary metabolites will allow for targeted amplification in transgenic plants.

  3. The formation and transformation of hormones in maternal, placental and fetal compartments: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R; Chetrite, Gérard S

    2016-07-01

    The fetal endocrine system constitutes the earliest system developing in fetal life and operates during all the steps of gestation. Its regulation is in part dependent on the secretion of placental and/or maternal precursors emanating across the feto-maternal interface. Human fetal and placental compartments possess all the enzymatic systems necessary to produce steroid hormones. However, their activities are different and complementary: the fetus is very active in converting acetate into cholesterol, in transforming pregnanes to androstanes, various hydroxylases, sulfotransferases, while all these transformations are absent or very limited in the placenta. This compartment can transform cholesterol to C21-steroids, convert 5-ene to 4-ene steroids, and has a high capacity to aromatize C19 precursors and to hydrolyze sulfates. Steroid hormone receptors are present at an early stage of gestation and are functional for important physiological activities. The production rate of some steroids greatly increases with fetal evolution (e.g. estriol increases 500-1000 times in relation to non-pregnant women). Other hormones, such as glucocorticoids, in particular the stress hormone cortisol, adipokines (e.g. leptin, adiponectin), insulin-like growth factors, are also a key factor for regulating reproduction, metabolism, appetite and may be significant in programming the fetus and its growth. We can hypothesize that the fetal and placental factors controlling hormonal levels in the fetal compartment can be of capital importance in the normal development of extra-uterine life.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Combined Effects of Different Water and Phosphate Levels on Growth and Biological Nitrogen Fixation of Nine Cowpea Varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Jemo, Martin; Sulieman, Saad; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Olomide, Oluwatosin A. K.; Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-01-01

    Water deficit and phosphate (Pi) deficiency adversely affect growth and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) of legume crops. In this study, we examined the impact of interaction between soil water conditions and available soil-Pi levels on growth, nodule development and BNF potential of nine cowpea varieties grown on dry savanna soils. In our experimental design, soils with different available soil-Pi levels, i.e., low, moderate, and high soil-Pi levels, collected from various farming fields w...

  5. Uncertainty assessment of a model for biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal: Application to a large wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Cosenza, Alida; Viviani, Gaspare

    In the last few years, the use of mathematical models in WasteWater Treatment Plant (WWTP) processes has become a common way to predict WWTP behaviour. However, mathematical models generally demand advanced input for their implementation that must be evaluated by an extensive data-gathering campaign, which cannot always be carried out. This fact, together with the intrinsic complexity of the model structure, leads to model results that may be very uncertain. Quantification of the uncertainty is imperative. However, despite the importance of uncertainty quantification, only few studies have been carried out in the wastewater treatment field, and those studies only included a few of the sources of model uncertainty. Seeking the development of the area, the paper presents the uncertainty assessment of a mathematical model simulating biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The uncertainty assessment was conducted according to the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology that has been scarcely applied in wastewater field. The model was based on activated-sludge models 1 (ASM) and 2 (ASM2). Different approaches can be used for uncertainty analysis. The GLUE methodology requires a large number of Monte Carlo simulations in which a random sampling of individual parameters drawn from probability distributions is used to determine a set of parameter values. Using this approach, model reliability was evaluated based on its capacity to globally limit the uncertainty. The method was applied to a large full-scale WWTP for which quantity and quality data was gathered. The analysis enabled to gain useful insights for WWTP modelling identifying the crucial aspects where higher uncertainty rely and where therefore, more efforts should be provided in terms of both data gathering and modelling practises.

  6. Global change and biological soil crusts: Effects of ultraviolet augmentation under altered precipitation regimes and nitrogen additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Flint, S.; Money, J.; Caldwell, M.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs), a consortium of cyanobacteria, lichens, and mosses, are essential in most dryland ecosystems. As these organisms are relatively immobile and occur on the soil surface, they are exposed to high levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, rising temperatures, and alterations in precipitation patterns. In this study, we applied treatments to three types of BSCs (early, medium, and late successional) over three time periods (spring, summer, and spring-fall). In the first year, we augmented UV and altered precipitation patterns, and in the second year, we augmented UV and N. In the first year, with average air temperatures, we saw little response to our treatments except quantum yield, which was reduced in dark BSCs during one of three sample times and in Collema BSCs two of three sample times. There was more response to UV augmentation the second year when air temperatures were above average. Declines were seen in 21% of the measured variables, including quantum yield, chlorophyll a, UV-protective pigments, nitrogenase activity, and extracellular polysaccharides. N additions had some negative effects on light and dark BSCs, including the reduction of quantum yield, ??-carotene, nitrogenase activity, scytonemin, and xanthophylls. N addition had no effects on the Collema BSCs. When N was added to samples that had received augmented UV, there were only limited effects relative to samples that received UV without N. These results indicate that the negative effect of UV and altered precipitation on BSCs will be heightened as global temperatures increase, and that as their ability to produce UV-protective pigments is compromised, physiological functioning will be impaired. N deposition will only ameliorate UV impacts in a limited number of cases. Overall, increases in UV will likely lead to lowered productivity and increased mortality in BSCs through time, which, in turn, will reduce their ability to contribute

  7. Alpha process with biological elimination of nitrogen. Application of mathematical models; Proceso alpha con eliminacion biologica de nitrogeno. Aplicacion de modelos matematicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J. C.; Lopez-Carrasco, M. D.; Cortacans, J. A.; Larrea, L.; Larrea, A.

    1999-07-01

    This article illustrates the advantages of a step feed process for the biological elimination of nitrogen by presenting the experiments carried out by INFILCO at a pilot plant in San Sebastian. This arrangement, also known as the alpha (alternative phase step feed) process, reduces the volume of the biological reactor, eliminates the need for internal recycling and optimised the consumption of the organic matter used for denitrication. This article also demonstrates the possibility of employing a mathematical model as a tool in assessing, designing and operating full scale treatment plants for typically urban sewage. (Author) 6 refs.

  8. It’s the System, Stupid: How Systems Biology Is Transforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    So far, little is known about systems biology and its potential for changing how we diagnose and treat disease. That will change soon, say the systems experts, who advise payers to begin learning now about how it could make healthcare efficient. PMID:22478806

  9. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  10. Biological fixation of nitrogen in three tropical feed crops leguminous and its transfer to Brachiaria humidicola in association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Jose Luis; Guenni, Orlando; Espinoza, Yusmary

    1997-01-01

    In Cojedes State drained savannas an experiment was carried out with the purpose of: a) to determine the biological fixation of nitrogen (BFN) in three tropical feed crops leguminous (Centrosema pubescens Cp, Stylosanthes hamata Sh and Pueraria phaseoloides, Pp) cultivated in monoculture and associated with the gramineous Brachiaria humidicola (Bh); b) to evaluate the transfer potential of N fixed to the air to the companion gramineous. To calculate the proportion of N biologically fixed, the technique of isotopic dilution was used with N 1 5. The fertilizer (enriched ammonium sulphate to 10% with N 1 5) was added during the rainy season in two regrowth periods. In each case, the aerial biomass was determined after 90 days of growth, being analyzed the total content of N and N 1 5 in the foliage. In both periods of evaluation, the association Bh / Cp was stabler, with a proportion of the leguminous in the mixture 20-30%. As monoculture, Bh had the biggest production of aerial biomass (972 gm -2 ) among all the treatments for the first period of evaluation (middle rainy season). The total production of dry matter (DM) in association, was modified between 574 (Bh/Cp) and 807 gm -2 (Bh/Sh). The production DM for the second period of evaluation (end rainy season) followed the same tendency, being observed, however, a general decrease in the yields due to the beginning of drought. The content of N in the leguminous was always higher than in Bh. Nevertheless, Bh in association reached an accumulation bigger than N (14 gm -2 ) due to its higher rate of growth. The leguminous alone had a significant proportion of N (47-69%) derivated of the BFN. Cp was the one that showed higher values of BFN (51-69%). Likewise, one observes a high proportion (57-76%) of element starting from the BFN when the leguminous were cultivated in association. In this sense one doesn't observe a clear transfer of N from the leguminous to the gramineous, since the contents of N 1 5 in Bh they were

  11. Sources and transformation of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre indicated by compound-specific δ15N analysis of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the use of compound-specific nitrogen isotopes of amino acids (δ15NAA) of coupled dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen (DON, PON) samples as a new approach to examine relative sources, transformation processes, and the potential coupling of these two major forms of N cycle in the ocean water column. We measured δ15NAA distributions in high-molecular-weight dissolved organic nitrogen (HMW DON) and suspended PON in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) from surface to mesopelagic depths. A new analytical approach achieved far greater δ15NAA measurement precision for DON than earlier work, allowing us to resolve previously obscured differences in δ15NAA signatures, both with depth and between ON pools. We propose that δ15N values of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) represents a proxy for proteinaceous ON δ15N values in DON and PON. Together with bulk δ15N values, this allows δ15N values and changes in bulk, proteinaceous, and ;other-N; to be directly evaluated. These novel measurements suggest three main conclusions. First, the δ15NAA signatures of both surface and mesopelagic HMW DON suggest mainly heterotrophic bacterial sources, with mesopelagic HMW DON bearing signatures of far more degraded material compared to surface material. These results contrast with a previous proposal that HMW DON δ15NAA patterns are essentially ;pre-formed; by cyanobacteria in the surface ocean, undergo little change with depth. Second, different δ15NAA values and patterns of HMW DON vs. suspended PON in the surface NPSG suggest that sources and cycling of these two N reservoirs are surpisingly decoupled. Based on molecular δ15N signatures, we propose a new hypothesis that production of surface HMW DON is ultimately derived from subsurface nitrate, while PON in the mixed layer is strongly linked to N2 fixation and N recycling. In contrast, the comparative δ15NAA signatures of HMW DON vs. suspended PON in the mesopelagic also suggest a

  12. Complementary Constraints from Carbon (13C) and Nitrogen (15N) Isotopes on the Efficiency of the Glacial Ocean's Soft-Tissue Biological Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which mimicks iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) than the pre-industrial control. Dissolved oxygen in the thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3. This simulation already fits observed carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the fit. Modest increases in μmax result in higher subpolar δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, and better agreement with reconstructions. Large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models with modest increases in μmax reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient during the LGM. Both circulation and biological nutrient utilization contribute. However, these conclusions are preliminary given our idealized experiments, which do not consider changes in benthic denitrification and spatially inhomogenous changes in aeolian iron fluxes. The analysis illustrates interactions

  13. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N 2 /O 2 (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 ± 0.7)×10 20 m −3 was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 ± 0.4)×10 19 m −3 at 0.1 vol. %

  14. Isotopic dilution methods to determine the gross transformation rates of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil: a review of the theory, methodologies, and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, H. J.; Cameron, K. C.; McLaren, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The rates at which nutrients are released to, and removed from, the mineral nutrient pool are important in regulating the nutrient supply to plants. These nutrient transformation rates need to be taken into account when developing nutrient management strategies for economical and sustainable production. A method that is gaining popularity for determining the gross transformation rates of nutrients in the soil is the isotopic dilution technique. The technique involves labelling a soil mineral nutrient pool, e.g. NH 4 + , NO 3 - , PO 4 3- , or SO 4 2- , and monitoring the changes with time of the size of the labelled nutrient pool and the excess tracer abundance (atom %, if stable isotope tracer is used) or specific activity (if radioisotope is used) in the nutrient pool. Because of the complexity of the concepts and procedures involved, the method has sometimes been used incorrectly, and results misinterpreted. This paper discusses the isotopic dilution technique, including the theoretical background, the methodologies to determine the gross flux rates of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, and the limitations of the technique. The assumptions, conceptual models, experimental procedures, and compounding factors are discussed. Possible effects on the results by factors such as the uniformity of tracer distribution in the soil, changes in soil moisture content, substrate concentration, and aeration status, and duration of the experiment are also discussed. The influx and out-flux transformation rates derived from this technique are often contributed by several processes simultaneously, and thus cannot always be attributed to a particular nutrient transformation process. Despite the various constraints or possible compounding factors, the technique is a valuable tool that can provide important quantitative information on nutrient dynamics in the soil-plant system. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Publishing

  15. Biologically-transformed zinc and its availability for bioaccumulation by marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Heyraud, M.

    1980-01-01

    Zinc which occurs in sea water as a trace element exists in several different stable or meta-stable forms in the aquatic environment. One of them is ''complexed'' form which is relatively stable. Radiotracer studies were carried out to investigate the mode of formation of the complexed zinc fraction and to find whether this fraction once formed by biological means is available for accumulation by marine biota. Sea water solutions used in the experiments were filtered through double 0.45 μm Millipore filters. Chelex-100 resin which quantitatively removes zinc from sea water was used to measure the relative degree of binding of different species of 65 Zn formed by association with marine organisms. 65 Zn in exometabolites from living animals represented in this case by shrimp (Lymata seticaudata), influence of organic detritus represented in this case by dead shrimp on the conversion of different forms of zinc and bioavailability of biologically processed 65 Zn were studied. It was observed that: (1) living and dead marine animals can produce a soluble species of complexed, possibly organically bound, zinc, (2) uptake of this species is reduced relative to that of the ionic form indicating that zinc which has passed through biological cycles may be less available for bioaccumulation than zinc which has been directly introduced into the marine environment in inorganic forms. (M.G.B.)

  16. In-situ study of migration and transformation of nitrogen in groundwater based on continuous observations at a contaminated desert site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Rui; Jin, Shuhe; Chen, Minhua; Guan, Xin; Wang, Jinsheng; Zhai, Yuanzheng; Teng, Yanguo; Guo, Xueru

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the controlling factors on the migration and transformation of nitrogenous wastes in groundwater using long-term observations from a contaminated site on the southwestern edge of the Tengger Desert in northwestern China. Contamination was caused by wastewater discharge rich in ammonia. Two long-term groundwater monitoring wells (Wells 1# and 2#) were constructed, and 24 water samples were collected. Five key indicators were tested: ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, dissolved oxygen, and manganese. A numerical method was used to simulate the migration process and to determine the migration stage of the main pollutant plume in groundwater. The results showed that at Well 1# the nitrogenous waste migration process had essentially been completed, while at Well 2# ammonia levels were still rising and gradually transitioning to a stable stage. The differences for Well 1# and Well 2# were primarily caused by differences in groundwater flow. The change in ammonia concentration was mainly controlled by the migration of the pollution plume under nitrification in groundwater. The nitrification rate was likely affected by changes in dissolved oxygen and potentially manganese.

  17. Biological effects of radiation: The induction of malignant transformation and programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1991-04-01

    In the Chernobyl explosions and fire, powderized nuclear fuel was released from the reactor core, causing an unexpected fallout. X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the isolated single particles were essentially pure uranium. These uranium aerosols contained all of the nonvolatile fission products, including the b-emitters, 95 Zr, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 141 Ce, and 144 Ce. The hot particles are extremely effective in inducing malignant transformation in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro. The major factor responsible for this effect is focus promotion caused by a wound-mediated permanent increase in cell proliferation (mitogenesis associated with mutagenesis). Transformed foci were analysed for the activation of c-abl, c-erb-A, c-erb-B, c-fms, c-fos, c-myb, c-myc, c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-sis, and c-raf oncogenes at the transcriptional level. The pattern of oncogene activation was found to vary from focus to focus. Long interspersed repeated DNA (L1 or LINE makes up a class of mobile genetic elements which can amplify in the cell genome by retroposition. This element is spontaneously transcriptionally activated at a critical population density and later amplified in rat chloroleukaemia cells. UV light and ionizing radiation induce this activation prematurely, and the activation is followed by programmed cell death (apoptosis) in a sequence of events identical to that seen in LIRn activation occurring spontaneously

  18. Ecosystem transformations of the Laurentian Great Lake Michigan by nonindigenous biological invaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuhel, Russell L; Aguilar, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan, a 58,000-km(2) freshwater inland sea, is large enough to have persistent basin-scale circulation yet small enough to enable development of approximately balanced budgets for water, energy, and elements including carbon and silicon. Introduction of nonindigenous species-whether through invasion, intentional stocking, or accidental transplantation-has transformed the lake's ecosystem function and habitat structure. Of the 79 nonindigenous species known to have established reproductive populations in the lake, only a few have brought considerable ecological pressure to bear. Four of these were chosen for this review to exemplify top-down (sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus), middle-out (alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus), and bottom-up (the dreissenid zebra and quagga mussels, Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, respectively) transformations of Lake Michigan ecology, habitability, and ultimately physical environment. Lampreys attacked and extirpated indigenous lake trout, the top predator. Alewives outcompeted native planktivorous fish and curtailed invertebrate populations. Dreissenid mussels-especially quagga mussels, which have had a much greater impact than the preceding zebra mussels-moved ecosystem metabolism basin-wide from water column to bottom dominance and engineered structures throughout the lake. Each of these non indigenous species exerted devastating effects on commercial and sport fisheries through ecosystem structure modification.

  19. Dissolved nitrogen transformations and microbial community structure in the organic layer of forest soils in Olkiluoto in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potila, H.; Sarjala, T.; Aro, L.

    2007-02-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in the ecosystem are strongly coupled. Biomass, structure and activity of the bacterial and fungal community are the key factors influencing C and N cycles. Changes in the function of soil microbial community can be a signal of plant responses to environmental changes. Dissolved N compounds, microbial biomass, microbial activity, fungal community structure and functional diversity of microbial communities were measured in September 2006 from five monitoring plots on Olkiluoto to assess information about soil microbial community structure and activity. High within and between variation in the studied plots were detected. However, in this study the values and their variation in the level of N mineralisation, dissolved N compounds, fungal biomass and microbial community structure in the studied plots were within a normal range in comparison with other published data of similar forest types in Finland. (orig.)

  20. Combining catalytical and biological processes to transform cellulose into high value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilà, Lorenc; Güell, Edgar J.; Maru, Biniam T.; Medina, Francesc; Constantí, Magda

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant polymer of biomass, has an enormous potential as a source of chemicals and energy. However, its nature does not facilitate its exploitation in industry. As an entry point, here, two different strategies to hydrolyse cellulose are proposed. A solid and a liquid acid catalysts are tested. As a solid acid catalyst, zirconia and different zirconia-doped materials are proved, meanwhile liquid acid catalyst is carried out by sulfuric acid. Sulfuric acid proved to hydrolyse 78% of cellulose, while zirconia doped with sulfur converted 22% of cellulose. Both hydrolysates were used for fermentation with different microbial strains depending on the desired product: Citrobacter freundii H3 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii, for H2 or lactic acid production respectively. A measure of 2 mol H2/mol of glucose was obtained from the hydrolysate using zirconia with Citrobacter freundii; and Lactobacillus delbrueckii transformed all glucose into optically pure D-lactic acid.

  1. Biomimetic transformation and biological activities of Globiferin, a terpenoid benzoquinone from Cordia globifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettrakul, Suppamit; Surerum, Sanya; Rajviroongit, Shuleewan; Kittakoop, Prasat

    2009-05-22

    A new 10-membered ring meroterpene (1), named globiferin, was isolated from root extracts of Cordia globifera. Biomimetic transformations of 1 and its derivatives, either by acid cyclization or by Cope rearrangement, provided information relating to the biogenesis of cordiachromes A-C. Globiferin (1) underwent Cope rearrangement upon refluxing in xylene and DMSO-d(6) to yield cordiachrome C (3) and cordiaquinol C (4), respectively. Heating in DMSO-d(6) resulted in an unexpected reduction of a quinone moiety. Globiferin diacetate (1b) cyclized under acidic conditions to give compounds 10 and 11, respective derivatives of natural cordiachromes B (2) and A (12). The present study indicates that globiferin (1) is a genuine intermediate for the biosynthesis of cordiachromes in Cordia species. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited significant antimycobacterial activity, with MIC values of 6.2 and 1.5 mug/mL, respectively. Antimalarial, antifungal, and cytotoxic activities of 1 and its derivatives were also evaluated.

  2. Formation Rate-Limited Pharmacokinetics of Biologically Active Epoxy Transformers of Prodrug Treosulfan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romański, Michał; Kasprzyk, Anna; Karbownik, Agnieszka; Szałek, Edyta; Główka, Franciszek K

    2016-05-01

    A prodrug treosulfan (TREO) is being evaluated in clinical trials as a myeloablative agent before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The active derivatives of TREO, monoepoxide (EBDM), and diepoxide (DEB) are formed in a pH-dependent nonenzymatic reaction. The aim of the study was to investigate pharmacokinetics of the TREO epoxy transformers in a rabbit model and explain the causes of low plasma concentrations of EBDM and DEB observed in patients receiving high-dose TREO before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. New Zealand white rabbits (n = 5 per cohort) received an intravenous infusion of TREO (group I), injection of DEB (group II), and injection of a solution containing EBDM (group III). When EBDM and DEB were administered to the rabbits, they underwent a very rapid elimination (half-life 0.069 and 0.046 h) associated with a high systemic clearance (10.0 and 14.0 L h(-1) kg(-1)). After administration of TREO, the t1/2 of EBDM was statistically equal to the t1/2 of the prodrug (1.6 h). To conclude, after administration of TREO, its epoxy transformers demonstrate a formation-limited elimination. Then EBDM and DEB have the same elimination half-life as TREO, but the levels of EBDM and DEB in the body, including plasma, are much lower than TREO on account of their inherently high clearance. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling and Forecast Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD using Combination Support Vector Machine with Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abazar Solgi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chemical pollution of surface water is one of the serious issues that threaten the quality of water. This would be more important when the surface waters used for human drinking supply. One of the key parameters used to measure water pollution is BOD. Because many variables affect the water quality parameters and a complex nonlinear relationship between them is established conventional methods can not solve the problem of quality management of water resources. For years, the Artificial Intelligence methods were used for prediction of nonlinear time series and a good performance of them has been reported. Recently, the wavelet transform that is a signal processing method, has shown good performance in hydrological modeling and is widely used. Extensive research has been globally provided in use of Artificial Neural Network and Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System models to forecast the BOD. But support vector machine has not yet been extensively studied. For this purpose, in this study the ability of support vector machine to predict the monthly BOD parameter based on the available data, temperature, river flow, DO and BOD was evaluated. Materials and Methods: SVM was introduced in 1992 by Vapnik that was a Russian mathematician. This method has been built based on the statistical learning theory. In recent years the use of SVM, is highly taken into consideration. SVM was used in applications such as handwriting recognition, face recognition and has good results. Linear SVM is simplest type of SVM, consists of a hyperplane that dataset of positive and negative is separated with maximum distance. The suitable separator has maximum distance from every one of two dataset. So about this machine that its output groups label (here -1 to +1, the aim is to obtain the maximum distance between categories. This is interpreted to have a maximum margin. Wavelet transform is one of methods in the mathematical science that its main idea was

  4. ZnO nanostructure fabrication in different solvents transforms physio-chemical, biological and photodegradable properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Attarad; Ambreen, Sidra; Javed, Rabia; Tabassum, Saira [Department of Biotechnology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ul Haq, Ihsan [Department of Pharmacy, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Zia, Muhammad, E-mail: ziachaudhary@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are synthesized in various organic solvents (acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) and water via coprecipitation process using zinc acetate as precursor. The resultant ZnO nanoparticles, nano rods and nano sheets are characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometric analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The variable size and geometry of nanoparticles depend upon medium used for synthesis. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures exhibit minor to moderate antioxidative (DPPH based free radical scavenging activity, total antioxidative potential and total reducing power) response. Mild to moderate antibacterial and antifungal activities, excellent antileishmanial potential (IC50 up to 3.76), and good cytotoxic perspective (LD50 up to 49.4) is also observed by the synthesized ZnO NPs. The nanoparticles also exhibit moderate α-amylase inhibition response. Furthermore the nanostructures are evaluated for methylene blue photodegradation response within 60 min time period. It is found that organic solvent alters shape, size and other physio-chemical properties of ZnO that ultimately modulate the biological, chemical, and environmental properties. - Highlights: • Zinc oxide nanoparticles are fabricated in different solvents using co-precipitation method • SEM, XRD and FTIR analysis confirms variation in physical and chemical characteristics of synthesized ZnO NPs • The synthesized ZnO demonstrates variation in biological, phytochemical and photodegradable properties.

  5. ZnO nanostructure fabrication in different solvents transforms physio-chemical, biological and photodegradable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Attarad; Ambreen, Sidra; Javed, Rabia; Tabassum, Saira; Ul Haq, Ihsan; Zia, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are synthesized in various organic solvents (acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) and water via coprecipitation process using zinc acetate as precursor. The resultant ZnO nanoparticles, nano rods and nano sheets are characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometric analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The variable size and geometry of nanoparticles depend upon medium used for synthesis. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures exhibit minor to moderate antioxidative (DPPH based free radical scavenging activity, total antioxidative potential and total reducing power) response. Mild to moderate antibacterial and antifungal activities, excellent antileishmanial potential (IC50 up to 3.76), and good cytotoxic perspective (LD50 up to 49.4) is also observed by the synthesized ZnO NPs. The nanoparticles also exhibit moderate α-amylase inhibition response. Furthermore the nanostructures are evaluated for methylene blue photodegradation response within 60 min time period. It is found that organic solvent alters shape, size and other physio-chemical properties of ZnO that ultimately modulate the biological, chemical, and environmental properties. - Highlights: • Zinc oxide nanoparticles are fabricated in different solvents using co-precipitation method • SEM, XRD and FTIR analysis confirms variation in physical and chemical characteristics of synthesized ZnO NPs • The synthesized ZnO demonstrates variation in biological, phytochemical and photodegradable properties.

  6. Effects of pH and H2O2 on ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate transformations during UV254nm irradiation: Implications to nitrogen removal and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Song, Mingrui; Chen, Baiyang; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Rongshu

    2017-10-01

    In order to achieve better removal and analyses of three dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) species via ultraviolet-activated hydrogen peroxide (UV/H 2 O 2 ) process, this study systematically investigated the rates of photo-oxidations of ammonia/ammonium (NH 3 /NH 4 + ) and nitrite (NO 2 - ) as well as the photo-reduction of nitrate (NO 3 - ) at varying pH and H 2 O 2 conditions. The results showed that the mass balances of nitrogen were maintained along irradiation despite of interconversions of DIN species, suggesting that no nitrogen gas (N 2 ) or other nitrogen-containing compound was formed. NH 3 was more reactive than NH 4 + with hydroxyl radical (OH), and by a stepwise H 2 O 2 addition method NH 3 /NH 4 + can be completely converted to NO x - ; NO 2 - underwent rapid oxidation to form NO 3 - when H 2 O 2 was present, suggesting that it is an intermediate compound linking NH 3 /NH 4 + and NO 3 - ; but once H 2 O 2 was depleted, NO 3 - can be gradually photo-reduced back to NO 2 - at high pH conditions. Other than H 2 O 2 , the transformation kinetics of DINs were all dependent on pH, but to varying aspects and extents: the NH 3 photo-oxidation favored a pH of 10.3, which fell within the pK a values of NH 4 + (9.24) and H 2 O 2 (11.6); the NO 3 - photo-reduction increased with increasing pH provided that it exceeds the pK a of peroxynitrous acid (6.8); while the NO 2 - photo-oxidation remained stable unless the pH neared the pK a of H 2 O 2 (11.6). The study thereby demonstrates a picture of the evolutions of DIN species together during UV/H 2 O 2 irradiation process, and for the first time presents a method to achieve complete conversion of NH 4 + to NO 3 - with UV/H 2 O 2 process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Alkoxy(alkyl)silylalkyl derivatives of nitrogen-containing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimova, Ol'ga M; Voronkov, Mikhail G; Chernov, Nikolai F

    1999-01-01

    The published data on the synthesis, properties and transformations of alkoxy(alkyl)silylalkyl derivatives of nitrogen-containing heterocycles of the general formula Het(CH 2 ) n SiX 3 are surveyed and systematised. Data on the biological activities and applications of these compounds are presented. The bibliography includes 255 references.

  9. Microbial Dark Matter Investigations: How Microbial Studies Transform Biological Knowledge and Empirically Sketch a Logic of Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Guillaume; Pathmanathan, Jananan S; Lannes, Romain; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Microbes are the oldest and most widespread, phylogenetically and metabolically diverse life forms on Earth. However, they have been discovered only 334 years ago, and their diversity started to become seriously investigated even later. For these reasons, microbial studies that unveil novel microbial lineages and processes affecting or involving microbes deeply (and repeatedly) transform knowledge in biology. Considering the quantitative prevalence of taxonomically and functionally unassigned sequences in environmental genomics data sets, and that of uncultured microbes on the planet, we propose that unraveling the microbial dark matter should be identified as a central priority for biologists. Based on former empirical findings of microbial studies, we sketch a logic of discovery with the potential to further highlight the microbial unknowns. PMID:29420719

  10. Episodic Canopy Structural Transformations and Biological Invasion in a Hawaiian Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Balzotti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The remaining native forests on the Hawaiian Islands have been recognized as threatened by changing climate, increasing insect outbreak, new deadly pathogens, and growing populations of canopy structure-altering invasive species. The objective of this study was to assess long-term, net changes to upper canopy structure in sub-montane forests on the eastern slope of Mauna Kea volcano, Hawai‘i, in the context of continuing climate events, insect outbreaks, and biological invasion. We used high-resolution multi-temporal Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data to quantify near-decadal net changes in forest canopy height and gap distributions at a critical transition between alien invaded lowland and native sub-montane forest at the end of a recent drought and host-specific insect (Scotorythra paludicola outbreak. We found that sub-montane forests have experienced a net loss in average canopy height, and therefore structure and aboveground carbon stock. Additionally, where invasive alien tree species co-dominate with native trees, the upper canopy structure became more homogeneous. Tracking the loss of forest canopy height and spatial variation with airborne LiDAR is a cost-effective way to monitor forest canopy health, and to track and quantify ecological impacts of invasive species through space and time.

  11. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l, which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine.

  12. Humic substances, their microbial interactions and effects on biological transformations of organic pollutants in water and soil: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipczynska-Kochany, Ewa

    2018-07-01

    Depicted as large polymers by the traditional model, humic substances (HS) tend to be considered resistant to biodegradation. However, HS should be regarded as supramolecular associations of rather small molecules. There is evidence that they can be degraded not only by aerobic but also by anaerobic bacteria. HS presence alters biological transformations of organic pollutants in water and soil. HS, including humin, have a great potential for an application in aerobic and anaerobic wastewater treatment as well as in bioremediation. Black carbon materials, including char (biochar) and activated carbon (AC), long recognized effective sorbents, have been recently discovered to act as effective redox mediators (RM), which may significantly accelerate degradation of organic pollutants in a way similar to HS. Humic-like coating on the biochar surface has been identified. Explanation of mechanisms and possibility of applications of black carbon materials have only started to be explored. Results of many original and review papers, presented and discussed in this article, show an enormous potential for an interesting, multidisciplinary research as well as for a development of new, green technologies for biological wastewater treatment and bioremediation. Future research areas have been suggested. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality transformation of dissolved organic carbon during water transit through lakes: contrasting controls by photochemical and biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Martin; Klaus, Marcus; Panneer Selvam, Balathandayuthabani; Ström, Lena; Laudon, Hjalmar; Jansson, Mats; Karlsson, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may be removed, transformed, or added during water transit through lakes, resulting in changes in DOC composition and pigmentation (color). However, the process-based understanding of these changes is incomplete, especially for headwater lakes. We hypothesized that because heterotrophic bacteria preferentially consume noncolored DOC, while photochemical processing removes colored fractions, the overall changes in DOC color upon water passage through a lake depend on the relative importance of these two processes, accordingly. To test this hypothesis we combined laboratory experiments with field studies in nine boreal lakes, assessing both the relative importance of different DOC decay processes (biological or photochemical) and the loss of color during water transit time (WTT) through the lakes. We found that influence from photo-decay dominated changes in DOC quality in the epilimnia of relatively clear headwater lakes, resulting in systematic and selective net losses of colored DOC. However, in highly pigmented brown-water lakes (absorbance at 420 nm > 7 m-1) biological processes dominated, and there was no systematic relationship between color loss and WTT. Moreover, in situ data and dark experiments supported our hypothesis on the selective microbial removal of nonpigmented DOC, mainly of low molecular weight, leading to persistent water color in these highly colored lakes. Our study shows that brown headwater lakes may not conform to the commonly reported pattern of the selective removal of colored constituents in freshwaters, as DOC can show a sustained degree of pigmentation upon transit through these lakes.

  14. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to evaluate biological effects induced by photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cassio A; Goulart, Viviane P; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M

    2016-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods associated with multivariate statistical techniques have been succeeded in discriminating skin lesions from normal tissues. However, there is no study exploring the potential of these techniques to assess the alterations promoted by photodynamic effect in tissue. The present study aims to demonstrate the ability of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on Attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling mode associated with principal component-linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA) to evaluate the biochemical changes caused by photodynamic therapy (PDT) in skin neoplastic tissue. Cutaneous neoplastic lesions, precursors of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), were chemically induced in Swiss mice and submitted to a single session of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT. Tissue sections with 5 μm thickness were obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and processed prior to the histopathological analysis and spectroscopic measurements. Spectra were collected in mid-infrared region using a FTIR spectrometer on ATR sampling mode. Principal Component-Linear Discriminant Analysis (PC-LDA) was applied on preprocessed second derivatives spectra. Biochemical changes were assessed using PCA-loadings and accuracy of classification was obtained from PC-LDA . Sub-bands of Amide I (1,624 and 1,650 cm(-1) ) and Amide II (1,517 cm(-1) ) indicated a protein overexpression in non-treated and post-PDT neoplastic tissue compared with healthy skin, as well as a decrease in collagen fibers (1,204, 1,236, 1,282, and 1,338 cm(-1) ) and glycogen (1,028, 1,082, and 1,151 cm(-1) ) content. Photosensitized neoplastic tissue revealed shifted peak position and decreased β-sheet secondary structure of proteins (1,624 cm(-1) ) amount in comparison to non-treated neoplastic lesions. PC-LDA score plots discriminated non-treated neoplastic skin spectra from post-PDT cutaneous lesions with accuracy of 92.8%, whereas non-treated neoplastic

  15. Nitrogen fixation in denitrified marine waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Fernandez

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria, whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate waters and sediments (mostly via denitrifying and anammox bacteria. Here we report on rates of nitrogen fixation obtained during two oceanographic cruises in 2005 and 2007 in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP, a region characterized by the presence of coastal upwelling and a major permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. Our results show significant rates of nitrogen fixation in the water column; however, integrated rates from the surface down to 120 m varied by ∼30 fold between cruises (7.5±4.6 versus 190±82.3 µmol m(-2 d(-1. Moreover, rates were measured down to 400 m depth in 2007, indicating that the contribution to the integrated rates of the subsurface oxygen-deficient layer was ∼5 times higher (574±294 µmol m(-2 d(-1 than the oxic euphotic layer (48±68 µmol m(-2 d(-1. Concurrent molecular measurements detected the dinitrogenase reductase gene nifH in surface and subsurface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH sequences showed the presence of a diverse diazotrophic community at the time of the highest measured nitrogen fixation rates. Our results thus demonstrate the occurrence of nitrogen fixation in nutrient-rich coastal upwelling systems and, importantly, within the underlying OMZ. They also suggest that nitrogen fixation is a widespread process that can sporadically provide a supplementary source of fixed nitrogen in these regions.

  16. Nitrogen Fixation in Denitrified Marine Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Camila; Farías, Laura; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria), whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate waters and sediments (mostly via denitrifying and anammox bacteria). Here we report on rates of nitrogen fixation obtained during two oceanographic cruises in 2005 and 2007 in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a region characterized by the presence of coastal upwelling and a major permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Our results show significant rates of nitrogen fixation in the water column; however, integrated rates from the surface down to 120 m varied by ∼30 fold between cruises (7.5±4.6 versus 190±82.3 µmol m−2 d−1). Moreover, rates were measured down to 400 m depth in 2007, indicating that the contribution to the integrated rates of the subsurface oxygen-deficient layer was ∼5 times higher (574±294 µmol m−2 d−1) than the oxic euphotic layer (48±68 µmol m−2 d−1). Concurrent molecular measurements detected the dinitrogenase reductase gene nifH in surface and subsurface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH sequences showed the presence of a diverse diazotrophic community at the time of the highest measured nitrogen fixation rates. Our results thus demonstrate the occurrence of nitrogen fixation in nutrient-rich coastal upwelling systems and, importantly, within the underlying OMZ. They also suggest that nitrogen fixation is a widespread process that can sporadically provide a supplementary source of fixed nitrogen in these regions. PMID:21687726

  17. Preferential flow, nitrogen transformations and 15N balance under urine-affected areas of irrigated and non-irrigated clover-based pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakro, Naser; Dillon, Peter

    1995-12-01

    Urine-affected areas can lead to considerable losses of N by leaching, ammonia volatilisation and denitrification from dairy pastures in the southeast of South Australia. Potable groundwater supplies are considered to have become contaminated by nitrate as a result of leaching from these leguminous pastures. Dairy cow urine, labelled with 15N urea, was applied to micro-plots and mini-lysimeters installed in two adjacent irrigated (white clover-rye grass) and non-irrigated (subterranean clover-annual grasses) paddocks of a dairy farm on four occasions representing different seasonal conditions. These experiments allowed measurement of nitrogen transformations, recovery of 15N in the pasture and soil, and leaching below various depths. Gaseous losses were calculated from the nitrogen balance. The results of the four experiments showed that within a day of urine application up to 40% of the applied urinary-N was leached below a depth of 150 mm as a result of macropore flow in the irrigated paddock, and up to 24% in the non-irrigated one. After application to the irrigated paddock 17% of the urinary-N moved immediately below 300 mm but only 2% below the 450-mm depth. The urinary-N remaining in the soil was converted from urea to ammonium within a day regardless of season. Within the first 7 days of application six times more nitrate was produced in summer than in winter. This has obvious implications for leaching potential. Leaching of 15N from the top 150 mm of soil, following urine applications in all seasons, was between 41% and 62% of the applied 15N in the irrigated paddock and 25-51% in the non-irrigated paddock. However, leaching losses measured at depths of 300 or 450 mm were smaller by a factor of 2-4. The leaching loss of 15N applied in spring in both paddocks was 41% below 150 mm and 12% below 450 mm. Recovery of 15N from the soil-plant system in the 450-nm deep lysimeters was ˜60% of that applied. Estimated ammonia was ˜9% of applied 15N with no paddock

  18. Optimization aspects of the biological nitrogen removal process in a full-scale twin sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system in series treating landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmas, Nikolaos; Ntougias, Spyridon; Chatzopoulou, Marianna; Melidis, Paraschos

    2018-03-29

    Despite the fact that biological nitrogen removal (BNR) process has been studied in detail in laboratory- and pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) systems treating landfill leachate, a limited number of research works have been performed in full-scale SBR plants regarding nitrification and denitrification. In the current study, a full-scale twin SBR system in series of 700 m 3 (350 m 3 each) treating medium-age landfill leachate was evaluated in terms of its carbon and nitrogen removal efficiency in the absence and presence of external carbon source, i.e., glycerol from biodiesel production. Both biodegradable organic carbon and ammonia were highly oxidized [biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) and total Kjehldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal efficiencies above 90%], whereas chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was slightly above 40%, which is within the range reported in the literature for pilot-scale SBRs. As the consequence of the high recalcitrant organic fraction of the landfill leachate, dissimilatory nitrate reduction was restricted in the absence of crude glycerol, although denitrification was improved by electron donor addition, resulting in TN removal efficiencies above 70%. Experimental data revealed that the second SBR negligibly contributed to BNR process, since carbon and ammonia oxidation completion was achieved in the first SBR. On the other hand, the low VSS/SS ratio, due to the lack of primary sedimentation, highly improved sludge settleability, resulting in sludge volume indices (SVI) below 30 mL g -1 .

  19. Buffer nitrogen solubility, in vitro ruminal partitioning of nitrogen and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves of four fodder tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, N; Mlambo, V

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the chemical composition, buffer N solubility, in vitro ruminal N degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves from Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, Morus alba and Trichanthera gigantea trees. These tree leaves are a potential protein source for ruminants, but their site-influenced nutritive value is largely unknown. Leucaena leucocephala leaves had the highest N content (42.1 g/kg DM), while T. gigantea leaves had the least (26.1 g/kg DM). Leucaena leucocephala had the highest buffer solubility index (20%), while 10% of the total N in leaves of the other three species was soluble. The rapidly fermentable N fraction 'a' was highest in M. alba leaves (734.9 g/kg DM) and least in T. gigantea leaves (139.5 g/kg DM). The rate of fermentation (c) was highest for M. alba (7%/hours) leaves. No significant correlations were recorded between buffer solubility index of N and in vitro ruminal N degradability parameters: a, b, and c. The highest response to tannin inactivation using polyethylene glycol, in terms of percentage increase in 36-hours cumulative gas production, was recorded in M. alba (39%) and T. gigantea (38%) leaves. It was concluded that buffer solubility of N is not a good indicator of ruminal N degradation in the leaves of these tree species. Leaves of M. alba could be more valuable as a source of rapidly fermentable N when animals are offered low-protein, high-fibre diets compared with other tree species evaluated in the current study. However, when feeding M. alba leaves, the role of tannins must be considered because these secondary plant compounds showed significant in vitro ruminal biological activity. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from alkaline fermentation liquid of waste activated sludge and application of the fermentation liquid to promote biological municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Chen, Yinguang

    2009-07-01

    In previous publications we reported that by controlling the pH at 10.0 the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) during waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation was remarkably improved [Yuan, H., Chen, Y., Zhang, H., Jiang, S., Zhou, Q., Gu, G., 2006. Improved bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from excess sludge under alkaline conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 40, 2025-2029], but significant ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)-N) and soluble ortho-phosphorus (SOP) were released [Chen, Y., Jiang, S., Yuan, H., Zhou, Q., Gu, G., 2007. Hydrolysis and acidification of waste activated sludge at different pHs. Water Res. 41, 683-689]. This paper investigated the simultaneous recovery of NH(4)-N and SOP from WAS alkaline fermentation liquid and the application of the fermentation liquid as an additional carbon source for municipal wastewater biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The central composite design (CCD) of the response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize and model the simultaneous NH(4)-N and SOP recovery from WAS alkaline fermentation liquid. Under the optimum conditions, the predicted and experimental recovery efficiency was respectively 73.4 and 75.7% with NH(4)-N, and 82.0 and 83.2% with SOP, which suggested that the developed models described the experiments well. After NH(4)-N and SOP recovery, the alkaline fermentation liquid was added to municipal wastewater, and the influence of volume ratio of fermentation liquid to municipal wastewater (FL/MW) on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal was investigated. The addition of fermentation liquid didn't significantly affect nitrification. Both SOP and total nitrogen (TN) removal were increased with fermentation liquid, but there was no significant increase at FL/MW greater than 1/35. Compared to the blank test, the removal efficiency of SOP and TN at FL/MW=1/35 was improved from 44.0 to 92.9%, and 63.3 to 83.2%, respectively. The enhancement of phosphorus and nitrogen

  1. First signal from a broadband cryogenic preamplifier cooled by circulating liquid nitrogen in a 7 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myoung Choul; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Se Gyu; Choi, Sang Hwan; Choi, Yeon Suk; Lee, Kyung Jae; Kim, SeungYong; Kim, Hyun Sik; Stahl, Stefan

    2012-12-18

    Despite the outstanding performance of Fourier transform ion cyclotron/mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS), the complexity of the cellular proteome or natural compounds presents considerable challenges. Sensitivity is a key performance parameter of a FTICR mass spectrometer. By improving this parameter, the dynamic range of the instrument can be increased to improve the detection signal of low-abundance compounds or fragment ion peaks. In order to improve sensitivity, a cryogenic detection system was developed by the KBSI (Korean Basic Science Institute) in collaboration with Stahl-Electronics (Mettenheim, Germany). A simple, efficient liquid circulation cooling system was designed and a cryogenic preamplifier implemented inside a FTICR mass spectrometer. This cooling system circulates a cryoliquid from a Dewar to the "liquid circulation unit" through a CF flange to cool a copper block and a cryopreamplifier; the cooling medium is subsequently exhausted into the air. The cryopreamplifier can be operated over a very wide temperature range, from room temperature to low temperature environments (4.2 K). First, ion signals detected by the cryopreamplifier using a circulating liquid nitrogen cooling system were observed and showed a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) about 130% better than that obtained at room temperature.

  2. Soil-N tagging - a method for measurement of biological nitrogen fixation in cereal-legume intercropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, D.D.; Subbiah, B.V.; Sachdev, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative estimates of atmospheric dinitrogen fixed by the legume crop and transferred to the associated cereal in cereal-legume intercropping system of maize-cowpea and wheat-gram using soil and fertilizer nitrogen labelling with 15 N have been reported. The estimates of N-fixation have been compared with the similar data from A-value method. Under field conditions sole cropped cowpea fixed 53.7 per cent of its total N uptake while as intercrop with maize fixed 43.5 per cent. Maize crop got 27.6 per cent of its total N uptake by transference of the nitrogen fixed by the intercropped cowpea. In the wheat-gram intercropping system the corresponding values under greenhouse conditions were 35.0, 44.8 and 20.2 per cent, respectively. (author)

  3. Biological nitrogen removal using soil columns for the reuse of reclaimed water: Performance and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaji; Chen, Lei; Rene, Eldon R; Hu, Qian; Ma, Weifang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2018-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to remove nitrogen compounds from reclaimed water and reuse the water in semi-arid riverine lake systems. In order to assess the nitrogen removal efficiencies in different natural environments, laboratory scale column experiments were performed using sterilized soil (SS), silty clay (SC), soil with submerged plant (SSP) and biochar amendment soil (BCS). The initial concentration of NO 3 - -N and the flow rate was maintained constant at 15 mg L -1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 m d -1 , respectively. Among the tested columns, both SSP and BCS were able to achieve NO 3 - -N levels <0.2 mg L -1 in the treated reclaimed water. The results from bacterial community structure analysis, using 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA genes, showed that the dominant denitrifier was Bacillus at the genera level. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemical composition, nitrogen degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in vines harvested from four tropical sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, R; Mlambo, V; Mangwe, M C; Dlamini, B J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the potential of vines from four sweet potato varieties (Tia Nong 57, Tia Nong 66, Ligwalagwala and Kenya) as alternative feed resources for ruminant livestock. The chemical composition [neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF), crude protein (CP) and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen (ADIN)], in vitro ruminal nitrogen (N) degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in the vines, harvested at 70 and 110 days after planting (DAP), were determined. Variety and harvesting stage did not (p > 0.05) influence CP and NDF content of the vines. Concentration of CP ranged from 104.9 to 212.2 g/kg DM, while NDF ranged from 439.4 to 529.2 g/kg DM across harvesting stages and varieties. Nitrogen degradability (ND) at 70 and 110 DAP was highest (p ruminal cumulative gas production parameters (a, b and c). The in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins, as measured by increment in gas production parameters upon PEG inclusion, had a maximum value of 18.2%, suggesting low to moderate antinutritional tannin activity. Ligwalagwala vines, with highly degradable N, would be the best protein supplement to use during the dry season when ruminant animals consume low N basal diets and maintenance is an acceptable production objective. Tia Nong 66 and Kenya varieties, with less degradable N, may be more suitable for use as supplements for high-producing animals such as dairy goats. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Aromatic plants play an important role in promoting soil biological activity related to nitrogen cycling in an orchard ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxin; Song, Beizhou; Yao, Yuncong; Wu, Hongying; Hu, Jinghui; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-02-15

    Aromatic plants can substantially improve the diversity and structure of arthropod communities, as well as reduce the number of herbivore pests and regulate the abundance of predators and parasitoids. However, it is not clear whether aromatic plants are also effective in improving soil quality by enhancing nutrient cycling. Here, field experiments are described involving intercropping with aromatic plants to investigate their effect on soil nitrogen (N) cycling in an orchard ecosystem. The results indicate that the soil organic nitrogen and available nitrogen contents increased significantly in soils intercropped with aromatic plants. Similarly, the activities of soil protease and urease increased, together with total microbial biomass involved in N cycling, including nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and azotobacters, as well as the total numbers of bacteria and fungi. This suggests that aromatic plants improve soil N cycling and nutrient levels by enriching the soil in organic matter through the regulation of both the abundance and community structure of microorganisms, together with associated soil enzyme activity, in orchard ecosystems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mass digitization of scientific collections: New opportunities to transform the use of biological specimens and underwrite biodiversity science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, Reed S; Cellinese, Nico

    2012-01-01

    New information technologies have enabled the scientific collections community and its stakeholders to adapt, adopt, and leverage novel approaches for a nearly 300 years old scientific discipline. Now, few can credibly question the transformational impact of technology on efforts to digitize scientific collections, as IT now reaches into almost every nook and cranny of society. Five to ten years ago this was not the case. Digitization is an activity that museums and academic institutions increasingly recognize, though many still do not embrace, as a means to boost the impact of collections to research and society through improved access. The acquisition and use of scientific collections is a global endeavor, and digitization enhances their value by improved access to core biodiversity information, increases use, relevance and potential downstream value, for example, in the management of natural resources, policy development, food security, and planetary and human health. This paper examines new opportunities to design and implement infrastructure that will support not just mass digitization efforts, but also a broad range of research on biological diversity and physical sciences in order to make scientific collections increasingly relevant to societal needs and interest.

  7. A Study on soybean cultivar and rhizobium strain interaction related to biological nitrogen fixation in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirvali Biranvand, N.

    1999-01-01

    Since, symbiotic effectiveness is affected by three important factors such as bacteria genotype, plant cultivar and environmental conditions (e.g. soil properties). In this research, simple and interaction effects of the first two factors about symbiosis of three soybean cultivar, which are most commonly cultivated soybean, with several commercial strain of bacteria with three different soils is investigated. For this purpose five Bradyrhizobium japonicum commercial strains (Rhizoking, Helinitro, Goldoat, Biodoz and CB 1809) were taken from soil and water rea search institute. Based on assurance of bacteria strains purity and ineffectiveness with cultivars, for comparison of strains symbiotic effectiveness with soybean cultivars and the best strain selection performed a factorial experiment with RCBD in 24 treatments and 4 replication. The seeds of soybean cultivars were cultivated in Growth chamber under Leonard jar system. The treatment used were 3 levels of soybean cultivar, 5 levels of Bradyrhizobium strains and 3 levels of Nitrogen (0, 35 and 70 PPM). Plants were fed with Brought on and Dil worth solution (1970) for 75 days. Then, plants were harvested and dried. Selective parameters were analysed by MSTATC program. The results indicated that, all bacteria stains were highly effective as far as symbiotic effectiveness is concerned. Eventually Rhizoking, Gold coat and Helinitro stains selected for soybean inoculation. Provided for pot culture, two soil samples from soybean original planting area (in the subregion of Gorgan and Sari cities) and another sample from Karaj countryside were taken with moderate, high and zero symbiont indigenous bacteria levels respectively. For study of interaction and simple effects of Bacteria strain and soybean cultivar in each soil; a factorial experiment with RCBD in 4 replication performed. Factors were contained soybean cultivar (three levels) and three Bacteria strain with a blank treatment for inoculation. In this respect

  8. On the `hysteresis` effect in the biological nitrogen removal :theory and full scale experimental evaluation; Sul fenomeno di `isteresi` nella rimozione biologica dell`azoto: concettualizzazione teorica e valutazione sperimentale a scala reale degli effetti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatano, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dip. di Ingegneria Idraulica, Ambientale e del Rilevamento

    1996-07-01

    The wastewater treatments plants localized in the Ruhr River (Germany), generally present a typical wastewater temperature variation curve during the winter period. These temperature changes produce specific effects on the nitrogen removal efficiencies in the activated sludge systems. The so called `hysteresis` phenomenon is responsible for these effects. The paper deals with some simplified theoretical considerations and with a full scale experimental evaluations of the effects caused by the hysteresis phenomenon in the biological nitrogen removal.

  9. Effect of Nitrogen and biological Fertilizers on Seed Yield and Fatty acid Composition of Sesame cultivars under Yazd conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shakeri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of different levels of nitrogen fertilizer and biofertilizers Azotobacter sp. and Azosprillum sp. on seed yield, oil yield and its percent and fatty acid composition in three sesame (Sesamum indicum L. cultivars an experiment was conducted using splite plot factorial arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural and Natural Resources Reasearch Center of Yazd in 2009 cropping season. The treatments included : cultivars ( Darab-14, Jiroft and Yazdi assigned to main plots, nitrogen fertilizer (0, 25 and 50 kg ha-1 and biofertilizer (inoculation and no-inoculation as factorial were randomized in sub-plots. Oil percent was measured using the Soxhlet method and fatty acid composition was measured using GC method. Results showed the significant differenc among three varieties concerning seed yield, oil yield and four fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, palmetic and stearis acid. Seed yield, oil yield, Oleic, Linolenic and Arasshidic acid significantly increased with applying N fertilizer. Seed yield, oil yield and linolenic acid percent significantly increased with applying biofertilizer. Oleic acid percent had negative and significant correlation with Linoleic acid (r = -0.759** and stearic acid (r=-0.774** percent. Generally, results showed the importance of applying biofertilizers against chemical fertilizers to protect the environment from harmful chemical pollution.

  10. Identification of microorganisms involved in nitrogen removal from wastewater treatment systems by means of molecular biology techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, M.; Alonso-Gutierrez, J.; Campos, J. L.; Mendez, R.; Mosquera-Corral, A.

    2010-01-01

    The identification of the main bacteria populations present in the granular biomass from a biological reactor treating wastewater has been performed by applying two different molecular biology techniques. By means of the DGGE technique five different genera of heterotrophic bacteria (Thiothrix, Thauera, Cloroflexi, Comamonas y Zoogloea) and one of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomanas) were identified. The FISH technique, based on microscopy, allowed the in situ visualization and quantification of those microorganisms. Special attention was paid to filamentous bacteria distribution (Thiothrix and Cloroflexi) which could exert a structural function in aerobic granular sludge. (Author) 26 refs.

  11. HPLC method for determination of biologically active epoxy-transformers of treosulfan in human plasma: pharmacokinetic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Główka, Franciszek K; Romański, Michał; Teżyk, Artur; Zaba, Czesław; Wróbel, Tomasz

    2012-03-25

    Clinical trials demonstrated treosulfan (TREO) as a promising myeloablative agent prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). TREO is a specific pro-drug from which biologically active mono- (S,S-EBDM) and diepoxybutane (S,S-DEB) derivatives are formed in vitro or in vivo by a non-enzymatic pH and temperature-dependent intramolecular nucleophilic substitution. Following extraction of the plasma samples with a mixture of dichloromethane and acetonitrile, S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB were derivatized with 3-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid (3-NBS) to UV-absorbing esters. Optimal temperature and time of derivatization as well as extraction method and also the effect of pH on TREO stability in plasma were established. Identity of the synthesized derivatives was confirmed by mass spectrometry. The post-derivatization mixture was purified from the excess of unreacted 3-NBS by extraction with water. The derivatization products and 2,2'-dinitrobiphenyl (internal standard) were separated on Nucleosil 100 C18 column using a mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water. The developed method was validated and demonstrated adequate accuracy and precision. Limit of quantification for both S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB amounted to 2.5 μM. The method was applied in clinical conditions to quantify the levels of TREO activation products in plasma of children undergoing HSCT. The methodology for simultaneous determination of TREO epoxy-transformers in human plasma is described for the first time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of transformation products of antiviral drugs formed during biological wastewater treatment and their occurrence in the urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jan; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    The fate of five antiviral drugs (abacavir, emtricitabine, ganciclovir, lamivudine and zidovudine) was investigated in biological wastewater treatment. Investigations of degradation kinetics were accompanied by the elucidation of formed transformation products (TPs) using activated sludge lab experiments and subsequent LC-HRMS analysis. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.46 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (zidovudine) and 55.8 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (abacavir). Despite these differences of the degradation kinetics, the same main biotransformation reaction was observed for all five compounds: oxidation of the terminal hydroxyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid (formation of carboxy-TPs). In addition, the oxidation of thioether moieties to sulfoxides was observed for emtricitabine and lamivudine. Antiviral drugs were detected in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with concentrations up to 980 ng L(-1) (emtricitabine), while in WWTP effluents mainly the TPs were found with concentration levels up to 1320 ng L(-1) (carboxy-abacavir). Except of zidovudine none of the original antiviral drugs were detected in German rivers and streams, whereas the concentrations of the TPs ranged from 16 ng L(-1) for carboxy-lamivudine up to 750 ng L(-1) for carboxy-acyclovir. These concentrations indicate an appreciable portion from WWTP effluents present in rivers and streams, as well as the high environmental persistence of the carboxy-TPs. As a result three of the carboxylic TPs were detected in finished drinking water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of biological nitrogen fixation in legume based cropping systems; a case study of West Africa farming systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanginga, N.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) has been gradually depleted from West African soils and now poses serious threats to food production. Many ways of increasing N supply (e.g. judicious use of inorganic fertilizers and nitrogen-fixing plants) have been tried in West African farming systems. Herbaceous and woody legumes commonly contribute 40-70 kg N ha -l season. This represents about 30% of the total N applied as residues. Nevertheless and despite repeated demonstrations of the usefulness of green manures in enhancing soil fertility, their practices and adoption are still limited. Promiscuous soya beans are being used to develop sustainable cropping systems in the moist savannah. Reliable estimates of N 2 fixed by soya beans and their residual N benefits to subsequent cereal crops in the savannah zone of southern Guinea have only infrequently been made. The actual amounts measured varied between 38 and 126 kg N ha -l assuming that only seeds of soya beans are removed from the plots, the net N accrual of soil nitrogen ranges between minus 8 kg N ha -l and plus 47 kg N ha -l depending on the soyabean cultivar. Residual soyabean N values of 10-24 kg N ha -l (14-36% of the total N in maize) were obtained in a soyabean-maize rotation. Although cereal yields following legume cultivation have been attributed to greater N accumulation, our data show that the relative increase in maize N was smaller than the relative increase in dry-matter yield. Hence, the increased yields of maize following soy beans are not entirely due to the carry-over of N from soyabean residues (as well as to conservation of soil N) but to other rotational effects as well. It is thus clear that the N benefit of grain legumes to non-legumes is small compared to the level of N fertilizer use in more intensive cereal production systems but is nevertheless significant in the context of the low amounts of input in subsistence farming. (author)

  14. An integrated methodological approach to the computer-assisted gas chromatographic screening of basic drugs in biological fluids using nitrogen selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, R; Massé, R; Sanchez, G; Bertrand, M J

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents the methodological aspects of a computerized system for the gas-chromatographic screening and primary identification of central nervous system stimulants and narcotic analgesics (including some of their respective metabolites) extracted from urine. The operating conditions of a selective nitrogen detector for optimized analytical functions are discussed, particularly the effect of carrier and fuel gas on the detector's sensitivity to nitrogen-containing molecules and discriminating performance toward biological matrix interferences. Application of simple extraction techniques, combined with rapid derivatization procedures, computer data acquisition, and reduction of chromatographic data are presented. Results show that this system approach allows for the screening of several drugs and their metabolites in a short amount of time. The reliability and stability of the system have been tested by analyzing several thousand samples for doping control at major international sporting events and for monitoring drug intake in addicts participating in a rehabilitation program. Results indicate that these techniques can be used and adapted to many different analytical toxicology situations.

  15. Framework for Construction of Multi-scale Models for Biological Wastewater Treatment Processes - Case Study: Autotrophic Nitrogen Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    In wastewater treatment technologies, employing biofilms or granular biomass, processes might occur at very different spatial and temporal scales. Model development for such systems is typically a tedious, complicated, and time consuming task, which involves selecting appropriate model equations...... for the different scales, making appropriate and simplifying assumptions, connecting them through a defined linking scheme, analyzing and solving the model equations numerically, and performing parameter estimations if necessary. In this study, a structured framework for modeling such systems is developed. It aims...... to support the user at the various steps and to reduce the time it takes to generate a model ready for application. An implementation of the framework is illustrated using a simple case study, which considers treatment of a nitrogen-rich wastewater via nitritation....

  16. Synthesis and study on biological activity of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds – regulators of enzymes of nucleic acid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexeeva I. V.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations on the development of new regulators of functional activity of nucleic acid biosynthesis enzymes based on polycyclic nitrogen-containing heterosystems are summarized. Computer design and molecular docking in the catalytic site of target enzyme (T7pol allowed to perform the directed optimization of basic structures. Several series of compounds were obtained and efficient inhibitors of herpes family (simple herpes virus type 2, Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A and hepatitis C viruses were identified, as well as compounds with potent antitumor, antibacterial and antifungal activity. It was established that the use of model test systems based on enzymes participating in nucleic acids synthesis is a promising approach to the primary screening of potential inhibitors in vitro.

  17. A mechanistic modelling and data assimilation approach to estimate the carbon/chlorophyll and carbon/nitrogen ratios in a coupled hydrodynamical-biological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Faugeras

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of hydrodynamical-biological models is to provide estimates of the main carbon fluxes such as total and export oceanic production. These models are nitrogen based, that is to say that the variables are expressed in terms of their nitrogen content. Moreover models are calibrated using chlorophyll data sets. Therefore carbon to chlorophyll (C:Chl and carbon to nitrogen (C:N ratios have to be assumed. This paper addresses the problem of the representation of these ratios. In a 1D framework at the DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea we propose a model which enables the estimation of the basic biogeochemical fluxes and in which the spatio-temporal variability of the C:Chl and C:N ratios is fully represented in a mechanical way. This is achieved through the introduction of new state variables coming from the embedding of a phytoplankton growth model in a more classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model (in which the C:N ratio is assumed to be a constant. Following this modelling step, the parameters of the model are estimated using the adjoint data assimilation method which enables the assimilation of chlorophyll and nitrate data sets collected at DYFAMED in 1997.Comparing the predictions of the new Mechanistic model with those of the classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model which was calibrated with the same data sets, we find that both models reproduce the reference data in a comparable manner. Both fluxes and stocks can be equally well predicted by either model. However if the models are coinciding on an average basis, they are diverging from a variability prediction point of view. In the Mechanistic model biology adapts much faster to its environment giving rise to higher short term variations. Moreover the seasonal variability in total production differs from the Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model to the Mechanistic model. In summer the Mechanistic model predicts higher production values in carbon unit than the Redfieldian NNPZD

  18. Biological floating bed and bio-contact oxidation processes for landscape water treatment: simultaneous removal of Microcystis aeruginosa, TOC, nitrogen and phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun Feng; Liang, Dong Hui; Fu, Le; Wei, Li; Ma, Min

    2018-06-13

    The aim of this study was to identify algicidal bacteria J25 against the Microcystis aeruginosa (90.14%), Chlorella (78.75%), Scenedesmus (not inhibited), and Oscillatoria (90.12%). Meanwhile, we evaluate the SOD activity and efficiency of denitrification characteristics with Acinetobacter sp. J25. A novel hybrid bioreactor combined biological floating bed with bio-contact oxidation (BFBO) was designed for treating the landscape water, and the average removal efficiencies of nitrate-N, ammonia-N, nitrite-N, TN, TP, TOC, and algal cells were 91.14, 50, 87.86, 88.83, 33.07, 53.95, and 53.43%, respectively. A 454-pyrosequencing technology was employed to investigate the microbial communities of the BFBO reactor samples. The results showed that Acinetobacter sp. J25 was the dominant contributor for effective removal of N, algal cells, and TOC in the BFBO reactor. And the relative abundance of Acinetobacter showed increase trend with the delay of reaction time. Graphical abstract Biological floating bed and bio-contact oxidation (BFBO) as a novel hybrid bioreactor designed for simultaneous removal Microcystis aeruginosa, TOC, nitrogen, and phosphorus. And high-throughput sequencing data demonstrated that Acinetobacter sp. J25 was the dominate species in the reactor and played key roles in the removal of N, TOC, and M. aeruginosa. Proposed reaction mechanism of the BFBO.

  19. Buckminsterfullerenes: a non-metal system for nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki; Saito, Makoto; Uemura, Sakae; Takekuma, Shin-Ichi; Takekuma, Hideko; Yoshida, Zen-Ichi

    2004-03-18

    In all nitrogen-fixation processes known so far--including the industrial Haber-Bosch process, biological fixation by nitrogenase enzymes and previously described homogeneous synthetic systems--the direct transformation of the stable, inert dinitrogen molecule (N2) into ammonia (NH3) relies on the powerful redox properties of metals. Here we show that nitrogen fixation can also be achieved by using a non-metallic buckminsterfullerene (C60) molecule, in the form of a water-soluble C60:gamma-cyclodextrin (1:2) complex, and light under nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. This metal-free system efficiently fixes nitrogen under mild conditions by making use of the redox properties of the fullerene derivative.

  20. Influence of different Sinorhizobium meliloti inocula on abundance of genes involved in nitrogen transformations in the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Katarina Huić; Schauss, Kristina; Hai, Brigitte; Sikora, Sanja; Redzepović, Sulejman; Radl, Viviane; Schloter, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Inoculation of leguminous seeds with selected rhizobial strains is practised in agriculture to ameliorate the plant yield by enhanced root nodulation and nitrogen uptake of the plant. However, effective symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia does not only depend on the capacity of nitrogen fixation but also on the entire nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere. We investigated the influence of seed inoculation with two indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti strains exhibiting different efficiency concerning plant growth promotion on nitrogen turnover processes in the rhizosphere during the growth of alfalfa. Quantification of six target genes (bacterial amoA, nirK, nirS, nosZ, nifH and archaeal amoA) within the nitrogen cycle was performed in rhizosphere samples before nodule formation, at bud development and at the late flowering stage. The results clearly demonstrated that effectiveness of rhizobial inocula is related to abundance of nifH genes in the late flowering phase of alfalfa. Moreover, other genes involved in nitrogen turnover had been affected by the inocula, e.g. higher numbers of amoA copies were observed during flowering when the more effective strain had been inoculated. However, the respective gene abundances differed overall to a greater extent between the three plant development stages than between the inoculation variants.

  1. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  2. Evaluation of the biological nitrogen fixation (N2) contribution in several forage legumes and the transfer of N to associated grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.S.V.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of experiment 1 was to compare two different techniques for labelling the soil mineral nitrogen with 15 N, for studies to quantify the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to forage legumes using the 15 N isotope dilution technique. The two techniques for labelling the soil were: incorporation a 15 N labelled organic compost (slow release treatment), and split applications of 15 N labelled ammonium sulphate. The evaluation of the techniques was through the quantification of BNF in the Itaguai Hybrid of Centrosema using two non-Na- fixing control plants (P. maximum K K-16 and Sorghum bicolor). The objective of experiment 2 was to quantify the contribution of BNF to forage legumes and the transfer of fixed nitrogen to associated grasses in mixed swards again using the 15 N isotope dilution technique. This study was conducted on a red podzolic soil (Typic Hapludult), with 7 forage legumes and 3 grasses in monoculture, and 3 mixed swards of Brachiaria brizantha with the Centrosema hybrid, Galactia striata and Desmodium ovalifolium, respectively, with varying ratios of grass to legume (4:1 to 1:4). In order to quantify the BNF contributions to the legumes and the transfer of fixed N to the B. brizantha, the plots were amended 8 times with doses of 0.01 g 15 N m -2 of 15 N labelled ammonium sulphate (12.5 atom % 15 N) each 14 days, giving a total of 0.08 g 15 N m -2 of 15 N during the 97 days of the experiment. In monoculture the different forage legumes obtained the equivalent of between 43 and 100 kg N ha -1 from BNF. Stylosanthes guianensis showed the greatest contributions from BNF at 100 Kg N ha -1 . In mixed swards with Brachiaria brizantha the proportion of N derived from BNF in the three legumes studied (Centrosema hybrid, G. striata and D. ovalifolium) was significantly greater than when they were grown in monoculture. (author). 197 refs, 9 figs, 19 tabs

  3. State of the art of methods for the elimination of nitrogen in small and medium-sized agricultural biogas installations - Final report; Etat de l'art des methodes (rentables) pour l'elimination, la concentration ou la transformation de l'azote pour les installations de biogaz agricoles de taille petite/moyenne - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakx, T.; Membrez, Y.; Mottet, A. [Erep SA, Aclens (Switzerland); Joss, A.; Boehler, M. [EAWAG, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on research work done on the elimination, concentration or transformation of nitrogen in small and medium-sized agricultural biogas installations. The goal of the project - the conception of a state of the art on existing, economically feasible technologies or processes to treat the nitrogen produced in anaerobic digestion - is discussed. Typical Swiss small/medium size agricultural biogas plants with an electrical power of around 100 kW from its combined heat and power generation (CHP) unit are examined. A reference installation is discussed which treats cow slurry, organic restaurant waste, used vegetable oils, bakery wastes, coffee grounds, and cereal wastes. A literature research is described which was conducted to find information regarding available treatment techniques for slurry and digestate treatment. Information from Switzerland, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Austria was used. Various techniques are examined including a screw-press separator, a centrifuge, membrane filtration, air stripping with acid wash, air stripping with catalytic combustion, evaporation, band dryer, precipitation, composting and biological treatment. The economic analysis and the comparison between techniques are quoted as being coarse as they are based on numerous assumptions.

  4. Removal of selected nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds in biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (BPCGW) using the catalytic ozonation process combined with the two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Han, Yuxing; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Ma, Weiwei

    2017-12-01

    Three identical anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated in parallel for 300 consecutive days for raw (R 1 ), ozonated (R 2 ) and catalytic ozonated (R 3 ) biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (BPCGW) treatment. The results demonstrated that catalytic ozonation process (COP) applied asa pretreatment remarkably improved the performance of the unsatisfactory single MBR. The overall removal efficiencies of COD, NH 3 -N and TN in R 3 were 92.7%, 95.6% and 80.6%, respectively. In addition, typical nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) of quinoline, pyridine and indole were completely removed in the integrated process. Moreover, COP could alter sludge properties and reshape microbial community structure, thus delaying the occurrence of membrane fouling. Finally, the total cost for this integrated process was estimated to be lower than that of single MBR. The results of this study suggest that COP is a good option to enhance pollutants removal and alleviate membrane fouling in the MBR for BPCGW treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of desipramine in biological samples using liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with in-syringe derivatization, gas chromatography, and nitrogen/phosphorus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Mehrafza, Narges; Bidgoli, Ali Akbar Hajialiakbari; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-10-01

    A method was established for the determination of desipramine in biological samples using liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by in-syringe derivatization and gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection. The extraction method was based on the use of two immiscible organic solvents. n-Dodecane was impregnated in the pores of the hollow fiber and methanol was placed inside the lumen of the fiber as the acceptor phase. Acetic anhydride was used as the reagent for the derivatization of the analyte inside the syringe barrel. Parameters that affect the extraction efficiency (composition of donor and acceptor phase, ionic strength, sample temperature, and extraction time) as well as derivatization efficiency (amount of acetic anhydride and reaction time and temperature) were investigated. The limit of detection was 0.02 μg/L with intra and interday RSDs of 2.6 and 7.7%, respectively. The linearity of the method was in the range of 0.2-20 μg/L (r(2) = 0.9986). The method was successfully applied to determine desipramine in human plasma and urine. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Modelo numérico do transporte de nitrogênio no solo. Parte II: Reações biológicas durante a lixiviação Numerical model of nitrogen transport in the soil. Part II: Biological reaction during leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felizardo A. Rocha

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Analisar o efeito da temperatura e umidade do solo nos processos de mineralização e nitrificação do nitrogênio e comparar as concentrações de nitrato e amônio, simuladas pelo modelo SIMASS-C, com aquelas obtidas experimentalmente, foi o objetivo que norteou o presente trabalho, razão por que se conduziram dois experimentos, o primeiro em câmeras de incubação, variando temperatura e teor de água do solo, e um segundo, em colunas de lixiviação montadas em laboratório. A temperatura e a umidade afetaram as transformações de nitrogênio, cujos efeitos foram mais pronunciados a partir de 15 dias de incubação, sobretudo nas temperaturas acima de 25 °C e umidades superiores à capacidade de campo. Ao se estimular as reações biológicas sofridas pelo nitrogênio, altos teores de água no solo causaram maiores erros entre as concentrações de nitrato e amônio simuladas e observadas.This work aimed at analyzing the effect of temperature and humidity of the soil on mineralization and nitrification processes of the nitrogen, as well as to compare nitrate and ammonium concentrations, simulated by the model SIMASS-C, with those observed. Two experiments were performed: the first in biological incubation camara, varying temperature and water content of the soil and the second, in columns in laboratory. The temperature and water content affected the transformations of nitrogen, and the effects were more pronounced after 15 days of incubation, mainly at temperatures above 25 °C and for water content higher than field capacity. By estimates of the biological reactions of nitrogen, higher levels of soil water caused larger errors between observed and simulated nitrate and ammonium concentrations.

  7. Transient, tidal-scale, nitrogen transformations in an estuarine turbidity maximum-fluid mud system (The Gironde, S.W. France)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abril, G.; Riou, S.A.; Etcheber, H.; Frankignoulle, M.; De Wit, R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The maximum turbidity zone (MTZ) of the Gironde Estuary is a site of important mineralization of particulate organic nitrogen. Moreover, this MTZ is characterized by intense cycles of settling and resuspension of anoxic fluid mud at both tidal and neap-spring time-scales. In the upper layer of the

  8. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Human activities have greatly altered the global nitrogen cycle and these changes are apparent in water quality, air quality, ecosystem and human health. However, the relative magnitude of the sources of new reactive nitrogen and the fate of this nitrogen is not well established. Further, the biogeochemical aspects of the nitrogen cycle are often studied in isolation from the economic and social implications of all the transformations of nitrogen. The California Nitrogen Assessment is an interdisciplinary project whose aim is evaluating the current state of nitrogen science, practice, and policy in the state of California. Because of the close proximity of large population centers, highly productive and diverse agricultural lands and significant acreage of undeveloped land, California is a particularly interesting place for this analysis. One component of this assessment is developing a mass balance of nitrogen as well as identifying gaps in knowledge and quantifying uncertainty. The main inputs of new reactive nitrogen to the state are 1) synthetic nitrogen fertilizer, 2) biological nitrogen fixation, and 3) atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Permanent losses of nitrogen include 1) gaseous losses (N2, N2O, NHx, NOy), 2) riverine discharge, 3) wastewater discharge to the ocean, and 4) net groundwater recharge. A final term is the balance of food, feed, and fiber to support the human and animal populations. The largest input of new reactive nitrogen to California is nitrogen fertilizer, but both nitrogen fixation and atmospheric deposition contribute significantly. Non-fertilizer uses, such as the production of nylon and polyurethane, constitutes about 5% of the synthetic N synthesized production. The total nitrogen fixation in California is roughly equivalent on the 400,000 ha of alfalfa and the approximately 40 million ha of natural lands. In addition, even with highly productive agricultural lands, the large population of livestock, in particular dairy cows

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Combined Effects of Different Water and Phosphate Levels on Growth and Biological Nitrogen Fixation of Nine Cowpea Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemo, Martin; Sulieman, Saad; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Olomide, Oluwatosin A K; Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-01-01

    Water deficit and phosphate (Pi) deficiency adversely affect growth and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) of legume crops. In this study, we examined the impact of interaction between soil water conditions and available soil-Pi levels on growth, nodule development and BNF potential of nine cowpea varieties grown on dry savanna soils. In our experimental design, soils with different available soil-Pi levels, i.e., low, moderate, and high soil-Pi levels, collected from various farming fields were used to grow nine cowpea varieties under well-watered and water-deficit conditions. Significant and severe water deficit-damaging effects on BNF, nodulation, growth, levels of plant-nitrogen (N) and -phosphorus (P), as well as shoot relative water content and chlorophyll content of cowpea plants were observed. Under well-watered and high available soil-Pi conditions, cowpea varieties IT07K-304-9 and Dan'Ila exhibited significantly higher BNF potential and dry biomass, as well as plant-N and -P contents compared with other tested ones. Significant genotypic variations among the cowpeas were recorded under low available soil-Pi and water-deficit conditions in terms of the BNF potential. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed that varieties IT04K-339-1, IT07K-188-49, IT07K-304-9, and IT04K-405-5 were associated with PC1, which was better explained by performance for nodulation, plant biomass, plant-N, plant-P, and BNF potential under the combined stress of water deficit and Pi deficiency, thereby offering prospects for development of varieties with high growth and BNF traits that are adaptive to such stress conditions in the region. On another hand, variety Dan'Ila was significantly related to PC2 that was highly explained by the plant shoot/root ratio and chlorophyll content, suggesting the existence of physiological and morphological adjustments to cope with water deficit and Pi deficiency for this particular variety. Additionally, increases in soil-Pi availability led

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Combined Effects of Different Water and Phosphate Levels on Growth and Biological Nitrogen Fixation of Nine Cowpea Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemo, Martin; Sulieman, Saad; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Olomide, Oluwatosin A. K.; Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-01-01

    Water deficit and phosphate (Pi) deficiency adversely affect growth and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) of legume crops. In this study, we examined the impact of interaction between soil water conditions and available soil-Pi levels on growth, nodule development and BNF potential of nine cowpea varieties grown on dry savanna soils. In our experimental design, soils with different available soil-Pi levels, i.e., low, moderate, and high soil-Pi levels, collected from various farming fields were used to grow nine cowpea varieties under well-watered and water-deficit conditions. Significant and severe water deficit-damaging effects on BNF, nodulation, growth, levels of plant-nitrogen (N) and -phosphorus (P), as well as shoot relative water content and chlorophyll content of cowpea plants were observed. Under well-watered and high available soil-Pi conditions, cowpea varieties IT07K-304-9 and Dan'Ila exhibited significantly higher BNF potential and dry biomass, as well as plant-N and -P contents compared with other tested ones. Significant genotypic variations among the cowpeas were recorded under low available soil-Pi and water-deficit conditions in terms of the BNF potential. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed that varieties IT04K-339-1, IT07K-188-49, IT07K-304-9, and IT04K-405-5 were associated with PC1, which was better explained by performance for nodulation, plant biomass, plant-N, plant-P, and BNF potential under the combined stress of water deficit and Pi deficiency, thereby offering prospects for development of varieties with high growth and BNF traits that are adaptive to such stress conditions in the region. On another hand, variety Dan'Ila was significantly related to PC2 that was highly explained by the plant shoot/root ratio and chlorophyll content, suggesting the existence of physiological and morphological adjustments to cope with water deficit and Pi deficiency for this particular variety. Additionally, increases in soil-Pi availability led

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Combined Effects of Different Water and Phosphate Levels on Growth and Biological Nitrogen Fixation of Nine Cowpea Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jemo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and phosphate (Pi deficiency adversely affect growth and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF of legume crops. In this study, we examined the impact of interaction between soil water conditions and available soil-Pi levels on growth, nodule development and BNF potential of nine cowpea varieties grown on dry savanna soils. In our experimental design, soils with different available soil-Pi levels, i.e., low, moderate, and high soil-Pi levels, collected from various farming fields were used to grow nine cowpea varieties under well-watered and water-deficit conditions. Significant and severe water deficit-damaging effects on BNF, nodulation, growth, levels of plant-nitrogen (N and -phosphorus (P, as well as shoot relative water content and chlorophyll content of cowpea plants were observed. Under well-watered and high available soil-Pi conditions, cowpea varieties IT07K-304-9 and Dan'Ila exhibited significantly higher BNF potential and dry biomass, as well as plant-N and -P contents compared with other tested ones. Significant genotypic variations among the cowpeas were recorded under low available soil-Pi and water-deficit conditions in terms of the BNF potential. Principal component (PC analysis revealed that varieties IT04K-339-1, IT07K-188-49, IT07K-304-9, and IT04K-405-5 were associated with PC1, which was better explained by performance for nodulation, plant biomass, plant-N, plant-P, and BNF potential under the combined stress of water deficit and Pi deficiency, thereby offering prospects for development of varieties with high growth and BNF traits that are adaptive to such stress conditions in the region. On another hand, variety Dan'Ila was significantly related to PC2 that was highly explained by the plant shoot/root ratio and chlorophyll content, suggesting the existence of physiological and morphological adjustments to cope with water deficit and Pi deficiency for this particular variety. Additionally, increases in soil

  12. The year-wise nodulation behavior and biological nitrogen fixation parameters of chickpea (cicer aritinum, L) at some selected sites in the southern zone of Pakistan during 1995-98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, M.

    2000-01-01

    Study was carried out during 1995-98 to know the location and year-wise nodulation response (number and weight of nodules/plant) and the related biological nitrogen fixation parameters (dry matter yield, n concentration and yield/plant) of the crop at some selected sites ( Peshawar, Kohat, Krak, Bannu and D. I. Khan ) under the agro climatic conditions prevailing in the southern zones of NWFP-Pakistan. The crop was found to be profusely nodulating under the agro climatic conditions prevailing at all sites except at Barani-Agricultural Research station (bars) Kohat, where the nodulation of the crop almost remained inclined to be nil. The nodulation behavior and biological nitrogen fixation parameters of chickpea during 1995-98 in the southern zone of NWFP- Pakistan has been described. (author)

  13. Electron Resonance Decay into a Biological Function: Decrease in Viability of E. coli Transformed by Plasmid DNA Irradiated with 0.5-18 eV Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouass Sahbani, S; Cloutier, P; Bass, A D; Hunting, D J; Sanche, L

    2015-10-01

    Transient negative ions (TNIs) are ubiquitous in electron-molecule scattering at low electron impact energies (0-20 eV) and are particularly effective in damaging large biomolecules. Because ionizing radiation generates mostly 0-20 eV electrons, TNIs are expected to play important roles in cell mutagenesis and death during radiotherapeutic cancer treatment, although this hypothesis has never been directly verified. Here, we measure the efficiency of transforming E. coli bacteria by inserting into the cells, pGEM-3ZfL(-) plasmid DNA that confers resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin. Before transformation, plasmids are irradiated with electrons of specific energies between 0.5 and 18 eV. The loss of transformation efficiency plotted as a function of irradiation energy reveals TNIs at 5.5 and 9.5 eV, corresponding to similar states observed in the yields of DNA double strand breaks. We show that TNIs are detectable in the electron-energy dependence of a biological process and can decrease cell viability.

  14. A measuring system for the fast simultaneous isotope ratio and elemental analysis of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur in food commodities and other biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieper, Hans-Peter; Kupka, Hans-Joachim; Williams, Tony; Rossmann, Andreas; Rummel, Susanne; Tanz, Nicole; Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    The isotope ratio of each of the light elements preserves individual information on the origin and history of organic natural compounds. Therefore, a multi-element isotope ratio analysis is the most efficient means for the origin and authenticity assignment of food, and also for the solution of various problems in ecology, archaeology and criminology. Due to the extraordinary relative abundances of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in some biological material and to the need for individual sample preparations for H and S, their isotope ratio determination currently requires at least three independent procedures and approximately 1 h of work. We present here a system for the integrated elemental and isotope ratio analysis of all four elements in one sample within 20 min. The system consists of an elemental analyser coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer with an inlet system for four reference gases (N(2), CO(2), H(2) and SO(2)). The combustion gases are separated by reversible adsorption and determined by a thermoconductivity detector; H(2)O is reduced to H(2). The analyser is able to combust samples with up to 100 mg of organic material, sufficient to analyse samples with even unusual elemental ratios, in one run. A comparison of the isotope ratios of samples of water, fruit juices, cheese and ethanol from wine, analysed by the four-element analyser and by classical methods and systems, respectively, yielded excellent agreements. The sensitivity of the device for the isotope ratio measurement of C and N corresponds to that of other systems. It is less by a factor of four for H and by a factor of two for S, and the error ranges are identical to those of other systems. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Enzymology of biological nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    Two genes involved in the regulation of nitrogenase activity, draT and draG, were cloned and found to be contiguous on the Azospirillum brasilense chromosome. The nifH gene, encoding dinitrogenase reductase, is near to draT with an intervening gap of 1.9 kb. The organization of these genes in Azospirillum lipoferum and Rhodosprillum rubrum is similar, but nifH and draT are separated by only 400 bp in the organisms. A. brasilense draTG is very similar to draTG in R. rubrum with 91.8% similarity and 85.3% identity at the amino acid level. Apparently A. brasilense uses the normal ATG initiation codon for draT, and draG. The genes for A. brasilense were able to restore function to appropriate mutants of R. rubrum. The heterologous expression of A. brasilense draTG in R. rubrum was not fully normal, as it responded more slowly to darkness and more quickly to ammonia than wild type cells. Our mutational analysis of the draTG region of A. brasilense confirms the function of these genes in the regulation of nitrogenase activity, but it also revealed minor but demonstrable differences in the control systems of R. rubrum and A. brasilense.

  16. [Retaining and transformation of incoming soil N from highland to adjacent terrestrial water body in riparian buffer zone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-cheng; Yu, Hong-li; Yao, Qin; Han, Zhuang-xing; Qiao, Shu-liang

    2007-11-01

    Highland soil nitrogen can enter adjacent water body via erosion and leaching, being one of the important pollutants in terrestrial water bodies. Riparian buffer zone is a transitional zone between highland and its adjacent water body, and a healthy riparian buffer zone can retain and transform the incoming soil N through physical, biological, and biochemical processes. In this paper, the major pathways through which soil nitrogen enters terrestrial water body and the mechanisms the nitrogen was retained and transformed in riparian buffer zone were introduced systematically, and the factors governing the nitrogen retaining and transformation were analyzed from the aspects of hydrological processes, soil characters, vegetation features, and human activities. The problems existing in riparian buffer zone study were discussed, and some suggestions for the further study in China were presented.

  17. Effect of Different Fertilization Systems (Chemical, Biological and Integrated( on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Concentration, Biochemical Attributes and Sepals Dry Weight of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    roghayeh mohammadpour vashvaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a subtropical medicinal plant belongs to the Malvaceae family. Roselle sepals are valuable due to its therapeutic properties and culinary uses. During past decades rising cost of chemical inputs and overusing them in conventional farming have caused various environmental issues such as soil and water resources contamination, reduction in food quality production, decreasing soil fertility and biological imbalance in the soil that they impose irreparable damage to ecosystems. Sustainable agriculture which is based on the use of bio-fertilizers with the aim of eliminating or considerably reducing the use of chemical inputs is the optimal solution to overcome these problems. Abo-Baker and Gehan (2011 in their study on the effect of bio-fertilizers in combination with different rates of chemical fertilizers on growth characters, yield component and chemical constituents of roselle demonstrated that the inoculation with the mixture of bio-fertilizers combined with 50 or 100% chemical fertilizers improved, in most cases, growth characters and increased sepal yield or at least did not differ significantly from the control (full recommended dose of NPK alone. These researchers stated that applying 50% of the recommended dose of NPK plus the mixture of bio-fertilizer can save half of the quantity of chemical fertilizers, decrease the production cost and obtain high quality product. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of bio-fertilizers in combination with different doses of chemical fertilizers on the element concentrations, biochemical properties and yield of roselle to find the appropriate integration of them. Material and Methods This experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete block design with three replications, at the Research Station, University of Zabol, during growing season of 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. Experimental treatments were plant nutrition with NPK (220, 130

  18. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current.

  19. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  20. Modeling phytoremediation of nitrogen-polluted water using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Aloyce W.; Hanai, Emmanuel E.

    2017-08-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has a great potential for purification of wastewater through physical, chemical and biological mechanisms. In an attempt to improve the quality of effluents discharged from waste stabilization ponds at the University of Dar es Salaam, a pilot plant was constructed to experiment the effectiveness of this plants for transformation and removal of nitrogen. Samples of wastewater were collected and examined for water quality parameters, including pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and various forms of nitrogen, which were used as input parameters in a kinetic mathematical model. A conceptual model was then developed to model various processes in the system using STELLA 6.0.1 software. The results show that total nitrogen was removed by 63.9%. Denitrification contributed 73.8% of the removed nitrogen. Other dominant nitrogen removal mechanisms are net sedimentation and uptake by water hyacinth, which contributed 16.7% and 9.5% of the removed nitrogen, respectively. The model indicated that in presence of water hyacinth biofilm about 1.26 g Nm-2day-1 of nitrogen was removed. However, in the absence of biofilm in water hyacinth pond, the permanent nitrogen removal was only 0.89 g Nm-2day-1. This suggests that in absence of water hyacinth, the efficiency of nitrogen removal would decrease by 29.4%.

  1. The nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-08

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological transformation of anthracene in soil by Pleurotus ostreatus under solid-state fermentation conditions using wheat bran and compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M C; Rodriguez, R; Sanchez, F; Ramirez, N

    2001-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus was grown in a soil mixture contaminated with anthracene, wheat bran and compost, in varying combinations. Assays with added bacteria and reinoculation of the fungus were also included. The results indicated that in many of the combinations, most of the anthracene was removed at the earliest sample time, 15 days. The most effective combination was spiked (anthracene-added) soil, fungus and compost and the addition of acclimated bacteria to this mixture inhibited anthracene removal. Analyses of extract by high-pressure liquid chromatography HPLC indicated that - anthraquinone, was the major metabolite formed. The results of this study indicate that solid-state fermentation of anthracene-contaminated soils using P. ostreatus in combination with wheat bran and compost additives can produce an accelerated rate of biological removal of anthracene from the soil

  3. Plasticity-induced martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels SUS 304 and SUS 316 L at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Quantitative measurement using X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Yoshifumi; Nakasone, Yuji; Shimizu, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Noboru

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates plasticity-induced martensitic transformation in two types of austenitic stainless steels SUS 304 and 316 L subjected to uniform tensile stresses at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The X-ray diffraction method was used in order to measure volume fractions of transformed α' and ε' martensitic phases and to obtain the dependence of the volume fractions of these phases on the applied strain level ε. The difficulty in the measurement of the martensitic phases by the X-ray diffraction method caused by the preferred orientation which had been introduced during the rolling process and during the tensile tests was overcome by the help of Arnell's Method. Two types of target materials, i.e. Cu and Mo for the X-ray source were used to verify the accuracy and reproducibility of the present X-ray diffraction analyses. The results were also compared with those obtained by the saturation magnetization method using VSM, or vibrating-sample magnetometer reported elsewhere. It was revealed that α' was transformed in SUS 304 both at 297 and 77 K whereas in SUS 316L only at 77 K. Another type of martensitic phase, i.e., ε was transformed in the both steels only at 77 K. Almost the same values of the volume fractions of α' and ε' phases were obtained by the two types of target materials. The plots of α' volume fraction obtained by the X-ray diffraction methods vs. that by VSM showed a good linear correlation. (author)

  4. Single-crystalline MFe(2)O(4) nanotubes/nanorings synthesized by thermal transformation process for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hai-Ming; Yi, Jia-Bao; Yang, Yi; Kho, Kiang-Wei; Tan, Hui-Ru; Shen, Ze-Xiang; Ding, Jun; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Olivo, Malini Carolene; Feng, Yuan-Ping

    2009-09-22

    We report a general thermal transformation approach to synthesize single-crystalline magnetic transition metal oxides nanotubes/nanorings including magnetite Fe(3)O(4), maghematite gamma-Fe(2)O(3), and ferrites MFe(2)O(4) (M = Co, Mn, Ni, Cu) using hematite alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanotubes/nanorings template. While the straightforward reduction or reduction-oxides process was employed to produce Fe(3)O(4) and gamma-Fe(2)O(3), the alpha-Fe(2)O(3)/M(OH)(2) core/shell nanostructure was used as precursor to prepare MFe(2)O(4) nanotubes via MFe(2)O(4-x) (0 MFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals with tunable size, shape, and composition have exhibited unique magnetic properties. Moreover, they have been demonstrated as a highly effective peroxidase mimic catalysts for laboratory immunoassays or as a universal nanocapsules hybridized with luminescent QDs for magnetic separation and optical probe of lung cancer cells, suggesting that these biocompatible magnetic nanotubes/nanorings have great potential in biomedicine and biomagnetic applications.

  5. Nitrogen Transformation in a Long-Term Maize-Bean cropping system Amended with Repeated Applications of Organic and Inorganic Nutrient Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibunja, C.N.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen is the most limiting element to agriculture productivity and inorganic fertilisers are too expensive for mos small-scale farmers in Kenya. The element is also susceptible to loss through leaching. There is need to improve the rate of field recoveries of applied nitrogen by the crops and the build-up of soil organic N reserves, which contribute to long term soil fertility. The long-term field plots at the National Agriculture Research Laboratories crop rotation and organic/inorganic management strategies. It was set up in 1976 to investigate the effect of continuous application of farmyard manure, crop residues and NP fertilisers on soil chemical properties and yields in a maize-bean rotation system. The main treatments are levels of inorganic fertilisers (N and P), 3 rates of manure application with or without stover retention. maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid '512' is planted at the start of the long rains season (March-Sept) while beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L) cultivar 'Mwezi moja' are planted during the following season (Oct-Jan) on residual fertiliser inputs. both plants are planted as mono-crops. The trial was used to follow the movement and distribution of available mineral N from 0 to 300 cm down the soil profile for a period of 2 years. Labelled 15 N fertiliser (10% a.e) as Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) at the rate 60 kg N ha -1 yr -1 was applied to maize in 1*2 m 2 micro-plots. Soils were sampled at various levels upto 3m, three times per season for two years and analyzed for available mineral N (NH 4 + N +No 3 - -N) and total nitrogen. The result of the first year indicated that the prevalent form of inorganic N found in the soil was in the form NO 3 - N. A substantial amount of NO 3 - N (1045-23.3 mg N kg soil - 1) was found in the plough layer (20 cm) of the soil at the beginning of the season. The concentration of NO 3 - -N in the first one metre decreased with depth as the crop matured due to plant uptake and loss through leaching. A bulge of

  6. Evaluation of parameters of a plankton community's biological rhythms under the natural environment of the Black Sea using the Fourier transform method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, Ye B

    2017-05-01

    Night-time changes in bioluminescence intensity in the coastal area of the Black Sea were recorded. It was noted that the biomass of luminous organisms is closely correlated with the biomass of plankton and other pelagic organisms, including commercial pelagic fish. The parameters of plankton communities' basic biological rhythms were determined using the discrete Fourier transform method. These rhythms were manifest as spatial and temporal changes in the bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that changes in the bioluminescence intensity over a 14.0-h period were due to the duration of the light/dark cycles. By contrast, changes in bioluminescence intensity with periods of 4.7 and 2.8 h were due to the endogenous rhythms of the plankton community (feeding and cell division). An original method for evaluating of errors in the calculated periods of the biological rhythms was proposed. A strong correlation (r = 0.906) was observed between the measured and calculated values for the bioluminescence intensity, which provided support for the assumptions made. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Analysis of specific absorption rate and internal electric field in human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil-type transcutaneous energy transmission transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kenji; Zulkifli, Nur Elina Binti; Ishioka, Yuji

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed the internal electric field E and specific absorption rate (SAR) of human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil transcutaneous energy transmission transformer. Using an electromagnetic simulator, we created a model of human biological tissues consisting of a dry skin, wet skin, fat, muscle, and cortical bone. A primary coil was placed on the surface of the skin, and a secondary coil was located subcutaneously inside the body. The E and SAR values for the model representing a 34-year-old male subject were analyzed using electrical frequencies of 0.3-1.5 MHz. The transmitting power was 15 W, and the load resistance was 38.4 Ω. The results showed that the E values were below the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.9 and 1.5 MHz, and SAR values were well below the limit prescribed by the ICNIRP for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.3 and 1.2 MHz.

  8. Transforming Ocean Observations of the Carbon Budget, Acidification, Hypoxia, Nutrients, and Biological Productivity: a Global Array of Biogeochemical Argo Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, L. D.; Johnson, K. S.; Claustre, H.; Boss, E.; Emerson, S. R.; Westberry, T. K.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Mazloff, M. R.; Riser, S.; Russell, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Our ability to detect changes in biogeochemical (BGC) processes in the ocean that may be driven by increasing atmospheric CO2, as well as by natural climate variability, is greatly hindered by undersampling in vast areas of the open ocean. Argo is a major international program that measures ocean heat content and salinity with about 4000 floats distributed throughout the ocean, profiling to 2000 m every 10 days. Extending this approach to a global BGC-Argo float array, using recent, proven sensor technology, and in close synergy with satellite systems, will drive a transformative shift in observing and predicting the effects of climate change on ocean metabolism, carbon uptake, acidification, deoxygenation, and living marine resource management. BGC-Argo will add sensors for pH, oxygen, nitrate, chlorophyll, suspended particles, and downwelling irradiance, with sufficient accuracy for climate studies. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) using BGC models indicate that 1000 BGC floats would provide sufficient coverage, hence equipping 1/4 of the Argo array. BGC-Argo (http://biogeochemical-argo.org) will enhance current sustained observational programs such as Argo, GO-SHIP, and long-term ocean time series. BGC-Argo will benefit from deployments on GO-SHIP vessels, which provide sensor verification. Empirically derived algorithms that relate the observed BGC float parameters to the carbon system parameters will provide global information on seasonal ocean-atmosphere carbon exchange. BGC Argo measurements could be paired with other emerging technology, such as pCO2 measurements from ships of opportunity and wave gliders, to extend and validate exchange estimates. BGC-Argo prototype programs already show the potential of a global observing system that can measure seasonal to decadal variability. Various countries have developed regional BGC arrays: Southern Ocean (SOCCOM), North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre (remOcean), Mediterranean (NAOS), the Kuroshio (INBOX

  9. Nitrogen cycling in a flooded-soil ecosystem planted to rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    15 N studies of various aspects of the nitrogen cycle in a flooded rice ecosystem on Crowley silt loam soil in Louisiana were reviewed to construct a mass balance model of the nitrogen cycle for this system. Nitrogen transformations modeled included 1) net ammonification (0.22 mg NH 4+ -N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). 2) net nitrification (207 mg NO 3- -N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). 3) denitrification (0.37 mg N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ), and 4) biological N 2 fixation (0.16 mg N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). Nitrogen inputs included 1) application of fertilizers, 2) incorporation of crop residues, 3) biological N 2 fixation, and 4) deposition. Nitrogen outputs included 1) crop removal, 2) gaseous losses from NH 3 volatilization and simultaneous occurrence of nitrification-denitrification, and 3) leaching and runoff. Mass balance calculations indicated that 33% of the available inorganic nitrogen was recovered by rice, and the remaining nitrogen was lost from the system. Losses of N due to ammonia volatilization were minimal because fertilizer-N was incorporated into the soil. A significant portion of inorganic-N was lost by ammonium diffusion from the anaerobic layer to the aerobic layer in response to a concentration gradient and subsequent nitrification in the aerobic layer followed by nitrate diffusion into the anaerobic layer and denitrification into gaseous end products. Leaching and surface runoff losses were minimal. (orig.)

  10. Nitrogen removal and microbial communities in a three-stage system simulating a riparian environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    The riparian zone is an active interface for nitrogen removal, in which nitrogen transformations by microorganisms have not been valued. In this study, a three-stage system was constructed to simulate the riparian zone environments, and nitrogen removal as well as the microbial community was investigated in this 'engineered riparian system'. The results demonstrated that stage 1 of this system accounted for 41-51 % of total nitrogen removal. Initial ammonium loading and redox potential significantly impacted the nitrogen removal performances. Stages 1 and 2 were both composed of an anoxic/oxic (A/O) zone and an anaerobic column. The A/O zone removed most of the ammonium load (6.8 g/m(2)/day), while the anaerobic column showed a significant nitrate removal rate (11.1 g/m(2)/day). Molecular biological analysis demonstrated that bacterial diversity was high in the A/O zones, where ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria accounted for 8.42 and 3.32 % of the bacterial population, respectively. The denitrifying bacteria Acidovorax sp. and the nitrifying bacteria Nitrosospira/Nitrosomonas were the predominant microorganisms in this engineered riparian system. This three-stage system was established to achieve favorable nitrogen removal and the microbial community in the system was also retained. This investigation should deepen our understanding of biological nitrogen removal in engineered riparian zones.

  11. Early-warning process/control for anaerobic digestion and biological nitrogen transformation processes: Batch, semi-continuous, and/or chemostat experiments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, R. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test an early-warning/process control model for anaerobic sludge digestion (AD). The approach was to use batch and semi-continuously fed systems and to assemble system parameter data on a real-time basis. Specific goals were to produce a real-time early warning control model and computer code, tested for internal and external validity; to determine the minimum rate of data collection for maximum lag time to predict failure with a prescribed accuracy and confidence in the prediction; and to determine and characterize any trends in the real-time data collected in response to particular perturbations to feedstock quality. Trends in the response of trace gases carbon monoxide and hydrogen in batch experiments, were found to depend on toxicant type. For example, these trace gases respond differently for organic substances vs. heavy metals. In both batch and semi-continuously feed experiments, increased organic loading lead to proportionate increases in gas production rates as well as increases in CO and H{sub 2} concentration. An analysis of variance of gas parameters confirmed that CO was the most sensitive indicator variable by virtue of its relatively larger variance compared to the others. The other parameters evaluated including gas production, methane production, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane concentration. In addition, a relationship was hypothesized between gaseous CO concentration and acetate concentrations in the digester. The data from semicontinuous feed experiments were supportive.

  12. Distribution of nitrogen in nature and its separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzsche, H.M.; Haendel, D.; Muehle, K.

    1981-01-01

    Proceeding from a survey on nitrogen in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere and nitrogen determination methods, a detailed review is given of procedures that allow to transform any nitrogen-containing starting material into molecular nitrogen for mass spectroscopic isotope analysis

  13. Rapid and selective derivatizatin method for the nitrogen-sensitive detection of carboxylic acids in biological fluids prior to gas chromatographic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingeman, H.; Haan, H.B.P.; Hulshoff, A.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and selective derivatization procedure is described for the pre-column labelling of carboxylic acids with a nitrogen-containing label. The carboxylic acid function is activated with 2-bromo-1-methylpyridinium iodide and the activated carboxylic acid function reacts with a primary or a

  14. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  15. Biological digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosevear, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the biological degradation of non-radioactive organic material occurring in radioactive wastes. The biochemical steps are often performed using microbes or isolated enzymes in combination with chemical steps and the aim is to oxidise the carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur to their respective oxides. (U.K.)

  16. Full scale experimental assessment of reliability of steady state design criteria of activated sludge process with biological nitrogen removal and chemical phosphorus removal; Verifica sperimentale a scala reale di criteri di dimensionamento dei sistemi a fanghi attivi per la rimozione dei nutrienti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatano, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dip. di Ingegneria Idraulica, Ambientale e del Rilevamento, Sez. Ambientale

    1996-06-01

    The biological phase of a wastewater treatment plant situated in the Ruhr River Region (Germany), has been monitored for about one year. The collected experimental data have been elaborated in this paper with the objective of an assessment of the reliability of some recent steady-state design criteria of the activated sludge process with biological nitrogen removal and chemical phosphorus removal.

  17. Research on the enhancement of biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures from ammonium-rich wastewater by the bio-electrocoagulation technology in lab-scale systems, pilot-scale systems and a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Qian, Guangsheng; Ye, Linlin; Hu, Xiaomin; Yu, Xin; Lyu, Weijian

    2018-04-17

    In cold areas, nitrogen removal performance of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) declines greatly in winter. This paper systematically describes the enhancement effect of a periodic reverse electrocoagulation technology on biological nitrogen removal at low temperatures. The study showed that in the lab-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology improved the biomass amount, enzyme activity and the amount of nitrogen removal bacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera and Enterobacter). This enhanced nitrification and denitrification of activated sludge at low temperatures. In the pilot-scale systems, the electrocoagulation technology increased the relative abundance of cold-adapted microorganisms (Luteimonas and Trueperaceae) at low temperatures. In a full-scale industrial WWTP, comparison of data from winter 2015 and winter 2016 showed that effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH 4 + -N, and NO 3 - -N reduced by 10.37, 3.84, and 136.43 t, respectively, throughout the winter, after installation of electrocoagulation devices. These results suggest that the electrocoagulation technology is able to improve the performance of activated sludge under low-temperature conditions. This technology provides a new way for upgrading of the performance of WWTPs in cold areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The mineralization and transformation of both added organic nitrogen and native soil N in red soils from four different ecological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Qingfu; Zhang Qinzheng; He Zhenli; Xi Haifu; Wu Gang; Wilson, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The NH 4 + -N, microbial biomass-N, humus-N, and extractable organic N derived from the added 15 N-labelled ryegrass and soil indigenous pool were measured separately with 15 N tracing techniques. Based on the recovery of NH 4 + - 15 N and lost- 15 N (mainly as NH 3 ), more than 30% of the added ryegrass 15 N was mineralized in 15 d. The amount of mineralized N increased with time up to 90 d for all soils except for the upland soil in which it decreased slightly. The mineralization of ryegrass N and incorporation of ryegrass- 15 N into microbial biomass was greatest in upland soil. The transformation of ryegrass 15 N into humus 15 N occurred rapidly in 15 d, with higher humus 15 N occurring in the upland or tea-garden soil than the paddy and unarable soil. The addition of ryegrass caused additional mineralization of soil indigenous organic N and enhanced the turnover of both microbial biomass N and stable organic N in soils

  19. Elimination of micropollutants and transformation products from a wastewater treatment plant effluent through pilot scale ozonation followed by various activated carbon and biological filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, Gregor; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A; Cornel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants are ineffective in removing a broad range of micropollutants, resulting in the release of these compounds into the aquatic environment, including natural drinking water resources. Ozonation is a suitable treatment process for micropollutant removal, although, currently, little is known about the formation, behavior, and removal of transformation products (TP) formed during ozonation. We investigated the elimination of 30 selected micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, X-ray contrast media, industrial chemicals, and TP) by biological treatment coupled with ozonation and, subsequently, in parallel with two biological filters (BF) or granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. The selected micropollutants were removed to very different extents during the conventional biological wastewater treatment process. Ozonation (specific ozone consumption: 0.87 ± 0.29 gO3 gDOC(-1), hydraulic retention time: 17 ± 3 min) eliminated a large number of the investigated micropollutants. Although 11 micropollutants could still be detected after ozonation, most of these were eliminated in subsequent GAC filtration at bed volumes (BV) of approximately 25,000 m(3) m(-3). In contrast, no additional removal of micropollutants was achieved in the BF. Ozonation of the analgesic tramadol led to the formation of tramadol-N-oxide that is effectively eliminated by GAC filters, but not by BF. For the antiviral drug acyclovir, the formation of carboxy-acyclovir was observed during activated sludge treatment, with an average concentration of 3.4 ± 1.4 μg L(-1) detected in effluent samples. Subsequent ozonation resulted in the complete elimination of carboxy-acyclovir and led to the formation of N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxo imidazolidin)-formamido-N-methoxyacetetic acid (COFA; average concentration: 2.6 ± 1.0 μg L(-1)). Neither the BF nor the GAC filters were able to remove COFA. These results highlight the importance of considering TP in the

  20. Effect of freshwater mussels on the vertical distribution of anaerobic ammonia oxidizers and other nitrogen-transforming microorganisms in upper Mississippi river sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Black

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted qPCR and non-targeted amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes within sediment layers identified the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox niche and characterized microbial community changes attributable to freshwater mussels. Anammox bacteria were normally distributed (Shapiro-Wilk normality test, W-statistic =0.954, p = 0.773 between 1 and 15 cm depth and were increased by a factor of 2.2 (p < 0.001 at 3 cm below the water-sediment interface when mussels were present. Amplicon sequencing of sediment at depths relevant to mussel burrowing (3 and 5 cm showed that mussel presence reduced observed species richness (p = 0.005, Chao1 diversity (p = 0.005, and Shannon diversity (p < 0.001, with more pronounced decreases at 5 cm depth. A non-metric, multidimensional scaling model showed that intersample microbial species diversity varied as a function of mussel presence, indicating that sediment below mussels harbored distinct microbial communities. Mussel presence corresponded with a 4-fold decrease in a majority of operational taxonomic units (OTUs classified in the phyla Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Plantomycetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Crenarcheota, and Verrucomicrobia. 38 OTUs in the phylum Nitrospirae were differentially abundant (p < 0.001 with mussels, resulting in an overall increase from 25% to 35%. Nitrogen (N-cycle OTUs significantly impacted by mussels belonged to anammmox genus Candidatus Brocadia, ammonium oxidizing bacteria family Nitrosomonadaceae, ammonium oxidizing archaea genus Candidatus Nitrososphaera, nitrite oxidizing bacteria in genus Nitrospira, and nitrate- and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing organisms in the archaeal family “ANME-2d” and bacterial phylum “NC10”, respectively. Nitrosomonadaceae (0.9-fold (p < 0.001 increased with mussels, while NC10 (2.1-fold (p < 0.001, ANME-2d (1.8-fold (p < 0.001, and Candidatus Nitrososphaera (1.5-fold (p < 0

  1. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wankel, Scott David [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Buchwald, Carolyn [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Hansel, Colleen [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  2. Nitrogen fixation by free-living microorganisms in tropical rice soils using labelled fertilizer. Part of a coordinated programme on isotope techniques in studies of biological nitrogen fixation for the dual purpose of increasing crop production and decreasing nitrogen fertilizer use to conserve the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.R.

    1981-11-01

    Both acetylene-reduction and 15 N techniques were used to study heterotrophic N fixation in the rhizosphere of rice plants. Soils subjected to flooding in 4 soil types in both greenhouse and the field were found to stimulate greater heterotrophic nitrogen fixation than moist soils. The addition of organic materials, in particular, cellulose and rice straw, in general, enhanced nitrogen fixed by heterotrophic organisms living in the rhizosphere of rice plants. The highest amount of N fixed was 38 kg N/ha, and was obtained in a flooded lateritic soil to which had been added cellulose. Heterotrophic nitrogen fixation was influenced by soil type. In this study, the lowest value for fixed N was recorded in an acid sulphate soil of low pH. The addition of increasing amounts of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer in the form of ammonium sulphate suppressed rhizospheric nitrogen fixation in all soils, but the extent of suppression differed in the different soils. Benomyl fungicide and methyl carbamate insecticide had a stimulatory effect on heterotrophic nitrogen fixation in soils under rice roots. Different rice cultivars stimulated strains of Azospirillum to varying extent, and thus did not fix nitrogen to the same extent. It is thus possible that varieties of rice could be selected on the basis of their ability to support non-symbiotic N fixation in their rhizosphere

  3. Long-term population dynamics and in situ physiology in activated sludge systems with enhanced biological phosphorus removal operated with and without nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, N.; Nielsen, P.H.; Aspegren, H.

    2003-01-01

    . However, we observed a lower correlation (0.9). The Actinobacteria were the only additional group of bacteria which showed a similar degree of correlation to the P content in activated sludge as the Rhodocyclus-related bacteria - but only for the system without nitrogen removal. Significant amounts (less...... of the Betaproteobacteria (part of them identified as Rhodocyclus-related bacteria) as well as the Actinobacteria were able to take up P-33(i), [H-3]-acetate and [H-3]-glucose under anaerobic-aerobic conditions. The contribution of anoxic P-33(i) uptake under alternating anaerobic-anoxic conditions was significantly lower...

  4. Cu2 + modulated nitrogen-doped grapheme quantum dots as a turn-off/on fluorescence sensor for the selective detection of histidine in biological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Fan, ZheFeng

    2018-01-01

    A highly sensitive sensor for detection of histidine (His) based on the nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs)-Cu2 + system has been designed. The N-GQDs were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal approach according to previous report. The fluorescence of N-GQDs can be effectively quenched by Cu2 + due to the binding between Cu2 + and functional groups on the surface of N-GQDs. The high affinity of His to Cu2 + enables Cu2 + to be dissociated from the surface of N-GQDs and recovering the fluorescence. The sensor displayed a sensitive response to His in the concentration range of 0-35 μmol L- 1, with a detection limit of 72.2 nmol L- 1. The proposed method is successfully applied to detect His in samples with a recovery range of 96-102%.

  5. Effects of nitrogen deposition and soil fertility on cover and physiology of Cladonia foliacea (Huds.) Willd., a lichen of biological soil crusts from Mediterranean Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raul; Manrique, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    We are fertilizing a thicket with 0, 10, 20 and 50 kg nitrogen (N) ha -1 yr -1 in central Spain. Here we report changes in cover, pigments, pigment ratios and FvFm of the N-tolerant, terricolous, lichen Cladonia foliacea after 1-2 y adding N in order to study its potential as biomarker of atmospheric pollution. Cover tended to increase. Pigments increased with fertilization independently of the dose supplied but only significantly with soil nitrate as covariate. β-carotene/chlorophylls increased with 20-50 kg N ha -1 yr -1 (over the background) and neoxanthin/chlorophylls also increased with N. (Neoxanthin+lutein)/carotene decreased with N when nitrate and pH seasonalities were used as covariates. FvFm showed a critical load above 40 kg N ha -1 yr -1 . Water-stress, iron and copper also explained variables of lichen physiology. We conclude that this tolerant lichen could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Research highlights: → We are providing evidence of the potential use of the crust-forming lichen Cladonia foliacea as biomarker of atmospheric pollution in Mediterranean ecosystems of Europe, which are understudied with regard to this topic. → Pigment concentration increased with N addition and FvFm, used as indicator of physiological status, showed a critical load above 20 kg N ha -1 y -1 . → Soil nitrate and pH were important in modulating responses to simulated N pollution and other soil parameters (micro-nutrients, water content...) also explained variables of lichen physiology. → We conclude that Cladonia foliacea could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Nitrogen deposition and soil variables affect the physiology of terrestrial Mediterranean lichens.

  6. Effects of nitrogen deposition and soil fertility on cover and physiology of Cladonia foliacea (Huds.) Willd., a lichen of biological soil crusts from Mediterranean Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raul, E-mail: raul.ochoa@ccma.csic.e [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Manrique, Esteban [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We are fertilizing a thicket with 0, 10, 20 and 50 kg nitrogen (N) ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in central Spain. Here we report changes in cover, pigments, pigment ratios and FvFm of the N-tolerant, terricolous, lichen Cladonia foliacea after 1-2 y adding N in order to study its potential as biomarker of atmospheric pollution. Cover tended to increase. Pigments increased with fertilization independently of the dose supplied but only significantly with soil nitrate as covariate. {beta}-carotene/chlorophylls increased with 20-50 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} (over the background) and neoxanthin/chlorophylls also increased with N. (Neoxanthin+lutein)/carotene decreased with N when nitrate and pH seasonalities were used as covariates. FvFm showed a critical load above 40 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Water-stress, iron and copper also explained variables of lichen physiology. We conclude that this tolerant lichen could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Research highlights: We are providing evidence of the potential use of the crust-forming lichen Cladonia foliacea as biomarker of atmospheric pollution in Mediterranean ecosystems of Europe, which are understudied with regard to this topic. Pigment concentration increased with N addition and FvFm, used as indicator of physiological status, showed a critical load above 20 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. Soil nitrate and pH were important in modulating responses to simulated N pollution and other soil parameters (micro-nutrients, water content...) also explained variables of lichen physiology. We conclude that Cladonia foliacea could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Nitrogen deposition and soil variables affect the physiology of terrestrial Mediterranean lichens.

  7. In-situ Monitoring of Plant-microbe Communication to Understand the Influence of Soil Properties on Symbiotic Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, T.; Del Valle, I.; Cheng, H. Y.; Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Lehmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plant-microbe signaling is important for many symbiotic and pathogenic interactions. While this signaling often occurs in soils, very little research has evaluated the role that the soil mineral and organic matter matrix plays in plant-microbe communication. One hurdle to these studies is the lack of simple tools for evaluating how soil mineral phases and organic matter influence the availability of plant-produced flavonoids that initiate the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. Because of their range of hydrophobic and electrostatic properties, flavonoids represent an informative class of signaling molecules. In this presentation, we will describe studies examining the bioavailable concentrations of flavonoids in soils using traditional techniques, such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and fluorescent microbial biosensors. Additionally, we will describe our progress developing a Rhizobium leguminosarum reporter that can be deployed into soils to report on flavonoid levels. This new microbial reporter is designed so that Rhizobium only generates a volatile gas signal when it encounters a defined concentration of flavonoids. By monitoring the output of this biosensor using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry during real time during soil incubations, we are working to establish the impact of soil organic matter, pH, and mineral phases on the reception of these signaling molecules. We expect that the findings from these studies will be useful for recommending soil management strategies that can enhance the communication between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria. This research highlights the importance of studying the role of soil as a mediator of plant-microbe communication.

  8. Impact of Crab Bioturbation on Nitrogen-Fixation Rates in Red Sea Mangrove Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Qashqari, Maryam S.

    2017-01-01

    be uptaken by plants. Hence, biological nitrogen fixation increases the input of nitrogen in the mangrove ecosystem. In this project, we focus on measuring the rates of nitrogen fixation on Red Sea mangrove (Avicennia marina) located at Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

  9. Hydrolytic Amino Acids Employed as a Novel Organic Nitrogen Source for the Preparation of PGPF-Containing Bio-Organic Fertilizer for Plant Growth Promotion and Characterization of Substance Transformation during BOF Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenglong; Ran, Wei; Yu, Guanghui; Zhang, Yingjun; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Opportunity costs seriously limit the large-scale production of bio-organic fertilizers (BOFs) both in China and internationally. This study addresses the utilization of amino acids resulting from the acidic hydrolysis of pig corpses as organic nitrogen sources to increase the density of TrichodermaharzianumT-E5 (a typical plant growth-promoting fungi, PGPF). This results in a novel, economical, highly efficient and environmentally friendly BOF product. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) was employed to monitor compost maturity levels, while pot experiments were utilized to test the effects of this novel BOF on plant growth. An optimization experiment, based on response surface methodologies (RSMs), showed that a maximum T-E5 population (3.72 × 108 ITS copies g−1) was obtained from a mixture of 65.17% cattle manure compost (W/W), 19.33% maggot manure (W/W), 15.50% (V/W)hydrolytic amino acid solution and 4.69% (V/W) inoculum at 28.7°C after a 14 day secondary solid fermentation. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the compost transformation process involved the degradation of protein-like substances and the formation of fulvic-like and humic-like substances. FRI parameters (PI, n, PII, n, PIII, n and PV, n) were used to characterize the degree of compost maturity. The BOF resulted in significantly higher increased chlorophyll content, shoot length, and shoot and root dry weights of three vegetables (cucumber, tomato and pepper) by 9.9%~22.4%, 22.9%~58.5%, 31.0%~84.9%, and 24.2%~34.1%, respectively. In summary, this study presents an operational means of increasing PGPF T-E5 populations in BOF to promote plant growth with a concomitant reduction in production cost. In addition, a BOF compost maturity assessment using fluorescence EEM spectroscopy and FRI ensured its safe field application. PMID:26974549

  10. Biological efficiency of Agaricus brasiliensis cultivated in compost with nitrogen concentrations Eficiência biológica de Agaricus brasiliensis em composto com concentrações de nitrogênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix G de Siqueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of compost is one of the most important steps for the cultivation of any species of mushroom. For the Agaricus species, this step is even more complex because it depends on the performance of different microorganisms that act on the substrate, turning it into selective compost that promotes the growth of the fungus to be cultivated. Among the various factors that affect the microbial activity, the initial concentration of nitrogen is considered one of the most important. Due to the lack of conclusive studies about that, the aim of this study was to evaluate the productivity and biological efficiency of Agaricus brasiliensis in compost prepared with different initial concentrations of nitrogen, according to the composting methodology and to the conventional pasteurization techniques (phase I and II. Three initial nitrogen concentrations (w/w (T1= 1.0%; T2= 1.5%; and T3= 2.0% were tested and mycelial growth was determined in terms of mm/day for all treatments. The productivity and biological efficiency were also determined. The most efficient initial concentrations of nitrogen were of 1.0% and 1.5%. This concentration of N in the compost permitted a faster development of the mushroom with higher productivity when compared to the results obtained with the application of 2% of nitrogen.A produção do composto é uma das etapas mais importantes para o cultivo de qualquer espécie de cogumelo. Para as espécies Agaricus, essa etapa é ainda mais complexa, porque depende da atuação de diferentes microrganismos que atuam sobre o substrato, transformando-o em um composto seletivo que favorece o crescimento do fungo a ser cultivado. Dentre os diversos fatores que afetam essa atividade microbiana, a concentração inicial de nitrogênio é considerada uma das mais importantes. Em função da falta de estudos conclusivos a respeito, este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a produtividade e eficiência biológica de Agaricus brasiliensis em

  11. Lipids as paleomarkers to constrain the marine nitrogen cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rush, Darci; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    Global climate is, in part, regulated by the effect of microbial processes on biogeochemical cycling. The nitrogen cycle, in particular, is driven by microorganisms responsible for the fixation and loss of nitrogen, and the reduction-oxidation transformations of bio-available nitrogen. Within marine

  12. Lipids as paleomarkers to constrain the marine nitrogen cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate is, in part, regulated by the effect of microbial processes on biogeochemical cycling. The nitrogen cycle, in particular, is driven by microorganisms responsible for the fixation and loss of nitrogen, and the reduction-oxidation transformations of bio-available nitrogen. Within marine

  13. Nitrogen Out of the Bottle: The Challenge of Managing the Genie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity converts more N2 to reactive nitrogen (Nr; all nitrogen species other than N2) than do natural terrestrial processes (mostly biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in unmanaged ecosystems). Most of the Nr is created as a consequence of food production, fossil fuel combustion and industry. The Haber-Bosch process, invented in the early 20th century, now provides a virtually inexhaustible supply of nitrogen fertilizer. This one invention is responsible for the existence of about half of the world's population. That's the good news. The other news is that most of this nitrogen (and additional amounts from fossil fuel combustion and industry) is lost to the environment where it has exceeded the ability of the environment to convert it back to unreactive N2. The accumulating Nr contributes to smog, greenhouse effect, ecosystem eutrophication, acid rain and loss of stratospheric ozone in a sequential manner—the nitrogen cascade. Collectively these changes alter climate, decrease air quality, and diminish ecosystem sustainability. The challenge is how do we manage the genie—make sure we get the benefits of nitrogen, while minimizing the problems it causes. The paper will layout the possible, the probable and the improbable (but if it occurred, would be transformative) options for nitrogen management. Included will be the role that a nation vs. a person should play. The paper will also give examples of success stories, where nitrogen losses to the environment have been decreased, without impacting the service being provided—food and energy production. The paper will conclude with a forecast to the future, based upon the RCP scenarios for 2100.

  14. Temporal and spatial variability of biological nitrogen fixation off the upwelling system of central Chile (35-38.5°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Camila; González, Maria Lorena; Muñoz, Claudia; Molina, Veronica; Farias, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Although N2 fixation could represent a supplementary source of bioavailable nitrogen in coastal upwelling areas and underlying oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), the limited data available prevent assessing its variability and biogeochemical significance. Here we report the most extensive N2 fixation data set gathered to date in the upwelling area off central Chile (36°S). It covers interannual to high frequency time scales in an area of about 82,500 km2 in the eastern South Pacific (ESP). Because heterotrophic N2 fixation may be regulated by DOM availability in the ESP, we conducted experiments at different oxygen conditions and included DOM amendments in order to test diazotrophic activity. Rates in the euphotic zone showed strong temporal variability which resulted in values reaching 0.5 nmol L-1 d-1 in 2006 (average 0.32 ± 0.17 nmol L-1 d-1) and up to 126.8 nmol L-1 d-1 (average 24.75 ± 37.9 nmol L-1 d-1) in 2011. N2 fixation in subsurface suboxic conditions (1.5 ± 1.16 nmol L-1 d-1) also occurred mainly during late summer and autumn while virtually absent in winter. The diversity of diazotrophs was dominated by heterotrophs, with higher richness in surface compared to OMZ waters. Rates in oxygen depleted conditions could exceed values obtained in the euphotic layer, but rates were not dependent on the availability of dissolved organic matter. N2 fixation also showed a positive correlation with total chlorophyll and the C:N ratio of phytoplankton, but not to the P excess compared to N. We conclude that the diazotrophic community responds to the composition of phytoplankton rather than the extent of N deficiency and the availability of bulk DOM in this system.

  15. Actinorhizal nitrogen fixing nodules: infection process, molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Actinorhizal nitrogen fixing nodules: infection process, molecular biology and genomics. Mariana Obertello, Mame Oureye SY, Laurent Laplaze, Carole Santi, Sergio Svistoonoff, Florence Auguy, Didier Bogusz, Claudine Franche ...

  16. Nitrogen recycling through the gut and the nitrogen economy of ruminants: An asynchronous symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, C K; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2007-01-01

    The extensive development of the ruminant forestomach sets apart their nitrogen (N) economy from that of nonruminants in a number of respects. Extensive pre-gastric fermentation alters the profile of protein reaching the small intestine, largely through the transformation of nitrogenous compounds...

  17. Cryogenic pulsed power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Eckels, P.W.; Hackworth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Singh, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Three liquid nitrogen cooled transformers, two with 14.4 MJ and one with 33.5 MJ storage capacity, are being built to provide respective currents of 0.31 and 0.95 MA to drive a distributed rail gun and are designed to withstand respective voltages of 70 and 200 kV. The transformers are contained in fiberglass reinforced polyester plastic dewars to avoid eddy current coupling and lateral forces that would exist with a metal dewar. To improve the coupling between windings the secondary winding is made relatively thin and is supported structurally for magnetic loading against the outer primary winding. The coils are pool bath cooled. Normal and fault mode analyses indicated safe operation with some precautions for venting nitrogen gas provided

  18. Genetic mitigation strategies to tackle agricultural GHG emissions: The case for biological nitrification inhibition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Arango, J; Masahiro, K; Hooper, A M; Yoshihashi, T; Ando, Y; Nakahara, K; Deshpande, S; Ortiz-Monasterio, I; Ishitani, M; Peters, M; Chirinda, N; Wollenberg, L; Lata, J C; Gerard, B; Tobita, S; Rao, I M; Braun, H J; Kommerell, V; Tohme, J; Iwanaga, M

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated soil-nitrifier activity and rapid nitrification are the cause of declining nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) and enhanced nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from farming. Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is the ability of certain plant roots to suppress soil-nitrifier activity, through production and release of nitrification inhibitors. The power of phytochemicals with BNI-function needs to be harnessed to control soil-nitrifier activity and improve nitrogen-cycling in agricultural systems. Transformative biological technologies designed for genetic mitigation are needed, so that BNI-enabled crop-livestock and cropping systems can rein in soil-nitrifier activity, to help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and globally make farming nitrogen efficient and less harmful to environment. This will reinforce the adaptation or mitigation impact of other climate-smart agriculture technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The nitrogen cycle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Nirtogen is an essential element for the evolution of life, because it is found in a variety of biologically important molecules. Therefore, N is an important element to study from a exobiological perspective. In particular, fixed nitrogen is the biologically useful form of nitrogen. Fixed nitrogen is generally defines as NH3, NH4(+), NO(x), or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules, and releasable by hydrolysis to NH3 or NH4(+). On Earth, the vast majority of nitrogen exists as N2 in the atmosphere, and not in the fixes form. On early Mars the same situations probably existed. The partial pressure of N2 on early Mars was thought to be 18 mb, significantly less than that of Earth. Dinitrogen can be fixed abiotically by several mechanisms. These mechanisms include thernal shock from meteoritic infall and lightning, as well as the interaction of light and sand containing TiO2 which produces NH3 that would be rapidly destroyed by photolysis and reaction with OH radicals. These mechanisms could have been operative on primitive Mars.The chemical processes effecting these compounds and possible ways of fixing or burying N in the Martian environment are described. Data gathered in this laboratory suggest that the low abundance of nitrogen along (compared to primitive Earth) may not significantly deter the origin and early evolution of a nitrogen utilizing organisms. However, the conditions on current Mars with respect to nitrogen are quite different, and organisms may not be able to utilize all of the available nitrogen.

  20. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  1. Effect of Nitrogen Foliar Application on Canola Yield (Brassica napus L. and Nitrogen Efficiency across Different Sowing Dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Doori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Between oil seeds, from the quality, quantity and nutrition index point of view, canola has the top level . Because of the solubility of N fertilizers, the time of urea application, is very important and one of the main reasons of the reduction in N application efficiency is utilization of urea in an inappropriate time. By precisely foliar application of nitrogen, the efficiency of nitrogen transformation to the grain will be very high because in this method the leaf is considered the main organ of nitrogen uptake and a low amount of absorbed nitrogen was transferred to the root and entered the soil. The more division of N application in growth stages and in accordance with plant need and foliar application result in increasing nitrogen use efficiency. The delay in sowing will result in the reduction of yield and this is due to low LAI, and thus low radiation absorb in vegetable phase and shorter reproductive phase with high temperature in flowering and subsequent stages that result in low prolific silique and make disorder in transferring stored material to grain. In this experiment using N foliar application to decrease the adverse effect of delay in sowing is objective. Materials and Methods The experiment was conducted in 2013-2014 in Ramin Agriculture and Natural Resource University of Khuzestan. Experiment was conducted as split plots in a randomized complete blocks design with three replications. In this experiment sowing date]optimum sowing (27 November, 17 December and late sowing (30 December [were assigned to main plots and several time of N-foliar application with 5 percent density from urea (20 liter per ha, ]TO (control, T1 (foliar N application in rosette stage, T2 (foliar N application in budding stage, T3 (foliar N application in flowering stage[ were placed in sub-plots in randomized way. Fertilizing was based on the results of soil examination. Therefore, 162 kg ha-1 of pure nitrogen (from resource urea in the way

  2. Quantification of transforming growth factor-beta in biological material using cells transfected with a plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter-luciferase construct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanWaarde, MAWH; VanAssen, AJ; Kampinga, HH; Konings, AWT; Vujaskovic, Z

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, can be quantified by a variety of bioassays or immunoassays. One of the disadvantages of these techniques is that they require sample purification to remove components that interfere with the TGF-beta signal. In the current

  3. Nitrogen on Mars: Insights from Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Sutter, B.; Jackson, W. A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chrisopher P.; Ming, W.; Archer, P. Douglas; Glavin, D. P.; Fairen, A. G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent detection of nitrate on Mars indicates that nitrogen fixation processes occurred in early martian history. Data collected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity Rover can be integrated with Mars analog work in order to better understand the fixation and mobility of nitrogen on Mars, and thus its availability to putative biology. In particular, the relationship between nitrate and other soluble salts may help reveal the timing of nitrogen fixation and post-depositional behavior of nitrate on Mars. In addition, in situ measurements of nitrogen abundance and isotopic composition may be used to model atmospheric conditions on early Mars.

  4. Modelling carbon and nitrogen turnover in variably saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Brovelli, A.; Porporato, A.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems provide services such as ameliorating the impacts of deleterious human activities on both surface and groundwater. For example, several studies have shown that a healthy riparian ecosystem can reduce the nutrient loading of agricultural wastewater, thus protecting the receiving surface water body. As a result, in order to develop better protection strategies and/or restore natural conditions, there is a growing interest in understanding ecosystem functioning, including feedbacks and nonlinearities. Biogeochemical transformations in soils are heavily influenced by microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Carbon and nutrient cycles are in turn strongly sensitive to environmental conditions, and primarily to soil moisture and temperature. These two physical variables affect the reaction rates of almost all soil biogeochemical transformations, including microbial and fungal activity, nutrient uptake and release from plants, etc. Soil water saturation and temperature are not constants, but vary both in space and time, thus further complicating the picture. In order to interpret field experiments and elucidate the different mechanisms taking place, numerical tools are beneficial. In this work we developed a 3D numerical reactive-transport model as an aid in the investigation the complex physical, chemical and biological interactions occurring in soils. The new code couples the USGS models (MODFLOW 2000-VSF, MT3DMS and PHREEQC) using an operator-splitting algorithm, and is a further development an existing reactive/density-dependent flow model PHWAT. The model was tested using simplified test cases. Following verification, a process-based biogeochemical reaction network describing the turnover of carbon and nitrogen in soils was implemented. Using this tool, we investigated the coupled effect of moisture content and temperature fluctuations on nitrogen and organic matter cycling in the riparian zone, in order to help understand the relative

  5. Verification of the differential biological effectiveness of photons in the energy range of 10 keV - 6 MeV based on oncogenic transformation rates in mouse embryofibroblasts and in the human CGL 1-hybrid cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    2005-01-01

    Working on observations of neoplastic transformation in human hybrid CGL1 cells, Frankenberg et al. (Radiat.Res. 157, 99-105, 2002) recently reported a relative biological effectiveness (RBE M ) of 4.3 for mammography X-rays (29 kV) relative to 200 kV X-rays. With reference to data in the literature, they inferred a factor of about 8 relative to 60 Co y-rays and concluded that this result is relevant to risk estimation. However, these conclusions do not appear to be valid. The data from the transformation study exhibit uncertainties in the statistical analysis that preclude any generalisation of the inferred RBE M . The data selected or inferred from the literature are likewise insufficient to support the stated RBEs. We therefore designed a study to repeat, under well-defined irradiation and culture conditions, this earlier investigation and to assess the validity of the high RBE values of 29 kV X-rays that had ben reported. Neoplastic transformation of human CGL1 cell hybrids was examined after exposure to 29 kV X-rays (mammography X-rays) and conventional 220 kV X-rays. The experiments with the two types of X-rays were performed simultaneously and shared the same controls.The transformation yields with both radiation qualities were fitted to the linear-quadratic dependence on absorbed dose, and a corresponding analysis was performed for the data earlier obtained by Frankenberg et al. The transformation yields in the present study exceed those in the earlier investigations substantially and it appears that the difference reflects inadequate feeding conditions of the cell cultures in the early experiments. The standard error bands are derived and are seen to be considerably more narrow than in the present results

  6. Biological fixation and nitrogen transfer by three legume species in mango and soursop organic orchards;Fixacao biologica e transferencia de nitrogenio por leguminosas em pomar organico de mangueira e gravioleira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulino, Gleicia Miranda; Barroso, Deborah Guerra, E-mail: gleiciamiranda@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: deborah@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fitotecnia; Alves, Bruno Jose Rodrigues; Urquiaga, Segundo; Espindola, Jose Antonio Azevedo, E-mail: bruno@cnpab.embrapa.b, E-mail: urquiaga@cnpab.embrapa.b, E-mail: jose@cnpab.embrapa.b [EMBRAPA Agrobiologia, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and the N transfer derived from BNF of the legume species - Gliricidia sepium (gliricidia), Crotalaria juncea (sunnhemp) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) - for an intercropped organic orchard with mango and soursop, through the {sup 15}N natural abundance method. The following inter cropping systems were evaluated: mango and soursop with gliricidia; mango and soursop with sunnhemp; mango and soursop with pigeon pea; and mango and soursop as control. Gliricidia showed the highest BNF potential (80%) , followed by sunnhemp (64.5%) and pigeon pea (45%). After two sunnhemp prunes, 149.5 kg ha{sup -1} of N per year were supplied, with 96.5 kg derived from BNF. After three annual prunes, gliricidia supplied 56.4 and 80.3 kg ha{sup -1} of N per year, with 45 and 64 kg derived from BNF, in two consecutive years. The quantity of N supplied to the system was higher than the mango and soursop requirements. Variations in the natural abundance of {sup 15}N were found only in soursop leaves. Gliricidia and sunnhemp were prominent in N transfer, with approximately 22.5 and 40% respectively. Green manuring using gliricidia permits fractioning of the N supply, which is an advantage in N obtention by the fruit trees (author)

  7. The marine nitrogen cycle: recent discoveries, uncertainties and the potential relevance of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, M.; Bange, H.W.; Dippner, J.W.; Middelburg, J.J.; Montoya, J.P.; Ward, B.

    2013-01-01

    The ocean’s nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation, assimilation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification. Dinitrogen is the most abundant form of nitrogen in sea water but only accessible by nitrogen-fixing microbes. Denitrification and

  8. Direct high-performance liquid chromatography method with refractometric detection designed for stability studies of treosulfan and its biologically active epoxy-transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Główka, Franciszek K; Romański, Michał; Teżyk, Artur; Żaba, Czesław

    2013-01-01

    Treosulfan (TREO) is an alkylating agent registered for treatment of advanced platin-resistant ovarian carcinoma. Nowadays, TREO is increasingly applied iv in high doses as a promising myeloablative agent with low organ toxicity in children. Under physiological conditions it undergoes pH-dependent transformation into epoxy-transformers (S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB). The mechanism of this reaction is generally known, but not its kinetic details. In order to investigate kinetics of TREO transformation, HPLC method with refractometric detection for simultaneous determination of the three analytes in one analytical run has been developed for the first time. The samples containing TREO, S,S-EBDM, S,S-DEB and acetaminophen (internal standard) were directly injected onto the reversed phase column. To assure stability of the analytes and obtain their complete resolution, mobile phase composed of acetate buffer pH 4.5 and acetonitrile was applied. The linear range of the calibration curves of TREO, S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB spanned concentrations of 20-6000, 34-8600 and 50-6000 μM, respectively. Intra- and interday precision and accuracy of the developed method fulfilled analytical criteria. The stability of the analytes in experimental samples was also established. The validated HPLC method was successfully applied to the investigation of the kinetics of TREO activation to S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB. At pH 7.4 and 37 °C the transformation of TREO followed first-order kinetics with a half-life 1.5h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, H.E.; Dey, G.R.; Vaudey, C.E.; Peaucelle, C.; Boucher, J.L.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Koppenol, W.H.; Janata, E.; Dauvois, V.; Durand, D.; Legand, S.; Roujou, J.L.; Doizi, D.; Dannoux, A.; Lamouroux, C.

    2009-01-01

    Water radiolysis in presence of N 2 is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N 2 and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO 2 - and NO 3 -. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N 2 O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  10. Transformation of a Traditional, Freshman Biology, Three-Semester Sequence, to a Two-Semester, Integrated Thematically Organized, and Team-Taught Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Julio G.; Everhart, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Biology faculty at San José State University developed, piloted, implemented, and assessed a freshmen course sequence based on the macro-to micro-teaching approach that was team-taught, and organized around unifying themes. Content learning assessment drove the conceptual framework of our course sequence. Content student learning increased…

  11. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    transfer depended on the reactivity of the emitted material. At the lower extreme of reactivity are the noble gases, neon and argon. Most neon and argon emitted during the degassing of the newly formed Earth is still in the atmosphere, and essentially none has been transferred to the hydrosphere or crust. At the other extreme are carbon and sulfur. Over 99% of the carbon and sulfur emitted during degassing are no longer in the atmosphere, but reside in the hydrosphere or the crust. Nitrogen is intermediate. Of the ˜6×106 TgN in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and crust, ˜2/3 is in the atmosphere as N2 with most of the remainder in the crust. The atmosphere is a large nitrogen reservoir primarily, because the triple bond of the N2 molecule requires a significant amount of energy to break. In the early atmosphere, the only sources of such energy were solar radiation and electrical discharges.At this point we had an earth with mostly N2 and devoid of life. How did we get to an earth with mostly N2 and teeming with life? First, N2 had to be converted into reactive N (Nr). (The term reactive nitrogen (Nr) includes all biologically active, photochemically reactive, and radiatively active nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere and biosphere of the Earth. Thus, Nr includes inorganic reduced forms of nitrogen (e.g., NH3 and NH4+), inorganic oxidized forms (e.g., NOx, HNO3, N2O, and NO3-), and organic compounds (e.g., urea, amines, and proteins).) The early atmosphere was reducing and had limited NH3. However, NH3 was a necessary ingredient in forming early organic matter. One possibility for NH3 generation was the cycling of seawater through volcanics (Holland, 1984). Under such a process, NH3 could then be released to the atmosphere where, when combined with CH4, H2, H2O, and electrical energy, organic molecules including amino acids could be formed (Miller, 1953). In essence, electrical discharges and UV radiation can convert mixtures of reduced gases into mixtures of organic

  12. Bacterial nitrogen fixation in sand bioreactors treating winery wastewater with a high carbon to nitrogen ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Pamela J; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Braun, Lorenz; Vikram, Surendra; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize

    2018-02-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria proliferate in organic-rich environments and systems containing sufficient essential nutrients. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium are the nutrients required in the highest concentrations. The ratio of carbon to nitrogen is an important consideration for wastewater bioremediation because insufficient nitrogen may result in decreased treatment efficiency. It has been shown that during the treatment of effluent from the pulp and paper industry, bacterial nitrogen fixation can supplement the nitrogen requirements of suspended growth systems. This study was conducted using physicochemical analyses and culture-dependent and -independent techniques to ascertain whether nitrogen-fixing bacteria were selected in biological sand filters used to treat synthetic winery wastewater with a high carbon to nitrogen ratio (193:1). The systems performed well, with the influent COD of 1351 mg/L being reduced by 84-89%. It was shown that the nitrogen fixing bacterial population was influenced by the presence of synthetic winery effluent in the surface layers of the biological sand filters, but not in the deeper layers. It was hypothesised that this was due to the greater availability of atmospheric nitrogen at the surface. The numbers of culture-able nitrogen-fixing bacteria, including presumptive Azotobacter spp. exhibited 1-2 log increases at the surface. The results of this study confirm that nitrogen fixation is an important mechanism to be considered during treatment of high carbon to nitrogen wastewater. If biological treatment systems can be operated to stimulate this phenomenon, it may obviate the need for nitrogen addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Climate change affects key nitrogen-fixing bacterial populations on coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Henrique F.; Carmo, Flavia L.; Duarte, Gustavo; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Castro, Clovis B.; Rosado, Alexandre S.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Peixoto, Raquel S.

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are at serious risk due to events associated with global climate change. Elevated ocean temperatures have unpredictable consequences for the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. The nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation. This study

  14. Climate change affects key nitrogen-fixing bacterial populations on coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Henrique F.; Carmo, Flavia L.; Duarte, Gustavo; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Castro, Clovis B.; Rosado, Alexandre S.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Peixoto, Raquel S.

    Coral reefs are at serious risk due to events associated with global climate change. Elevated ocean temperatures have unpredictable consequences for the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. The nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation. This study

  15. Virtual Nitrogen Losses from Organic Food Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell Noll, L.; Galloway, J. N.; Leach, A. M.; Seufert, V.; Atwell, B.; Shade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is necessary for crop and animal production, but when it is lost to the environment, it creates a cascade of detrimental environmental impacts. The nitrogen challenge is to maximize the food production benefits of Nr, while minimizing losses to the environment. The first nitrogen footprint tool was created in 2012 to help consumers learn about the Nr losses to the environment that result from an individual's lifestyle choices. The nitrogen lost during food production was estimated with virtual nitrogen factors (VNFs) that quantify the amount of nitrogen lost to the environment per unit nitrogen consumed. Alternative agricultural systems, such as USDA certified organic farms, utilize practices that diverge from conventional production. In order to evaluate the potential sustainability of these alternative agricultural systems, our team calculated VNFs that reflect organic production. Initial data indicate that VNFs for organic grains and organic starchy roots are comparable to, but slightly higher than conventional (+10% and +20% respectively). In contrast, the VNF for organic vegetables is significantly higher (+90%) and the VNF for organic legumes is significantly lower (-90%). Initial data on organic meat production shows that organic poultry and organic pigmeat are comparable to conventional production (both <5% difference), but that the organic beef VNF is significantly higher (+30%). These data show that in some cases organic and conventional production are comparable in terms of nitrogen efficiency. However, since conventional production relies heavily on the creation of new reactive nitrogen (Haber-Bosch, biological nitrogen fixation) and organic production primarily utilizes already existing reactive nitrogen (manure, crop residue, compost), the data also show that organic production contributes less new reactive nitrogen to the environment than conventional production (approximately 70% less). Therefore, we conclude that on a local

  16. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Vitousek, Peter [Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Erisman, Jan Willem [VU University Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goulding, Keith [The Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Fangmeier, Andreas [Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4+) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3-), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of solid slaughterhouse waste: study of biological stabilization by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry combined with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuetos, María José; Gómez, Xiomar; Otero, Marta; Morán, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) along with thermogravimetric analysis together with mass spectrometry (TG-MS analysis) were employed to study the organic matter transformation attained under anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse waste and to establish the stability of the digestates obtained when compared with fresh wastes. Digestate samples studied were obtained from successful digestion and failed systems treating slaughterhouse waste and the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes. The FTIR spectra and TG profiles from well stabilized products (from successful digestion systems) showed an increase in the aromaticity degree and the reduction of volatile content and aliphatic structures as stabilization proceeded. On the other hand, the FTIR spectra of non-stable reactors showed a high aliphaticity degree and fat content. When comparing differential thermogravimetry (DTG) profiles of the feed and digestate samples obtained from all successful anaerobic systems, a reduction in the intensity of the low-temperature range (approximately 300 degrees C) peak was observed, while the weight loss experienced at high-temperature (450-550 degrees C) was variable for the different systems. Compared to the original waste, the intensity of the weight loss peak in the high-temperature range decreased in the reactors with higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) whereas its intensity increased and the peak was displaced to higher temperatures for the digesters with lower HRT.

  18. Effects of glycerol upon the biological actions of near-ultraviolet light: spectra and concentration dependence for transforming DNA and for Escherichia coli B/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Foote, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration dependence for the protection of isolated transforming DNA and Escherichia coli by glycerol against 365-nm monochromatic near-ultraviolet light (UV) was measured. Glycerol protection saturates at a concentration of about 0.1 M for DNA and 1.0 M for E. coli. Action spectra for glycerol protection of transforming DNA (tryptophan and histidine markers) are similar to those obtained previously for diazobicyclo[2.2.2.]octane (DABCO) protection, with protection reaching a maximum near 350-nm UV and decreasing rapidly at wavelengths above and below 350 nm. However, glycerol protects against near-UV about twice as efficiently as DABCO. The action spectrum for protection of E. coli by glycerol against the lethal effects of near-UV was not the same as the spectrum for DNA since glycerol sensitized the cells, but not the DNA, at wavelengths longer than about 380 nm. A possible role of hydroxyl or other radicals was supported by the observation that benzoate also protected DNA against inactivation by 334-nm UV. (author)

  19. Tightening the nitrogen cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, B.T.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of nitrogen to crop plants is a universally important aspect of soil quality, and often nitrogen represents the immediate limitation to crop productivity in modern agriculture. Nitrogen is decisive for the nutritive value of plant products and plays a key role in the environmental impact of agricultural production. The fundamental doctrine of nitrogen management is to optimise the nitrogen use efficiency of both introduced and native soil nitrogen by increasing the temporal a...

  20. Enzymology of biological nitrogen fixation. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    Two genes involved in the regulation of nitrogenase activity, draT and draG, were cloned and found to be contiguous on the Azospirillum brasilense chromosome. The nifH gene, encoding dinitrogenase reductase, is near to draT with an intervening gap of 1.9 kb. The organization of these genes in Azospirillum lipoferum and Rhodosprillum rubrum is similar, but nifH and draT are separated by only 400 bp in the organisms. A. brasilense draTG is very similar to draTG in R. rubrum with 91.8% similarity and 85.3% identity at the amino acid level. Apparently A. brasilense uses the normal ATG initiation codon for draT, and draG. The genes for A. brasilense were able to restore function to appropriate mutants of R. rubrum. The heterologous expression of A. brasilense draTG in R. rubrum was not fully normal, as it responded more slowly to darkness and more quickly to ammonia than wild type cells. Our mutational analysis of the draTG region of A. brasilense confirms the function of these genes in the regulation of nitrogenase activity, but it also revealed minor but demonstrable differences in the control systems of R. rubrum and A. brasilense.

  1. Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Cranton, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The theory of transformative learning has been explored by different theorists and scholars. However, few scholars have made an attempt to make a comparison between transformative learning and Confucianism or between transformative learning and andragogy. The authors of this article address these comparisons to develop new and different insights…

  2. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6, and 15 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rad) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rad/day and 25 rad/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 110 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replication. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the 15-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used

  3. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  4. Mammalian cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    This section contains summaries of research on mechanisms of lethality and radioinduced changes in mammalian cell properties, new cell systems for the study of the biology of mutation and neoplastic transformation, and comparative properties of ionizing radiations

  5. Backlund transformations as canonical transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, A.; Zimerman, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Toda and Wadati as well as Kodama and Wadati have shown that the Backlund transformations, for the exponential lattice equation, sine-Gordon equation, K-dV (Korteweg de Vries) equation and modifies K-dV equation, are canonical transformation. It is shown that the Backlund transformation for the Boussinesq equation, for a generalized K-dV equation, for a model equation for shallow water waves and for the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are also canonical transformations [pt

  6. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  7. Mean age distribution of inorganic soil-nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Dong K.; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    Excess reactive nitrogen in soils of intensively managed landscapes causes adverse environmental impact, and continues to remain a global concern. Many novel strategies have been developed to provide better management practices and, yet, the problem remains unresolved. The objective of this study is to develop a model to characterize the "age" of inorganic soil-nitrogen (nitrate, and ammonia/ammonium). We use the general theory of age, which provides an assessment of the time elapsed since inorganic nitrogen has been introduced into the soil system. We analyze a corn-corn-soybean rotation, common in the Midwest United States, as an example application. We observe two counter-intuitive results: (1) the mean nitrogen age in the topsoil layer is relatively high; and (2) mean nitrogen age is lower under soybean cultivation compared to corn although no fertilizer is applied for soybean cultivation. The first result can be explained by cation-exchange of ammonium that retards the leaching of nitrogen, resulting in an increase in the mean nitrogen age near the soil surface. The second result arises because the soybean utilizes the nitrogen fertilizer left from the previous year, thereby removing the older nitrogen and reducing mean nitrogen age. Estimating the mean nitrogen age can thus serve as an important tool to disentangle complex nitrogen dynamics by providing a nuanced characterization of the time scales of soil-nitrogen transformation and transport processes.

  8. Modelling and simulation of the phased feeding process with biological elimination of nitrogen and phosphorus; Modelizacion y simulacion del proceso de alimentacion escalonada con eliminacion biologica de nitrogeno y fosforo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J. C.; Jorda, J. R.; Cortacans, J. A. [Infilco Espanola, S. A. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    It is set forth experimental results on an Alternative Phase Step Feed Pilot Plant (Nitrogen and Phosphorus removal) placed in San Agustin de Guadalix (Madrid CYII) WWTP. Results on IAWQ Model N. 2 calibration and evaluation of its predictive capacity are also included. Finally, it is introduced the Alphasin, Process Simulator that INFILCO uses as a design and assessment tool on Alpha Process Plants with organic matter removal exclusively or incorporating nutrients (Nitrogen and/or Phosphorus) removal. (Author) 8 refs.

  9. Hadamard Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Agaian, Sos; Egiazarian, Karen; Astola, Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    The Hadamard matrix and Hadamard transform are fundamental problem-solving tools in a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines and technologies, such as communication systems, signal and image processing (signal representation, coding, filtering, recognition, and watermarking), digital logic (Boolean function analysis and synthesis), and fault-tolerant system design. Hadamard Transforms intends to bring together different topics concerning current developments in Hadamard matrices, transforms, and their applications. Each chapter begins with the basics of the theory, progresses to more advanced

  10. Emissão de óxido nitroso nos processos de remoção biológica de nitrogênio de efluentes Nitrous oxide emission in the biological nitrogen removal process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bortoli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O óxido nitroso (N2O é altamente impactante ao meio ambiente por ser um dos três gases mais importantes quando considerado o alto potencial de efeito estufa e a baixa quantidade emitida para a atmosfera. A preocupação com a geração de N2O no tratamento de efluentes tem crescido nas duas últimas décadas. Muitos estudos vêm sendo realizados com o objetivo de avaliar as condições de geração e emissão de N2O em etapas de remoção de nitrogênio no tratamento, tanto em escala laboratorial quanto em estações de tratamento de efluentes. Essas pesquisas demonstram que, sob certas condições, ambos os processos podem produzir e emitir grandes quantidades de N2O para a atmosfera, o que remete à importância de mais investigações para determinar as condições específicas que minimizem a produção e a emissão de N2O nesse caso.The nitrous oxide (N2O has a high striking power in environmental. It's one of the three most important greenhouse gases, when considered the greenhouse potential and emissions to the atmosphere. The concern in the two last decades with the N2O generation in wastewater treatment has grown. Many studies have been conducted with the objective of evaluate the conditions of N2O generation and emission in the nitrification and denitrification process, in biological nitrogen removal of wastewater treatment, both lab scale and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP. These studies show that under certain conditions, both processes can generate and emit large amounts of N2O to the atmosphere, what demonstrates the importance of conducting further investigations to determine specific conditions that minimize N2O production and emission.

  11. Micro-computed tomography of pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by adenoviral gene transfer of biologically active transforming growth factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauldie Jack

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT is a novel tool for monitoring acute and chronic disease states in small laboratory animals. Its value for assessing progressive lung fibrosis in mice has not been reported so far. Here we examined the importance of in vivo micro-CT as non-invasive tool to assess progression of pulmonary fibrosis in mice over time. Methods Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal delivery of an adenoviral gene vector encoding biologically active TGF-ß1 (AdTGF-ß1. Respiratory gated and ungated micro-CT scans were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post pulmonary adenoviral gene or control vector delivery, and were then correlated with respective histopathology-based Ashcroft scoring of pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Visual assessment of image quality and consolidation was performed by 3 observers and a semi-automated quantification algorithm was applied to quantify aerated pulmonary volume as an inverse surrogate marker for pulmonary fibrosis. Results We found a significant correlation between classical Ashcroft scoring and micro-CT assessment using both visual assessment and the semi-automated quantification algorithm. Pulmonary fibrosis could be clearly detected in micro-CT, image quality values were higher for respiratory gated exams, although differences were not significant. For assessment of fibrosis no significant difference between respiratory gated and ungated exams was observed. Conclusions Together, we show that micro-CT is a powerful tool to assess pulmonary fibrosis in mice, using both visual assessment and semi-automated quantification algorithms. These data may be important in view of pre-clinical pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of lung fibrosis in small laboratory animals.

  12. Nitrogen cycling in summer active perennial grass systems in South Australia: Non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, V.V.S.R.; Kroker, S.J.; Hicks, M.; Davoren, W.; Descheemaeker, K.K.E.; Llewellyn, R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-symbiotic nitrogen (N2) fixation by diazotrophic bacteria is a potential source for biological N inputs in non-leguminous crops and pastures. Perennial grasses generally add larger quantities of above- and belowground plant residues to soil, and so can support higher levels of soil biological

  13. Transformation of Follicular Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossos, Izidore S.; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2011-01-01

    Histological transformation of follicular lymphoma (FL) to a more aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas is a pivotal event in the natural history of FL and is associated with poor outcome. While commonly observed in clinical practice and despite multiple studies designed to address its pathogenesis, the biology of this process represents an enigma. In this chapter we present a state of the art review summarizing the definition of histologic transformation, its incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome. Furthermore, we specifically emphasize gaps in our knowledge that should be addressed in future studies. PMID:21658615

  14. Characterizing bacterial gene expression in nitrogen cycle metabolism with RT-qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James E; Wantland, Nicholas B; Campbell, Mark; Klotz, Martin G

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have greatly accelerated our ability to obtain the raw information needed to recognize both known and potential novel modular microbial genomic capacity for nitrogen metabolism. With PCR-based approaches to quantifying microbial mRNA expression now mainstream in most laboratories, researchers can now more efficiently propose and test hypotheses on the contributions of individual microbes to the biological accessibility of nitrogen upon which all other life depends. We review known microbial roles in these key nitrogen transformations, and describe the necessary steps in carrying out relevant gene expression studies. An example experimental design is then provided characterizing Nitrosococcus oceani mRNA expression in cultures responding to ammonia. The approach described, that of assessing microbial genome inventory and testing putative modular gene expression by mRNA quantification, is likely to remain an important tool in understanding individual microbial contributions within microbial community activities that maintain the Earth's nitrogen balance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria in Mediterranean seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) roots

    KAUST Repository

    Garcias Bonet, Neus

    2016-03-09

    Biological nitrogen fixation by diazotrophic bacteria in seagrass rhizosphere and leaf epiphytic community is an important source of nitrogen required for plant growth. However, the presence of endophytic diazotrophs remains unclear in seagrass tissues. Here, we assess the presence, diversity and taxonomy of nitrogen-fixing bacteria within surface-sterilized roots of Posidonia oceanica. Moreover, we analyze the nitrogen isotopic signature of seagrass tissues in order to notice atmospheric nitrogen fixation. We detected nitrogen-fixing bacteria by nifH gene amplification in 13 out of the 78 roots sampled, corresponding to 9 locations out of 26 meadows. We detected two different types of bacterial nifH sequences associated with P. oceanica roots, which were closely related to sequences previously isolated from the rhizosphere of a salt marsh cord grass and a putative anaerobe. Nitrogen content of seagrass tissues showed low isotopic signatures in all the sampled meadows, pointing out the atmospheric origin of the assimilated nitrogen by seagrasses. However, this was not related with the presence of endophytic nitrogen fixers, suggesting the nitrogen fixation occurring in rhizosphere and in the epiphytic community could be an important source of nitrogen for P. oceanica. The low diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria reported here suggests species-specific relationships between diazotrophs and P. oceanica, revealing possible symbiotic interactions that could play a major role in nitrogen acquisition by seagrasses in oligotrophic environments where they form lush meadows.

  16. [Effects and mechanism of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-qin; Qi, Yu-chun; Dong, Yun-she; Peng, Qin; Guo, Shu-fang; He, Yun-long; Yan, Zhong-qing

    2015-11-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon in the soil of middle and high latitude as well as high altitude, freeze-thawing cycles have a great influence on the nitrogen cycle of terrestrial ecosystem in non-growing season. Freeze-thawing cycles can alter the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil, which thereby affect the migration and transformation of soil nitrogen. The impacts of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem found in available studies remain inconsistent, the mechanism is still not clear, and the research methods also need to be further explored and innovated. So it is necessary to sum up and analyze the existing achievements in order to better understand the processes of soil nitrogen cycle subjected to freeze-thawing cycles. This paper reviewed the research progress in China and abroad about the effects and mechanisms of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem, including mineralization, immobilization, nitrification and denitrification, N leakage and gaseous loss, and analyzed the deficiencies of extant research. The possible key research topics that should be urgently paid more attention to in the future were also discussed.

  17. Visualizing Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Transformation, defined as the step of extracting, arranging and simplifying data into visual form (M. Neurath, 1974), was developed in connection with ISOTYPE (International System Of TYpographic Picture Education) and might well be the most important legacy of Isotype to the field of graphic...... design. Recently transformation has attracted renewed interest because of the book The Transformer written by Robin Kinross and Marie Neurath. My on-going research project, summarized in this paper, identifies and depicts the essential principles of data visualization underlying the process...... of transformation with reference to Marie Neurath’s sketches on the Bilston Project. The material has been collected at the Otto and Marie Neurath Collection housed at the University of Reading, UK. By using data visualization as a research method to look directly into the process of transformation, the project...

  18. Biophysical Insights into Cancer Transformation and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorn?, Ji??; Foletti, Alberto; Kobilkov?, Jitka; Jandov?, Anna; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan; Nedbalov?, Martina; ?o?ek, Ale?; Danani, Andrea; Tuszy?ski, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are hierarchically self-organized complex structures characterized by nonlinear interactions. Biochemical energy is transformed into work of physical forces required for various biological functions. We postulate that energy transduction depends on endogenous electrodynamic fields generated by microtubules. Microtubules and mitochondria colocalize in cells with microtubules providing tracks for mitochondrial movement. Besides energy transformation, mitochondria form a spati...

  19. Contribución relativa del nitrógeno del suelo y del fijado biológicamente a la economía de la nutrición nitrogenada de maní (Arachis hypogaea L. en diferentes condiciones de fertilidad Relative contribution of biological fixed nitrogen and soil nitrogen to the nutrition economy of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. under different conditions of soil fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Castro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La producción de maní en Argentina se concentra en la región central de la provincia de Córdoba, la cual experimentó últimamente una pérdida importante de la productividad de los suelos y una declinación aleatoria del rendimiento de los cultivos. La contribución relativa de la fijación biológica (FBN de nitrógeno al maní en suelos de diferente fertilidad no ha sido suficientemente estudiada. Entonces, se evaluó el efecto de cepas de rizobios (TTOO2R, SEMIA 6144R y TAL 1000R sobre el rendimiento y el balance de nitrógeno de maní cultivado en suelos con alto y bajo contenido del nutriente. No hubo diferencias significativas en los parámetros simbióticos y de rendimiento del cultivo entre las cepas introducidas y las nativas, pero se observó una contribución relativa mayor de la FBN en el suelo con bajo contenido de nitrógeno (~58% de contribución que en el suelo con alto contenido (~27% de contribución. Esta comprobación del aporte relativo de la FBN asociada a la fertilidad del suelo, no registra antecedentes en la región central de Córdoba y debería recibir mayor consideración en el manejo del cultivo particularmente por su localización actual al sur de la provincia, donde los suelos presentan menores niveles de fertilidad. El rendimiento de maní confitería mostró mayores valores, si bien no significativos, con la inoculación en los 3 años del estudio.The peanut production in Argentina is concentrated in the central region of Córdoba province. At present, losses of soil fertility and a random decline peanut yield have been reported for this area. The relative contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (FBN in peanut plants cropped in soils with different fertility, has not been extensively studied. An experiment was carried out to determine the effects of rhizobia strains (TTOO2R, SEMIA 6144R and TAL 1000R on peanut crop yield and plant nitrogen balance under different conditions of soil nitrogen. The results

  20. Utilization of nitrogen fixing trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewbaker, J.L.; Beldt, R. van den; MacDicken, K.; Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O.; Escalante, G.; Herrera, R.; Aranguren, J.; Arkcoll, D.B.; Doebereinger, J. (cord.)

    1983-01-01

    Six papers from the symposium are noted. Brewbaker, J.L., Beldt, R. van den, MacDicken, K. Fuelwood uses and properties of nitrogen-fixing trees, pp 193-204, (Refs. 15). Includes a list of 35 nitrogen-fixing trees of high fuelwood value. Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O. Leguminous trees for shade, pp 205-222, (Refs. 68). Escalante, G., Herrera, R., Aranguren, J.; Nitrogen fixation in shade trees (Erythrina poeppigiana) in cocoa plantations in northern Venezuela, pp 223-230, (Refs. 13). Arkcoll, D.B.; Some leguminous trees providing useful fruits in the North of Brazil, pp 235-239, (Refs. 13). This paper deals with Parkia platycephala, Pentaclethra macroloba, Swartzia sp., Cassia leiandra, Hymenaea courbaril, dipteryz odorata, Inga edulis, I. macrophylla, and I. cinnamonea. Baggio, A.J.; Possibilities of the use of Gliricidia sepium in agroforestry systems in Brazil, pp 241-243; (Refs. 15). Seiffert, N.F.; Biological nitrogen and protein production of Leucaena cultivars grown to supplement the nutrition of ruminants, pp 245-249, (Refs. 14). Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru, L. campina grande (L. leucocephala), and L. cunningham (L. leucocephalae) were promising for use as browse by beef cattle in central Brazil.

  1. EarthN: A new Earth System Nitrogen Model

    OpenAIRE

    Goldblatt, Colin; Johnson, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The amount of nitrogen in the atmosphere, oceans, crust, and mantle have important ramifications for Earth’s biologic and geologic history. Despite this importance, the history and cycling of nitrogen in the Earth system is poorly constrained over time. For example, various models and proxies contrastingly support atmospheric mass stasis, net outgassing, or net ingassing over time. In addition, the amount available to and processing of nitrogen by organisms is intricately linked with and prov...

  2. EarthN: A new Earth System Nitrogen Model

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Benjamin W.; Goldblatt, Colin

    2018-01-01

    The amount of nitrogen in the atmosphere, oceans, crust, and mantle have important ramifications for Earth's biologic and geologic history. Despite this importance, the history and cycling of nitrogen in the Earth system is poorly constrained over time. For example, various models and proxies contrastingly support atmospheric mass stasis, net outgassing, or net ingassing over time. In addition, the amount available to and processing of nitrogen by organisms is intricately linked with and prov...

  3. Security Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    ... adjustment. With American military forces engaged around the world in both combat and stabilization operations, the need for rigorous and critical analysis of security transformation has never been greater...

  4. Landskabets transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck Petersen, Rikke

    2005-01-01

    Seminaroplæg fra forskere. Faglige seminarer på KA, forår 2005. Belyser transformation af det danske landskab fysisk som holdningsmæssigt, samt hvordan phd-arbejdets egen proces håndterer den.......Seminaroplæg fra forskere. Faglige seminarer på KA, forår 2005. Belyser transformation af det danske landskab fysisk som holdningsmæssigt, samt hvordan phd-arbejdets egen proces håndterer den....

  5. Covariant Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Kisil, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    The paper develops theory of covariant transform, which is inspired by the wavelet construction. It was observed that many interesting types of wavelets (or coherent states) arise from group representations which are not square integrable or vacuum vectors which are not admissible. Covariant transform extends an applicability of the popular wavelets construction to classic examples like the Hardy space H_2, Banach spaces, covariant functional calculus and many others. Keywords: Wavelets, cohe...

  6. Transforming Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Anndee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Transforming Anatomy Studying historic books allows people to witness the transformation of the world right before their very eyes. The Bruxellensis Icones Anatomicae[1] by Andreas Vesalius is a vital piece of evidence in the movement from a more rudimentary understanding of the human body into the more complex and accurate development of modern anatomy. Vesalius’ research worked to both refute and confirm findings of his predecessor, the great historical Greek philosopher, Galen...

  7. Impacts of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrogen on the open ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duce, R.A.; LaRoche, J.; Altieri, K.; Arrigo, K.R.; Baker, A.R.; Capone, D.G.; Cornell, S.; Dentener, F.; Galloway, J.; Ganeshram, R.S.; Geider, R.J.; Jickells, T.; Kuypers, M.M.; Langlois, R.; Liss, P.S.; Liu, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; Moore, C.M.; Nickovic, S.; Oschlies, A.; Pedersen, T.; Prospero, J.; Schlitzer, R.; Seitzinger, S.; Sorensen, L.L.; Uematsu, M.; Ulloa, O.; Voss, M.; Ward, B.; Zamora, L.

    2008-01-01

    Increasing quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about a third of the ocean's external (nonrecycled) nitrogen supply and up to 3% of the annual new marine biological production, 0.3 petagram of carbon per year. This input could account

  8. Enhanced detectability of fluorinated derivatives of N,N-dialkylamino alcohols and precursors of nitrogen mustards by gas chromatography coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis for verification of chemical weapons convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Prabhat; Purohit, Ajay; Tak, Vijay K; Dubey, D K

    2009-11-06

    N,N-Dialkylamino alcohols, N-methyldiethanolamine, N-ethyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine are the precursors of VX type nerve agents and three different nitrogen mustards respectively. Their detection and identification is of paramount importance for verification analysis of chemical weapons convention. GC-FTIR is used as complimentary technique to GC-MS analysis for identification of these analytes. One constraint of GC-FTIR, its low sensitivity, was overcome by converting the analytes to their fluorinated derivatives. Owing to high absorptivity in IR region, these derivatives facilitated their detection by GC-FTIR analysis. Derivatizing reagents having trimethylsilyl, trifluoroacyl and heptafluorobutyryl groups on imidazole moiety were screened. Derivatives formed there were analyzed by GC-FTIR quantitatively. Of these reagents studied, heptafluorobutyrylimidazole (HFBI) produced the greatest increase in sensitivity by GC-FTIR detection. 60-125 folds of sensitivity enhancement were observed for the analytes by HFBI derivatization. Absorbance due to various functional groups responsible for enhanced sensitivity were compared by determining their corresponding relative molar extinction coefficients ( [Formula: see text] ) considering uniform optical path length. The RSDs for intraday repeatability and interday reproducibility for various derivatives were 0.2-1.1% and 0.3-1.8%. Limit of detection (LOD) was achieved up to 10-15ng and applicability of the method was tested with unknown samples obtained in international proficiency tests.

  9. The global nitrogen cycle in the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David; Coyle, Mhairi; Skiba, Ute; Sutton, Mark A; Cape, J Neil; Reis, Stefan; Sheppard, Lucy J; Jenkins, Alan; Grizzetti, Bruna; Galloway, James N; Vitousek, Peter; Leach, Allison; Bouwman, Alexander F; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Dentener, Frank; Stevenson, David; Amann, Marcus; Voss, Maren

    2013-07-05

    Global nitrogen fixation contributes 413 Tg of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to terrestrial and marine ecosystems annually of which anthropogenic activities are responsible for half, 210 Tg N. The majority of the transformations of anthropogenic Nr are on land (240 Tg N yr(-1)) within soils and vegetation where reduced Nr contributes most of the input through the use of fertilizer nitrogen in agriculture. Leakages from the use of fertilizer Nr contribute to nitrate (NO3(-)) in drainage waters from agricultural land and emissions of trace Nr compounds to the atmosphere. Emissions, mainly of ammonia (NH3) from land together with combustion related emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), contribute 100 Tg N yr(-1) to the atmosphere, which are transported between countries and processed within the atmosphere, generating secondary pollutants, including ozone and other photochemical oxidants and aerosols, especially ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) and ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4. Leaching and riverine transport of NO3 contribute 40-70 Tg N yr(-1) to coastal waters and the open ocean, which together with the 30 Tg input to oceans from atmospheric deposition combine with marine biological nitrogen fixation (140 Tg N yr(-1)) to double the ocean processing of Nr. Some of the marine Nr is buried in sediments, the remainder being denitrified back to the atmosphere as N2 or N2O. The marine processing is of a similar magnitude to that in terrestrial soils and vegetation, but has a larger fraction of natural origin. The lifetime of Nr in the atmosphere, with the exception of N2O, is only a few weeks, while in terrestrial ecosystems, with the exception of peatlands (where it can be 10(2)-10(3) years), the lifetime is a few decades. In the ocean, the lifetime of Nr is less well known but seems to be longer than in terrestrial ecosystems and may represent an important long-term source of N2O that will respond very slowly to control measures on the sources of Nr from which it is produced.

  10. Nitrogen fixation in Red Sea seagrass meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Malak

    2017-05-01

    Seagrasses are key coastal ecosystems, providing many ecosystem services. Seagrasses increase biodiversity as they provide habitat for a large set of organisms. In addition, their structure provides hiding places to avoid predation. Seagrasses can grow in shallow marine coastal areas, but several factors regulate their growth and distribution. Seagrasses can uptake different kinds of organic and inorganic nutrients through their leaves and roots. Nitrogen and phosphorous are the most important nutrients for seagrass growth. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia by diazotrophic bacteria. This process provides a significant source of nitrogen for seagrass growth. The nitrogen fixation is controlled by the nif genes which are found in diazotrophs. The main goal of the project is to measure nitrogen fixation rates on seagrass sediments, in order to compare among various seagrass species from the Red Sea. Moreover, we will compare the fixing rates of the Vegetated areas with the bare sediments. This project will help to ascertain the role of nitrogen fixing bacteria in the development of seagrass meadows.

  11. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    ) such as the Marine nitrogen cycle The marine nitrogen cycle. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ are intra-cellular intermediates that do not accumulate in water column. (Source: Codispoti et al., 2001) Page 1 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www... and nitrous oxide budgets: Moving targets as we enter the anthropocene?, Sci. Mar., 65, 85-105, 2001. Page 2 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www.eoearth.org/article/Marine_nitrogen_cycle square6 Gruber, N.: The dynamics...

  12. Optimising carbon and nitrogen sources for Azotobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... Edificio Manuel Ancizar, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. ..... 0,04. 0,06. 0,08. 0,10. Run 9 Run 10 Run 13 Run 14. A cetylen e red u ctio n. (n m .... Biological nitrogen fixation in the tropics: Social.

  13. The asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reaction in the syntheses of biologically relevant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbrenner-Lux, Vincent; Kumar, Kamal; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-10-13

    The hetero-Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most powerful transformations in the chemistry toolbox for the synthesis of aza- and oxa-heterocycles embodying multiple stereogenic centers. However, as compared to other cycloadditions, in particular the dipolar cycloadditions and the Diels-Alder reaction, the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction has been much less explored and exploited in organic synthesis. Nevertheless, this powerful transformation has opened up efficient and creative routes to biologically relevant small molecules and different natural products which contain six-membered oxygen or nitrogen ring systems. Recent developments in this field, in particular in the establishment of enantioselectively catalyzed hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadditions steered by a plethora of different catalysts and the application of the resulting small molecules in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research, are highlighted in this Minireview. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Standard biological parts knowledgebase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Galdzicki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org. The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org. SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL, a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate "promoter" parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible.

  15. Standard Biological Parts Knowledgebase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Michal; Rodriguez, Cesar; Chandran, Deepak; Sauro, Herbert M.; Gennari, John H.

    2011-01-01

    We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb) as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org). The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org). SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate “promoter” parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible. PMID:21390321

  16. Standard biological parts knowledgebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Michal; Rodriguez, Cesar; Chandran, Deepak; Sauro, Herbert M; Gennari, John H

    2011-02-24

    We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb) as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org). The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org). SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate "promoter" parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible.

  17. The marine nitrogen cycle: recent discoveries, uncertainties and the potential relevance of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Maren; Bange, Hermann W.; Dippner, Joachim W.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Ward, Bess

    2013-01-01

    The ocean's nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation, assimilation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification. Dinitrogen is the most abundant form of nitrogen in sea water but only accessible by nitrogen-fixing microbes. Denitrification and nitrification are both regulated by oxygen concentrations and potentially produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a climate-relevant atmospheric trace gas. The world's oceans, including the coastal areas and upwelli...

  18. New investigations in the USA into formation of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses laboratory investigations in the USA on air pollution by nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. Laboratory combustors used for combustion of black coal, anthracite and brown coal are described. Measuring systems and measuring instruments used for flue gas analyses and determining nitrogen oxide, hydrocyanic acid and ammonia content in flue gas are evaluated. Effects of excess air on nitrogen oxide formation are analyzed. Analyses show that excess air influences relation between nitrogen oxides, hydrocyanic acid and ammonia. Recommendations on the optimum excess air rate are made. In the case of all coal typs, with the exception of anthracite, the optimum excess air rate is 0.7 which guarantees the highest transformation rate of nitrogen in fuel into molecular nitrogen. Effects of excess air on oxidation of hydrocyanic acid and ammonia are described. The analyses consider effects of excess air on chemical reactions during coal combustion under laboratory conditions. (4 refs.) (In Russian)

  19. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  20. Chronic nitrogen deposition influences the chemical dynamics ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition induces a forest carbon sink across broad parts of the Northern Hemisphere; this carbon sink may partly result from slower litter decomposition. Although microbial responses to experimental nitrogen deposition have been well-studied, evidence linking these microbial responses to changes in the degradation of specific compounds in decaying litter is sparse. We used wet chemistry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) methodologies to study the effects of chronic simulated nitrogen deposition on leaf litter and fine root chemistry during a three-year decomposition experiment at four northern hardwood forests in the north-central USA. Leaf litter and fine roots were highly different in initial chemistry such as concentrations of acid-insoluble fraction (AIF, or Klason lignin) and condensed tannins (CTs). These initial differences persisted over the course of decomposition. Results from gravimetrically-defined AIF and lignin/carbohydrate reference IR peak ratios both provide evidence that lignin in fine roots was selectively preserved under simulated nitrogen deposition. Lignin/carbohydrate peak ratios were strongly correlated with AIF, suggesting that AIF is a good predictor of lignin. Because AIF is abundant in fine roots, slower AIF degradation was the major driver of the slower fine root decomposition under nitrogen enrichment, explaining 73.9 % of the additional root mass retention. Nitrogen enrichment also slowed the

  1. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuilt......, that it can be adapted to changing functional needs, and that it has an architectural and cultural value. A specific proposal for a transformation that enhances the architectural qualities and building heritage values of an existing building forms the empirical material, which is discussed using different...... theoretical lenses. It is proposed that three parameters concerning the ꞌtransformabilityꞌ of the building can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of sustainable transformation: technical aspects, programmatic requirements and narrative value. It is proposed that the concept of ꞌsustainable...

  2. Identity transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Robinson, Sarah; Jones, Sally

    , as well as the resources they have when they come to the classroom. It also incorporates perspectives from (ii) transformational learning and explores the concept of (iii) nudging from a pedagogical viewpoint, proposing it as an important tool in entrepreneurship education. The study incorporates......This paper develops the concept of ‘pedagogical nudging’ and examines four interventions in an entrepreneurship classroom and the potential it has for student identity transformation. Pedagogical nudging is positioned as a tool, which in the hands of a reflective, professional......) assists students in straddling the divide between identities, the emotions and tensions this elicits, and (iv) transform student understanding. We extend nudging theory into a new territory. Pedagogical nudging techniques may be able to unlock doors and bring our students beyond the unacknowledged...

  3. Identification and quantification of nitrogen cycling processes in cryptogamic covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Lenhart, Katharina; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Elbert, Wolfgang; Burrows, Susannah; Clough, Tim; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Behrendt, Thomas; Büdel, Burkhard; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul; Keppler, Frank; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Cryptogamic covers (CC) comprise communities of photoautotrophic cyanobacteria, lichens, algae, and bryophytes together with heterotrophic bacteria, microfungi, and archaea in varying proportions. Depending on their habitat, cryptogamic rock covers, cryptogamic plant covers, and cryptogamic soil covers are distinguished. The latter comprise biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which globally occur under dryland conditions. In a first assessment of their global role, we quantified that CC fix ˜49 Tg of nitrogen (N) per year (Elbert et al., 2013), corresponding to ˜1/2 of the maximum terrestrial biological N fixation determined in the latest IPCC report. The fixed N is used for biomass formation and partially leached into the ground, where it can be taken up by plants or transformed into N oxides, being emitted into the atmosphere. We show that biocrusts release nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO), which are key species in the global cycling of nitrogen and in the production of ozone and hydroxyl radicals, regulating the oxidizing power and self-cleaning capacity of the atmosphere. Based on laboratory, field and satellite measurement data, we obtained a best estimate of 1.1 Tg a-1 of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a-1 of HONO-N being globally emitted by biocrusts, corresponding to ˜20% of the global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation (Weber et al., 2015). During full wetting and drying cycles, emissions peaked at low water contents suggesting NO- and HONO-formation under aerobic conditions during nitrification. Other measurements revealed that cryptogamic organisms release nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas of crucial importance for climate change. The emission rates varied with temperature, humidity, and N deposition, but divided by respiratory CO2 emission they formed an almost constant ratio, which allowed upscaling on the global scale. We estimated annual N2O emissions of 0.3 - 0.6 Tg by cryptogams, accounting for 4-9% of the global N2O

  4. Stimulation of biological N2-fixation to accelerate the microbial remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshenko, N.N.; Lushnikov, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    All remediation projects are comprised at least in accelerating the processes of the self-cleaning and self-restoration of biocenose which is led to increasing the functional activity of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microflora (HOM). Some of experts are carefully relate to introducing the commercial cultures of active hydrocarbon-consuming microbes into soils. They are afraid of unpredictable behavior of the cultures in soils. That why the stimulation of metabolic activity of indigenous soil microflora seems to be most preferable. In fact, contamination of soil with low nitrogen capacity by oil spills leads to significant deficient of nitrogen for HOM. Nitrogen content limits the soil self-restoration. Inorganic nitrogen fertilizers are supplied to recover the balance. The study of the microbial destruction of petroleum-hydrocarbons in association with biochemical transformation of nitrogen was carried out in lab and field experiments during 2000-2004. Study showed the activity of HOM correlates with rate of microbial fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Activity of biological N 2 -fixation significantly depends on supplying fertilizers (dose, date and kind). General practice of remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils applies high initial doses of nitrogen-fertilizers (0.5-1 t per ha). Such practice leads to inhibition of N 2 -fixation processes, decreasing rate of oil destruction and loosing nitrogen due to activation of microbial denitrification. In opposition to that, the fractioned and advanced supplying mineral nitrogen fertilizers with aluminosilicate is the cost-effective approach to remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Field experiments showed that the approach allows to increase efficiency of treatment up to 70-75% and to decrease operational expenses 2-3 times at least. (authors)

  5. Estimated Historical and Current Nitrogen Balances for Illinois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. David

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Midwest has large riverine exports of nitrogen (N, with the largest flux per unit area to the Mississippi River system coming from Iowa and Illinois. We used historic and current data to estimate N inputs, outputs, and transformations for Illinois where human activity (principally agriculture and associated landscape drainage have had a dominant impact. Presently, ~800,000 Mg of N is added each year as fertilizer and another 420,000 Mg is biologically fixed, primarily by soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.. These annual inputs are greater than exports in grain, which results in surplus N throughout the landscape. Rivers within the state export approximately 50% of this surplus N, mostly as nitrate, and the remainder appears to be denitrified or temporarily incorporated into the soil organic matter pool. The magnitude of N losses for 1880, 1910, 1950, and 1990 are compared. Initial cultivation of the prairies released large quantities of N (~500,000 Mg N year�1, and resulted in riverine N transport during the late 19th century that appears to have been on the same order of magnitude as contemporary N losses. Riverine flux was estimated to have been at a minimum in about 1950, due to diminished net mineralization and low fertilizer inputs. Residual fertilizer N from corn (Zea mays L., biological N fixed by soybean, short-circuiting of soil water through artificial drainage, and decreased cropping-system diversity appear to be the primary sources for current N export.

  6. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuil...

  7. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  8. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  9. Superconducting transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting transformer having a winding arrangement that provides for current limitation when subjected to a current transient as well as more efficient utilization of radial spacing and winding insulation. Structural innovations disclosed include compressed conical shaped winding layers and a resistive matrix to promote rapid switching of current between parallel windings

  10. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  11. Transforming Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Dahl Højgaard, Pia

    2017-01-01

    , was a result of transforming society from a feudal system to a capitalistic and market based economy. This story is interesting in itself - but it also provides a key to understanding the cadastral system of today. The system has evolved over time and now serves a whole range of functions in society. The paper...

  12. Studies on nitrogen retention in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorbek, G; Henckel, S; Chwalibog, André

    1987-01-01

    Nitrogen retention (RN) was measured in 60 barrows of Danish Landrace and a total of 470 balance periods was carried out during the growth period from 20 to 85 kg live weight. In the first serie (Expt A) six different feed compounds of high biological value (HBV) were fed to 48 barrows, while...... in the second serie (Expt B) 12 barrows were measured on feed compounds of HBV or low biological value (LBV). Three different levels of gross energy were used in Expt B. Individual differences of 10-20% in the pigs capability for nitrogen retention were observed. Nitrogen retention increased from 12 to 21 g N....../d on the HBV-compounds and was not influenced by increasing nitrogen or energy intake. Nitrogen retention was curvilinear in relation to metabolic live weight (kg0.75) in both series. A parabolic function on kg0.75 gave the best fit to the data with the following regression equations: Expt A + B: RN, g/d = 1...

  13. Cambios biológicos en suelos fertilizados con nitrógeno cultivados con manzano en el Alto Valle de Río Negro Biological changes in nitrogen fertilized soil of apple orchards in the Alto Valle of Rio Negro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Gili

    2009-12-01

    activity and edaphic properties. Nitrate content, total nitrogen, organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, deshidrogenase and catalase activity were determined and the carbon mineralization index, the proportion of microbial biomass carbon in organic carbon and the metabolic coefficient (qCO2 were calculated. Nitrogen was applied as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3 at two rates, 100 (N1 and 200 kg N ha-¹ (N2, and on two times, 50% at petal fall (October and the rest at harvest (March, and the results compared with a control treatment without N (N0. The experiment was repeated over two growing seasons, 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Soil samples were taken before and after each fertilization. Nitrogen addition had differential effects on soils chemical and biological properties depending on the season and plant phenology. In autumn and spring, soil nitrates (NO3 - increased significantly and soil biota was modified during both growing seasons. In the 2005-2006 season, spring nitrogen additions increased soil biota activity in terms of C-BM, RE and Dh-asa; whereas in the second growing season, 2006-2007, nitrogen addition had no effect on soil chemical and biological properties. Soil biological activity was affected by orchard management practices, fertilization and pruning.

  14. Gas phase adsorption technology for nitrogen isotope separation and its feasibility for highly enriched nitrogen gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaki; Asaga, Takeo

    2000-04-01

    Highly enriched nitrogen-15 gas is favorable to reduce radioactive carbon-14 production in reactor. The cost of highly enriched nitrogen-15 gas in mass production is one of the most important subject in nitride fuel option in 'Feasibility Study for FBR and Related Fuel Cycle'. In this work gas phase adsorption technology was verified to be applicable for nitrogen isotope separation and feasible to produce highly enriched nitrogen-15 gas in commercial. Nitrogen isotopes were separated while ammonia gas flows through sodium-A type zeolite column using pressure swing adsorption process. The isotopic ratio of eight samples were measured by high resolution mass spectrometry and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Gas phase adsorption technology was verified to be applicable for nitrogen isotope separation, since the isotopic ratio of nitrogen-15 and nitrogen-14 in samples were more than six times as high as in natural. The cost of highly enriched nitrogen-15 gas in mass production were estimated by the factor method. It revealed that highly enriched nitrogen-15 gas could be supplied in a few hundred yen per gram in mass production. (author)

  15. Developments in nitrogen generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, C.L.; Abrardo, J.M.; Himmelberger, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three process cycles for the production of nitrogen by the cryogenic separation of air are described in detail. These cycles are: (1) a waste expander cycle; (2) an air expander cycle; and (3) a cycle for producing large quantities of gaseous nitrogen. Each cycle has distinct advantages for various production ranges and delivery pressures. A dicussion of key parameters that must be considered when selecting a cycle to meet specific product requirements is presented. The importance of high plant reliability and a dependable liquid nitrogen back up system is also presented. Lastly, a discussion of plant safety dealing with the hazards of nitrogen, enriched oxygen, and hydrocarbons present in the air is reviewed

  16. Experimental setup for precise measurement of losses in high-temperature superconducting transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janu, Z.; Wild, J.; Repa, P.; Jelinek, Z.; Zizek, F.; Peksa, L.; Soukup, F.; Tichy, R.

    2006-10-01

    A simple cryogenic system for testing of the superconducting power transformer was constructed. Thermal shielding is provided by additional liquid nitrogen bath instead of super-insulation. The system, together with use of a precise nitrogen liquid level meter, permitted calorimetric measurements of losses of the 8 kVA HTS transformer with a resolution of the order of 0.1 W.

  17. Modeling Nitrogen Decrease in Water Lettuce Ponds from Waste Stabilization Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Gitta Agnes; Sunarsih

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents about the dynamic modeling of the Water Lettuce ponds as a form of improvement from the Water Hyacinth ponds. The purpose of this paper is to predict nitrogen decrease and nitrogen transformation in Water Lettuce ponds integrated with Waste Stabilization Ponds. The model consists of 4 mass balances, namely Dissolved Organic Nitrogen (DON), Particulate Organic Nitrogen (PON), ammonium (NH4+), Nitrate and Nitrite (NOx). The process of nitrogen transformation which considered in a Water Lettuce ponds, namely hydrolysis, mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, plant and bacterial uptake processes. Numerical simulations are performed by giving the values of parameters and the initial values of nitrogen compounds based on a review of previous studies. Numerical results show that the rate of change in the concentration of nitrogen compounds in the integration ponds of waste stabilization and water lettuce decreases and reaches stable at different times.

  18. Contribution of bacterial cell nitrogen to soil humic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, R.; Barro, L.

    1981-01-01

    Living cells of Serratia marcescens, uniformly labelled with 15 N, were added to samples of maple (Acer saccharum) and black spruce (Picea mariana) forest soils. After different periods of incubation from zero time to 100 days, the soils were subjected to alkali-acid and phenol extraction to provide humic acid, fulvic acid, humin and 'humoprotein' fractions. Significant amounts of the cell nitrogen were recovered in the humic and fulvic acids immediately after addition. After incubation, less cell nitrogen appeared in the humic acid and more in the fulvic acid. The amount of cell nitrogen recovered in the humin fraction increased with incubation. Roughly 5 to 10 per cent of the added cell nitrogen was found as amino acid nitrogen from humoprotein in a phenol extract of the humic acid. The data are consistent with the occurrence of co-precipitation of biologically labile biomass nitrogen compounds with humic polymers during the alkaline extraction procedure involved in the humic-fulvic fractionation. (orig.)

  19. Uptake of fertilizer nitrogen and soil nitrogen by rice using 15N-labelled nitrogen fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.R.; Patrick, W.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data from five field experiments using labelled nitrogen fertilizer were used to determine the relative effects of soil nitrogen and fertilizer nitrogen on rice yield. Yield of grain was closely correlated with total aboveground nitrogen uptake (soil + fertilizer), less closely correlated with soil nitrogen uptake and not significantly correlated with fertilizer nitrogen uptake. When yield increase rather than yield was correlated with fertilizer nitrogen uptake, the correlation coefficient was statistically significant. (orig.)

  20. Discrete transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Firth, Jean M

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of signals and systems using transform methods is a very important aspect of the examination of processes and problems in an increasingly wide range of applications. Whereas the initial impetus in the development of methods appropriate for handling discrete sets of data occurred mainly in an electrical engineering context (for example in the design of digital filters), the same techniques are in use in such disciplines as cardiology, optics, speech analysis and management, as well as in other branches of science and engineering. This text is aimed at a readership whose mathematical background includes some acquaintance with complex numbers, linear differen­ tial equations, matrix algebra, and series. Specifically, a familiarity with Fourier series (in trigonometric and exponential forms) is assumed, and an exposure to the concept of a continuous integral transform is desirable. Such a background can be expected, for example, on completion of the first year of a science or engineering degree cour...

  1. Fertilizer nitrogen fixation in plants and its transmutation in soils in case of annual application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilova, E.I.; Smirnov, P.M.; Khon, N.I.

    1974-01-01

    Using certain combinations of 15 N labeled and unlabeled nitrogen-containing fertilizers data were obtained for direct determination of nitrogen balance in the year of fertilization and subsequently. Annual and total (for 3 years) increment in utilization of soil nitrogen resulting from repeated fertilization was also determined. Coefficient of nitrogen utilization by barley decreased over the 3-year period after additional application of ammonium sulfate while biological immobilization of nitrogen tended to increase. Application of straw during the first year of the experiment did not significantly affect the nitrogen balance in the following years. The total coefficient of nitrogen utilization for the 2 to 3-year period was higher than that of the first year while biological immobilization was relatively lower. Additional utilization of soil nitrogen as compared to the control was the same over the whole 3-year period; additional mobilization (annual and total) was relatively higher due to lower removal of soil nitrogen in the subsequent years. Utilization of previously immobilized nitrogen was higher in the case of repeated fertilization than without application of nitrogen fertilizers. The content of newly immobilized nitrogen during 3 years in the hydrolyzable undistilable fraction (nitrogen of bounded amino acids) was relatively lower and this was accompanied by the growth of hydrolyzable distilable and unhydrolyzable nitrogen

  2. XML Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available XSLT style sheets are designed to transform the XML documents into something else. The two most popular parsers of the moment are the Document Object Model (DOM and the Simple API for XML (SAX. DOM is an official recommendation of the W3C (available at http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-DOM-Level-1, while SAX is a de facto standard. A good parser should be fast, space efficient, rich in functionality and easy to use.

  3. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  4. Transformative Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    The purpose of this paper is to enhance the conceptual understanding of the mediatory relationship between paradoxes on an organizational and an individual level. It presents a concept of agency that comprises and mediates between a structural and individual pole. The constitution of this agency ...... is achieved through narrative activity that oscillates between the poles and transforms paradoxes through the configuration of plots and metaphors. Empirical cases are introduced in order to illustrate the implications of this understanding....

  5. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  6. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  7. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ(15)NNO2- and δ(18)ONO2-, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus." The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ(18)O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ(18)O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ(18)ONO2- in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying the regulation of

  8. Nitrogen trading tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  9. Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for communications about resource use efficiency and for measures to increase the use efficiency of nutrients in relation to food production. This holds especially for nitrogen. Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and a main nutrient element. It is needed in relatively large

  10. Efficient Plastid Transformation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiguo; Lutz, Kerry Ann; Maliga, Pal

    2017-09-01

    Plastid transformation is routine in tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) but 100-fold less frequent in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ), preventing its use in plastid biology. A recent study revealed that null mutations in ACC2 , encoding a plastid-targeted acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, cause hypersensitivity to spectinomycin. We hypothesized that plastid transformation efficiency should increase in the acc2 background, because when ACC2 is absent, fatty acid biosynthesis becomes dependent on translation of the plastid-encoded ACC β-carboxylase subunit. We bombarded ACC2 -defective Arabidopsis leaves with a vector carrying a selectable spectinomycin resistance ( aadA ) gene and gfp , encoding the green fluorescence protein GFP. Spectinomycin-resistant clones were identified as green cell clusters on a spectinomycin medium. Plastid transformation was confirmed by GFP accumulation from the second open reading frame of a polycistronic messenger RNA, which would not be translated in the cytoplasm. We obtained one to two plastid transformation events per bombarded sample in spectinomycin-hypersensitive Slavice and Columbia acc2 knockout backgrounds, an approximately 100-fold enhanced plastid transformation frequency. Slavice and Columbia are accessions in which plant regeneration is uncharacterized or difficult to obtain. A practical system for Arabidopsis plastid transformation will be obtained by creating an ACC2 null background in a regenerable Arabidopsis accession. The recognition that the duplicated ACCase in Arabidopsis is an impediment to plastid transformation provides a rational template to implement plastid transformation in related recalcitrant crops. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Cellulose decomposition in a 50 MVA transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechalak, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Dissolved gas-in-oil analysis for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide has been used for years to predict cellulose decomposition in a transformer. However, the levels at which these gases become significant have not been widely agreed upon. This paper evaluates the gas analysis results from the nitrogen blanket and the oil of a 50 MVA unit auxiliary transformer in terms of whether accelerated thermal breakdown or normal aging of the paper is occurring. Furthermore, this paper presents additional data on carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide levels in unit and system auxiliary transformers at generating stations and explains why their levels differ

  12. Electrical transformer handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.W.; Horne, D. (eds.)

    2005-07-01

    This handbook is a valuable user guide intended for electrical engineering and maintenance personnel, electrical contractors and electrical engineering students. It provides current information on techniques and technologies that can help extend the life of transformers. It discusses transformer testing, monitoring, design, commissioning, retrofitting and other elements involved in keeping electrical transformers in safe and efficient operation. It demonstrates how a power transformer can be put to use and common problems faced by owners. In addition to covering control techniques, testing and maintenance procedures, this handbook covers the power transformer; control electrical power transformer; electrical power transformer; electrical theory transformer; used electrical transformer; down electrical step transformer; electrical manufacturer transformer; electrical picture transformer; electrical transformer work; electrical surplus transformer; current transformer; step down transformer; voltage transformer; step up transformer; isolation transformer; low voltage transformer; toroidal transformer; high voltage transformer; and control power transformer. The handbook includes articles from leading experts on overcurrent protection of transformers; ventilated dry-type transformers; metered load factors for low-voltage, and dry-type transformers in buildings. The maintenance of both dry-type or oil-filled transformers was discussed with reference to sealing, gaskets, oils, moisture and testing. The adoption of dynamic load practices was also discussed along with the reclamation or recycling of used lube oil, transformer dielectric fluids and aged solid insulation. A buyer's guide and directory of transformer manufacturers and suppliers was also included. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Development of a method for direct biological removal of ammonium to nitrogen in treatment of waste waters of the anaerobic sludge digestion - deammonification. Final report; Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur direkten biologischen Umsetzung von Ammonium zu Stickstoff bei der Behandlung von Abwaessern der Anaerob-Klaerschlammfaulung - Deammonifikation. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Seyfried, C.F.; Kunst, S.; Diekmann, H.; Hippen, A.; Helmer, C.; Scholten, E.

    2001-07-01

    The nitrogen elimination in municipal and industrial wastewater continues to play a major role in wastewater treatment, especially since the Wastewater Directive (AbwV) from 1997 introduced several changes in the requirements and regulations in regard to the pollutant and nutrient removal. As particularly the nitrogen elimination often makes for a considerable cost factor in wastewater treatment, especially when part-streams with high nitrogen loads must be (co-)treated, there is a constant search for economically viable treatment concepts. In this research project, the method of deammonification was developed, that is the process sequence of aerobic nitritation and anoxic ammonium oxidation ('biological comproportioning' of ammonium and nitrite into molecular nitrogen), which is based completely on the metabolism processes of autotrophic micro-organisms, which leads to saving potentials, especially of the carbon demand. Because of the shortened aerobic oxidation steps and the application of biofilm technology, it is also possible to reduce the oxygen demand and the reaction volume. In regard to the purposeful application of deammonification in operation technology, the project steps were targeted to determine the process-defining parameters and to check suitable method technologies and operation control systems in greater detail. To achieve this, the crucial frame conditions for the realisation and the operation performance of the autotrophic nitrogen elimination were defined on the basis of industrial and pilot-technical examinations under consideration of the (micro-)biological connections. Eventually, directives on the establishment of a stable deammonification operation could be derived. On the one hand, we ran a stock-taking of the operation of three industrial leachate treatment plants, on the other hand we operated test-plants on sludge-water treatment. Furthermore, various examinations with different reactor configurations and purposeful

  15. Identification of microorganisms involved in nitrogen removal from wastewater treatment systems by means of molecular biology techniques; Identificacion de microorganismos implicados en la eliminacion de nitrogeno en sistemas de tratamiento de aguas residuales mediante tecnicas de biologia molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, M.; Alonso-Gutierrez, J.; Campos, J. L.; Mendez, R.; Mosquera-Corral, A.

    2010-07-01

    The identification of the main bacteria populations present in the granular biomass from a biological reactor treating wastewater has been performed by applying two different molecular biology techniques. By means of the DGGE technique five different genera of heterotrophic bacteria (Thiothrix, Thauera, Cloroflexi, Comamanas y Zoogloea) and one of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomanas) were identified. The FISH technique, based on microscopy, allowed the in situ visualization and quantification of those microorganisms. Special attention was paid to filamentous bacteria distribution (Thiothrix and Cloroflexi) which could exert a structural function in aerobic granular sludge. (Author) 26 refs.

  16. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  17. Hamlet's Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  18. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  19. Rotary Transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  20. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  1. Kinetics of irreversible thermal decomposition of dissociating nitrogen dioxide with nitrogen oxide or oxygen additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvozdev, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of NO or O 2 admixtures on kinetics of the irreversible thermal decomposition of nitrogen dioxide at temperatures 460-520 deg C and pressures 4-7 MPa has been studied. It follows from experimental data that the rate of N 2 O 4 formation reduces with the increase of partial pressure of oxygen or decrease of partial pressure of nitrogen oxide. The same regularity is seen for the rate of nitrogen formation. The rate constants of N 2 O formation in dissociating nitrogen tetroxide with oxygen or nitrogen oxide additions agree satisfactorily with previously published results, obtained in stoichiometric mixtures. The appreciable discrepancy at 520 deg C is bind with considerable degree of nitrogen oxide transformation which constitutes approximately 14%. It is determined that the kinetics of formation of the products of irreversible N 2 O and N 2 decomposition in stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric 2NO 2 ↔ 2NO+O 2 mixtures is described by identical 3NO → N 2 O+NO 2 and N 2 O+NO → N 2 +NO 2 reactions

  2. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  3. Phosphorus and nitrogen in the eutrophication of waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, S.; Frisk, T.; Kaermeniemi, T.; Niemi, J.; Pitkaenen, H.; Silvo, K.; Vuoristo, H.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a summary of the contribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in the eutrophication process of inland and coastal waters. Special attention was paid to the mechanisms of these nutrients in regulating biological processes and to the methods available in estimating their effects in the eutrophication of water bodies. The report includes five chapters which are entitled: Introduction, which is a general background to the subject with special attention to the requirements of the Finnish Water Act. Phosphorus and nitrogen as factors regulating biological processes. The topics included are: definition of eutrophication, forms of phosphorus and nitrogen and their sources to inland and coastal waters, effects of these nutrients as growth factors of phytoplankton and macrophytes and consequences of eutrophication. Estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen. The topics discussed from the point of view of the tasks of the National Board of Waters and the Environment are: estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen in the planning and supervision of industry, fish farming, peat production, municipalities, agriculture and forestry. A brief state-of-the art of the research carried out in the National Board of Waters and the Environment is given. Methods of estimating the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen loading in waters. The topics are: relationships between phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations in waters, material balances, water quality models, classification of waters and different groups of organisms as indicators of water quality. Conclusions for the estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen in receiving waters

  4. Behaviour of uranium dioxide in liquid nitrogen tetraoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Klavsut', G.N.; Dolgov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction kinetics of uranium dioxide with liquid nitrogen tetroxide at 25-150 deg C has been studied. It is shown that in the temperature range studied NO[UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ] is the final product of the reaction. With the increase of specific surface of uranium dioxide and with the temperature increase the degree of oxide transformation increases. Uranium dioxide-liquid N 2 O 4 interaction proceeds in the diffusion region. Seeming activation energies and rate constants of the mentioned processes are calculated. Effect of nitrogen trioxide additions on transformation kinetics is considered

  5. Lipids as paleomarkers to constrain the marine nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Darci; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2017-06-01

    Global climate is, in part, regulated by the effect of microbial processes on biogeochemical cycling. The nitrogen cycle, in particular, is driven by microorganisms responsible for the fixation and loss of nitrogen, and the reduction-oxidation transformations of bio-available nitrogen. Within marine systems, nitrogen availability is often the limiting factor in the growth of autotrophic organisms, intrinsically linking the nitrogen and carbon cycles. In order to elucidate the state of these cycles in the past, and help envisage present and future variability, it is essential to understand the specific microbial processes responsible for transforming bio-available nitrogen species. As most microorganisms are soft-bodied and seldom leave behind physical fossils in the sedimentary record, recalcitrant lipid biomarkers are used to unravel microbial processes in the geological past. This review emphasises the recent advances in marine nitrogen cycle lipid biomarkers, underlines the missing links still needed to fully elucidate past shifts in this biogeochemically-important cycle, and provides examples of biomarker applications in the geological past. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dissolved organic nitrogen recalcitrance and bioavailable nitrogen quantification for effluents from advanced nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lu; Brett, Michael T; Jiang, Wenju; Li, Bo

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the composition of nitrogen (N) in the effluents of advanced N removal (ANR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study also tested two different experimental protocols for determining dissolved N recalcitrance. An analysis of 15 effluent samples from five WWTPs, showed effluent concentrations and especially effluent composition varied greatly from one system to the other, with total nitrogen (TN) ranging between 1.05 and 8.10 mg L -1 . Nitrate (NO 3 - ) accounted for between 38 ± 32% of TN, and ammonium accounted for a further 29 ± 28%. All of these samples were dominated by dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN; NO 3 -  + NH 4 + ), and uptake experiments indicated the DIN fraction was as expected highly bioavailable. Dissolved organic N (DON) accounted for 20 ± 11% for the total dissolved N in these effluents, and uptake experiments indicated the bioavailability of this fraction varied between 27 ± 26% depending on the WWTP assessed. These results indicate near complete DIN removal should be the primary goal of ANR treatment systems. The comparison of bioavailable nitrogen (BAN) quantification protocols showed that the dissolved nitrogen uptake bioassay approach was clearly a more reliable way to determine BAN concentrations compared to the conventional cell yield protocol. Moreover, because the nitrogen uptake experiment was much more sensitive, this protocol made it easier to detect extrinsic factors (such as biological contamination or toxicity) that could affect the accuracy of these bioassays. Based on these results, we recommend the nitrogen uptake bioassay using filtered and autoclaved samples to quantify BAN concentrations. However, for effluent samples indicating toxicity, algal bioassays will not accurately quantify BAN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Particles matter: Transformation of suspended particles in constructed wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulling, B.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that constructed wetlands transform suspended particles in (treated) municipal wastewater through selective precipitation in ponds, biological filtering by plankton communities and physical and biological retention in reed beds. These processes effectively remove faecal indicator

  8. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg-1 d-1 in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 105 t N yr-1, and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12–15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication. PMID:26991904

  9. Ammonium Transformation in 14 Lakes along a Trophic Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Leoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a widespread pollut